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VOL 1. MAY 2018

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CELEBRATING ASIAN AMERICAN HERITAGE WITH ART & ACTIVISM

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COVER: PUBLIC ARTWORK, “LIMINAL SPACE” AT ROSS ALLEY CHINATOWN, SUMMER MEI-LING LEE


CCC Board of Directors Chairperson Cecilia Sze

HAPPY ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN MONTH! Dear friends, Welcome to the Asian Heritage Street Celebration. This is the first year the Chinese Culture Center (CCC) is presenting the Asian Heritage Street Celebration and we are so thrilled to participate. As part of our Building a Museum Without Walls initiative, this festival is one of many endeavors CCC is curating to activate and create community in public spaces, and inject a fresh perspective with art. In doing so, together we uplift the underserved and are a voice for equality. We invite everyone to participate and push the boundaries of the impact of our communities’ stories beyond walls and borders. As Chinatown is gearing up for Cultural District planning, we need your voice to contribute to the creativity and vibrancy of the community. We encourage you to include art in your life all year round. We look forward to meeting with everyone! Mabel S. Teng Executive Director Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco

Tamiko Wong Festival Director CCC Program Director

Vice Chairs Wai-ling Eng Sherman Tang Alfred Tom Secretary Shannon Yip Treasurer George Mak Board of Directors Daniel Cheng Ben Choi Gin Y. Ho Helen Y. H. Hui, Esq. Thomas Klitgaard, Esq. Ryan Lee Tatwina Chinn Lee Laurene McClain, Esq. Magdalen Mui Mark T. Ng Warren Seeto Minna Tao Garry K. Wong Executive Director Mabel S. Teng

ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH CHINESE CULTURE CENTER ACTIVITIES Friday, May 4, 5-8pm - Opening: Womxn, Omen, Wǒmén in Chinatown* 41 Ross Alley, San Francisco Exhibit On View through June 17 Thursday-Sunday 11am-4pm Saturday, May 5 2-4pm – “Into the Dirt, Pink” Screening 41 Ross Alley, San Francisco Sunday, May 6, 11-4pm - Asian Heritage Street Celebration* Civic Center, main stage at Larkin & McAllister Wednesday, May 16, 2018 CAAMFest at 41 Ross – Pacific Gateway: Angel Island VR 11am-4pm 41 Ross Alley, San Francisco Saturday, May 19, 12pm-3pm – Dancing on Waverly Festival* Waverly Place, between Sacramento and Clay Wednesday, May 23, 2018 CAAMFest Community Screenings – “Liminal Space/Crossings” San Francisco Public Library 100 Larkin Street San Francisco CA


XIANRUI: 1O YEARS

Left: Adrian Wong, “Dreams, Cosmology. Top: Beili Liu “Go #1” Bottom: Stella Zhang, “Things Fall Apart.”

ON VIEW NOW THROUGH AUGUST 18, 2018 CHINESE CULTURE CENTER 750 KEARNY ST., 3RD FLOOR SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94108 Chinese Culture Center (CCC) marks the Tenth Anniversary of its groundbreaking “XianRui (Fresh and Sharp)” exhibition series with a look back at the six artists whose work has been presented through this important initiative to support mid-career but under-recognized artists of Chinese descent at critical junctures in their practices. XianRui was first launched in 2008 and was one of the first initiatives to support Asian American artists. “It hadn’t been done be-

fore,” says series creator and CCC Artistic Director, Abby Chen.“And it’s surprising that there still isn’t another platform of this kind, even after ten years. Now, as we revisit these artists’ paths, we find that they have, in many ways, shifted the mainstream by gaining a foothold in the art scene for Asian American artists and adding their stories to the narrative of art history.” The group exhibition highlights the work of experimental ink painter Zheng Chongbin, mixed media and installation artists Summer Lee, Beili Liu, Adrian Wong, and Stella Zhang, and fiber artist Dora Hsiung. All six are distinguished for pushing the boundaries of various art genres and disciplines in their creative practices. “We are extremely proud to be part of their

success and trailblazing achievements,” says Mabel Teng, CCC Executive Director. “Since their solo shows at CCC, many of the “XianRui” artists have earned a great deal of critical acclaim and have become established in the art world with their work now in international exhibitions, art fairs, and public and private collections.” Since participating in “XianRui” in 2011, Bay Area-based ink painter Zheng Chongbin’s work has been collected by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, LACMA, Brooklyn Museum, and others. Zheng debuted an environmental video installation during the 2015 Venice Biennale and was selected as one of eleven highlighted artists at the Shanghai Biennale in 2016. Stella Zhang, the 2010 “XianRui” artist,has since shown at Art Basel in Hong Kong, and her work

WOMXN OMEN WǑMÉN

was featured in the “New York Times.” About “XianRui: Fresh & Sharp” XianRui (translated as “Fresh and Sharp” in Chinese) is the nation’s first initiative to feature work by pioneering mid-career artist contemporary artists of Chinese descent. A signature series launched by Artistic Director and Curator Abby Chen, it highlights under-recognized artists with a major solo exhibition.XianRuiwas launched with the support of the Phyllis Wattis Foundation, San Francisco Grants for the Arts, and San Francisco Foundation, with additional support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Exhibition partners from the past 10 years have included Red Clay Art Lovers Club, Asian Art Museum, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Asian Pacific Islander Cultural Center, and the San Francisco International Arts Festival.

我們 ON VIEW NOW THROUGH JUNE 17, 2018 41 ROSS ALLEY SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94108

Three female artists (Shisi Huang, Bijun Liang, Vida K) explore power, access, and gender equity in the San Francisco Chinatown, while connecting with women in the community. Mentored by artist and educator Laura Boles Faw, these next generation of artists share the community’s stories. Two of the artists are homegrown in San Francisco Chinatown. Site specific works include an interactive installation inspired by a Chinese wishing well, a movable chatting room sparking in-depth conversation, and multi-sites audio portraits based on storytelling workshop. Womxn, Omen, Wǒmén in Chinatown is presented by the Chinese Culture Center at 41 Ross.

brings the community’s stories to light in a one of the most visited historic alleyways in the community, across from the Golden Gate Cookie Factory. The works by the three participating artists will be presented at 41 Ross and different sites in Chinatown.

Womxn, Omen, Wǒmén in Chinatown is part of WOMEN我們, a first of its kind exhibition series to explore feminism, LGBTQ themes in contemporary Chinese art. The title, WOMEN我們, is a play on the English language word and romanized Mandarin Chinese meaning “us.” Inaugurated in Shanghai in 2011, the project traveled to San Francisco, Miami, and is making its Chinatown edition with Womxn, Omen, Wǒmén in Chinatown, curated by Ziying Duan.

在華埠 IN CHINATOWN 41 Ross is an experimental space that

性別權力符號的再創造 REIMAGINING SYMBOLS OF POWER AND ACCESS

Artists Laura Boles Faw, Bijun Liang, Shisi Huang, Vida K.


TRANSITION24

SURVIVAL ACCESS MIGRATION RESILIENCE

TRANSITION24 a story-sharing project using San Francisco’s 24 MUNI bus line to engage communities along its route in an exploration of survival, access, migration and community resilience. The project will feature a series of multi-media exhibits showcasing oral histories, photography and public archives, and will incorporate MUNI infrastructure as public installation sites.

Artists Thy Tran, Rania Ho, Bryan Wu are the team behind TRANSITION24, supported by the Kenneth Rainin Foundation. Workshop on “Survival Project” in 2017.


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Top: Winter Ball in Chinatown Center: “Peace Movements” & “Present Tense 2017” at 41 Ross Bottom: Dancing on Waverly, Gingee at Chinatown Music Fesival


Top: Xu Tan, Justin Hoover, Community Youth “Keywords” Mural Center L-R: Summer Lee, “Liminal Space,” Tanja Geis, Jonathan Wallraven Bottom: Mik Gaspay, “Sunrise”

ART WITHOUT WALLS


saturday WAVERLY PLACE, San Francisco

between Sacramento & Clay

cccsf.us / 415-986-1822

MAY

19th 12pm-4pm FREE ADMISSION

5月19日 星期六 上午12點至下午4點

免 費 入 場 PRESENTED BY :

SUPPORTED BY :


Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco cordially invites you to 53 years of Community Service

HARMONY & BLISS

“EMBRACE & EMPOWER” SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2018

HONORING

Mayor Edwin M. and Anita Lee Lifetime Achievement Award in Bridge Building

Dr. Eugene Y.C. and Anita T.H. Choi Medical Community Service and Philanthropists Lifetime Achievement Award in Community Building

Abby Chen

Curator and Artistic Director, Chinese Culture Center Visionary Leadership Award

5:30pm Cocktail Reception/Foyer Activities & 7pm Dinner and Program


LEX Lailani Africa

Trace Repeat

Wynnstar

Rosendale

Chalo Let’s Dance

Ishtar-Lhotus of Soul Synergy ARTventures

Performance Schedule EMCEES

Ryan Takemiya is a community organizer, speaker, writer, and event producer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. In 2009, he created Rama (www.gostudiorama.com), a Bay Area-based, Asian American arts and entertainment organization dedicated to the creation of a new Pan Asian arts movement. As the Executive Director of Rama, Ryan produces large-scale concerts, festivals, performances, and other events featuring the best independent Asian American talent the Bay Area has to offer. Born and raised in Berkeley, CA, Ryan is a proud 4th generation Californian of Japanese and Chinese descent. Betty Yu joined KPIX 5 in November 2013 as a general assignment reporter. She spent two years at WTVJ, the NBC-owned station in Miami, as a reporter before moving to San Francisco. Prior to that, she was an anchor and reporter for News 12 The Bronx and Brooklyn, a 24-hour cable news station, for four years. She

PERFORMERS

covered New York City crime, politics, sports, and severe weather. In 2012, Betty was honored as anchor on the “Best Single Newscast” from the New York Press Club. A Bay Area native, Betty graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with degrees in political science and rhetoric. She also has a Master of Science degree in journalism from Columbia University. Stephen Chun is currently a Traffic Producer at iHeart Radio including a reporter for Bloomberg Radio, KQED, and KBSW Action News 8 Central Coast. Off air, Stephen is a personal trainer and serves on the alumni board for George Washington High School mentoring students to become future broadcasters. As an active member in the API community, Stephen is the Event Director for L.A. based short films festival, Asians on Film, mentors for AAJA (Asian American Journalists Association), and hosts for the SF CNY Parade, Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival, and J-Pop Summit Festival just to name a few.

Trace Repeat is an Oakland based eight-piece soul and funk band. They believe in reviving the aesthetics of their Motown forefathers, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and the tempting Temptations. Huffpost says if you don’t feel Trace Repeat’s funky groove, check your pulse! http://facebook.com/TraceRepeat Katherine Park is an actor and singer based in Alameda, CA. She made her theater debut as Jeung Ying in the world premiere of the play Broken Blossoms by Eddie Wong, produced by Chinese Historical Society of America, and has acted in over 40 indie films. She is known for her angelic voice and her dedication to the arts. Please follow her on twitter @KATHERINEPARK (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) Tamiko and the Naughty Potatoes Since a chance meeting at a cafe, singer-songwriter Tamiko Wong became part of the group that is now known as “Tamiko and the Naughty Potatoes.” Already popular at various venues in San Francisco’s Chinatown and Japantown,

they perform at open mics, sing-alongs, and community events. Drawing on Chinese, Japanese, Latin American, and California traditions, they offer a musical program that reflects America today. https://www.facebook.com/ tamikospotatoes/ Wynnstar is an agency of Youth performers who goes around the BayArea to showcase their talents such as a variety of singing and intro/finale of great hip hop dancing. https:// www.facebook.com/wynnstarprod/ Lailani Africa is a singer-songwriter from the San Francisco Bay Area. She has been creating songs since the age of 13. Her involvement in open mic, local shows and nonprofit foundations through the years have shown her the power of arts, collaboration and community involvement. Find reviews, event coverage, music and fun at lailaniafrica.com. You can also find her in Eastridge Center’s Video Series, Inner Circle and

Tam


Asian Heritage Street Festival Performance Schedule 11am - 2pm Opening Ceremony Blessing, Wat Buddhapradeep National Anthem by Katherine Park Faces of Asia Cultural Procession & Awards

miko and the Naughty Potatoes:

World Team USA, Thai Dance Mari Tsukino, Cosplay Tsukino Mari

Trace Repeat, Funk Soul Band Chalo Let’s Dance Katherine Park Ushanjali School of Dance American Chinese Cultural and Art Association, Qi Pao

2pm - 4pm

Katherine Park

Tamiko and the Naughty Potatoes Wynnstar Talent Agency Ishtar-Lhotus LEX the Lexicon Artist Lailani Africa Rosendale

* Please note that the performance times may change throughout the day.

Ryan Takemiya

as the Social Media Host of Sunday Sessions on Insta Story! Instagram.com/lailaniafrica World Team USA A traditional Thai dance group from Eastern Thailand. They will perform Ra Bome Sri Su Kwan, a Thai traditional dance to wish good luck to people. Based on the Thai belief of having good spirit inside people’s entire body which affects people’s thinking and body health. Tsukino Mari (San Francisco Japantown Sailor Moon) is a singer and performer best known for her down to earth and bubbly personality. Mari may look familiar as she has appeared on American, Mexican, and Japanese TV and media. Today she hopes to brighten your day. Instagram:tsukinomari Rosendale is an Asian American singer and songwriter from the Bay Area. Now based in San Francisco, he balances a life of writing, recording, and performing music. His popular

Betty Yu acoustic covers on YouTube led him to opportunities for EDM vocal work in 2015; his progressive house and future bass collaborations are now featured on large indie labels such as Revealed, Sensual Musique, and Taz Network. His voice, songs, and artistry have helped him garner more than 60,000 subscribers and thousands of views on his YouTube channel (@ RosendaleSings). Chalo Let’s Dance Award-winning professional Indian dance company founded in 2016 based in Berkeley. The company performs monthly for private and public functions. Judy Huang, the founder, is known for her energetic, fun bollywood and Bhangra dance performance. So, Chalo (come and) let’s dance! #chaloletsdance LEX the Lexicon Artist is Taipei-raised, Oakland-based entertainer Alex Sun Liu. Inspired by off-the-wall internet rappers, LEX combines frank storytelling, sharp commentary, and a comically huge ego to deliver the unique per-

Stephen Chun spective of a weird Asian nerd in America. LEX invokes early 2000’s hip-hop swagger, nerdy charisma, viral pop sensibility, internet rapper antics, and unrestrained live show energy - all to tell the most irreverent stories possible. LEX has performed at variety shows, festivals, and conventions such as Oakland’s Tourettes Without Regrets and Eastlake Music Festival, San Francisco’s United States of Asian America Festival (USAAF), Seattle’s Emerald City Comic Con, and Austin’s Nerdcore Dayz showcases at SXSW. Ishtar-Lhotus of Soul Synergy ARTventures is a multimedia, interdisciplinary artist and performer. Influenced by an extremely eclectic life journey, her work celebrates and reflects a wide spectrum of creative expression that is ultimately universal at the core. She loves to combine dance, singer/songwriting, keyboards/ percussion, poetry, video and visual arts. She has been featured as a soloist and ensemble artist since her youth. www.facebook.com/ IshtarLhotus www.youtube.com/IshtarLhotus

Gee Yung Lion Dance Association Monks, Thai Temple Wat Buddhapradeep in San Bruno The Wat Buddhapradeep Thai Cultural Center and Temple is a place for both Buddhist and non-Buddhist who have an interest in Thai culture to meet and explore. It offers classes and workshops on subjects such as traditional Thai dancing and Buddhist studies. http://www.buddhapradeep.org


The Sunken Place and the Model Minority Myth

By R. K. Guha

I sometimes wish I could go back in time and be my own guardian angel. I would reach down into that dark place of the Model Minority Myth and pull the younger me out. I would tell myself, “Baby, you got this. The best thing you can do is to ignore these goras.” *** 2017’s Get Out is uniquely about the Black experience in America. Everything from standyour-ground, to backyard auctions, to the performances of white liberal guilt by Rose’s family and friends are authored from real life experience; this is no more true than with the construction of the Sunken Place, which serves as a metaphor for Black helplessness in the face of white supremacy. As an Indian-American watching Get Out, I knew there was something about the Sunken Place that felt analogous to my own experiences growing up in America. I recalled a similar “expectation” to acquiesce to whiteness, and the tool used to keep people like me subservient: The Model Minority Myth. Like the Sunken Place, the Myth is about white control over Asian Americans. As with racism of any kind, it is about shifting goal posts and double standards. I sometimes wish I could go back in time and be my own guardian angel. I would reach down into that dark place of the Model Minority Myth and pull the younger me out. I would tell myself, “Baby, you got this. The best thing you can do is to ignore these goras.” *** I sometimes wish I could go back in time and be my own guardian angel. I would reach down into that dark place of the Model Minority Myth and pull the younger me out. I would tell myself, “Baby, you got this. The best thing you can do is to ignore these goras.” *** 2017’s Get Out is uniquely about the Black experience in America. Everything from stand-yourground, to backyard auctions, to the performances of white liberal guilt by Rose’s family and friends are authored from real life experience; this is no more true than with the construction of the Sunken Place, which serves as a metaphor for Black helplessness in the face of white supremacy.As an Indian-American watching Get Out, I knew there was something about the Sunken Place that felt analogous to my own experiences growing up in America. I recalled a similar “expectation” to acquiesce to whiteness, and the tool used to keep people like me subservient: The Model Minority Myth. Like the Sunk

en Place, the Myth is about white control over Asian Americans. As with racism of any kind, it is about shifting goal posts and double standards. For me, the conditioning of the Myth began in grade school: teachers offering unsolicited opinions about spices and the cleanliness of India; and, white students performing their best Apu Nahasapeemapetilon impression as a facsimile for all South Asian culture–all this,

while kids like me are expected to remain quiet, to absorb these microaggressions, and to not raise a fuss. Kids will be kids, after all. The Myth was reinforced at home, too, where the expectation was to focus only on homework, placing into AP classes, and getting into a good college. I was to do all of this, of course, while never spouting a cuss word, never getting into a fight, and never creating a scene. I remember the whistling of the pressure cooker when my mom would simmer a lamb curry; unlike that pressure cooker though, I never got a chance to release that anxiety. In undergrad, I remember going on a date with a gora who remarked, “I’ve never kissed an Indian guy before,” and later in life, finding so many men on the grid of every dating app who only called for “whites only”. I remember the magazines that didn’t hire me because of my name or because I looked that much more different than the sea of faces in their cube farms. I remember watching white coworkers coast by on mediocrity and get rewarded. I remember being told to try harder, only to reap sim-ilar rewards even when I outperformed them. As I write these words, I smirk. Of course, for folks like me, all it takes is one white person to pull the lever to activate the trapdoor beneath our feet, and lo! we are suspended in space, our velocity mercy to the agenda of a diminishing status quo, struggling to regain momentum. It is certainly not the Sunken Place, but it is a place akin to such a place. The Myth was reinforced at home, too, where the expectation was to focus only on homework, The Myth was reinforced at home, too, where the expectation was to focus only on homework, placing into AP classes, and getting into a good college. I was to do all of this, of course, while never spouting a cuss word, never getting into a fight, and never creating a scene. I remember the whis tling of the pressure cooker when my mom would simmer a lamb curry; unlike that pressure cooker though, I never got a chance to release that anxiety. In undergrad, I remember going on a date with a gora who remarked, “I’ve never kissed an Indian guy before,” and later in life, finding so many men on the grid of every dating app who only called for “whites only”. I remember the magazines that didn’t hire me because of my name or because I looked that much more different than the sea of faces in their cube farms. I remember watching white coworkers coast by on mediocrity and get rewarded. I remember being told to try harder, only to reap similar rewards even when I outperformed them. As I write these words, I smirk. Of course, for folks like me, all it takes is one white person to pull the lever to activate the trapdoor beneath our feet, and lo! we are suspended in space, our velocity mercy to the agenda of a diminishing status quo, struggling to regain momentum. It is certainly not the Sunken Place, but it is a place akin to

such a place. where the expectation was to focus only on homework, placing into AP classes, and getting into a good college. I was to do all of this, of course, while never spouting a cuss word, never getting into a fight, and never creating a scene. I remember the whistling of the pressure cooker when my mom would simmer a lamb curry; unlike that pressure cooker though, I never got a chance to release that anxiety. In undergrad, I remember going on a date with a gora who remarked, “I’ve never kissed an Indian guy before,” and later in life, finding so many men on the grid of everydating app who only called for “whites only”. I remember the magazines that didn’t hire me because of my name or because I looked that much more different than the sea of faces in their cube farms. I remember watching white coworkers coast by on mediocrity and get rewarded. I remember being told to try harder, only to reap similar rewards even when I outperformed them. As I write these words, I smirk. Of course, for folks like me, all it takes is one white person to pull the lever to activate the trapdoor beneath our feet, and lo! we are suspended in space, our velocity mercy to the agenda of a diminishing status quo, struggling to regain momentum. It is certainly not the Sunken Place, but it is a place akin to such a place. I was told by my parents to remain quiet, study hard, do well in school, and get a job that lets us continue the tradition of upper-middle class privilege into which we were born. It’s a won derful trap that promises the illusion of reward: Work super-hard and get a respectable amount of money. I get why the generation before mineplayed by these rules. Immigrating to the U.S. meant tolerating systematic abuse and shrugging off microaggressions from white people. After all, being new to a country that is already predisposed to hating outsiders who don’t look or sound like the status quo means quickly learning how to best toe the party line and how to minimize the ripples created. This cycle, unfortunately, doesn’t leave room to interrogate inequities. Fundamentally, people like me are expected to anglicize our names, adopt American attitudes, and deliver a work ethic inconsistent with the status quo, for a fraction of the pay. *** I don’t begrudge immigrants who followed this paradigm in order to build a better life for their family and raise kids in a society that’s just a little less disjointed than the motherland’s. They saw that they had two options: Stay in a land where opportunities for future generations seemed finite if unstable; or, roll the dice and gamble on the so-called promised land. Yet, I challenge these parents’ desire for their children, born as American citizens, to comply with this rubric of subservience. If you raise us with the intention of leading lives better than yours, you should expect–no, demand–that we will grow up to fight for equitable and fair treatment at all costs, so that the generation after us is playing a


less rigged version of the game that us and you had to.I was taught to be to be quiet and play by the rules. Speaking up could cause trouble and trouble would be inconvenient. As a meek Indian-American kid, I would grow up to be a meek Indian-American teenager, which would obviously lead me being to the kind of university student who would be quick to find the boundaries of acceptable and be eager to please; thisthen led to me being the kind of entry-level employee who would be quiet about workplace abuses, racist language, and negotiating for higher pay. A rallying cry left over from the generation before mine: Always remember to please the sahibs, and don’t do anything to upset them! Placating the sahibs means tolerating and getting used to microaggressions and abuse in common settings, and doing what you need to in order to preserve yourself andyour livelihood — all without rocking the boat. I see so many of my beautiful Indian peers resisting the model minority trap: They see the shiny lure, the trigger and they steer clear of it. Instead, they make noise about it, and about the possible perpetrators trying to pull one of ours in. I therefore light a votive candle and offer a mo ment of silence, for Piyush Jindal, Nimrata Randhawa, Ajit Pai, Raj Shah, and so many others we have seen fall into the Model Minority trap. They saw the shiny lure – political power – and continue to sink. I don’t know if I would use the word embarrassment to describe how I feel seeing them kowtow to a political party that is proud about its racist and xenophobic hopes; if anything, I am sad. I am sad because just as the next generation of Indian-Americans are out there advocating for immigration and openness, we have lost a few of our own – and they’re so far down there, they can’t even hear us screaming out

to them, asking them to find their ways back to us. I get it. Appease the sahib and you’ll find power. The premise that non-white men and women like us are not capable of deriving power from our own greatness feels foolish. More foolish, though, is the suggestion that we must lean on proximity to whiteness to create power. This kind of power is fickle. This kind of power comes with footnotes and conditions. This kind of power can be taken away at any moment. Feel pity for people like Pai, Shah, and Randhawa: they may not have understood the terms and conditions of their power completely. They are, ultimately, nothing but modern day equivalents of the Indians who served at the leisure of British colonialists in pre-Partition India. *** My mom and I were watching the Oscars this year and Taraji P. Henson appeared on stage to introduce Mary J. Blige; it was a loving introduction, and you could see Henson exuding pride for Blige’s appearance on the Oscar stage. I turned to my mom and I asked, “Why are Indians not this good at lifting one another up and celebrating each other’s successes in front of white people?” This act of uplifting is what earned, self-contained power looks like. It is unencumbered by whiteness. It is why when we consider the Sunken Place, we must consider Wakanda, too. Black Panther – the film that spawned the wonderful world of Wakanda – offers lessons for Indians. Wakanda envisions what a world for Black people would look like without colonial poaching. For this reason, the make-believe nation is beautiful; it imagines a world where the law leads with love and equality The construct of Wakanda is only threatened when external American influence comes to exploit its

resources for increased global power and revenge. I consider what this means for people in my community. The allegory of colonialism is not subtle in the film–and the scars of colonization are felt not only by those living in the motherland, but by all members of the diaspora. This hits a nerve close to me. I sometimes wonder what an India that never ended up under British rule would look like. *** Our proximity to the Sunken Place is a curious thing: Every generation since the Partition still wears the scars of British colonial rule. These scars have trained us to exalt whiteness above brownness and to encourage the mimicry of Western culture. Every new generation inherits these scars, even as I hope that someday that might fade from our skin. The allure of the Model Minority Myth remains far too strong. We all hear its twisted siren song. Some of us are even so captivated by its call that we slip and fall and disappear away. While we might light candles for those who are lost, we know there won’t be any bringing them back. For the rest of us, it’s time to turn away from siren song. I believe we must learn to celebrate one another and to start reclaiming our identity. We must keep the so-difficult-to-pronounce-them-your-white-colleagues-struggle-to-say-it names our parents gave us. We must be aggressive when we lobby for that promotion. We must demand the best; then we must pull out a seat out at that damned table for the next person who reminds us of what we have just endured. R.K. Guha is a writer living in the suburbs just north of Detroit. He remains hard at work on a book of essays and tends to plants in his spare time. He is also an editor of The Aerogram.

Photo Credit : The Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus(CAPAC)


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A Make-Believe Nation Craig Santos Perez

by BRYAN THAO WORRA

Pike Place Ravi Shankar

Under a gray fine as sand grains Puget Sound sounds astound no one for the crowd is pressed to the plastic gills of a fish stall, rapt at sinewy young mongers tossing carp, filleting them with an efficiency of motion, doling out coral nubs of salmon jerky to a sea of flailing hands, wisecracking the entire time, minor stars in their own minds. Throughout labyrinthine arcades in Seattle’s oldest market, edibles are treated like art objects: rows of mussels iridescent in ice,

collar, top hat in hand, circa 1930s, a decade before Pearl Harbor; then I realize why. He would sign Executive Order 9066, that World War II policy leading to the internment of a hundred thousand JapaneseAmericans, many of whom owned fish stalls in this very market & were ordered by decree to sell their land to middlemen for a fraction of their worth. Families brush past me, the snap and pop of full grocery

bell peppers near neon spilling carefully over wooden bushels, uncapped jars of jalapeno jam

sacks and yipping poodles scored by a blues riff some distant street musician I cannot see wails on a sax. Outside, below the market, ferries stream in and out of Elliot Bay, trim, white, heavily-manned vessels

framed by sprigs of rosemary. Randomly, FDR comes to mind, in an evening overcoat with velvet

surrounded by swooping, swiveling gulls that mooch whatever they can. I haven’t seen a single Asian all day.

Honolulu, Hawaiʻi I drive through the industrial neighborhood: ocean blue tarps and colorful tents cluster like a coral reef amongst a shipwreck of shopping carts and bikes. This encampment is one of many across Hawaiʻi, the state with the highest homeless rate in the nation. So many islanders barely surviving beyond the frame of a tourist postcard. So many families bankrupted by the high cost of living in “paradise.” I park in the nearby lot of the Children’s Discovery Center, then unbuckle my daughter from her carseat. After I pay the admission fees, she pulls me by the hand to her favorite area: a make-believe town with a post office, clinic, library, theater, television studio, grocery store, and classroom. As she plays, I make-believe a nation where all of this is a pure public good, non-rivalrous and non-excludable. A nation where housing, good government, and bread are no longer privatized. A nation divested from the public harms of border walls and military weapons. When she tires, we return to our car. I drive, more slowly, through the encampment. Soon, without warning, real bulldozers, dump trucks, cops, and state workers will enforce laws that ban sitting and lying in public spaces. They will sweep these makeshift homes and vulnerable citizens off the sidewalk, where a girl is now playing in an inflatable, plastic pool, surrounded by her parents. She looks the same age as my daughter, who has fallen asleep in her carseat, as I dream of a future common wealth.

Ode to Mother’s Sarong Sokunthary Svay Refugee wallpaper for family portraits a knotted baby carrier on mother’s back monsoon covering black and blue night tapestry midnight inquiries unwrapped questions to be encased covered coveted

a heart-wrap rice field shawl Mekong towel black hair threads cross blue rivers cover of ocean and kmao between thighs in jungle flight this mother-landing carried my brother and monsoon rains across infinite jungle


Do you know? More than 300 million people worldwide are living with chronic hepatitis B or C infection, making viral hepatitis many times more common than HIV. Chronic infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses can lead to serious and life-threatening liver damage, including liver cirrhosis (scarring), liver cancer and the need for liver transplantation. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is especially common in China and other Asian countries where infant immunization for the disease is not yet routine. HBV is second only to tobacco as a cancer-causing agent. Many people with viral hepatitis have not been diagnosed, and the vast majority has not received medical treatment for the disease. SF Hep B Free strongly encourages you to see your own doctor to get tested for hepatitis B so that she or he can monitor your health. San Francisco Hep B Free - Bay Area is a citywide campaign to turn San Francisco into the first hepatitis B free city in the nation. This unprecedented campaign will provide free and low-cost hepatitis B testing and vaccinations to Asian and Pacific Islander (API) adults at locations throughout San Francisco. The three objectives of the SF Hep B Free campaign are: • To create public and healthcare provider awareness about the importance of testing & vaccinating APIs for hepatitis B. • To promote routine hepatitis B testing and vaccination within the primary care medical community. • To ensure access to treatment for chronically infected individuals.


CALIFORNIA 加州尋根之旅 ROOTS EXCURSIONS Discover the Untold Stories of California

Weaverville Visit Weaverville, the site of one of the most remote California Chinatowns, established by goldminers, laborers, and Chinese immigrants over 150 years ago. When: Saturday & Sunday, June 2 and 3 Tickets: $300 (includes transportation, accommodations for double occupancy, and tour) Inquire for pricing on single room bookings 参观威弗维尔,是150多年前由金礦工人和勞工建立最有歷 史性的華埠之一。 時間: 周六和周日,6月2日和3日 票價: $300 (包括交通和住宿) (不包括餐費) 查詢單人間預訂的價格。

SPOTS ARE VERY POPULAR

SIGN UP TODAY!

熱門席位 趕緊預定

Book online 網上預訂: tour.cccsf.us darin@cccsf.us 415-986-1822


ART ACTIVITIES Leland Wong Live Art Demo

Leland Wong’s art has been part of the Bay area’s Asian American community for more than thirty-seven years. Born in 1952, he grew up in San Francisco’s Chinatown, surrounded by art goods and curios sold in his family’s business on Grant Avenue. His father, Fueng Wah Wong’s longstanding interest in art greatly influenced Leland Wong, so that by the age of fourteen, he already sought to become an artist. Actively involved with print making and photography since high school, Wong first began designing posters and handbills for street fairs and local Chinese community events. These emerging interests led to his enrollment in San Francisco State University, where he earned a BFA in 1975. During the 1970s, he also became involved with Kearny Street Workshop, a Chinatown/ Manilatown community art group, where he produced posters and conducted workshops in screen printing and photography. Wong designed his first Nihonmachi Street Fair poster at Kearny Street in 1974, inaugurating a highly popular series that has continued for nearly three decades, while simultaneously working on projects with various community service organizations. He remains active in the community as an artist, screen printer and photographer. Leland Wong’s prints and photography have been widely published and exhibited in both national and regional venues. Among them are: The Corcoran Gallery (Washington, D.C.), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Oakland Museum, the de Young Museum, Children’s Art Museum (Oakland), National Japanese American Historical Society, Asian Resource Gallery, Chinatown Community Arts Gallery, SOMARTS Gallery, and Chinese Culture Center.

Asian Art Museum

Asian Art Museum joins in Celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage Month with a free, museum-wide celebration featuring an artist’s talk, kids’ tours, art-making and more. Choreographer and Flyaway Productions founding artistic director Jo Kreiter, and composer-performer Van-Anh Vo, talk about their upcoming project, Tender. An apparatus-based, off-the-ground dance on the facade of the Tenderloin’s Cadillac Hotel, Tender interweaves excerpts of interviews from members of the Tenderloin-based Vietnamese community into the performance. Short samples of the music will be interspersed with the talk. Current Exhibition: Divine Bodies Bringing historical paintings and sculptures from mainly Hindu and Buddhist traditions together with contemporary photo-based work, Divine Bodies invites you to ponder the power of transformation, the possibility of transcendence and the relationship of the body to the cosmos. POP-UP MEDITATION: BODY AWARENESS Workshops & Activities, and part of Divine Bodies Programs, PopUp Meditation

Artist Spotlight: Sketchpad Gallery

Sketchpad is a gallery based in the heart of San Francisco specializing in contemporary and entertainment illustration. The vision for Sketchpad is to highlight both local illustrators and the craftspeople behind film and video game’s most enduring works. For the festival, Sketchpad has fun and whimsical artwork and affordable prints that highlight the vibrant local arts scene. An audience favorite, Sketchpad was featured in the CCC Design Store “Dogs, Dogs, Dogs: A Lunar New Year Pop-up” earlier in 2018 with dog themed artwork that delighted viewers. Sketchpad will be in all upcoming festivals for “Dancing on Waverly” and “Chinatown at Twilight” with different variety of artists throughout the year. Check out the CCC “Building a Museum Without Walls” Calendar for more Sketchpad!


THANK YOU! The Team

Al Perez, Poster Concept & Design Albert Chan, Volunteer Coordination Ben Mok, VIP Hospitality Christine Padilla, Social Media Crystal Lee, Faces of Asia Procession Darin Ow-Wing, Stage Manager, Art Making Eddie Lee, Design Frances Kai-Hwa Wang, Newspaper Content Editor Hoi Leung, Art Show Jenny Leung, Communications Joy Kim, Outreach & Design Leland Wong, Live Art Demonstration Matt Koehler, Art Show May Leong, VIP Hospitality Nathaniel Jue, E-Newsletter Pam Mei Harrison, Communications Pearl Wong, Art Making Peter Jew, Photography Samantha Chundur, Art Show Tamiko Wong, Festival Director Tim Wong, Website Wizard Stephen Chun, MC Ryan Takemiya, MC Betty Yu, MC Angela Pang, Faces of Asia Judge Bill Barnickel, Faces of Asia Judge Simon Sin, Faces of Asia Judge Performers American Chinese Cultural and Art Association, Qi Pao Chalo Let’s Dance Faces of Asia Cultural Procession & Awards Ishtar-Lhotus Katherine Park Lailani Africa LEX the Lexicon Artist Mari Tsukino, Cosplay Rosendale Tamiko and the Naughty Potatoes Trace Repeat, Funk Soul Band Ushanjali School of Dance Wat Buddhapradeep World Team USA, Thai Dance Wynnstar Talent Agency

Volunteers Aaron Lum Allen Leong Annie Dare Don Huey Evan Shi Francis Ng Grace-Sonia Melanio Jasmine Herrera Jason Nou Jeffrey Chan Karina Rosales Katy Lee Kenneth Dare Kimberly Young Lorelisse Lara Michael Jeong Michael Liang Mikayla Yee Mitchell Gongie Mitchell Bonner Paul Eng Remy Pfran Simon Kong Terry Lee Tina Hsu Vera Wong William Lee Xiaoxiao Bao In-Kind Donors Cova Hotel Lien Nguyen, Insurance and Financial Services, Miss and Mrs VietNam International of San Francisco, USA Sno-Crave Tea House SF Socola Chocolatier and Barista Tamiko Wong

San Francisco Board of Supervisors


EXPLORE CHINATOWN SEE CONTEMPORARY ART JOIN EXCURSIONS CELEBRATE AT FESTIVALS

@CCCSANFRANCISCO CCCSF.US 750 KEARNY 3RD FL

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Asian Heritage Street Celebration Newspaper  

Cover: Public Artwork, "Liminal Space" at Ross Alley Chinatown, Summer Mei-Ling Lee

Asian Heritage Street Celebration Newspaper  

Cover: Public Artwork, "Liminal Space" at Ross Alley Chinatown, Summer Mei-Ling Lee

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