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commonwealth catholic charities | annual report | 2019

We see the power of hope every day


This is the day the Lord has made. We will rejoice and be glad in it. Psalm 118:24

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here is a rhythm at Commonwealth Catholic Charities where simple but meaningful acts of compassionate service bring new hope to those we encounter. A kind voice and encouraging word for a lonely senior, guidance and support for a pregnant mom, the promise of a family for an adoptive couple, a welcoming hand for migrants and refugees, a bag of groceries, safety and security for a neglected child, stable housing after years living on the street—all instill hope for the days to come. Every day is a day to rejoice when we meet the needs of our brothers and sisters. CCC supports the Church’s mission of being the hands and feet of Christ, our Savior, pouring ourselves in service to our neighbors. The days of 2019 were spent impacting the lives of over 47,000 individuals across the Catholic Diocese of Richmond. Each individual served is an encounter with Christ, reflecting rays of hope in which we rejoice every day. With your continued prayers and support for our mission, we will continue each day in joyful service to the most vulnerable across our Diocese.

Most Rev. Barry C. Knestout, D.D. Bishop of Richmond

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Jason “Jay” Brown Chief Executive Officer


“If we live the faith in our daily life then our work too becomes the chance to spread the joy of being a Christian." Pope Francis

Mission

To provide quality compassionate human services to all people, especially the most vulnerable, regardless of faith.

Vision We envision a world where poverty is alleviated, people of all races and faith are treated with respect, and all are inspired to serve.

Values

Fait h , Life, Family, Diversit y, C ommunit y, and Accessi bilit y

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS Executive Committee Cliona Mary Robb, Chair Paul Sinclair Susan Schneider David Whitehead Gerald Brittle, Richmond Advisory, Chair Charles G. Marlowe, Roanoke Advisory, Chair Mary Margaret Kastelberg, Past Chair

Commonwealth Catholic Charities Rev. Shay W. Auerbach, S.J. Colleen Berry Joseph Boisineau Gerald Brittle Damien Cabezas Francis H. (Chip) Casola James J. DePasquale Randal (Randy) J. Gatzke Patrick F. Heinen Melanie L. Jorgensen

Mary Margaret Kastelberg, Past Chair Tulinh Le Nickola (Nick) Lucas Lynnleigh Maloney Charles (Chuck) G. Marlowe Kathleen (Kate) M. McCauley Michael Metzger Monica B. Molony Kathleen (Kathy) Mortensen Francis Nelson, Jr.

Cliona Mary Robb, Chair Susan Schneider, Treasurer Paul Sinclair, Vice Chair Kelly Stuart David Whitehead, Secretary Jay Brown

Commonwealth Human Services Foundation Carey Bliley Robert C. Courain, Jr. Evan Lamont Curbeam John G. Dane Lloyd C. Dunnavant

Housing Corporation Rosann Bocciarelli Joseph Boisineau, Vice Chair James P. Carreras Jim DePasquale, Secretary

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Ellen Gortler Louise Hartz Scott Horchler, Treasurer Kathleen (Kathy) Mortensen, Chair J. Kevin Muldowney, Secretary

Scott Horchler, Treasurer Paul Sinclair, Chair Lucia Anna (Pia) Trigiani Jay Brown

Samuel Patterson, III John Puccinelli, Vice Chair Cliona Mary Robb Christine N. Thomas Dianne Thompson


“I can’t believe how fortunate I am to witness the way CCC absolutely thrives in achieving its mission to serve our most vulnerable neighbors. Even under stress, CCC continues to shine. There are a lot of challenges in the year ahead, and I draw great comfort from the sheer competence and unwavering compassion of the CCC staff.” Cliona Mary Robb Chair, CCC Board of Directors

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SERVING THE MOST VULNERABLE THROUGHOUT THE COMMONWEALTH

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A


AT A GLANCE | CLIENTS SERVED IN 2019

5,000

317

friendly phone calls made to lonely and isolated seniors

158

886 375

women received pregnancy counseling

children in foster care placed in loving homes

80

infants and children found forever families through adoption

100 %

satisfaction with services reported by foster youth, parents, and partners

53

children and their families received critical post-adoption support

group therapy participants

people engaged in individual & family therapy

122

individuals with developmental disabilities received case management and access to services

129

vulnerable adults received guardianship services

171

bags of produce delivered to homebound seniors

102

seniors received phone calls and visits to avoid social isolation

4,646

people assisted through interpreter services

1,086

refugee & immigrant children were guided through the public school system with school liaisons

856

people received legal assistance through immigration services

438

refugees found jobs through CCC’s employment services

276

adults & children were resettled through refugee resettlement

199

refugees and immigrants participated in English language classes

12,058

bags of food distributed in Richmond and Roanoke

5,949

individuals were assisted by Roanoke’s St. Francis House Food Pantry

1,825

individuals were assisted by Richmond’s Dibert Food Pantry

334

adults benefited from housing counseling

276 people received budgeting and credit repair resources

79

clients received job skills training and/or job placement

2,827 individuals connected to housing or diverted from homelessness

324

individuals experiencing homelessness were assisted through street outreach

309

families assisted with housing

104

clients transitioned from homelessness to stable housing

69 clients with disabilities received long-term housing support 7


CHILDREN’S SERVICES

Love Every Day

F

rom the moment that Billy and Laura Marshall learned about Asa, a little boy living in an orphanage in China, they knew they were meant to be a family. When the Marshalls first saw a photo of Asa, they were shocked to learn that the baby they thought was nine-months-old was actually three. Asa had been severely neglected and was dangerously malnourished. From the time he entered the orphanage, Asa had been left in a crib all day, received no nurturing, stimulation, or affection. Diagnosed with Down Syndrome, Asa had been left to die. At three-years-old, Asa weighed just 12 pounds. He couldn’t hold his head up, couldn’t sit up without help, and wouldn’t eat. He never talked or babbled. He didn’t play with toys. He just laid on his back, staring at the ceiling. Just six months after being welcomed into his forever home, Asa’s weight nearly doubled and he had grown six inches. He was eating and could even hold a spoon and feed himself. Asa just celebrated his fourth birthday and is now a thriving, growing, happy little boy, surrounded by the love of his family every day. 8

Three-year-old Asa at the time of his adoption

Asa is now happy, thriving, and showered with love by his forever family.


Adoption | Foster Care | Pregnancy Counseling | Baby Clothes Closet

EXPENSES Children’s Services

$5,612,149

40%

317

women received pregnancy counseling

158

children in foster care placed in loving homes

80

infants and children found forever families through adoption

100 %

satisfaction with services reported by foster youth, parents, and partners

53

children and their families received critical post-adoption support 9


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH & DISABILITY SERVICES

Advocacy Every Day

F

or three years, John lived with severe cataracts in both eyes. John, 71, has one adult child but they rarely see each other and have very limited contact. Because of his poor eyesight and other health issues, John lives in a congregate living facility and attends a day support program. CCC's Guardianship Services provide John with critical assistance in managing his medical and legal affairs. "The cataracts severely impacted his life activities," said Guardianship Specialist, Monika Huddleston-Elrod. In order to provide medical consent to a client, a guardianship specialist goes to medical appointments, speaks to the medical team, and investigates the risks and benefits associated with the procedure to make a decision that is in the best interest of the client. "I was able to provide consent to have the cataracts removed," said Huddleston-Elrod. "John can now perform more activities independently— some things that many of us take for granted like getting in and out of a vehicle, buttoning and zipping clothes, being able to read, and simply opening a door on his own. He is also very happy to be able to play his bongo drums again!"

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Counseling | Guardianship | DD Waiver | Independence for Seniors EXPENSES Behavioral Health & Disability Services

$1,397,111

10%

5,000

friendly phone calls made to lonely and isolated seniors

886 375

group therapy participants

people engaged in individual & family therapy

122

individuals with developmental disabilities received case management and access to services

129

vulnerable adults received guardianship services

171

bags of produce delivered to homebound seniors

102

seniors received phone calls and visits to avoid social isolation 11


RESETTLEMENT & IMMIGRATION SERVICES

Hope Every Day

I

n her home country of Iraq, Amina lived with her husband and sons. Tragedy struck the family when her husband was killed during the fighting between the Sunni and Shiite sects. Devastated, she and her sons moved in with family for a time but soon had to flee to Syria. The war and violence in Syria became worse and she once again fled for her life—this time to Malaysia.

Finally, in 2015, she and her children came to the United States, where CCC helped them settle them into a small apartment. Amina attended CCC’s ESL class and worked hard to get her driver’s license. She found a job in housekeeping with hours that allow her to be home with her children in the afternoons and evenings. Amina was recently promoted to supervisor and purchased her first home. Her children are now in middle and high school and thriving in America. They plan to attend college when they’re older. This year, Amina will apply for U.S. citizenship and hopes to be able to travel to visit her brother. “Amina and her children have been through so much," said Amar Bhattarai, Director of Refugee Resettlement. "Through it all, they have shown extraordinary strength and never lost their hope for a new start and a new life."

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Resettlement | Immigration Legal Services | Interpreter Services

EXPENSES Refugee and Immigration Services

$2,096,414

15%

4,646

people assisted through interpreter services

1,086

refugee & immigrant children were guided through the public school system with school liaisons

856

people received legal assistance through immigration services

438

refugees found jobs through CCC’s employment services

276

adults & children were resettled through refugee resettlement

199

refugees and immigrants participated in English language classes 13


INCOME & ASSET-BUILDING SERVICES

Opening Doors Every Day

T

hrough a Department of Social Services partnership, CCC’s Workforce Development program has expanded from the Greater Richmond area into the Roanoke, Newport News, and Norton areas. "Clients we talk to have often exhausted all of their resources," said Michelle Jones, CCC program supervisor. "They may have been laid-off, cannot pay their bills, or are at risk of losing their homes." Individuals in the program learn important job skills, practice interviewing, create resumes, learn financial strategies, and much more. “CCC is unique in our ability to provide an integrated services approach. Our clients come to us with a need for job skills and we are able to provide them with so much more than that. Because of our own wide range of services, we can provide behavioral counseling, access to our food pantries, baby clothes closets, and other services," said Jones. "Workforce Development really opens the door for us to help people improve their overall quality of life across the board."

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Workforce Development | Housing & Financial Counseling | Food Pantries EXPENSES Income & Asset-building Services

$960,208

7%

12,058

bags of food distributed in Richmond and Roanoke

5,949

individuals were assisted by Roanoke’s St. Francis House Food Pantry

1,825

individuals were assisted by Richmond’s Dibert Food Pantry

334

adults benefited from housing counseling

276 people received budgeting and credit repair resources

79

clients received job skills training and/or job placement 15


SUPPORTIVE HOUSING & HOMELESS SERVICES

Outreach Every Day

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ndividuals experiencing homelessness in the Richmond area now have a new and improved place to go for services. In late October 2019, the team at CCC’s Housing Resource Center locked the doors at 511 West Grace Street and began the two mile drive to 809 Oliver Hill Way, where they settled into their new location. “This larger space is a huge benefit,” said Abby Boyd, Director of Supportive Housing and Homeless Services. “The location is excellent and, with the additional space, we have room to grow and expand our services.” Commonwealth Catholic Charities has big plans for the space. “We know that the need for expanded homeless services exists in the city of Richmond. We also know that there is an entire population of youth who don’t fit the typical profile of a person experiencing homelessness. They may have been kicked out of their home, left an abusive or unsafe home, or have aged out of the foster care system. Whatever the reason, we want to provide a safe place for them to come and receive services and support— which is why we decided to open the Youth Hub.” The Youth Hub, which is now located in the new Oliver Hill Way space, is the result of a partnership between CCC, Advocates for Richmond Youth, Virginia Commonwealth University, and United Way of Greater Richmond and Petersburg. The Youth Hub is funded through the Robins Foundation’s Innovation Grant. In the new Oliver Hill Way location, homeless assistance and Youth Hub services are provided Monday-Friday, 8:30-5:00. CCC also continues daily outreach, bringing services directly to clients living on the streets.

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Homeless Services | Youth Hub EXPENSES Supportive Housing & Homeless Services

$2,070,905

15%

2,827 individuals were assisted with homelessness diversion and housing

324 individuals experiencing homelessness were assisted through street outreach

309

families assisted with housing

104

clients transitioned from homelessness to stable

69 clients with disabilities received long-term housing support

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“The Commonwealth Human Services Foundation portfolio of funds was established as a safety net and source of additional income in support of the mission of CCC. We are well-positioned for a recovering market.  In the meantime, the Foundation funds are here to help CCC meet the needs of the most vulnerable communities we serve.”  Christine N. Thomas, MBA, CFP Investment Committee Chair

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T I


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS REVENUES

      

Program service fees and government grants

2019 $11,806,534

Percent of Total 83%

Private and corporate foundations Individuals and special events Faith communities (including Catholic Diocese of Richmond) United Way Investments and other revenues In-kind donations Total

$1,012,668 $438,169 $293,211 $127,660 $230,899 $297,503 $14,206,644

7% 3% 2% 1% 2% 2% 100%

EXPENSES

      

Children’s Services Refugee and Immigration Services Supportive Housing and Homeless Services Behavioral Health and Disability Services Income and Asset-building Services Management/General Development Total

$5,612,149 $2,096,414 $2,070,905 $1,397,111 $960,208 $1,484,651 $337,474 $13,958,912

40% 15% 15% 10% 7% 11% 2% 100%

$.87 of ever y d o l lar donated goes d irect l y t o cl ient ser vice s

The information presented in this report has been extracted and condensed from the Combined Financial Statements for Commonwealth Catholic Charities, which were audited by Independent Auditors and published separately. For more information on our finances, please contact us at john.montoro@cccofva.org or 804.545.5913.

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WAYS YOU CAN HELP MAKE A MONTHLY DONATION

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onate to CCC every month by setting up a recurring donation online, mail in a check every month, or give us a call to discuss additional options. By supporting CCC programs and services every month you’re make a difference in the lives of others all year long!

“Monthly giving makes us feel like we’re helping CCC make a difference all year long.”

DID YOU KNOW?

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any companies have matching gift programs exclusively available to their employees. This means you can double your donation to CCC with just a few easy steps! Ask your employer’s HR office for details. For more information on planned giving or stock donations please contact Jessica Wells at 804.256.2011 or jessica.wells@cccofva.org.

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Fred & Ellen Gortler


OUR SIGNATURE EVENT: HOLIDAY FESTIVAL OF MUSIC

O

ur Holiday Festival of Music took on a Victorian-inspired theme as it was the 175th anniversary of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. The event featured period musical selections with the Richmond Symphony, VCU choirs and costumed carolers. Queen Victoria even made a cameo appearance! Special thanks to the generous sponsors of the 27th annual Holiday Festival of Music at Richmond’s historic Cathedral of the Sacred Heart. Because of our generous sponsors and wonderful attendees, we raised over $75,000!

Save t he date! 29t h annual Ho l iday Fest ival o f Music November 30, 20 20 21


COMMUNICATION EVERY DAY

C

ommunicating to our supporters and to the communities we serve continued to increase through our various media channels in 2019. Social media posts helped us disseminate timely client needs. We received generous contributions of food, diapers and wipes, school supplies, clothing, along with many items on our website wish list at www. cccofva.org/wish-list.

In-house production of videos increased our story telling ability of clients served and of staff interactions with them.

Our signature print publication, Chronicle, highlighted our client success stories and services throughout the year.

Regional outreach to parishes and other faith communities through our direct mail scripture campaign provided a reminder of our services available to their congregants. “

Through love

W H AT E V E R YO U D I D for one of the least of these,

SERVE ONE ANOTHER.

you did it for me.

GALATIANS 5:13

MATTHEW 25:40

W H O E V E R W E LC O M E S one of these little children in my name

welcomes me. MARK 10:14

At Commonwealth Catholic Charities, we welcome and serve children who need and deserve stability, safety, and love. We are here to serve alongside your ministry in the Petersburg community. Much like the work of the local church, we at Commonwealth Catholic Charities exist to serve and assist all people who need our help. Since 1923, we have been providing quality, compassionate human services to all people, especially the most vulnerable, regardless of faith. We’re here in the neighborhood and can help you provide services to those who come to you for help and guidance. Many of the services we provide are low-cost or free. We look forward to continuing to serve the Petersburg area alongside you.

We are here to serve alongside your ministry in the Roanoke community. Serving the least of these is a mission that we share with your church. Like you, we serve the most vulnerable individuals in our communities. We listen, share, counsel, encourage, comfort, and guide struggling parents, lonely adults, scared children, and fragile teens. At CCC, we see and connect with those who often go unseen. We are close by and can provide services to those who come to you for help and guidance, whether they are a member of your congregation or your community. Many of our services are low-cost or free. The services listed on the back of this card are readily available in your area. Please keep us in mind the next time one of the least of these knocks on your door.

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We guide women with unplanned pregnancies through the adoption process or through the decision to parent her child. We help childless couples fulfil their dreams of welcoming a child into their loving home. We care for foster children and unaccompanied refugee minors who have endured difficult conditions and need the safety and security of caring adults. Our baby clothes closets provide diapers and clothing when money must first feed a family and keep a roof over its head. Assistance for their nourishment can also be received from our food pantries. Our play therapy counseling sessions are held in a comforting environment where children can express their feelings through the simple act of play. We are close by to help your parish extend a welcome greeting of hope to children and families in your congregation and community.

y a t s o t e n i l n o s u Fo l l ow r u o f o l l a n o e t a d o up-t ! s ie it iv t c a d n a s t n eve


VOLUNTEERS W

e are so grateful to all 165 volunteers who provided 8,374 volunteer hours of service, resulting in savings of over $230,000!

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t was a year of many firsts with the initiation of the Parish Engagement program. Director of Parish Engagement, John Elwell, began the process of strengthening existing relationships with parishes to build partnerships and provide information about CCC services including ways parishioners can support CCC services, as well as access them. Faith communities, organizations, and individuals across Virginia continue to support CCC's mission and services. Whether through diapers and wipes for the Baby Clothes Closet, basic necessities for newly-independent foster care youth, new backpacks for school age refugee children, or thousands of bags of groceries for food pantries in Richmond and Roanoke, CCC supporters continue to give in abundance. Visit our website to learn about volunteer opportunities at Commonwealth Catholic Charities.

Parishioners from Our Lady of Nazareth, Saint Gertrude Catholic Church, and Our Lady of Perpetual Help donated food to our St. Francis House Food Pantry in Roanoke for clients to celebrate Thanksgiving.

Members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Upsilon Omega Chapter in Richmond donated toys and bikes to the children in our Refugee Resettlement program at Christmas.

A summertime food donation to our Richmond food pantry from Saint Bridget Catholic Church

The Richmond Police Department donated dozens of bicycles to benefit Housing, Refugee, and Foster Care clients. 23


CHARLOTTESVILLE 918 Harris Street Charlottesville, VA 22903 434.974.6880 NEWPORT NEWS 12284 Warwick Blvd,Suite 1A Newport News, VA 23606 757.247.3600 NORFOLK 7813 Halprin Drive Norfolk, VA 23518 757.256.6272 NORTON 507 Park Avenue Norton, VA 24273 276.679.1195

PETERSBURG 111 Perry Street Petersburg, VA 23803 Guardianship: 804.733.6207 DD Waiver: 804.733.7037 RICHMOND 1601 Rolling Hills Drive Richmond, VA 23229 804.285.5900 Pregnancy Counseling Hotline: 804.615.7007 Housing Resource Center 809 Oliver Hill Way Richmond, VA 23219 804.648.4177

ROANOKE 541 Luck Avenue, SW, Suite 118 Roanoke, VA 24016 540.342.0411 820 Campbell Ave, SW Roanoke, VA 24016 540.342.7561 St. Francis House Food Pantry 836 Campbell Ave., SW 540.268.0044 www.cccofva.org

Profile for Commonwealth Catholic Charities

2019 Annual Report  

Commonwealth Catholic Charities' 2019 Annual Report

2019 Annual Report  

Commonwealth Catholic Charities' 2019 Annual Report

Profile for cccofva

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