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UNIT DESCRIPTIONS 2014


A FEW NOTES ON THIS GUIDE This booklet contains all of the units currently available to Australia Studies Centre (ASC) students from Christian Heritage College’s catalogue of classes. Please note that not all of these units will be offered every semester. We will endeavour to provide the confirmed list of units for a given semester at least 4 months prior to orientation for that semester. Please contact the ASC team with questions rather than Christian Heritage College (CHC) staff. This will ensure your request is handled in the most efficient manner without adding to CHC staff workload.

CONTACT INFORMATION Kimberly Spragg, Director

Heidi Prillwitz, US Administrator

kimberly.spragg@cccu-australia.org

hprillwitz@cccu.org 202.548.5201, option 1

Australia Studies Centre (CCCU-Australia Pty. LTD) (Mail & Packages) Australia Studies Centre P.O. Box 2084 Mansfield BH, QLD 4122 AUSTRALIA

(Only large courier packages) Australia Studies Centre c/o Christian Heritage College 322 Wecker Road Carindale, Qld 4152 AUSTRALIA

asc@bestsemester.com

www.BestSemester.com/ASC The Australia Studies Centre (ASC) is hosted by Christian Heritage College (CHC) in Brisbane, Queensland. (CRICOS Provider Name: Christian Heritage College. CRICOS Provider Code: 01016F) CHC aims to be a Christian higher education institution that prepares people to make a difference in the world around them and in their professional career. To love God with your whole heart, soul and mind, and to love your neighbour as yourself, are the principles which guide CHC’s mission and which give shape to the pursuit of higher education within a Christian vision of life. The outworking of this is through CHC’s understanding of a Christian worldview which underpins and informs all of CHC’s pursuits.

The Australia Studies Centre is managed by the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, an international association of intentionally Christian colleges and universities. The ASC is one of 12 BestSemester programs (www.BestSemester.com/ASC). 2


AUSTRALIA STUDIES CENTRE COURSE INFORMATION The Australia Studies Centre (ASC) is offered in partnership with Christian Heritage College (CHC), a CCCU affiliate member in Carindale, a suburb of Brisbane, Queensland. The ASC is designed to integrate the firsthand observation and study of Australian culture, history, religion, politics and Indigenous cultures together with experiential service learning and formal instruction in Christian Studies, Business, Ministries, Social Sciences and Education and Humanities.

The program is comprised of two culture units designed especially for ASC students and two discipline units chosen from Christian Heritage College’s list of classes.

RECOMMENDED CREDITS CULTURE EMPHASIS (Required) The View from Australia: Issues in Religion, Politics, Economics & Cultural Values

4

Australian Aboriginal Cultures

4

or

Indigenous Cultures in Australia & Aotearoa (New Zealand)

4

DISCIPLINE EMPHASIS (Select two units from any of the following: School of Christian Studies, School of Business, School of Education & Humanities, School of Ministries, School of Social Sciences)

Christian Heritage College unit # 1

4

Christian Heritage College unit # 2

4 16

TOTAL CREDITS

The program recommends to home institutions that students be granted the equivalent of 16 semester hours of credit. Students are required to enrol in at least 16 credits while attending the ASC.

CONTENTS ASC Core Units ................................... Christian Studies Units ....................... Business Units .................................... Ministries Units ................................... Social Sciences Units ........................... Education Units .................................. History Units ....................................... English Units ....................................... Drama Units ....................................... 3

4 5 7 12 18 28 34 36 40


AUSTRALIA STUDIES CENTRE UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) AS 200 The View from Australia: Issues in Religion, Politics, Economics & Cultural Values The emphasis of this unit is on current issues and world developments that affect Australia, as interpreted from an Australian perspective. Through examination of Australians' reactions to and handling of these matters, students should develop a basic understanding of the Australian culture and worldview and should be able to articulate, appreciate and critique the orienting values of Australian society. Students will also compare, contrast and critique their own cultural value structures through reflection exercises and begin to distinguish cultural virtues from Christian truth. Themes for the unit include: the settlement of Australia and the influence of landscape and environment on national identity; Australian government; Australian ideological trends, religion, immigration, consumer behaviour and foreign policy. This unit includes a 35-hour service placement. (Possible Credit: General Studies, History, Political Science, Sociology, Religion/Theology, Cross-Cultural Studies.) AS 201 Australian Aboriginal Cultures The emphasis of this unit is on the histories of the Indigenous peoples of Australia. Aboriginal people living in Australia today are the present "face" of ancient cultural lines that stretch back over eons of time. These lines contain knowledge about connections to Country; family relationships and kinship systems; an education system that is ‘holistic'; teaching about the physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual levels of an individual; practical knowledge for daily survival; the Ancestral Spirits and Creation stories; ceremonies, songs, dances and music. This unit will begin by looking at the various lines that cover the following: concept of Country, spiritual belief systems, kinship and family relationships, totemic systems, foods and medicines, education systems and spiritual beliefs, including the Creation stories. Other lines will include the arrival of Europeans; the disruption to Indigenous ways of life; Aboriginal resistance; racism and its consequences, the church's involvement; government policies, including the removal of Aboriginal children from their families; land rights and other social and political movements and Indigenous identity in the 21st century. (Possible Credit: Anthropology, Sociology, History, Cross-Cultural Studies.) AS 202 Indigenous Cultures in Australia & Aotearoa (New Zealand) This unit requires a 6 day trip to Aotearoa/New Zealand after the regular ASC semester and incurs an additional unit fee. (Minimum enrollment: 10 students) This unit emphasises the histories of Indigenous people of Australia and New Zealand. Aboriginal people living in Australia today are the present "face" of ancient cultural lines that stretch back over eons of time. These lines contain knowledge about connections to Country; family relationships and kinship systems; an education system that is ‘holistic'; teaching about the physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual levels of an individual; practical knowledge for daily survival; the Ancestral Spirits and Creation stories; ceremonies, songs, dances and music. The Māori people are a vibrant influence in the cultural makeup of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Many of the exceptional qualities of this nation come from the interactions between Māori and non-Māori (or Pākehā). This unit will begin by looking at the various lines that cover the following: Aboriginal and Māori concepts of Country, spiritual belief systems, kinship and family relationships, totemic systems, foods and medicines, education systems and spiritual beliefs, including the Creation stories. Other lines will include the arrival of Europeans; the disruption to Indigenous ways of life; Aboriginal & Māori resistance; racism and its consequences, the church's involvement; government policies, including the removal of Aboriginal children from their families; land rights; Māori rituals (or tikanga), and Indigenous identity in the 21st century. (Possible Credit: Anthropology, Sociology, History, Cross-Cultural Studies.)


CHRISTIAN STUDIES UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) CS115 Foundations of a Bible-based Christ-centred Worldview (Previously CS100 Christian Discipleship) CS115 is the first of three core units that seek to lay a foundation for the ongoing development of a Bible-based Christ-centred worldview as a paradigm to guide students in their professional lives. CS215 Contours of a Biblical-based Christ-centred Worldview (Previously CS125 Contours of a Biblical Christian Worldview) Core questions such as, “Where did I come from?”, “Who am I?” and “Where am I going?” are essentially spiritual questions regarding reality, meaning, purpose, identity and ultimate destiny. The Christian faith has long held that these questions and their answers can be effectively explored within the context of a Bible-based Christ-centred worldview grounded in Scripture. CS252 World Religions (Previously CS251 Christianity and Other Religions) Evangelical Christians have traditionally been interested in other religions in the context of missionary activities in foreign countries. However, in contemporary multicultural Australia, being able to dialogue with others is also vital to the maintenance of a healthy society. This unit assists students to start the process of developing the understanding needed to have this dialogue. CS255 Cross Cultural Engagement (Previously CS253 Cross Cultural Experience) Prerequisite: CS215 Contours of a Biblical-based Christ-centred Worldview (or equivalent). This unit aims to challenge students with an exposure to and analysis of cross-cultural contexts and experiences. Students visit at least one other culture and experience the lived outcome of different social, cultural, economic and religious beliefs and traditions. They use worldview and missional understandings to examine that culture and compare it with personal beliefs and experiences. This unit facilitates constructive engagement with people of other backgrounds, as well as greater sensitivity to people who come to Australia and experience cultural change. Please contact the Director of the Australia Studies Centre to discover which culture will be visited in the semester of your enrollment. CHC alternates the cultural engagement through a trip within Australia and a trip to an Australian neighbouring country such as Fiji. This often involves an additional cost to students and may require additional visa permissions. CS315 Christianity and Worldviews (Previously CS200 Christianity and Worldviews) Prerequisite: CS215 Contours of a Biblical-based Christ-centred Worldview (or equivalent). At the heart of all learning is the challenge of making sense and meaning of the world. To assist in this task, every person interprets reality through a Weltanschauung, or worldview. Such a worldview is based on ultimate faith commitments about the meaning of our lives, our values, our destiny and the world in which we live so that it is, in this sense, an allencompassing system of belief that operates within each person. JC202 Leadership for Life and Ministry Christian leaders have a responsibility to make decisions and accomplish results in a godly manner. Godly leaders must therefore be examples, especially in character and integrity, and function effectively in a variety of areas. This unit defines a biblical basis for leadership and establishes a platform for critical reflection on the development of the leader’s life, character and qualities. It enhances leadership skills and the outworking of leadership in ministry 5


practice. As leadership occurs in most spheres of life, material will be taken from the church, para-church and business sectors to study ministry leadership and its associated practices. JC218 Building Community (Previously CS213 Building Christian Community) Community as a re-emergent practice is an increasing concern worldwide, especially in light of the growing trend of community breakdown. This unit explores practices and approaches to build communities into what God intended, and the Bible teaches. It focuses on building communities from various perspectives, based on biblical and theological understandings of this mandate. It critically evaluates ministry practices for the building of community. The two units above which are housed in the CHC School of Ministries are included in a Christian Studies major at CHC.

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BUSINESS UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management (Previously BS201) This unit introduces the aims, nature and contexts of business activity. It also introduces basic concepts and principles of management, and their applications to the management of organisations. It addresses issues of management ethics and responsibilities, and seeks to equip students to begin thinking about business and management from a Christian perspective.

BZ101 Business Communication (Previously BS110) This unit examines the business communications process, drawing from the disciplines of psychology, management and organisational behaviour. The unit aids in the development of an understanding of the issues, complexities and problems of business communication with a view towards creative problem-solving, effective communication and informed decision-making about communication options. In addition, the unit examines the new forms of communication technologies and their impact on business communication. BZ102 Accounting Principles (Previously BS102) This unit introduces students to the accounting process, including the environment of accounting, the accounting elements, the accounting equation, transaction analysis and recording, trial balance and reports The unit provides an understanding of accounting principles for business managers and forms the basis for further accounting studies. BZ103 Introduction To Marketing (Previously BS103) This unit will provide students with a basic understanding of marketing theory and practice. Topics will include consumer behaviour, market research, product development, pricing policy, the promotional mix, channels of distribution, marketing strategy and emerging issues in marketing management. BZ104 Economics (Previously BS170) This unit introduces students to the principles of economics and their application in a wide range of contexts including individuals, organisations and the aggregate economy Christian worldview, specifically the concept of missional business, is foundational in this unit. There is an emphasis on short case studies, many related to the Australian economy. BZ105 Information Systems For Business (Previously BS105) This unit introduces students to the role and application of information systems in business contexts Students will consider the processes of information systems and development, leading to the development of a simple business application using Microsoft Access. The unit also provides an overview of trends and issues in information systems management and of application of information technology in specific business settings BZ201 Data Anaylsis (Previously BS201) Prerequisite: BZ105 Information Systems for Business (or equivalent). This unit provides the statistical concepts, methods and skills necessary to analyse and interpret business data Students are introduced to the concepts involved in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include the role of statistics in investigation, methods of 7


condensing, displaying, describing and presenting data, elementary descriptive statistics, elementary probability, the binomial, Poisson and normal distributions, single-sample inference, comparison of frequencies, correlation, and inference for two or more samples. BZ202 Financial Management (Previously BS252) Prerequisite: BZ102 Accounting Principles (or equivalent). This unit seeks to show how the accounting system is expanded and reports generated to accommodate more complex entities and user requirements. It addresses financial reporting issues as well as financial management and the analysis of financial statements. BZ203 Business Law (Previously BS270) This unit introduces students to the legal framework within which commerce is carried on in Australia. It examines basic legal concepts and legal reasoning, the major institutions of the Australian legal system, areas of substantive law including contract and torts, and the relationship between law and business ethics. BZ211 Financial Accounting (Previously BS255) Prerequisite: BZ102 Accounting Principles (or equivalent). This unit provides an understanding of the principles and applications of financial accounting and the relevant accounting standards applicable in Australia. BZ212 Management Accounting (Previously BS351) Prerequisite: BZ102 Accounting Principles (or equivalent). This course covers a range of issues fundamental to Management Accounting. It introduces students to basic Management Accounting concepts including costs, cost behaviour, cost accumulation systems, budgets, variance analysis, as well as managerial planning, control and decision making techniques. BSZ213 Company Accounting (Previously BS362) Prerequisites: BZ102 Accounting Principles and BZ211 Financial Accounting (or equivalent). This unit explores company accounting and information disclosure issues applicable to organisations preparing financial statements throughout the life cycle of a group of related entities. The course examines and illustrates accounting and reporting issues from inception and acquisition to trading and termination. BZ230 International Business (Previously BS365) Prerequisite: BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management and BZ104 Economics (or equivalent). This unit introduces the special problems and issues facing managers in the management of international business operations, and considers how these problems can be minimised or avoided. Topics covered include: managing across cultures, managing political risk and negotiations, organizing international operations, decision-making and controlling international operations, human resource management, motivating and leading, ethics, investment and relationships with the host governments. BZ231 Human Behaviour in Organisations (Previously BS220) Prerequisite: BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management (or equivalent). Incompatiable: HB220 Human Behaviour in Organisations. This unit introduces concepts that provide a framework for understanding human behaviour and examines their application to business and management. It examines some relevant aspects of individual human behaviour, as well as focusing on behaviour in groups and organisations. It also provides Christian perspectives on human behaviour and seeks to integrate these with psychological models.

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BZ232 Leadership In Organisations (Previously BS225 Leadership and Change Management) Prerequisite: BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management (or equivalent). Incompatible: HB225 Leadership and Change Management. This unit examines issues of leadership in our society. Topics covered include leadership theories, approaches and the development of a personal philosophy of leadership. Both personal and professional dimensions of leadership are developed, and moral and ethical issues arising in leadership are examined. BZ251 Consumer Behaviour (Previously BS225) Prerequisite: BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent). This unit will further develop students' understanding of consumer behaviour, which was introduced in BZ103 Introduction to Marketing. Those students pursuing the Marketing major will benefit from both the formative value of the case studies and the complexities of researching and writing a literature review of theories pertaining to consumer behaviour. BZ252 Marketing Communication (Previously BS244) Prerequisite: BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent). This unit will further develop students' understanding of integrated marketing communication strategies, which were introduced in BZ103 Introduction to Marketing. Those students pursuing the Marketing major will benefit from both the formative value of the case studies and the complexities of developing and writing an Integrated Marketing Communication strategy in a group situation. BZ253 Creativity In Entrepreneurship (Previously BS351) Prerequisites: BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management (or equivalent) and BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent) . This unit introduces students to entrepreneurship, creative thinking and planning for new business initiatives and builds on the strategic management concepts developed in BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management and BZ103 Introduction to Marketing, topics include entrepreneurial attitudes, abilities, and behaviours, developing an entrepreneurial culture, opportunity recognition and viability screening, first-mover advantages and disadvantages, risk recognition and risk reduction strategies, and intellectual property protection Students will examine and critique several business plans and/or case studies. BZ300 Christian Philosophy of Business (Previously BS300) Prerequisite: 80 credit points (8 units) of Business units (or equivalent). This unit plays a key role in providing students with the opportunity to explore Christian spiritual and philosophical perspectives in business and management and to focus on the questions of how life and culture influence business and management. Through research, students will be able to critically examine issues and problems in Christian approaches to business management and to apply ethical principles in business decision making. BZ310 Business Planning (Previously BS363) Prerequisites: BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management (or equivalent), BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent), BZ104 Economics (or equivalent) and BZ202 Financial Management (or equivalent). This unit provides students with an understanding of aspects of business formation, planning, leading, organising, taxation, financial management, marketing, human and physical resource management, contractual and legal obligations, business and lifestyle protection, and planning for growth. It focuses on small business enterprises in Australia. BZ311 Tax Law and Practice (Previously BS370) Prerequisite: BZ203 Business Law (or equivalent). This unit provides an understanding of the principles of taxation and the relevant sections of the taxation legislation and case law applicable in Australia.

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BZ312 Auditing (Previously BS375) Prerequisite: BZ213 Company Accounting (or equivalent). This unit combines the knowledge of financial reporting and governance standards and adopts a risk-based audit approach in line with the Australian Auditing Standards. BZ313 Law of Corporations (Previously BS372) Prerequisite: BZ203 Business Law (or equivalent). This unit is intended to equip students with a sound understanding of the various issues relating to running and organising a business in the form of a company incorporated in Australia. BZ331 Change Management in Organisations (Previously BS225 Leadership and Change Management) Prerequisite: BZ232 Leadership in Organisations (or equivalent). Incompatible: HB225 Leadership and Change Management. This unit examines issues of organisational change and development. Topics covered include organisational culture and change processes and strategies. Both personal and professional dimensions of organisational development are developed, and moral and ethical issues arising in change management are examined. BZ332 Human Resource Management (Previously BS325) Prerequisite: BZ231 Human Behaviour in Organisations (or equivalent). Incompatible: HB325 Human Resource Mangement. This unit addresses the objectives and problems associated with human resource management in organizations. Topics include job analysis and design human resource planning; recruitment and selection; training and development; performance appraisal; career planning; motivation and leadership; compensation and benefits; occupational health and safety; industrial relations; the legal environment; HRM auditing and emerging trends. BZ333 Strategic Management And Planning (Previously BS321 Strategic Management and Planning) Prerequisites: BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management (or equivalent), BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent), BZ104 Economics (or equivalent) andBZ202 Financial Management (or equivalent). Incompatible: BZ353 Strategic Marketing. The unit develops the basic concepts of strategic management, and covers the concept of corporate

strategy the fundamentals of strategic analysis; and the formulation, development and implementation of strategy This unit is taught with a major emphasis on case study and analysis. BZ351 Market Research And Analysis (Previously BS242 Market Research) Prerequisites: BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent) and BZ201 Data Analysis (or equivalent). The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, design and interpretation of marketing research and its value as a management and decision-making tool in commercial and non-profit organisations. Those students pursuing the Marketing Major will benefit from both the formative value of the case studies and the complexities of developing and conducted a market research project in a group situation. BZ352 Event Management (Previously BS382) Prerequisites: BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent) and BZ252 Marketing Communication (or equivalent). This unit aims to develop a sound knowledge of the stages involved in the conception and implementation of a project or special event Skills will be developed in clarifying the goals of the project or event, writing project briefs, executing feasibility studies, resource acquisition and allocation, organising and managing project and event teams with reference to finance, co-ordination of consultants, contractual arrangements and supervision of project implementation and evaluation of the results. Students will be encouraged to apply material studied in other units of their studies to the problems of managing projects and special events.

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BZ353 Strategic Marketing (Previously BS322) Prerequisites: BZ100 Introduction to Business and Management (or equivalent), BZ103 Introduction to Marketing (or equivalent), BZ104 Economics (or equivalent) and BZ202 Financial Management (or equivalent). Incompatible: BZ333 Strategic Management and Planning. This unit reinforces the theory and practices of strategic marketing and develops a sound understanding of strategic analysis and decision-making Students undertake research on a selected brand or organisation and produce a strategic marketing plan. The unit is taught with a major emphasis on case study and analysis.

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MINISTRIES UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) JA101 Biblical Interpretation and Application The ability to interpret and apply scriptural texts is foundational to every area of Christian study, belief and ministry. In this unit, students will examine hermeneutical models used by different groups through the church’s history, and they will learn lessons that can be applied to gain a greater understanding of the intended meaning of various passages of scripture. Students will develop skills in exegeting, interpreting and applying the various literary genres found in the Bible. Students will learn to use a variety of Bible study tools and research methods that will enable them to interpret the Bible for themselves. They will also be challenged to reflect on their own hermeneutical approaches and the way these are shaped by contemporary contexts. JA102 Biblical Studies in the Old Testament Many doctrinal, ethical and practical aspects of Christian theology, history and practice originate in the Old Testament, making it important for ministry students to be familiar with the text and the ways it is interpreted. This unit provides an opportunity to develop approaches and skills in handling biblical evidence and evaluating the contexts of biblical exegesis in ways that can be applied to ministry. It considers interpretation strategies and draws guidelines and inspiration from the Old Testament for application to personal faith, ministry and mission today. It also develops an awareness of changing understandings of biblical texts through history and in contemporary contexts. The unit aims to develop a sound basis upon which further study may be developed. JA103 Biblical Studies in the New Testament Many doctrinal, ethical and practical aspects of Christian theology, history and practice originate in the New Testament making it important for ministry students to be familiar with the text and the ways it is interpreted. This unit provides an opportunity to develop approaches and skills in handling biblical evidence and evaluating the contexts of biblical exegesis in ways that can be applied to ministry. It considers interpretation strategies and draws guidelines and inspiration from the New Testament for application to personal faith, ministry and mission today. It also develops an awareness of changing understandings of biblical texts through history and in contemporary contexts. The unit aims to develop a sound basis upon which further study may be developed. JA104 Cornerstones for Ministry Society today has many vehicles, especially through the media, that try to undermine the cornerstones of faith. In order to be thoroughly equipped for active ministry in the Church and wider society, students require a clear understanding of the cornerstones of the Christian faith and what holds them true to this faith. Church history demonstrates that one of the constant struggles of Christianity, both individually and corporately, is its relationship with culture. This unit seeks to establish within the student core components of the Christian faith from an Evangelical and Charismatic perspective. Two essential core components are faith in God and faith in His Word. A thorough investigation into these components will provide the student with a sure defence of these foundations for the practice of ministry. JA105 History of Christian Thought and Its Practice (Incompatible with JA106) In a world where the plurality of biblical interpretations and theological stances continues to expand, the ability to assess these conflicting differences is imperative for the Evangelical/Charismatic minister of today. This unit surveys the major developments in Christian thinking through history and the ways they have contributed to contemporary practice. It brings an appreciation of the rich heritage of Christian thought and introduces a critical awareness of 12


changing processes of engagement with knowledge. This core unit contributes to establishing foundational knowledge and skills in order to provide a framework for the student’s theological, personal and ministry formation and practice. JA106 History of Christian Thought on Social Justice (Incompatible with JA105) This unit focuses on a knowledge and understanding of the development of Christian thought on social justice. It also provides useful insights into the development of knowledge within community and the tools associated with an introduction to critical thinking about the evaluation of knowledge on social justice issues. A survey of the major developments in social justice thinking through history and the ways it has contributed to contemporary practice is also discussed. JB101 Spiritual Formation Christianity involves transformed lives, not just assent to Christian beliefs. A person who comes to faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour needs to realise that they have been converted from a position of sin to a position of righteousness. The subject provides students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of Christian spirituality and the disciplines and attitudes necessary for personal spiritual formation. This core formational subject provides the basis for the student to further establish their spirituality which is essential for the development and sustainability of their personal and ministry life. JB102 Reflections in Theology Theology forms the essence of what the Christian faith teaches, affirms and holds to be true. As such, accuracy concerning its truth is vital to the formation of life and ministry. It is therefore imperative that such a body of truth be carefully engaged. Theology is also concerned with being conformed to its revealed reality. This subject seeks to examine and discuss a body of systematic theology from an Evangelical/Charismatic perspective for students to engage and appropriate. The study includes Christology, Pneumatology, Anthropology and Soteriology. JB103 Ministry Formation In order to fulfil God’s call and participate in the mission of God and His Church, ministry students need to be able to identify and formulate their unique expression of ministry. A correct understanding and integration of that ministry is critical to the formation of any future minister. Students are provided with an introductory understanding of how ministry is formed and developed within the context of relationship with God and community, as well as seeing ministry as a lifestyle. This includes exploring the mission of God and examining what is effective service in community. The subject is designed to help students understand themselves, their gifts and interpret their experience in relation to ministry. JB110 Understanding Social Justice Within Mission At the core of the Christian justice agenda is love and service in the name of God - an agenda which is initiated by God, Himself. The theme of justice runs throughout the biblical witness of God’s encounter with His creation. It speaks of a deep compassion for justice in the Creator’s agenda for communal life - a life enriched by the values of compassion, mercy, forgiveness and reconciliation. This unit enables students to begin constructing or forming their own theology of justice based on theological and biblical premises. Attention is given not only to social justice issues but to the place of justice within the overall mission of the church. The unit emphasises the key biblical passages that address justice. JB201 A Biblical Understanding of the Church Prerequisites: JA102 Biblical Studies in the Old Testament; JA103 Biblical Studies in the New Testament; JB103 Ministry Formation (or equivalent). The church is a complex social and historical phenomenon, and has been subject to remarkable growth and renewal in spite of its history of division within and attack from without. Yet for many 13


people, both within and outside of the Christian community, “the church” is a misunderstood concept. This unit is designed to assist students to formulate an understanding of the essential nature, function and mission of the church, based upon biblical study and interpretation as well as the field of ecclesiology, which uses theology and sociology to help explain the church. It is designed to examine the life of the church as a worshipping, evangelising, and serving community, called by the Father, commissioned by the Son and empowered by the Holy Spirit. JB202 Contemporary Ethics and Compliance Prerequisite: JB102 Reflections in Theology (or equivalent). Humanity’s quest for understanding of the „good life‟, and of moral categories of right and wrong, represents a major aspect of the formation of Christian faith and commitment. The unit introduces students to ethical reflection as intrinsic to Christianity in general and to the theological enterprise more specifically. This unit provides an opportunity for students to participate in the Christian tradition of moral reflection and formation. The unit also aims to raise an awareness of the importance of the legislative environment in which Christian leaders have to act thus providing an introduction to a regulatory framework for the practice of ministry. JB210 Sociology for Ministry Prerequisites: JA102 Biblical Studies in the Old Testament; JA103 Biblical Studies in the New Testament; JA105 History of Christian Thought and Its Practice (or equivalent). Since Christian ministry is conducted within a range of social contexts that are often changing, a brief study of sociology and its application to ministry is of benefit to ministry students. This unit introduces major social theories that provide insights into the relationship between ministry and society, and to the dynamics of contemporary social life as these impact individuals, families, and society at-large. This study provides students with an opportunity to develop critical skills in interpreting sociological evidence, evaluating models of society and examining historical perspectives on the place of ministry in society. It also brings an increased appreciation of the important role that Christian ministry can play in the wider society, and a greater understanding of the church as a social institution. JB211 Reflections on Biblical Leadership Prerequisites: JA101 Biblical Interpretation and Application; JA102 Biblical Studies in the Old Testament; JA103 Biblical Studies in the New Testament (or equivalent). Leadership is a key aspect of any human endeavour and it is particularly important in determining the direction and success of any organisation. This unit explores the topic of leadership from a biblical perspective. Examples of leadership in the Old and New Testament will be analysed within their biblical context and in terms of contemporary understandings of leadership. This study provides students with an opportunity to develop critical skills in the handling and application of biblical texts to contemporary situations. It brings an appreciation of the role that biblical examples of leadership can play in Christian circles and in wider society. Essential principles bearing on the purpose and character of leadership will be examined. A special focus will be the notion of „servant leadership‟ in the Old Testament and the leadership example of Jesus Christ as seen in the New Testament. JB213 Towards a Christian Worldview for Ministry Prerequisites: JA104 Cornerstones for Ministry; JA105 History of Christian Thought and Its Practice; JB102 Reflections in Theology (or equivalent). Most people tend to think of themselves as living out of a set of values and a worldview which has been consciously thought out and chosen. More often, however, our worldview is shaped by a set of presuppositions of which we are often barely aware and which is rarely exposed to reflection and critical evaluation. Even Christians with a conscious commitment to God, and the Bible as their guide, find that the religious and social culture in which they live has shaped their patterns of thought and action in profound and unconsidered ways. In this unit, students will be challenged to critically examine their worldview foundations in the light of biblical, historical and global worldview perspectives, and to develop a personal ministry worldview foundation that is consistent with Biblical values, sound Christian theology, and a well thought out understanding of the Christian faith.

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JB214 Jesus - His Life and Ministry Prerequisite: JA103 Biblical Studies in the New Testament (or equivalent). Jesus is the central person in the Christian faith. His life and ministry occupies an essential place in Christian theology, history and ministry practice and is therefore of continued value in the formation of a student’s life and ministry. This unit focuses on the life and ministry of Jesus including His character, relationships, teachings and ministry practice as found in the Gospel texts, and the different strategies of interpretations used by a range of scholars regarding these texts. It is designed to enable students to develop knowledge and critical skills that will help them to understand the life and teachings of Jesus more fully, and evaluate the contexts of biblical exegesis in ways that can be applied to ministry practice. JB215 Paul - His Life and Theology Prerequisite: JA103 Biblical Studies in the New Testament (or equivalent). Paul’s letters provide a wealth of knowledge and insights to enhance student’s engagement with faith, missionary endeavours and ministry practice. This unit provides an overview of Paul’s life and the major theological themes in his epistles and further develops interpretative skills in biblical and theological studies and their application to contemporary ministry settings. Students will develop critical skills in: exegesis; the handling of biblical evidence; evaluating interpretations of biblical texts; and in the application of the Bible to contemporary ministry contexts. JB216 Major Themes of Luke - Acts Prerequisite: JA103 Biblical Studies in the New Testament (or equivalent). The study of Luke’s writings of the early church is of particular importance to Evangelical and Charismatic scholars as it provides a wide range of teaching and reflection on major themes of the Holy Spirit and acts of the Church that are relevant to contemporary faith and ministry practice. This unit develops important biblical and theological insights regarding these themes towards further formation for ministry practice, by enhancing skills of critical thinking, personal reflection and application for ministry. Students will reflect on these contexts and perspectives and how they relate to ministry practice. JB217 Major Themes of the Old Testament Prerequisites: JA102 Biblical Studies in the Old Testament; JB101 Spiritual Formation (or equivalent). The Old Testament provides many biblical and theological themes on which Christian beliefs and practices are founded. Hence it is important to identify and interpret these themes and critically reflect on their contribution to ministry. This unit will guide students in their study of major Old Testament themes and how they have been applied to contemporary ministry practice. Old Testament texts and themes are examined within their original literary, cultural and historical contexts. Findings are then evaluated and examined with the purpose of communicating and applying them to contemporary audiences and ministry practice. JB218 Movement of the Spirit Through the Church and its History Prerequisite: JC200 The Holy Spirit in Ministry (or equivalent). The concept of renewal and restoration as the process whereby God renews the spiritual vitality of the church and restores neglected truths to a central place in its life is foundational to Evangelical and Charismatic perspectives on church life. An examination of the movements of the Spirit through history gives students a sense of the history of theological and renewal movements, and locates particular issues in relation to a larger conceptualisation of the development of the church. This places a renewal theology of the Spirit in the context of the historical moment in which it arises. This unit builds upon the biblical principles addressed in JC200 The Holy Spirit in Ministry and further identifies historical contexts in which the Spirit operated within the church. These understandings provide the student with an opportunity to develop an awareness of the movements of the Spirit for contemporary ministry situations. JC200 The Holy Spirit in Ministry A fundamental belief in the Evangelical and Charismatic traditions is the necessity of the Holy Spirit in a believer’s life in order to minister. This requires an understanding and experience of the Holy Spirit in ministry. Ministry in both the 15


Old and New Testament expresses His activity and dynamic presence, especially in God’s intervention in human affairs. In order to minister as God intends, we must rely on the leading and guidance of His Holy Spirit. Jesus set the example with His own life and ministry by only doing what He heard and saw from the leading of the Holy Spirit. This core unit is strategic, as it instructs students in a distinctively Christian activity for professional practice. Being led, guided, and empowered by the Holy Spirit is imperative for a minister who is called by God for His service. JC201 Relationships and Communication in Ministry Relationships and communication are two key aspects within ministry. The Bible depicts many examples of strong relationships and their synergising effect on ministry, the foremost being that of Jesus with His disciples and followers. The Bible also describes various forms of communication which are utilised within ministry contexts and are vital for all forms of healthy relationships. This unit helps develop and enhance student’s relational and communication skills, by providing critical insight into relevant strategies for their development. This unit critically evaluates and explores both relationships and communication as essential within ministry. It fosters pathways to develop relational skills towards facilitating sustained healthy relationships and provides fundamental elements for effective communication in a variety of modes and ministry contexts. JC202 Leadership for Life and Ministry Christian leaders have a responsibility to make decisions and accomplish results in a godly manner. Godly leaders must therefore be examples, especially in character and integrity, and function effectively in a variety of areas. This unit defines a biblical basis for leadership and establishes a platform for critical reflection on the development of the leader’s life, character and qualities. It enhances leadership skills and the outworking of leadership in ministry practice. As leadership occurs in most spheres of life, material will be taken from the church, para-church and business sectors to study ministry leadership and its associated practices. JC210 Effective Teams Teams play a vital role in ministry in a number of ways and create a fertile climate for spiritual service, a sense of shared mission, wise stewardship of resources, and mutual supportiveness. This unit equips students to effectively engage in team ministry, both as part of a team, and in the role of leading a team. It develops an understanding of team dynamics, based on premises and principles gleaned from critical reflection on various models and practices of team. From there the unit fosters a variety of practical ministry skills for working with teams. It also empowers students to evaluate the effectiveness of teams against set criteria, in order to improve this effectiveness. JC211 Engaging in Discipleship Prerequisite: JB101 Spiritual Formation (or equivalent). Discipleship is the outworking of the biblical mandate and model stated in the great commission of Matthew 28:19 - that calls us to „make‟ disciples. As such, an understanding of discipleship and its application is central to ministry and mission. This unit explores discipleship from its biblical foundations to the practices of discipleship today. It provides knowledge and insights into the relevant issues involved, as well as fostering skills for effective discipleship practices. This unit further reflects on and discusses strategies of actioning “discipleship”. This includes critical reflection on evangelism, instructing spiritual growth, guiding transformation and spiritual disciplines as part of the discipleship process. JC212 Engaging in Pastoral Care Effective pastoral care is integral to Christian ministry as a means of expressing the gospel of Jesus Christ in word and action. This elective unit is designed to equip students to effectively practice pastoral care that is firmly grounded in an understanding of the biblical, theological and historical roots of ministry practice. Students‟ skills will be enhanced by critically reflecting on various principles and models of pastoral care, and how this knowledge is outworked to develop an effective, caring, local church community where people are not only ministered to but also trained and equipped to become active disciples in the body of Chris

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JC213 Contemporary Preaching Prerequisite: JA101 Biblical Interpretation and Application (or equivalent). Preaching is a primary way by which God has chosen to deliver His message of salvation. Preaching is also the primary way a local church pastor leads, feeds, cares, nurtures, corrects, instructs, equips, motivates and mobilises the collective life of the congregation. This unit provides opportunities for critical reflection on the process and purpose of preaching as well as on the spiritual aspects and practical techniques of sermon preparation and delivery, enhancing students‟ skills to preach in a relevant way. Three essentials in the ministry of effective preaching will be analysed and reflected upon: firstly, the Word of God – the message; secondly, the man or woman of God – the messenger; and, thirdly, the power of the Holy Spirit in illumining the text to the preacher in preparation and empowerment for the delivery. JC214 Ministry and Organisational Management Although the Church is not a business, good stewardship of God-given resources requires an understanding and application of godly business practices, whether in Church or non-profit organisations. This unit relates biblical principles and practices of management to the church and other non-profit organisations. It also addresses issues of organisational culture, environment, design and structure as they apply to management practices. Finally the unit fosters a range of relevant management skills for use in ministry settings, from human resources management, to change management, to legal issues in management, to strategic planning and events management. JC215 The Church in Mission Prerequisite: JB103 Ministry Formation (or equivalent). Mission is fundamental to the identity, nature and purpose of the Christian church, especially as it calls people to faith and pursues justice and mercy. This unit examines the church’s outworking and expression of mission in a variety of contexts. It critically reflects on the mission of God and the evangelistic mandate given by Christ to His followers. Implications for contemporary ministry practice are explored. JC216 Cross Cultural Evangelism The premise of cross-cultural evangelism is that effective Christian communication, locally and overseas, invariably requires the crossing of cultural barriers. The unit critically reflects on effective cross-cultural ministry from biblical, theological, historical, and ministry related sources. It analyses causes and responses to historical surges in crosscultural ministry towards defining best practices and strategies for contemporary contexts. It evaluates ways of communicating the Gospel across-cultural boundaries and barriers, in order to outwork evangelism. JC217 Social Justice and the Local Church Jesus proclaimed good news to the poor, release to captives, freedom for the oppressed. His final commandment to His disciples was to go into the entire world and proclaim this good news. This unit aims to enhance the student’s understanding of, and commitment to, the work of the church in responding to the biblical mandate to “do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with their God”, both locally and globally. Students will be encouraged to develop a program of social justice appropriate for ministry practice. This unit will give an overview of various contexts of social justice and critically evaluate contemporary models and strategies for social action. JC218 Building Community Community as a re-emergent practice is an increasing concern worldwide, especially in light of the growing trend of community breakdown. This unit explores practices and approaches to build communities into what God intended, and the Bible teaches. It focuses on building communities from various perspectives, based on biblical and theological understandings of this mandate. It critically evaluates ministry practices for the building of community.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) CD101 Introduction to Community Development This unit introduces the theoretical and practical components of community development. Beginning from an understanding of community experiences and trends, students will learn how community development practices and principles can enable them to respond to contemporary needs. The unit will provide connections between the private world of the practitioner, the groups and associations with which one may work, and the broader public and policy realms in which the practitioner will move. Issues such as community profiling, skills in community development, maintaining hope, and working with groups will be discussed with reference to areas of community need such as mental health, refugees and youth. CD161 Community Development Skills Those working in counselling and human services need to develop basic counselling skills in the context of growing self-awareness. These skills, which are grounded in research and empirical support, are essential for the development of a strong inter-personal working relationship between counsellor and client and for the client to move towards desired goals. They are also the foundation on which all counselling theory’s specific interventions are built. For the student to develop these basic counselling skills, specific practice, with time for development of skills and feedback from others, is necessary. This unit approaches the topic in a holistic manner, teaching skills in the context of communication purpose and group orientation. CD254 Biblical Perspectives of Human Community Prerequisite: 10 credit points (1 unit) of Community Development or Christian Studies units (or equivalent). It is important for the Christian community development professional or Christian person who desires to implement the values and practices of community development within her or his own community, to understand that community development practice may be viewed as applied theology. In other words ethical community development is one authentic expression of the Christian gospel, key scriptural principles, and a sound Christian worldview. Although the Bible has a great deal to say issues of power, wealth, poverty, vocation, community, relations with others, the environment and politics, these themes often receive little emphasis in traditional social science courses. This unit will attempt to assist students to begin to grapple with what the Bible has to say about real life in the real world and how Christians are called to engage others within their immediate and more distant communities. CD260 Community Development Practice Prerequisites: CD101 Introduction to Community Development; CD161 Community Development Skills (or equivalent). It is important for community development workers to be able to draw on a practice framework – understanding and applying models, approaches, strategies – to make sense of their practice in the wide variety of community development contexts that exist today. This unit is intended to provide students with understandings and practical skills relevant to working with communities of people in a variety of settings utilising a range of approaches and models of community development practice. CD264 Urban Community Development Prerequisite: 10 credit points (1 unit) of Community Development units (or equivalent). The world today is rapidly becoming urbanised with more than half of the human race now living in cities. The flood of migration from rural to urban contexts has led to many social problems and challenges including poverty, a strain on resources and infrastructure, dislocation, social and family fragmentation and an increase in mental health disorders. Community 18


workers and Christians with a concern for cities and urban communities need to understand the issues and implications for community development of urban expansion and poverty. In particular, students will consider the uniqueness of the city context and the implications that effect community development practice and strategy among the urban poor. CD265 Aid and Development: Christian Perspectives Prerequisite: 10 credit points (1 unit) of Community Development units (or equivalent). Although the practices of international aid and development stem back to ancient times, governments, organisations, groups and individuals, particularly from the West, have become increasingly involved in these activities since the close of the Second World War. Many of the organisations and individuals who have been involved in financing and delivering aid have done so from the basis of their Christian faith, often in association with the ideals of Christian mission and a desire to enact the Christian Gospel. Yet many commentators, aid practitioners, and scholars have questioned the capacity of these approaches to increase economic development, alleviate poverty, or promote social health. Research has identified only tenuous links between development and positive outcomes for local communities and very few programs have outlasted donor support or achieved lasting improvements. The purpose of this unit therefore is both to critique traditional approaches to aid and development delivery as well as introduce students to evidentiary-based models that emphasise collaboration with and empowerment of recipients. CD282 Community Development Practice Fields Prerequisite: 10 credit points (1 unit) of Community Development units (or equivalent). Students need to not only assimilate foundational theory and skills related to community development practice, but also must understand the diverse fields and contexts in which community development takes place. Exposure to a breadth of potential community development applications is important, not only to allow them to identify potential areas of future involvement, but also so they may differentiate generic community development principles and practices from those related to specific practice contexts. In order to acquaint students with a broad range of community development practice fields, this unit takes a ‘life-cycle’ approach beginning with child sponsorship and working through programs and initiatives that include a focus on education, health, trafficking and supporting refugees and asylum seekers. CD301 Reflecting on Community Development Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of advanced Community Development units (or equivalent). Working effectively as a community development practitioner requires practitioners to not only have a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of their profession, but also engage in ongoing evaluation and reflection upon the underlying tenets and philosophy of this practice. To help develop the skills required for a critically reflective approach of this type of students will consider community development theory and application from a number of viewpoints, including post-structuralist, feminist, social justice, eco-justice, cultural and theological perspectives. In addition, approaches to meaningful dialoguing with others holding different perspectives and varying priorities will be introduced, providing students with the opportunity to reflect on their perspectives through authentic engagement with those who may hold differing views. CD354 Transformation Theology Prerequisite: 10 credit points (1 unit) of advanced Community Development units (or equivalent). This unit forms a biblical, theological and practical reflection on the role and task of Christians in society, and especially changes in society, which community development seeks to engender. The unit gives an understanding of historical, theological and sociological perspectives which form a foundation for societal change and community development. CH101 Introduction to Chaplaincy This unit is intended to provide students with a clearer understanding of the nature of chaplaincy as a Christian ministry and the contexts in which chaplains may be operate. It will examine the nature and theological framework

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of chaplaincy, its scope and limitations, and compare the different contexts in which chaplaincy is commonly undertaken. CH161 Chaplaincy Micro Skills The unit focuses on developing practical micro-skills and an understanding of the communication process to a level where students can operate successfully in a practicum placement. CH171 Introduction to Pastoral Care This unit introduces models and contexts of pastoral care, with particular emphasis on the church context. It also explores foundational Christian truths and their relevance to pastoral counselling practice. Students will learn basic counselling skills and will be introduced to several approaches to pastoral counselling by recognised practitioners. Awareness will also be developed of the ethics and limitations of pastoral care, and of the need for appropriate referrals to specialist help. CH220 Pastoral Care of Young People Prerequisites: 20 credit points (2 units) of Youth Work or Chaplaincy units (or equivalent); Blue Card (issued by the Queensland Government’s Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian). This unit addresses the question of pastoral care for young people both in terms of proactive personal and spiritual formation, and in terms of helping teenagers who are facing major life issues. Students will evaluate different models of pastoral care amongst young people, and consider the opportunities and challenges of pastoral care in a range of contexts, including ethical considerations. CH231 School Chaplaincy Prerequisites: CH220 Pastoral Care of Young People or YO220 Pastoral Care of Young People (or equivalent); Blue Card (issued by the Queensland Government’s Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian). This unit provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically on different models of school chaplaincy and to gain greater understanding of the realities of working as a chaplain in a school community. The different roles and responsibilities which arise in school chaplaincy contexts will be examined and attention will be paid to maintaining appropriate relationships with school authorities, other support workers, government agencies and the wider school community. CO161 Basic Counselling Skills Those working in counselling and human services need to develop basic counselling skills in the context of growing self-awareness. These skills, which are grounded in research and empirical support, are essential for the development of a strong inter-personal working relationship between counsellor and client and for the client to move towards desired goals. They are also the foundation on which all counselling theory’s specific interventions are built. For the student to develop these basic counselling skills, specific practice, with time for development of skills and feedback from others, is necessary. This unit approaches the topic in a holistic manner, teaching skills in the context of communication purpose and group orientation. CO253 Introduction to Schools of Counselling Prerequisite: HB101 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent). To effectively assist others, counsellors need a thorough understanding of both the counselling process and the broad theoretical approaches which form the foundation of effective therapeutic work. Although there exists a variety of individual counselling models, nearly all are rooted in the philosophy and theory of one (or perhaps two) of the major ‘schools’ or approaches to psychology and counselling. These schools provide coherent foundations on which to build an understanding human beings, their problems and how best to help them. Through being introduced to these schools, including Christian

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developments in these approaches, students will begin to be able to respond appropriately to the wide variety of issues they will face in the counselling context, as well as to develop their own personal worldview and theory base. CO255 Psychological Disorders, Assessment and Evidence Based Practice Prerequisite: HB101 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent). Those in people-helping professions must have an understanding of an array of issues that cause people to seek counselling. One of the major categories of problems for which people seek assistance is mental health concerns. Although counsellors are not able to provide formal assessment and diagnosis of psychological disorders, it is still important that they are able to recognise symptoms of such conditions thereby ensuring they work within their ethical limits and are able to refer when appropriate. In addition they are often called upon to work as part of multi-disciplinary teams with psychiatrists, doctors and psychologists, providing holistic care to those with psychological problems. For all these reasons counsellors must be able to identify clients who may be experiencing a range of mental health concerns. In recent decades a number of counselling models have been identified by extensive research as being efficacious in the treatment of a number of psychological disorders. Paramount amongst these are the evidence based approaches. It is therefore important that counselling students understand these therapeutic models and their application. CO282 Major Issues in Counselling Prerequisite: HB101 Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent). As well as an understanding of the underpinning theories and skills of counselling, people in the helping professions must also have some awareness of the kinds of issues faced by those who seek counselling. This unit focuses on a number of specific issues commonly presented in counselling and provides the student with a basic understanding of that issue, and interventions for effectively helping those who find themselves in these situations. This comprehensive overview of a variety of issues provides opportunity for students to not only learn theory and skills, but also creates an environment for students to reflect on these issues in terms of personal relevance and from a distinctly Christian perspective. CO310 Theology of Counselling Prerequisites: CS125 Contours of a Biblical Christian Worldview; CO253 Introduction to Schools of Counselling (or equivalent). Students of Counselling, in addition to a range of knowledge and skills, need to be able to reflect on theological and philosophical underpinnings of their practice. It can be claimed that all action proceeds from belief, whether known or tacit. Consequently, it is important to examine implicit beliefs in any given professional setting. While students have a knowledge of counselling theories they also need, within a Christian context, to be challenged to integrate their faith with their learning. It is important that psychological issues be integrated with theological principles, where appropriate, so that there is not a separation between espoused belief and practice. In this unit, students will be encouraged to investigate foundational themes within Christian theology especially as they apply to the counselling context. It will be important that any theological considerations be applied practically to counselling and not be abstractly attached. Appropriate examination of theology and psychology will encourage practitioners to integrate their faith and practice. HB101 Introduction to Psychology This unit introduces students to a broad overview of the field of psychology. Topics include the science of psychology, the nervous system, perception, motivation, intelligence, emotions, memory, psychological disorders and treatment. This study allows students to explore a number of possible future interest areas in psychology. HB111 Personal and Social Relationships It is essential that counsellors should be able to differentiate their own personal issues from those of their clients, and that they have to come to some measure of wholeness before seeking to apply intervention strategies with others. This unit focuses on models of personality, the self, and issues arising from the interaction of the family of origin, as a context for students to explore personal areas of strength and weakness.

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HB121 Human Development This unit focuses on development through the lifespan, with identification of growth from preschool to old age. Topics include cognitive, social, moral, physical and spiritual development. Theories explored include both social constructivist theories as well as stage models. HB171 Introduction to Pastoral Care This unit introduces models and contexts of pastoral care, with particular emphasis on the church context. It also explores foundational Christian truths and their relevance to pastoral counselling practice. Students will learn basic counselling skills and will be introduced to several approaches to pastoral counselling by recognised practitioners. Awareness will also be developed of the ethics and limitations of pastoral care, and of the need for appropriate referrals to specialist help. HB220 Human Behaviour in Organisations Prerequisite: BS120 Introduction to Business and Management (or equivalent). This unit introduces concepts that provide a framework for understanding human behaviour and examines their application to business and management. It examines relevant aspects of individual human behaviour, as well as behaviour in groups and organisations. It provides Christian perspectives on human behaviour and seeks to integrate these with psychological models and understandings. HB225 Leadership and Change Management Prerequisite: HB220 Human Behaviour in Organisations (or equivalent). This unit examines issues of leadership, organisational change and development. Topics include leadership theories, organisational culture, and change processes and strategies. Both personal and professional dimensions of leadership and organisational development are developed, and moral and ethical issues arising in change management are examined. HB232 Social Psychology Prerequisite: HB101 Introduction to Psychology; 20 credit points (2 units) of Social Sciences (or equivalent). In order to facilitate constructive human growth and behaviour, the social science practitioner must have an understanding of the person as a social being. Through an understanding of research in social psychology, personal awareness of relationships and the application of Biblical perspectives on the functioning of relationships, this unit will enable the student to develop knowledge of the person as an individual and as a member of society. Greater awareness of the person as a social being will assist the student to more fully understand both interpersonal and intrapersonal behaviour and attitudes, to relate more fully and maturely to others, and to contribute positively in the development of society. Understanding of the behaviour and attitudes within and between groups contributes to growth within societal structures, as well as positive development of organisations and social groups. This unit builds on previous studies in the social sciences as it encourages students to evaluate social psychology research and reflect on theories and principles of social psychology in the light of important Christian theological perspectives relating to societal and communal dimensions of humanness and Christian mission. HB325 Human Resource Management Prerequisite: HB220 Human Behaviour in Organisations or HB225 Leadership and Change Management (or equivalent). This unit addresses the objectives and problems associated with human resource management in organizations. Topics include job analysis and design, human resource planning, recruitment and selection, training and development, performance appraisal, career planning, motivation and leadership, compensation and benefits, occupational health and safety, industrial relations, the legal environment, HRM auditing, and emerging trends.

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HB380 Addictive Behaviours: Counselling Interventions Prerequisites: CO282 Major Issues in Counselling; 10 credit points (1 unit) in Human Behaviour or Counselling units (or equivalent). This unit provides a framework for counselling people who exhibit various forms of compulsive behaviours. It investigates the causes and characteristics of compulsive behaviours and explores a range of appropriate strategies for intervention, including twelve-step programs. HB382 Child and Adolescent Issues Prerequisites: CO282 Major Issues in Counselling; 10 credit points (1 unit) in Human Behaviour or Counselling units (or equivalent). This unit focuses on the issues met by counsellors of children and adolescents, and provides foundations for helping this age group. Emphasis is given to the developmental issues of young people and the particular societal pressures they face, and the skills necessary for counselling this age group are addressed. HB383 Relationship and Family Issues Prerequisite: 40 credit points (4 units) of advanced Social Sciences units (or equivalent). Much of counselling and welfare work focuses on the person in relationship. Human service workers must be fully aware of their own attitudes to family relationships, their own family of origin and the issues which commonly confront couples and families today, as well as the wide variety of family units now functioning in society. This unit focuses on aspects of relationships including roles, expectations, conflicts, pre-marriage, divorce, remarriage, parenting and sexuality. It also provides opportunity for students to engage these issues from a distinctively Christian perspective. HB385 Abuse Issues Prerequisites: CO282 Major Issues in Counselling; 10 credit points (1 unit) in Human Behaviour or Counselling units (or equivalent). This unit addresses the complex issues of abuse that occur in society. It is designed to raise students’ awareness of the forms and nature of abusive practices, to underscore the trauma responses of individuals, families and communities, to outline special concerns and issues relevant to particular forms of abuse, and to examine appropriate responses for dealing with abuse. It also examines a range of strategies for the prevention of abuse and treatment of victims and offenders. HB386 Grief and Trauma: Counselling Interventions Prerequisites: CO282 Major Issues in Counselling; 10 credit points (1 unit) in advanced Human Behaviour or Counselling units (or equivalent). Ordinary life is frequently touched with loss – death, marriage breakup, lifethreatening illness, financial disaster, loss of career, dislocation, loss of dreams. People often seek help to address losses in their lives, either sudden or expected. Counsellors and other people helpers are often asked to counsel people who have come through a trauma – suicide, accident, disaster, etc. This unit explores responses to trauma and crisis events and the process of dealing with grief associated with trauma, as well as grief that is met in the normal course of life. HB389 Sexuality, Spirituality and Counselling Prerequisites: CO282 Major Issues in Counselling; 10 credit points (1 unit) in advanced Human Behaviour or Counselling units (or equivalent). Human sexuality and spirituality are important, distinct, and yet related aspects of humanness, and a critical review of Christian perspectives of human sexuality is pertinent for those interested in counselling. In counselling contexts, problems in sexuality, gender and spiritual issues are often vitiating concerns. Students thus need to gain a comprehensive understanding of sexuality and spirituality, their distinctions and interconnectedness, if they are to understand people and their problems more fully. Today, a great range of views on sexuality, spirituality and gender are debated in society, and counsellors need to understand not only these different perspectives but also the basis of their own beliefs. As a consequence, this unit will investigate and critically engage a range of perspectives but will particularly examine Christian perspectives. In addition, it is important for students of counselling to possess awareness related to their own sexuality, spirituality and gender as well as a 23


commitment to ongoing growth and development in these areas. This unit will therefore also link theoretical knowledge, self-awareness and application to counselling practice. HS101 Introduction to Human Services Human services practitioners need to operate from a well considered framework of practice that takes into account the existential / theological assumptions of the practitioner and their broader self awareness; understanding of relevant psycho-social theories; the knowledge, skills and territory of human services; and the ability to understand and work in human services organisations. Students in the area of human services must also have a foundational understanding of the nature of the human services sector, its historical roots and the philosophical perspectives and policy debates which underpin it. This unit includes an historical introduction to welfare provision, from biblical times to the rise of the welfare state in modern western society, and the ideological factors which have shaped our notions of the need for welfare services. The student is also given an overview of the human services sector in Australia today, examining the role of both government and non-government providers of community services. Major conceptual frameworks and important philosophical debates will be highlighted in order to enable students to reflect on the issues underpinning human services provision and the formulation of public policy in this area. HS111 The Person of the Community Worker Understanding oneself is essential for understanding others. An effective means of gaining understanding of human behaviour, psychological and interpersonal functioning is through self-reflection and the personal development of appropriate life skills. An investigation of models of personhood and relationship patterns will aid the understanding of social and community interaction. The unit also provides students with an opportunity to decide if further studies in the human services or community development fields is personally appropriate. HS161 Human Services Skills Those working in human services are called upon to interact effectively with a broad range of clients, stake-holders and colleagues. As a result, it is essential they develop basic skills in the context of critical reflection and a growing self-awareness. The major focus of this unit, therefore, is to help students master the basic human services skills, by specific classroom practice. The unit is seen as a practical one, with time for development of skills, and feedback from others. The unit approaches the topic in a holistic manner, in that skills are not taught in isolation but in the context of communication purpose, ethics and group orientation. HS201 Working in Human Services Organisations Prerequisite: HS101 The Person of the Community Worker (or equivalent). Students in the area of human services need to have a foundational understanding of the nature of the human services sector, its historical roots and the philosophical perspectives and policy debates which underpin it. In order to assist students to locate the human services in historical perspective this unit includes an historical introduction to welfare provision, from biblical times to the rise of the welfare state in modern western society, as well the ideological factors which have shaped our notions of the need for welfare services. In addition an overview of the human services sector in Australia today, an examination of the role of government and non-government providers of community services is presented, allowing students to begin to understand the sector in which they are planning to work. Major conceptual frameworks and important philosophical debates will be highlighted in order to enable students to reflect on the issues underpinning human services provision and the formulation of public policy in this area. HS260 Human Services Practices Prerequisite: HS161 Human Services Skills (or equivalent). Human services practitioners increasingly work within a complex array of practice contexts. It is important for such workers to be able to draw on a human services practice framework – understanding and applying models, approaches, strategies – to make sense of and guide their practice in those contexts. This unit is intended to provide the student with understandings and practical skills and relevant to working with people in a variety of contexts utilising a range of approaches and models of human services 24


practice. Building on previous study of welfare and social issues, this unit will examine practice issues in the human services sector in Australia today. Attention will be paid to identifying important components of a framework for human service practice, client participation and engagement, strengths and needs based practice, case management, individual, group, community and advocacy strategies. HS301 Reflecting on Human Services Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of advanced Human Services units (or equivalent). Working effectively in area of people-helping requires practitioners to be able to not only understand the theory and practice of their profession, but also to critique and reflect upon the underlying tenets and philosophy of this practice in the context of their personal and evolving personal practice framework. This unit will encourage students to consider human services theory and application from a number of viewpoints, including post-structuralist, feminist, social justice, cultural and theological perspectives. Students will also be encouraged to continue to develop, evaluate and integrate their own views on these issues and also to develop and apply skills with which to conduct ongoing critical analysis within their profession. In addition approaches to meaningful dialogue with other human services practitioners holding different perspectives and varying priorities will be introduced for the purpose of providing students with opportunity to critically consider and develop their own views and opinions as appropriate. HS364 Management and Professional Skills in Human Services Prerequisites: HS161 Human Services Skills; 10 credit points (1 unit) of advanced Human Services units (or equivalent). In addition to a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of human services practice, graduates in this field are often required to exercise a range of complex professional and managerial skills. In particular, they may be required to function as team leaders, project managers or in other positions of responsibility. These roles require skills and knowledge in the areas of effective communication, team leading, management, compiling funding applications, report writing, policy development, and training, coaching and mentoring other staff. This unit is designed to introduce students to foundational theory and skills in these areas that they may require once they gain employment or seek promotion within the human services profession. SO101 Australian Society: Introduction to Sociology This foundational unit in Sociology provides students with the content knowledge and theoretical understandings needed to investigate, analyse and reflect upon Australian society from a sociological perspective. The unit explores key sociological theories and perspectives that students will apply to critique and investigate the social processes, institutions and cultural symbols and norms that contribute to the sociological heart of this nation. These sociological frameworks will all be filtered through a distinctively Christian perspective and a biblical rationale for this field of study will be personally shaped and moulded throughout this unit. SO242 Social Science Research Methods Prerequisites: SO101 Australian Society: Introduction to Sociology; 20 credit points (2 units) of Social Sciences units (or equivalent). This unit introduces students to research methodologies which are commonly used in the social sciences. It provides a foundational understanding of both quantitative and qualitative methods of research, and equips students to evaluate and critique the reliability of statistical data. In this way, students are equipped to be informed consumers of social science research and active participants in research activities. SO251 Ethics, Policy and Professional Issues Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of Social Sciences units (or equivalent). The applied social sciences represent fields in which there are many inherent ethical issues. It is essential, therefore, for social science students to possess frameworks with which to engage key ethical decisions and dilemmas. This unit is designed to help students understand current policy relating to applied social science practice as well as principles and processes used to influence the formation and implementation of policy in the future. In addition professional issues including

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membership of professional organisations, industry standards, professional networking, professional development and self care for the practitioner will be discussed. SO252 Culturally Sensitive and Inclusive Practice An awareness and understanding of cultural issues is essential for effective social science practice. Community practitioners from across the spectrum often work with diverse groups of people both within Australia and overseas and effective practice requires them to understand and respond to those who differ from them in numerous ways including language, tradition, religion, ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, and disability. As such this unit will expose students to the skills and approaches required for practice which is sensitive and inclusive of a broad range of individuals and community groups. In addition it will focus on skills of reflective practice required to engage in ongoing critique and development of one’s interaction with culturally diverse peoples. SO302 Understanding Humanness Prerequisite: Permission of the CHC Dean of Social Sciences. This unit explores what it means to be human. It recognises that the nature of the human being has been thought about from many differing perspectives: philosophical, anthropological and sociological, psychological, cultural, biological and religious. Using a theological starting point, the unit seeks to evaluate differing perspectives on being human and to explore the nature of the human being in spiritual, social, ethical and economic relationships. YO100 Introduction to Youth Work Students entering into studies preparing them for youth work practice need to gain insights into the nature of young people, touching on their identity, development, and cultures. They also need to gain insights into what is involved in differing youth work contexts and what is involved in being a youth worker in those contexts. This unit sets out to help students gain such an understanding of young people and provide an introduction of some of the issues presented by youth work practice. YO121 Understanding Young People This unit investigates various aspects of human development, including such topics as life-span theories and cognitive, emotional, moral and spiritual growth. The unit identifies processes which influence both developmental and individual differences, with an emphasis on young people aged 12 to 25 years. YO202 The Socio-Cultural Worlds of Young People Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of Youth Work or Chaplaincy units (or equivalent). This unit is designed to introduce students to some of the social and cultural factors and contexts which shape the world of young people today. It investigates the different and sometimes-conflicting images of young people constructed by the media, and public policy. The unit addresses interventions that youth workers might access in their work with young people. The unit also examines some of the ways in which young people see themselves. YO220 Pastoral Care of Young People Prerequisites: 20 credit points (2 units) of Youth Work or Chaplaincy units (or equivalent); Blue Card (issued by the Queensland Government’s Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian). This unit addresses the question of pastoral care for young people both in terms of proactive personal and spiritual formation, and in terms of helping teenagers who are facing major life issues. Students will evaluate different models of pastoral care amongst young people, and consider the opportunities and challenges of pastoral care in a range of contexts, including ethical considerations.

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YO231 School Chaplaincy Prerequisites: YO220 Pastoral Care of Young People or CH220 Pastoral Care of Young People (or equivalent); Blue Card (issued by the Queensland Government’s Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian). This unit provides students with the opportunity to reflect critically on different models of school chaplaincy and to gain greater understanding of the realities of working as a chaplain in a school community. The different roles and responsibilities which arise in school chaplaincy contexts will be examined and attention will be paid to maintaining appropriate relationships with school authorities, other support workers, government agencies and the wider school community. YO381 Religious Education for School Chaplains Prerequisites: YO231 School Chaplaincy or CH231 School Chaplaincy; 20 credit points (2 units) or Youth Work units (or equivalent); Blue Card (issued by the Queensland Government’s Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian). This unit seeks to provide chaplains, with or without teacher training, with an overview of the issues surrounding religious education in school contexts. It endeavours to prepare school chaplains with some of the skills and theories to teach and/or coordinate RE programs in school settings.

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EDUCATION UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) CR111 Introduction to Cross-Curricular Literacies This unit in cross-curricular literacies is designed to introduce preservice teachers to the many aspects and contexts of communication systems relevant to the academic and professional components of educational contexts. It will build preservice teachers’ knowledge and use of the discourses and practices of literate, numerate and digital demands on teachers and school students.

CR131 Introduction to Language, Literature and Literacy Prerequisite: CR111 Introduction to Cross-Curricular Literacies (pass Literacy component) (or equivalent). This unit introduces different approaches to teaching English. Preservice teachers will engage with language structure, language learning, and pedagogy. There is an emphasis on the critical evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of literacy teaching strategies in relation to scholarly research. Attention is also given to the importance of teaching emerging forms of technological, multi-modal, and culturally-diverse textual practices in the context of globalisation. CR161 Introduction to Mathematics and Numeracy Prerequisite: CR111 Introduction to Cross-Curricular Literacies (pass Numeracy component) (or equivalent). This unit will develop preservice teachers’ discipline content knowledge of the broad range of Mathematics topics in all strands of current Queensland and Australian curriculum documents. Preservice teachers’ previously learned knowledge of content and procedures will be reinforced, with an emphasis on appropriate understanding of the underlying Mathematics in order to teach these topics. CR171 Introduction to Science This unit is a core science education unit for preservice teachers covering the discipline content knowledge for Early and Middle Years. Its aim is to prepare preservice teachers with appropriate levels of scientific literacy and numeracy and a broad knowledge of scientific content for the earth and beyond, energy and change, life and living, natural and processed materials and science inquiry skills components of the Science curriculum. Preservice teachers will also be encouraged to consider the Science as a construction of western sociocultural contexts and will be challenged to critique human responsibilities and actions as stewards of the natural environment. CR181 Introduction to History and Geography This unit provides preservice teachers with foundational discipline content knowledge in the areas of History and Geography, with a focus on Australian context. The unit examines historical movements as well as the ideologies that have shaped the history of Australia. It encourages analysis of historical data and the use of those materials to encourage an understanding of the Australian character both in the past and in contemporary Australian life. This unit also introduces a wide range of geographical issues that investigate the interactions between human and physical components of the environment. Critical engagement with issues of stewardship and sustainability are developed. CR191 Introduction to Technology Education: Technology and ICT This unit provides preservice teachers with foundations in the discipline content knowledge required for the teaching of Technology within classroom contexts. It emphasises problem identification, solution generation and evaluation through application of the design process, rather than the learning of specific applications. It provides 28


preservice teachers with opportunities to develop an understanding of the knowledge, skills and processes necessary for teaching and learning the concepts and principles of Technology in the classroom. CR220 Content and Pedagogy: The Arts Prerequisite: Classroom experience required. This unit combines a balance of practice and theory to introduce the importance of The Arts in the development and growth of school students. Different techniques of teaching and theories that impact The Arts education of preservice teachers is also addressed including how our faith must be an integral part of our approach to arts education. CR224 Content and Pedagogy: The Arts and Health and Physical Education This unit is designed to provide preservice teachers with an introduction to the field of The Arts and Health and Physical Education (HPE) within education. Preservice teachers will develop an understanding of the value of The Arts and HPE in the classroom to promote the holistic growth and development of school students in the middle phase. CR232 Curriculum and Pedagogy: English and Literacy Prerequisites: CR131 Introduction to Language, Literature and Literacy (or equivalent); Classroom experience required. This second unit relating to the English key learning area is designed to be very practical, providing preservice teachers with a broad scope of suitable teaching and learning practices, with a significant emphasis on the teaching of reading and writing. It will also provide a point of reference to contemporary research and theory in order to ground pedagogical content knowledge in best practice. CR240 Content and Pedagogy: Health and Physical Education This unit develops a philosophical and practical perspective on human health and movement practices. The view developed undergirds a study of health, movement theories, psychomotor development, aquatics, games and associated pedagogy. Preservice teachers will develop skills in health and movement practices as well as curriculum development and evaluation in Health and Physical Education. CR262 Curriculum and Pedagogy: Mathematics and Numeracy Prerequisites: CR161 Introduction to Mathematics and Numeracy (or equivalent); Classroom experience required. This second core mathematics education unit develops and applies the content knowledge developed in CR161, equipping preservice teachers to design and implement engaging, relevant learning episodes for school students in the early and middle phases. CR263 Mathematics for the Middle Years Prerequisite: CR161 Introduction to Mathematics and Numeracy (or equivalent). Preservice teachers who desire to be teachers of middle years mathematics develop their personal level of numeracy and their knowledge of key topics in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and chance and data, extending their study of primary curriculum topics in CR161 and CR262. CR264 Differentiating Mathematics in the Middle Years Prerequisite: CR262 Curriculum and Pedagogy: Mathematics and Numeracy (or equivalent). This unit is designed to build preservice teachers’ understanding of the needs of divergent learners in Mathematics. It will equip them with ideas and strategies to cater effectively for the differentiation required to make a contribution to the learning of both gifted and challenged learners. Both the literacy and numeracy involved in Mathematics will be considered in identifying and remediating problems and issues. 29


CR272 Curriculum and Pedagogy: Science Prerequisites: CR171 Introduction to Science (or equivalent); Classroom experience required. This unit is designed to help preservice teachers to develop their personal scientific literacy and knowledge, but more importantly to gain knowledge and experience of „best practice‟ science education, based on latest research into how school students learn Science. CR273 Environmental Education for the Middle Years Prerequisite: CR171 Introduction to Science (or equivalent). This unit exposes preservice teachers to key concepts involved in environmental protection and management, and uses a variety of strategies to raise awareness of associated issues from a teaching perspective, including field studies, focussed research, group investigations and discussions. CR274 Chemistry and Physics for the Middle Years Prerequisite: CR171 Introduction to Science (or equivalent). This elective Science education unit aims to prepare preservice teachers to be teachers with a knowledge of scientific content in the physical sciences and a practical knowledge of best practice for physical science education. CR282 Advanced Studies in History and Geography Prerequisite: CR181 Introduction to History and Geography (or equivalent). This unit provides preservice teachers with advanced discipline content knowledge in the areas of History and Geography, with a focus on the international context. The unit examines historical movements as well as the ideologies that are shaping history as well as information on the growth and development of civilisation. It encourages analysis of historical data and the use of those materials to encourage an understanding of the civilisation both in the past and in contemporary life. This unit also introduces a wide range of geographical issues that investigate the interactions between human and physical components of the environment. Critical engagement with issues of sustainability is developed. CR283 Innovative SOSE Teaching for the Middle Years This unit will investigate and analyse a range of issues and principles for making SOSE lessons and units interesting and engaging for learners and to break down misconceptions that surround this key learning area. The aim of this unit is to develop preservice teachers’ ability to plan both whole school and individual year level curriculum programs that are well documented, aligned with the syllabus and reconceptualised from a Christian perspective. Students will engage in an exploration and analysis of a diverse range of innovative, creative and divergent strategies for breaking down the walls between classroom and society and these will be critiqued within a Christian framework of cultural transformation, missional and transcendent teaching and learning tasks. CR289 Curriculum and Pedagogy: SOSE and Technology Prerequisites: CR181 Introduction to History and Geography; CR191 Introduction to Technology Education: Technology and ICT (or equivalent); Classroom experience required. This unit provides preservice teachers with pedagogical understandings for SOSE and Technology key learning areas. It emphasises problem identification, solution generation and evaluation through application of SOSE values and principles, as well as the design process. It also provides for the development of an understanding of the knowledge, skills and processes necessary to effectively teach the concepts and principles of SOSE and Technology in the primary classroom. CR290 Content and Pedagogy: Technology Prerequisite: CR191 Introduction to Technology Education: Technolgy and ICT (or equivalent). This unit provides preservice teachers with foundations in the discipline and pedagogical content knowledge required for the teaching of Technology within classroom contexts. It emphasises problem identification, solution generation and evaluation 30


through application of the design process, rather than the learning of specific applications. It provides preservice teachers with opportunities to develop an understanding of the knowledge, skills and processes necessary for teaching and learning the concepts and principles of Technology in the classroom. CR292 ICT Applications for the Middle Years Prerequisite: CR191 Introduction to Technology Education: Technolgy and ICT (or equivalent). This elective unit gives preservice teachers with a particular interest and expertise with ICTs to explore more advanced uses of ICTs to develop and to support meaningful, innovative programs of learning for their students. CR301 Middle Years: Integrative Studies (Science, SOSE, Technology, Arts, HPE) Prerequisite: Classroom experience required. This unit is designed to assist preservice teachers with preparing for participating in curriculum work for middle years school students within a range of schooling contexts. Highlighting the value of cross-curricular priorities and integration, the unit will focus on the development of meaningful, authentic learning tasks and contexts, including the design and implementation of authentic assessment tools for middle years school students that link assessment with learning. In this way preservice teachers will be equipped in developing motivating and engaging learning environments and assessment tasks designed to cater for the learning needs of school students in the Middle Years. CR331 Early Years: Context and Philosophies This unit lays the foundation for an holistic understanding of the contexts of development of the young child. The impact of foundations laid in the early years throughout the school years are explored in the unit. The need for a thorough knowledge of current developmental research, demographic trends, and theories past and present, as a basis for sound pedagogical practice, is articulated and explored. CR333 Early Years: Pedagogies for Literacy and Numeracy Prerequisite: Classroom experience required. This unit develops frameworks for preservice teachers to build the literacy and numeracy skills and practices of early years learners within the classroom. This will develop sound foundations in identifying, teaching and assessing the literate and numerate demands of contemporary educational, professional and social contexts of early phase students. CR334 Early Years: Issues in Developing Effective Learning Environments Prerequisite: Classroom experience required. This unit encompasses the notion that the quality of the physical, psychological, aesthetic, intellectual, experiential and social environments are congruent with the success or failure of the learning experience for young children. The unit gives preservice teachers the opportunity to reflect on and articulate their knowledge about the provision of healthy ‘learnscapes’ as a part of the duty-of-care responsibilities of the Early Years educator. ES114 Educational Psychology: Learning and Development (P-7) This unit is the first in a strand of differentiated Education Studies for preservice teachers in primary courses. It provides preservice teachers with a foundational understanding of child development which underpins the professional work of educators in P-7 contexts. As such, it introduces preservice teachers to the developmental contexts of both early years and primary school classrooms and contexts, including the needs of the multicultural and Indigenous student, and investigates these from a number of developmental perspectives. ES116 Educational Psychology: Learning and Development (7-12) This unit is the first in a strand of differentiated Education Studies for preservice teachers in secondary courses. It provides preservice teachers with a foundational understanding of child development which underpins the 31


professional work of educators in secondary (Years 7-12) contexts. As such, it introduces preservice teachers to the developmental contexts of secondary school classrooms and contexts, including the needs of the multicultural and Indigenous student, and investigates these from a number of developmental perspectives. ES124 Introduction to Teaching and Learning (P-7) This unit is designed to introduce P-7 preservice teachers to the many theories, strategies, approaches and methods that facilitate effective practice in the classroom. In doing so, it will build their knowledge, understanding and experience of a range of teaching skills and approaches. This unit introduces preservice teachers to the significant practical implications of the range of teaching and learning theories to both early years and primary classrooms and contexts. This emphasis upon praxis is a distinguishing feature of this unit, whereby preservice teachers will be encouraged to practically and personally observe, implement and reflect upon the teaching and learning theories they will be investigating. ES126 Introduction to Teaching and Learning (7-12) This unit is designed to introduce secondary (Years 7-12) preservice teachers to the many theories, strategies, approaches and methods that facilitate effective practice in the classroom. In doing so, it will build their knowledge, understanding and experience of a range of teaching skills and approaches. This unit introduces preservice teachers to the significant practical implications of the range of teaching and learning theories to secondary classrooms and contexts. This emphasis upon praxis is a distinguishing feature of this unit, whereby preservice teachers will be encouraged to practically and personally observe, implement and reflect upon the teaching and learning theories they will be investigating. ES234 Educational Contexts and Philosophies: Early Learning and Primary School Centres (P-7) This unit encompasses the notion that culture and philosophy underpin the context, perceptions and outcomes of education, and that, in order to be professional and effective, educators need to be cognisant of this. As such, it introduces students to the sociocultural contexts of both early phase and primary school classrooms and contexts and investigates these from a number of philosophical positions. Specific attention is paid to the particular sociocultural needs of early phase and primary students within diverse cultural settings. Drawing upon the tenets of philosophy, preservice teachers will develop an understanding of the ideas and philosophies that have shaped contemporary education in the P-7 school. Overall, this unit will provide the tools for the preservice teacher to think in critical and reflective ways about teaching philosophy and practice, and to develop Christian ways of thinking about and reconceptualising education in the P-7 classroom. ES235 Educational Contexts and Philosophies: The Middle Phase of Learning This unit encompasses the notion that culture and philosophy underpin the context, perceptions and outcomes of education, and that, in order to be professional and effective, educators need to be cognisant of this. As such, it introduces preservice teachers to the sociocultural contexts of middle years school classrooms and contexts and investigates these from a number of philosophical positions. Specific attention is paid to the particular sociocultural needs of middle years school students within diverse cultural settings. Drawing upon the tenets of philosophy, preservice teachers will develop an understanding of the ideas and philosophies that have shaped contemporary education in the middle years. Overall, this unit will provide the tools for the preservice teacher to think in critical and reflective ways about teaching philosophy and practice, and to develop Christian ways of thinking about and reconceptualising education in the middle years classroom. ES236 Educational Contexts and Philosophies: Middle and Secondary Schools This unit encompasses the notion that culture and philosophy underpin the context, perceptions and outcomes of education, and that, in order to be professional and effective, educators need to be cognisant of this. As such, it introduces preservice teachers to the sociocultural contexts of secondary school classrooms and contexts and investigates these from a number of philosophical positions. Specific attention is paid to the particular sociocultural 32


needs of secondary students within diverse cultural settings. Drawing upon the tenets of philosophy, preservice teachers will develop an understanding of the ideas and philosophies that have shaped contemporary education in the secondary school. Overall, this unit will provide the tools for the preservice teacher to think in critical and reflective ways about teaching philosophy and practice, and to develop Christian ways of thinking about and reconceptualising education in the secondary classroom. ES354 Learning Communities: Holistic Approaches to Schooling, Children and Families (P-7) Prerequisite: Classroom experience required. This unit will expose preservice teachers to philosophies, models and practical applications relevant to building safe and supportive learning communities. It will investigate pastoral care models and approaches, as well as safe learning environments and how these support school students and teachers in the primary school. Preservice teachers will investigate broader community-based initiatives which support the holistic development of the school student in the primary school as well as how the primary school learning community can actively support the wider community. Throughout this unit, preservice teachers will actively engage in group processes within a learning community. ES356 Learning Communities: Holistic Approaches to Schools and Students (7-12) Prerequisite: Classroom experience required. This unit will expose preservice teachers to philosophies, models and practical applications relevant to building safe and supportive learning communities for secondary contexts. It will investigate pastoral care models and approaches, as well as safe learning environments and how these support secondary school students and teachers. Preservice teachers will investigate broader community-based initiatives which support the holistic development of the secondary school student as well as how the secondary school learning community can actively participate in and support the wider community. Throughout this unit, preservice teachers will actively engage in group processes within a learning community. ES480 Worldview and Sociology for Teachers Prerequisite: Classroom experience required. This unit is designed to develop in preservice teachers an understanding of a range of key worldview assumptions and sociological theories that teaching and learning within contemporary society. The unit will also equip preservice teachers with a range of analytical skills and abilities which they will use to critique and evaluate a variety of issues and imperatives affecting education and schooling within the current socio-cultural milieu. As a result, preservice teachers should gain an enhanced understanding of the place of education within society, the roles and interrelationships of ‘teacher’ and ‘student’, and the forces which impact upon them from both sociological and distinctively Christian perspectives.

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HISTORY UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) HT100 Turning Points in World History As an introduction to World History, this unit allows students to explore and to understand the major periods, events, and developments that have shaped world civilisations and cultures to the present day. It also broadens their concept of what ‘History’ and its developments are, as well as giving them increasing ability to analyse historical events and developments.

HT120 Introduction to Australian History This unit is a foundational study for students of Australian History. It examines historical movements as well as the ideologies that have shaped the history of Australia. It encourages analysis of historical data and the use of those materials to encourage an understanding of the Australian character both in the past and in contemporary Australian life. HT140 Early and Medieval Christianity This unit outlines and evaluates the major developments in the history of Christianity from the early church era to the end of the medieval period. It encourages the students to develop an understanding of the relationships of the church with the wider society of each era, and of his/her place in history and in society. HT150 Ancient Civilisations The unit introduces students to the major civilisations that emerged in the ancient Middle East and in the Mediterranean - from their known beginnings to classical Greek and Roman civilisations. It also introduces them to the basic questions of historical study - its nature and the criteria by which its authenticity is validated. HT200 Renaissance and Reformation Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). This unit encourages students not only to have a knowledge of the events and persons that triggered the Renaissance and the Reformation, but a knowledge and an understanding of how and why these two ‘movements’ arose (the broader historical context), and how they have impacted life today. The questions of their relationship as philosophies and as ‘movements’ will be discussed. HT211 War and Peace in the Twentieth Century Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). Knowledge and understanding of the events, trends, ideologies, and conflicts of the twentieth century is essential to an understanding of what is happening in the early twenty-first century. In this unit, students are encouraged to analyse the constant threat or presence of war, nationalism, racism, anti-imperialism and democracy, and the competition amongst competing ideologies of the era, and to speculate on the prospects of peace in the future. HT220 Issues in Australian Society Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). This unit takes a balanced social historical perspective on the issues that have shaped the Australian national identity, particularly in the socio34


cultural areas. It examines the influences and the trends that have led to how Australians see themselves and how the outside world perceives them. HT230 Survey of Church History Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). This unit places the Church within its historical, cultural, and social contexts through an introduction to Church History in relation to selected critical themes. It encourages students to reflect on and to understand the Church of today and its mission to the world. HT235 Politics and Conflict in Southeast Asia Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). This unit brings to the students’ attention the geographical proximity and therefore the importance of knowledge and understanding of the history, politics, and culture of Australia’s nearest neighbours. Because these nations are not, on the whole, Christian nations, students should be made aware of both common interests and cultural differences between Australia and the nations of Southeast Asia. This will also help the students as future teachers to be conscious of the biases of their own students in the future. HT240 Modern China and Japan Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). China and Japan have long cultural traditions; however, the modern era is examined in this unit. The unit is designed to encourage student understanding of the key turning points in Modern China and Japan as these two nations struggled to develop political and economic systems relevant to the twentieth century and to define their own national identities. In doing so, students are encouraged to compare Australia’s Western Christian-based development with those of China and Japan. HT250 Greece and Rome: 500BC to AD150 Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). This unit explores the eras of Classical Greece, and of Republican and Imperial Rome. It highlights the political, cultural, and social legacies of both Greece and Rome to Western civilisation, and highlights the major players (both leaders and philosophers) who shaped the classical world and still influence the world of today. HT255 The Modern Middle East Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). This unit examines the historical background of the Middle East, and investigates the question of why political and religious issues and problems still exist in the modern Middle East. HT260 Australia, Asia and the Pacific Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory History units (or equivalent). This unit highlights the increasing involvement Australia has had in Asia and the Pacific since 1945, and the historical changes of attitude it has had towards regional economic and defence alliances. It also examines the future of Australia - its advantages and its challenges - as it seeks to take on a more pro-active role in the region. HT385 Philosophies of History Prerequisite: 40 credit points (4 units) of advanced History units (or equivalent). As an advanced study, this unit examines the philosophical question: What is history? It considers historiography and the role of the historian, the underlying philosophical presumptions, the methodologies, the theories, and the issues and problems that the historian faces. It also examines history written from a Christian worldview. 35


ENGLISH UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) EL110 The Western Literary Tradition This unit explores the historical background of Western Literature, and considers how that literature has been affected by historical events and philosophies. It encourages students to gain knowledge and understanding of Western Literature (with an emphasis on English Literature) from medieval times to the contemporary European world, along with a recognition of the influence of Christianity on both the societies and the literature over this period. EL120 Introduction to Australian Literature This unit takes an historical as well as a literary approach to Australian literature. It explores the various migrations of different peoples from different societies and cultures since 1788, how these changed the original inhabitants’ culture and changed Australians’ sense of national identity over time. The unit places emphasis on the literary genres most favoured at certain periods in Australian history, and examines and analyses the concept of an emerging and changing Australian national identity as demonstrated in its literature. EL140 Great Books of the Western World I This unit is the first part of a two-part study of books that have been considered over time by literary critics as ‘great books’. It takes an historical and narrative approach to texts from the very earliest texts - such as Greek and Roman classics and the Bible - to the eighteenth century with a view to discovering the reasons for their survival and to examining, in some detail, the subjects and the ideas that they contain. EL150 Great Books of the Western World II This unit continues the major themes of EL140 Great Books of the Western World I. It necessarily involves a longer list of texts and authors than did the previous unit because of the spread of education throughout the Western World from the eighteenth century to the present day, and incorporates an introduction to literary criticism as consistent with modern concepts of literary theory. EL170 Introduction to Fantasy and Science Fiction This unit encourages students to consider the two genres of Fantasy and Science Fiction, not in the light of Christian condemnation, but with a view to their uniqueness as literary genres. It introduces students to a wide range of texts as examples of the genres and encourages them to critically analyse texts and to evaluate and reflect on their social impact in today’s world. EL200 Shakespeare and His Times Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). Shakespeare’s works lie at the very centre of the Western Literary Canon; but he was not alone as a writer of poetry and dramatic works. Nor was he impeded as a poet and a dramatist by negative influences in his surroundings. He was a part of a country in the early Renaissance period where literary experiments were encouraged in the playhouses and the theatres, where poets were lauded, and where the monarch was actively involved in the promotion of literary endeavours. This unit explores the world in which Shakespeare wrote, and the way in which his genius was encouraged by that environment. 36


EL220 The Media in Christian Perspective Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). The variety of forms of the media, the role that it plays in society, and both the positive and the negative impacts that it has in our society constitute the content of this unit that aims to bring a knowledge and an understanding of the media’s power to students, and to produce an awareness of that power and a heightened discrimination in their approach to it. It encourages Christian students to use the media with both knowledge and discernment. EL225 Contemporary Australian Writers Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit views the works of Australian contemporary writers as part of the emergence of Australian literature onto the international scene. It examines the common themes and issues that have engaged Australian writers since white settlement (including the portrayal of religion and other forms of spirituality – such as aboriginal spirituality) and discusses the influence of trends in contemporary philosophy and literary theory in the works of contemporary Australian writers. EL230 American Literature Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit is a broad introduction to American Literature, examining and exploring the major themes, authors and genres over a number of historical eras. It examines in some depth recurring American themes and motifs, and examines some poetry, short stories, and longer prose works. EL235 Modern Literature Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). The Modern world that made its appearance in Western nations in the first half of the twentieth century displayed the characteristics of a culture that was losing its way, and that would eventually arrive at a culture determined (in varying degrees) by the philosophy of postmodernism. The literature of the period reflects a sense of aimlessness and meaninglessness in both its themes and its language. EL240 Film Narrative Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit addresses the issue of narrative structure in film. It discusses the increasingly improved technical resources open to directors, explores different approaches to narrative through a number of representative films, and engages students in both historical and contemporary developments in film narrative. Finally, it allows them to explore the processes through which various literary texts are translated into film. EL245 The Bible as Literature I Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit is an introductory unit aimed at giving first year students a general knowledge of the Bible as both a religious and a literary text. It is both historical and literary in its approach; and aims, therefore, to develop students’ competency in recognising biblical allusions and patterns of discourse in key literary English-language texts. EL251 Religious Allegory Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). Because an interest in religious allegory and symbolism is growing in today’s society, this unit aims to assist students in their knowledge and understanding of the genre. It explores its history, and how the genre is displayed in literature, in popular culture, in film, and in Christian writings. It also leaves students with the question: ‘What is the future of Religious Allegory in the Twenty-First Century?’

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EL255 Fantasy and Science Fiction - The Saga Quest Continues Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). As the second unit in the study of Fantasy and Science Fiction, this unit continues the theme of the educational and social value of such of the genres as encountered in EL170 Introduction to Fantasy and Science Fiction. It helps students to evaluate the influence of particular authors and to analyse their works, both in written texts and in film, and asks the question: ‘Where do these genres go in the future?’ EL265 Adolescent Literature Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit examines the psychological and literary needs of both adolescents and young adults. It explores how fiction (particularly novels) can meet some of the needs and reflect some of the interests of young people, and provides an appreciation of what young people like, what they need, and how they can evaluate such texts. It also gives student teachers an appreciation of Christian Literature for adolescents and young adults. EL275 Women Writers Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit approaches the subject of women’s writing (and, consequently, women’s reading) from historical, literary, philosophical and theological viewpoints through an examination of the history of women writers’ struggles to gain recognition from the male literary establishment; and through an analysis of women’s writing - its genres, styles, plots, themes, characterisations. In addition, it encourages reflection on how the writing of women (and the reading of women) differs from men’s writing and reading. At the same time, the students will be expected to reflect on and discuss the dominant philosophy behind today’s women’s writing (feminism) and to speculate on the formulation of a feminine Christian literary theory. EL280 Christian Writers Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit takes the view that texts and writers are both products and shapers of the cultural milieux of their time and place. It therefore adopts an historical approach to the subject of ‘Christian Writers’, demonstrating how an historical era’s philosophies and events both shape and are shaped by significant literary texts written by particular writers. It concentrates on both the eras and the genres in which Christian literature has been written, and encourages students to discover if Christian writing is different from other literature of the same period. This should aid them in their teaching of literature in general to secondary school students. EL290 Creative Writing Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory English units (or equivalent). This unit is based on the students’ own creative writing in prose fiction, verse, and drama scripts. It provides them with the basic skills required to be creative writers by offering them an appreciation of the three literary genres, and the chance to hone their writing skills through workshop exercises, readings, and discussions. EL350 Great Books of the Western World III Prerequisites: EL140 Great Books of the Western World I; EL150 Great Books of the Western World II; 30 credit points (3 units) of advanced English units (or equivalent). This unit has, as its focus, the Great Books that have, from Classical Greece to today’s Western civilisation, both survived and adapted to changing societies and cultures. It is therefore a revisitation of the history of the Great Books of the Western World (EL140 Great Books of the Western World I and EL150 Great Books of the Western World II) but with a greater emphasis on how and why these books have been so regarded, and on what their relevance is to a post-modern society. By examining the major genres written and the major ideas adopted by Western authors, students can explore how Western literature has

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developed, and how literary criticism has changed (or not changed) the criteria for assessing the ‘greatness’ of literary texts. EL360 The Bible as Literature II Prerequisites: EL245 The Bible as Literature I; 30 credit points (3 units) of advanced English units (or equivalent). This unit pursues the same aims as EL245 The Bible as Literature I, but demands a more critical and reflective attitude to Biblical texts. By comparing the literature of the Bible in all its genres with specific English texts, it requires a far greater knowledge of English literature than does EL245, and it compels students to re-think the status of the Bible as literature or as a type of literature that is unique. EL380 Literary Criticism Prerequisite: 40 credit points (4 units) of advanced English units (or equivalent). Literary Criticism goes beyond Interpretation (finding the meaning) of literary texts to consideration of their literary value and the passing of judgment on that value. This unit investigates the historical development of literary criticism in Europe (with a particular emphasis on English Literary Criticism and on twentieth-century and twenty-first-century Literary Criticism), while examining the theories of various prominent theorists throughout the ages.

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DRAMA UNITS (All units are worth 4 U.S. credits) DM100 The Elements of Drama As an introductory unit to the Drama course, this unit helps students to understand the fundamental concepts relating to the nature and elements of drama. It introduces them to the major styles of drama and the origins of the dramatic form, while helping them to become more aware of and more competent in a range of dramatic skills, and to relate the world of drama and of the theatre to the Christian faith.

DM110 Expressive Forms I This unit emphasises the development of a range of foundational skills such as movement, breathing, and voice that are necessary for the actor. It makes the student aware of the anatomy involved in breathing and in the production and use of the voice, as well as of the impact that voice and movement can have on dramatic performance knowledge that they can communicate to their students in secondary schools. In addition, it encourages students to adopt a biblical perspective as both integrated physical human beings and as members of a team. DM120 Introduction to Dramatic Performance Practical experience in performing before a live audience is the ultimate aim of this unit. Students will be involved in the full dramatic experience from the processes and skills of dramatic production, to the experience of working under a Director, workshopping, blocking and rehearsals. DM130 The History of Drama This unit takes students through the historical periods of Western civilisation from classical Greece and Rome to the present day; and examines how the nature and conventions of the dramatic form have been depicted by dramatists throughout the ages. This is a foundational unit for students of drama who are to become teachers, providing them with knowledge of how drama has changed with civilisations and cultures. DM210 Expressive Forms II Prerequisites: DM110 Expressive Forms I; 10 credit points (1 unit) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). This unit builds on the foundational skills of DM110 Expressive Forms I by presenting the students with more probing questions and more challenging tasks over a greater range of genres and contexts. In its emphasis on the place of symbolism and ritual, it encourages them to reflect on their own religious experience. DM220 Advanced Dramatic Performance Prerequisites: DM120 Introduction to Dramatic Performance; 10 credit points (1 unit) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). This unit helps students to extend and develop the skills and experience gained in DM120 Introduction to Dramatic Performance with the added experience of working with an outside director and of expanding their experience in the aesthetic domain as well as in the practical performance domain. DM240 Drama in Film and Television Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). This unit addresses the need for students to realise the increasing importance of the interface between drama and the electronic media by providing them with knowledge of the theory and practice of the latter and the relationship between those of the former. It is 40


particularly important for student teachers to be aware of this, as the students that they will be teaching will be very much aware of the electronic media in all its forms. DM250 Drama and the Church Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). The aim of this unit is to prepare students for the production and presentation of high quality Christian drama that contains artistic integrity, thematic depth, and dramatic forms appropriate for Christian - sponsored plays, so that the message of the Gospel will appeal to a contemporary audience. The course will encourage students to reflect critically on the production of quality drama both inside and outside the Church, and will assist them to devise and produce, within a small team, their own dramatic outcomes. DM275 Costume and Design Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). The aim of this unit is that students will gain knowledge and an understanding of the design, construction, and function of costume in the theatre. They will do this, not only by means of lectures and research, but by practical application of their knowledge to a dramatic project where, in pairs, they will write a scene, design costumes suitable for it, and construct those costumes for a dramatic performance of the script that they have written. DM280 Sound and Lighting Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). This unit explores the theory of design of sound and of lighting for the theatre, and offers students the opportunity of gaining practical expertise in the collecting and the creation of data and the use of equipment suitable for the stage in both sound and lighting. DM285 Contemporary Drama Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). This unit seeks to provide a framework in order to discuss the diversity of contemporary drama. It is therefore not a chronological study of the period in relation to contemporary drama, but an examination of new forms of theatre and an exploration of new, controversial themes that cover a wide range of different cultural and traditional ideas and values. The framework offered in this unit is five-fold: political, social, popularist, global, and multicultural, and playwrights who represent some or all of these categories are studied. DM290 Australian Drama Prerequisite: 20 credit points (2 units) of introductory Drama units (or equivalent). This unit examines Australian Drama as part of the international literary, philosophical, and artistic worlds, and as a uniquely national dramatic phenomenon with its own myths and identity. The students assess the historical development and thematic content of Australian Drama through oral and written discussion of an Australian Performance, and through the acting-out of their own performances. DM380 Towards a Theology of the Arts Prerequisite: 40 credit points (4 units) of advanced Drama units (or equivalent). This unit explores the dynamic relationship between commitment to faith and commitment to art, and to develop a sound foundation for a Christian aesthetic based on a biblical perspective. _______________________________________________________________________ PLEASE CONTACT US WITH QUESTIONS: Australia Studies Centre, US office Heidi Prillwitz, Student Programs Advisor 321 Eighth Street, N.E.; Washington, D.C., 20002 USA Office: 877-946-9373 (toll free) E-mail: asc@bestsemester.com 41


Australia Studies Centre a program of the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities 322 Wecker Road, Carindale, Qld 4152 AUSTRALIA P.O. Box 2246, Mansfield BC, QLD 4122 AUSTRALIA

E-mail: asc@bestsemester.com Website: www.BestSemester.com/ASC ABN: 76 128 260 793 (CCCU-Australia Pty Limited) 42


ASC unit descriptions 2014 Update