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A storyteller is more than just a teller of stories. Storytellers are entertainers, teachers and healers with a long spiritual tradition. Their creative work often focuses on strengthening the communities in which they live. Drawing on the richness of the oral tradition, storytellers are bridge builders that connect us to other people, to ourselves and to the invisible world of the imagination. Central Carolina Community Foundation often serves a vital role as the storyteller for the community we serve. Through stories we let people know what is important to us — our struggles and our life lessons, our beliefs, our values, our traditions, our hopes and our dreams. Telling stories is a way to honor our past, describe our present and shape our future. Stories are also a reflection of our community’s social world. We use them to promote and strengthen the social bonds of our families, institutions, communities and culture. Our Community Foundation has become a catalyst for improvement within urban centers and in rural settings through philanthropy that is visionary, diverse and inclusive. We have illustrated need and inspired individuals and organizations to rally together to make a difference. A sustainable aspect of philanthropy, the Foundation provides leadership and problem solving in the present and prepares for the future with a permanent endowment. We invite you to take a leading role in the stories yet to be told. The stories we share here will provide the inspiration. Enjoy!

JoAnn M. Turnquist

j. hagood tighe, esq.

President & CEO

Chair


What is a community, if not the sum of its stories? We have gathered a handful, here. They tell of this place — the Midlands of South Carolina — of needs unmet (as yet) and promises fulfilled. Of generous hearts and volunteer spirits. Of a vision for tomorrow, bright with potential. These are but a sampling, of course, of the thousands of stories that make up our colorful tapestry. We invite you to pull up a chair and stay a while.

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malcolm and kitty dade

the nickelodeon theatre

the graduation imperative

making a difference, one gift at a time

an investment in the changing face of downtown columbia

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brian and ashley huff

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talk about giving

sharing gifts of time, talent & treasure

building community ambassadors to serve the latino community

a child’s first donation

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grants

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malcolm and kitty dade

making a difference, one gift at a time

If you ask Malcolm and Kitty Dade why they moved from Michigan to South Carolina, you’ll get the typical answer — the weather. “We wanted to get away from the snow,” they laugh. After retiring in 1994, Malcolm and Kitty Dade moved from their home in Detroit to Columbia. A retired teacher, Kitty spent most of her years teaching secretarial science, now known as office information systems, at the high-school level. Malcolm retired as vice president of human resources from an electric utility in Michigan. Prior to his work there, Malcolm was employed for many years by elected officials at the local, state and national levels. During their careers, the Dades did not rack up millions of dollars that they could give to charity. But they realized they didn’t need to, because being a philanthropist only takes a desire to give back and help others in your community.

At the Community Foundation, we often find ourselves telling others that you don’t have to be Bill Gates or Warren Buffet to be a philanthropist. Malcolm and Kitty understand this notion and are an example of how you can make a difference in your community by planning ahead. “Small contributions, when put together, can make a big impact for an organization,” says Malcolm. “We try to give back to organizations whose missions we agree with and who we believe will use those donations wisely to benefit others.” Education is the main beneficiary of their charitable giving. Malcolm and Kitty have long supported their alma maters — Drake University for her and Wayne State University for him — as well as Michigan State University, where Malcolm served on the board of trustees. They also support several Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs.)

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They now support many of the same types of local organizations they did in Michigan, such as public radio, museums and the zoo. In addition, they give their money and their time to support St. Luke’s Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Upper South Carolina. Malcolm and Kitty are planning for their legacy. After moving to Columbia, they created a small family foundation “as a way to continue giving when we are no longer here and can’t do so for ourselves,” Malcolm says. Private foundations require a lot of management, such as excise taxes, minimum payouts, and public disclosure. The costs of limited deductions, rigorous IRS reporting requirements and strict IRS regulations can be disproportionately high particularly for foundations with less than $5 million in assets. After 10 years of management challenges, the Dades sought another solution. They found Central Carolina Community Foundation a particularly attractive option because maintenance requirements are minimal and moving their investments was simple. The Dade’s seed money came from appreciated stocks. Their goal (as is the Foundation’s) is that the initial deposit grows in such a way that the longterm impact will be substantial. The majority of their legacy will be funded through insurance policies that name the Foundation as the beneficiary. Now that the Malcolm and Kitty Dade Foundation is a donor-advised fund at the Community Foundation, the couple couldn’t be happier. “Having our fund here at the Community Foundation gives our investment a long-term focus,” Malcolm said. “And the Foundation’s investment policy is much better than most individuals can do for themselves.” Kitty added, “Most importantly, moving the foundation here has removed all the administrative burdens from Malcolm and me.” As new donors, Malcolm and Kitty are still determining the long-term goals of their fund. But they do encourage others to consider starting a fund with the Community Foundation. “What I would like to share with others is that this process is easier than they expect. I think there are many other couples in similar situations who would set up a charitable fund if they knew how easy the process is,” he says. “It does not take millions to make a difference.” S 4

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Services we offer The Foundation works closely with individuals, families, organizations and financial advisors to make charitable giving easy, flexible and effective. We provide our donors with a unique giving experience tailored to suit their situation and goals, and we work diligently to connect them with the issues they care about most. More than 380 individuals, corporations and nonprofit agencies have selected the Community Foundation as their philanthropic partner due to our knowledge of local needs and our extensive experience in local problem solving.


Individuals and Families The Community Foundation can assist you no matter what your charitable goals may be. If your passion is helping with basic needs or supporting the arts, then a field-of-interest fund can provide the flexibility to support different organizations in your area of interest. If, however, one or more specific organizations are close to your heart, a designated fund will allow you to support them in perpetuity. A donoradvised fund allows you or your advisors to recommend grants to charitable organizations anywhere in the country. Perhaps you simply want to support the most pressing needs in our community. Establishing a community fund gives the Foundation the ability to respond to those needs. We are able to help you meet your philanthropic goals, regardless of your income. Most of our funds require only a $10,000 initial deposit of cash, securities, real estate or other property. Another option many donors find beneficial is to make a planned gift by designating a portion of their estate to the Community Foundation or naming us as the beneficiary of a retirement plan, insurance policy or trust.

Families and Corporations Private foundations have long provided families and corporations a way to give back to their communities or create legacies, but private foundations can also become tedious. The disadvantages — higher costs, ongoing administrative burdens, quarterly tax payments, mandatory payout rates and reduced tax benefits — are disproportionately higher for foundations with less than $5 million in assets. Establishing a named fund at Central Carolina Community Foundation can be a sensible alternative to a private foundation and often meets the needs of donors more efficiently and effectively. Our services include financial reporting, investment management, grantmaking, philanthropic planning, scholarship design, marketing and overall administration of the foundation. By reducing the administrative costs, more money is available for grantmaking. And the fund can continue forever, creating a lasting legacy of philanthropy for your family or company.

Nonprofit Organizations An agency fund provides security for the future of a nonprofit organization and can ensure stability for years to come. When you place your agency’s fund with the Community Foundation it becomes a part of our pool of funds, which is professionally managed using a diversified strategy. Our Asset Management Committee establishes investment policies including

asset allocation and investment objectives, and frequently reviews asset growth and performance. The Community Foundation’s economies of scale provide your organization the benefits of a diverse investment portfolio and low investment fees that typically come only with very large funds. Our marketing materials provide a platform for your organization to educate a diverse audience about your work in the community. We can also speak to your donors about planned gifts and other giving vehicles that benefit your agency fund. Overall, the work we do on your behalf reduces your administrative time, allowing your staff to focus on your mission.

Financial Advisors We are here to help make charitable giving convenient, effective and fruitful for you and your clients.   If you would like to call us to explore an option before you discuss it with your client, please do so. We value client anonymity, and we are happy to work exclusively through you. The majority of our relationships with professional advisors begin this way.  Our staff is experienced in crafting charitable giving vehicles based on the individual needs of our donors. We can provide you with information to help your clients make well-informed decisions that meet their financial and charitable goals. Clients that open funds with the Community Foundation receive quarterly reports that show fund balance, realized and unrealized gains, contributions made to their fund and grants paid from their fund. Donors may request their fund balance from the Foundation at any time. Clients also receive information about charitable opportunities and organizations, allowing them to make informed giving decisions.

Giving Options for Everyone Whether you are a family looking to create a legacy or a nonprofit seeking to secure your future, we offer a variety of giving tools to help you achieve your charitable goals. There are two ways to give to the Foundation – immediate or planned gifts – and there are several methods by which to contribute these gifts. Immediate gifts include cash, securities, real estate or other property. Planned giving options include bequests, charitable gift annuities, trusts and beneficiary gifts. Each of these choices offers various financial and tax benefits. We recommend you speak with your financial advisor to discuss what options are best for you. >> If you have any questions about the services we can provide you, please contact JoAnn Turnquist at 803.254.5601 x323 or joann@yourfoundation.org. a story of

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Brian and Ashley Huff

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“Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s gr ace in its various forms.”

1 peter 4:10

It is a verse that closely mirrors the Communit y Foundation’s definition of phil anthropy: sharing one’s gifts of time , talent and tre asure to benefit others. It also perfectly describes Ashle y and Brian Huff.

“We don’t like to be minimalists,” Brian says, describing their giving philosophy. “Scripture encourages us to give generously, setting a minimum goal of 10 percent of pretax income or your ‘first fruits’ as your tithe for your church, and to give gifts over and above your tithe for other ministries and charities. We strive to follow this example because we enjoy doing so.” The Huffs support various organizations and ministries that meet both local and international needs. The vast majority of the causes they support are faith-based organizations that make a tangible difference in the lives of others. Locally, organizations like Oliver Gospel Mission, The Free Medical Clinic and The Cooperative Ministry help some of the Midland’s most vulnerable citizens. Around the world, Samaritan’s Purse and World Vision aid victims of war, poverty, natural disaster and disease. “We are simply stewards of what God has entrusted to us,” says Brian, “and if you are faithful with what God has entrusted to you, He will trust you with more.” Brian and

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Ashley had found this to be true in their lives. “In addition to the great joy we experience when we are helping other people, we are often surprised with blessings that we never anticipated. Then there is even more to share and the cycle of giving continues to grow.” Brian’s enthusiasm for helping others rings in his voice as he describes the causes that he and Ashley care about most. “We are particularly passionate about organizations that reach out to youth and young adults, such as Adrian Despres of Kingdom Building Ministries,” he says. Adrian’s ministry reaches thousands of students and young adults each year. In addition, he serves as chaplain for the University of South Carolina’s football team. Two additional favorites are Campus Crusade for Christ and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA). Campus Crusade’s ministry reaches 191 countries around the globe, while FCA, the largest Christian campus ministry in the world, uses athletics as a medium to reach athletes and coaches.


The local radio station 89.7 WMHK also holds a special place in their hearts. “WMHK has been a wonderful blessing to me personally,” Brian shares. “During good times, and especially during difficult times in my life, this station serves as a daily source of encouragement and wisdom for me.” While philanthropy has long been a part of their lives, Brian and Ashley were only recently introduced to the Community Foundation. Maintaining all the records and receipts for their charitable giving had become a challenge. Brian asked their accountant, Jack Williamson of Williamson & Associates, about creating a foundation through which they could direct their philanthropic gifts. Jack referred him to the Community Foundation. “For us, the Foundation was the obvious alternative to creating a private foundation,” Brian recalls. “Our donor-advised fund provides us the simplicity of making one large gift for the year and gives us the flexibility to support the causes we care about most. There are no more receipts to track down. It has really simplified our lives.” Of course “giving” isn’t just about money, as Brian and Ashley demonstrate so well. It’s also about sharing time and talents. Brian, an ophthalmologist, has used his surgical skills on medical missions in Haiti, Nicaragua and El Salvador, and he will soon be traveling to Ecuador. On these missions, a team of surgeons and eye care support staff typically perform 25 to 100 cataract surgeries. “You can accomplish great things on mission trips,” says Brian, “but there is no greater joy than operating on someone who is blind. Within 24 hours of surgery, he or she is able to see, and you are instantly aware of the difference you made in someone’s life.”

“For us, the Foundation was the obvious alternative to creating a private foundation. Our donor-advised fund provides us the simplicity of making one large gift for the year and gives us the flexibility to support the causes we care about most. There are no more receipts to track down. It has really simplified our lives.”

These trips also help Brian put his own problems in perspective. “Visiting these countries and seeing the hardships that others endure is the best recipe for appreciation and contentment I know,” Brian reflects. He encourages others to take a mission trip to a third-world country. “I’ve found it reaffirms my appreciation for the incredible blessings we take for granted every day in America.” The Huffs are a wonderful example of the philanthropic work in our Midlands community. Together, these stories of giving and sharing build a philanthropic platform upon which our community will build for generations to come. S

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Funds

Legacy Society Central Carolina Community Foundation created the Legacy Society to honor those who have made a lasting commitment to our community by including charitable gifts to the Foundation in their estates. The Legacy Society provides a way for the Community Foundation to recognize and thank these individuals, during their lifetimes and beyond. We appreciate their vision and insight for our community’s future. If you would like to become a member of the Legacy Society simply notify us of your plans to leave a gift to the Community Foundation. Gayle O. Averyt Mary Wyatt Balbach Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Barinowski Mrs. Jane A. Barnhill Mac and Leslie Bennett Charlotte Lunsford Berry Mr. Charles Shannon Blackwell* Mr. and Mrs. Addison Bostain Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Bowers Sr. Betsy Linn Chambers Arlen* and Janet Cotter Jo Mengedoht Cox Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Dade Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Dana Mrs. William W. Dukes Jr. Sam and Toni Elkins David A. and Julie D. Epting Mr. and Mrs. George C. Fant Jr. Julia R. Gentles Ms. Diane Goolsby Ms. Leila Grimball Rusty and Plum Hammond Marjorie Heggie and David Estefano Mrs. Sue Hendricks C. Carroll and Susan B. Heyward Mr. and Mrs. Owen M. Holmes III Clifton J. Kitchens Marion A. Knox* Mrs. Kate Miller LaCoste* Dr. Lanneau D. Lide Jr.

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Lloyd S. Liles Mr. and Mrs. David L. Martin Jamie Young McCulloch Dr. and Mrs. James E. Mercer Jacqueline M. Miller Frances K. Mills Mr. I. Harby Moses Ethan W. Nord Dorothy G. Owen Katie and Scott Peterson Mr.* and Mrs. J. Key Powell Bill Rogers Mr.* and Mrs. Edward Y. Roper Sr. Mr. J. Royal Roseberry III Paul and Ann Schuler Marshall and Frances Shearouse* Ruth Kay Sidisin* Henry and Linda Sims John C. “Buck” Smith* Mary Averill Stanton* H. Talcott Stith Jr.* John* and Betty Warren Mr. and Mrs. H. Dallon Weathers Jr. Christine Webb* Mr. and Mrs. John T. Weeks Milford H. “Joe” Wessinger*  Sally Nash Wilson Max and Sibby Wood *deceased

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The $9.3 million awarded in grants and scholarships during fiscal year 2011 is possible because of the generosity of the individuals, families and organizations who have partnered with us by creating charitable funds at the Foundation. The Community Foundation offers several different types of funds to meet the varying philanthropic and financial goals of our donors.


funds

Agency Funds provide nonprofit organizations with a professional investment program, increased market exposure and reduced overhead. Alpha Xi Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau Inc. Research Fund Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association Inc. - South Carolina Chapter Animal Protection League Endowment Fund Calhoun County Library Building Fund Capital Senior Center Endowment Fund Carolina Children’s Home Endowment Fund Children Unlimited Endowment Inc. Foundation Fund Children’s Chance Endowment Fund Children’s Chance - Harry Sunshine Fund Columbia City Ballet Endowment Fund Columbia Garden Club Foundation Endowment Fund Commun-I-Care Bart Barone Endowment Fund Congaree Land Trust Endowment Fund Congaree Land Trust - Evelyn Pringle Boyd Memorial Fund Cultural Council of Richland and Lexington Counties Endowment Fund EdVenture Yes Every Child Endowment Fund Family Connection of South Carolina Inc. Endowment Fund Family Service Center Fund for Crippled Children Girl Scouts of S.C. - Mountains to Midlands - Myrtle Lasley Endowment Fund Glenforest School Endowment Fund* Governor’s School for the Arts Endowment Fund Hammond School Endowment Fund Junior Achievement of Central South Carolina Inc. Endowment Fund Junior League of Columbia Inc. Endowment Fund KershawHealth Foundation Agency Fund* Lexington/Richland Alcohol and Drug Abuse Council Endowment Fund Mental Illness Recovery Center Inc. Endowment Fund Montessori School of Camden Endowed Fund Nancy K. Perry Children’s Shelter Foundation Fund Newberry County Hospital Foundation Inc. Endowment Fund Palmetto Place Children’s Emergency Shelter Capital Campaign Fund Palmetto Place Children’s Emergency Shelter Endowment Fund Senior Resources Inc. Endowment Fund Sexual Trauma Services of the Midlands Endowment Fund Sistercare Inc. Endowed Fund South Carolina Philharmonic Endowed Fund Southern Interscholastic Press Association Endowment Fund Sumter County Gallery of Art Endowment Fund Town Theatre Endowment Fund The Walker Foundation Endowed Fund* United Way of the Midlands Endowment Fund Women in Philanthropy of the United Way of the Midlands Fund

COMMUNITY FUNDS are supported through unrestricted gifts to the Foundation and allow us to respond to the ever-changing needs of the Midlands.  Mary and Clinch Belser Community Fund Boyle Family Community Fund Faucette Fund

Genesis Fund Greater Chapin Community Endowment Joyce Martin Hampton Community Fund Harriet and Walter Keenan Community Fund Kershaw County Endowment Fund Lipscomb Family Unrestricted Fund Cindy and Evan Nord Community Fund Orangeburg Calhoun Community Foundation Francis L. Shealy and Mary Joyce Shealy Community Fund Sarah and Wilbur Smith Fund Mary Averill Stanton Unrestricted Grantmaking Fund Sumter Community Foundation Fund

DESIGNATED FUNDS allow the donor to identify specific nonprofit organizations to receive grants. Deane and Roger Ackerman Designated Fund for the Sumter County Gallery of Art James F. Adams Memorial Fund Averyt Special Fund Blanton Matching Fund Brookland Foundation Inc. Homeless Outreach Endowment Fund Clarkson Memorial Fund for Zion Episcopal Church Cemetery Columbia Jewish Community Center - Weinberg Foundation Fund Daily Bread Memorial Fund Robert W. Foster Designated Fund Gilbert Community Park Fund Girl Scouts of S.C. - Mountains to Midlands - Chandler Burns Scholarship Fund Harby Milk Fund Harvest Hope Food Bank Designated Fund Heathwood Hall Episcopal School Designated Fund Kate M. LaCoste Endowment for Carolina Children’s Home Kate M. LaCoste Endowment for Fairforest Baptist Church Kate M. LaCoste Endowment for First Baptist Church Mott Administrative Endowment Fund for CCCF Nurturing Center Designated Funds A & B Orangeburg County Fine Arts Center Designated Fund Master Sergeant Worley E. Phipps Fund Dave Ransdell Memorial Fund Edward Y. and Mary Lee Roper Family Endowment for The Cooperative Ministry Edward Y. and Mary Lee Roper Family Endowment for Harvest Hope Food Bank John J. and Inez K. Ross Charitable Fund S.C. Greenhouse Growers’ Research Endowment Fund Sandhills School Emergency Fund Marshall and Frances Shearouse Fund Mary Averill Stanton Administrative Endowment Fund for CCCF Mary Averill Stanton Fund for the Aiken SPCA Mary Averill Stanton Fund for the HSPCA of Richland County Swansea High School Athletic Foundation Fund Alice E. and Richard N. Vandekieft Memorial Fund John and Betty Warren Fund Milford H. Wessinger Designated Fund* Sarah Nash Wilson Fund

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DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS provide sustainable benefit and allow the flexibility to recommend grants for many charitable organizations and programs. The Academy of Columbia Foundation Fund Deane and Roger Ackerman Family Fund Alexander Family Fund Allison Family Fund Lynette Lewis Allston and Allard A. Allston Family Fund Gayle O. Averyt Donor-Advised Fund Baker and Baker Fund for Children’s Literacy Charlotte Jackson Berry Donor-Advised Fund Lewis Blackman Foundation Fund Bill and Jean Blount Donor-Advised Fund Claire Holding Bristow Fund* The Furman and Kim Buchanan Fund C.F. Evans & Company Edward B. Cantey Donor-Advised Fund The Cassels Foundation Fund Eugene Bowen and Vivian Gunter Chase Family Foundation Fund Anne and Neal Christiansen Fund Cotter Family Fund Jay and Yolanda Courie Community Fund Thomas W. Cozart Jr. Family Foundation Fund Malcolm and Kitty Dade Foundation* Frank J. and Laura M. Dana Fund Dove Fund Easterby Family Fund South Ebert Fund for Learning Disabilities Fant Family Donor-Advised Fund Farrell Family Foundation Fund First Fruits Foundation Fund Robert W. Foster Charitable Fund Frankstone Family Fund Leon S. and Billie Goodall Donor-Advised Fund Vesta and Eddie Haselden Fund Scott Hannon Memorial Foundation Endowment Fund Stella B. Hennessee Fund Boyd C. Hipp II Family Fund Michael and Michelle Hogue Donor-Advised Fund Carolyn Holderman Fund* Hootie and The Blowfish Foundation Fund Addie Lawson Howle and Hugh Stokes Sprott Fund William R. Horton and Mary R. Major Family Fund Katharine and William Hubbard Family Fund Nexsen B. and Sylvia T. Johnson Fund Jones Family Fund Alan and Charlotte Kahn Family Fund John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Advised Fund Lloyd and Doris Liles Donor-Advised Fund Lipscomb Family Donor-Advised Fund Joyce Binkley Long Ovarian Cancer Research DonorAdvised Fund The Marion and Finley Lucas Jr. Donor-Advised Fund Jim and Claudia Maloney Foundation Fund Cass Elias McCarter Memorial Fund Ben and Henriette Morris Family Fund Mr. and Mrs. Page Morris Family Fund The Mungo Charitable Fund Nelson Mullins Riley and Scarborough Foundation Fund Beth and Eric Nord Fund for the Arts Cindy and Evan Nord Family Fund Ethan W. Nord Donor-Advised Fund Evan W. Nord Donor Designated Fund Walter and Virginia Nord Donor-Advised Fund Theodis Parsons Palmer-McMahon Leadership Fund 12

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Roy and Marnie Pearce Fund Poston Family Fund Redd Family Fund Dan and Mary Rivers Charitable Gift Fund George W. and Connally S. Rogers Fund Hannah and Ronald Rogers Fund Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Royall Jr. Fund The SCBT Foundation Fund Marcia Reinfeld Samuels Donor-Advised Fund Scarborough Family Charitable Trust Fund Ann Scott Foundation Fund The Scott-Pearce Family Fund Wayne Shuler Family Foundation Fund The George E. and Sabie M. Simmons Charitable Fund Eloise C. Snyder Foundation Fund Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Sullivan Foundation Fund Christy and Ken Taucher Donor-Advised Fund Taylor Family Charitable Trust Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Tronco Jr. Fund Allyson Nord Wandtke Donor-Advised Fund Samuel C. and Mary E. Baskin Waters Foundation Fund John T. and Shirley A. Weeks Fund Wendyth and Warner Wells Charitable Fund Williams Fund The Robert W. Wingard Jr. Donor-Advised Fund Andrew D. Zalkin Charitable Fund

DONOR-ADVISED NON-ENDOWED FUNDS provide immediate impact and the flexibility to recommend grants for many charitable organizations and programs. AIDS Partnership Fund Abacus Planning Group Inc. Escrow Fund Aloha Trust Escrow Fund George and Ford Bailey Fund Frank and Melanie Baker Escrow Fund Peter A. and Mary W. Balbach Escrow Fund Barone-Johnson Escrow Fund Beth and Russell Bauknight Fund Bell Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Blanton Escrow Fund The Buckley School Foundation Campaign Fund Mrs. Sidney B. Burnett Escrow Fund James T. Burns Charitable Funds Caulkins-Anderson Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Paul J. Chambers III Family Fund* Clark Family Fund Henry and Emily Clay Escrow Fund Columbia Beautification Foundation Fund BeautiFive Project Columbia Beautification Foundation Fund Forever Forest Tree Foundation Richard E. Conner Sr. and JoAnn M. Conner Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Susannah and John Cook Fund Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Davidson Sr. Escrow Fund Davis Family Escrow Fund Beverly L. Edgell Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Ellis, Lawhorne and Sims Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Clarence and Virginia Evans Donor-Advised Escrow Fund George C. Fant Jr. Escrow Fund Barry J. and Jennifer A. Feldman Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Thomas S. and Elizabeth M. Walker Fitzgerald DonorAdvised Escrow Fund Bobby Foster Escrow Fund


funds Margaret and Clarence Fouse Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Reginald E. and Phyllis D. Francklyn Fund Get in the Pink Fund Glenn Escrow Fund Chris Goodall Family Fund Graduation Imperative* Graybill Escrow Fund Greater Chapin Community Escrow Fund Elizabeth E. Griffith Charitable Fund Mr. and Mrs. Ted Halkyard Escrow Fund Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Haltiwanger Escrow Fund Handpicked Inc. Escrow Fund Helen’s Hugs Fund Scott and Emilee Hendrix Donor-Advised Escrow Fund C. Carroll and Susan B. Heyward Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Ashley and Brian Huff Donor-Advised Escrow Fund* Bruce Hughes Charitable Fund Hutto Escrow Fund Mike Kelly Charitable Fund Dr. and Mrs. Richard Lawson Escrow Fund Lehman Charitable Fund LinkScholars Escrow Fund Literacy 2030* John and Mary Jane Martin Fund Mary and John McCants Escrow Fund Julius W. and Elizabeth M. McKay Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Midlands Housing Alliance Transition Center Fund Reverend Joe D. Mills Fund The Mungo Charitable Escrow Fund* The Nesbitt Family Foundation Fund Nord Cascading Unitrust Escrow Fund J. Michael and Rachel R. Otis Donor-Advised Escrow Fund David G. and Joan R. Owen Escrow Fund The Henry Michael Powell Memorial Fund Deborah Fyffe Prier Fund Redd Family Escrow Fund Jim and Perry Ritchie Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Rogers Townsend & Thomas, PC Fund* Bill Rogers Escrow Fund S.C. Youth Philanthropy Partnership Fund M. Edward Sellers and Suzan D. Boyd Escrow Fund Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Shaw Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Steve and Louise Slater Escrow Fund Ben and Lorraine Smith Charitable Donor-Advised Escrow Mr. and Mrs. John C. B. Smith Jr. Escrow Fund Wilbur C. and Diane T. Smith Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Mac and Beverly Stidham Escrow Fund Strasburger Escrow Fund Talk About Giving* Cameron Todd Escrow Fund Jack and Elizabeth Towell Donor-Advised Escrow Fund David E. and Dorothy G. Tribble Escrow Fund Pat and Susie VanHuss Donor-Advised Escrow Fund WRS/DMT Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Weiner Escrow Fund Susan P. and Stephen K. Wiggins Fund Louise McLaurin Womble Fund Women in Philanthropy of United Way of the Midlands Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Max and Sibby Wood Escrow Fund Andrew D. and Connie B. Woodham Fund

Margaret and Chris Yeakel Donor-Advised Escrow Fund Dr. and Mrs. William F. Young Escrow Fund

Field-of-Interest Funds support specific focus areas, but do not limit the funding to one particular organization. Lester L. Bates Fund Diane Goolsby Fund Pierrine and Hootie Johnson Field-of-Interest Fund M. B. Kahn Construction Company Employees Disaster Relief and Emergency Fund M. B. Kahn Construction Company Fund Nell V. Mellichamp Fund Mental Health Resources Foundation Fund Ministry Resources Foundation Fund Monroe Family Fund New Morning Foundation - General Community Fund Pied Piper Fund David W. Robinson Catalyst Award Fund The Sunshine Fund Jack E. and Naomi H. Taylor Fund Milford H. Wessinger Building Better Tomorrows Fund

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS provide educational opportunities for future community leaders.  A.C. Flora First Five Years Foundation Fund James A. Broome Scholarship Fund The Buckley School Foundation Zack and Rachel Clarkson Scholarship Fund Daughters of the Holy Cross Sara Hempley Scholarship Fund Explorers Scholarship Fund First Choice Member Scholarship Rhittie Gettone - Leading by Example - Communities In Schools Scholarship Fund Gilbert Alumni Technology Scholarship Fund Gilbert Ruritan Scholarship Fund Handel-Carter Assistance Fund William S. and Elizabeth B. Heath Scholarship Fund Dr. Robert Howard/WHS Scholarship Fund Bobby J. Jacobs Jr. Turn Your Life Around Award Estelle Jones Memorial Scholarship Fund Estelle Jones Non-Traditional Students Scholarship Fund LinkScholars Program Fund James T. McCain Leadership Fund Terry A. McCoy Leadership Scholarship Endowment Dr. William L. McDow Scholarship Fund Miller Scholarship Fund Miss South Carolina Scholarship Fund* National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors Scholarship Fund Grace Brooks and E. Perry Palmer Fund The Pierce/Zimmerman Scholarship Fund James J. Robb Scholarship Fund Rogers and Meredith College Fund Bobbi Rossi Memorial Scholarship Fund Louetta Slice Scholarship Fund Smart Matters Scholarship Fund H. Eugene Webb Jr. Scholarship Fund Milford H. Wessinger Scholarship Fund* Woodlands’ Families Scholarship Fund *New Fund Total Funds: 388; includes anonymous funds

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The Nickelodeon Theatre

A n In v es t men t in t he

Changing face of Do w n t o w n Col umbia

We sit in the courtyard that the Nickelodeon Theatre’s new Main Street home shares with Mast General Store. The Nick’s Capital Campaign chair, Larry Hembree, and Andy Smith, the executive director, flip through an old file that holds what were once “future” plans for the cinema. Today, these plans are a reality.

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nick el odeon

In 2007, Columbia’s nonprofit cinema, the Nickelodeon, launched what would become a $5 million Capital Campaign. Its purpose? To move the theater from its current location to downtown Main Street, in the space that once housed the Fox Theater.

t he

“One of our campaign goals was to grow the audience by 10 percent,” said Larry Hembree, the campaign’s chairman. “Boy, did we do that.” Early efforts were supported by an Organizational Impact grant from the Community Foundation. The grant allowed the Nick to hire an Asheville-based consultant to help the nonprofit’s board and staff develop a strategic plan. It became clear that with the purchase of a new building, moving and construction plans, operations — like finance and organizational structure —required change. “This grant was key,” Larry says. “We were able to bring in someone from the outside to look at this project and review all areas that we needed to focus on to move forward. We didn’t know where to go before the strategic planning process. “ Through donor funds, the Foundation has since given more than $56,000 to the Nick’s Capital Campaign. Since its founding, The Nick has focused almost solely on movie exhibition. It now faces a more expansive future, one that reaches further into the community. Larry and Andy Smith, executive director, have identified two new focuses: education and filmmaker services. “We’re trying to diversify the way we reach the community,” Larry says. In the spring, the Nick will launch an afterschool program with high school students in its new Helen Hill Media Education Center, where students will learn media literacy and critical viewing skills. The learning space will have couches, computers with editing software and a flat screen TV for reviewing their own work. Kindergartners through high school students across the Midlands will benefit

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from the expansion, as the Nick plans to play host to school field trips as well as inschool programs. Under the Indie Grits brand, the Nick will work more directly with filmmakers through workshops and networking. And via its partnership with the University of South Carolina’s film archive, the Nick will provide filmmakers with resources on a national scale. Today, the Nick’s new home is still filled with construction tools rather than people, popcorn and movies, but you would think otherwise if judging by the impact its presence has already made on Main Street. After the Nick purchased the new site, several stores and restaurants opened, including Mast General Store and the Brazilian Cowboy. The expectation is that this downtown revitalization will continue, with the Nick open seven nights a week. “Right now, on big nights at the Nick, Hunter Gatherer and other surrounding restaurants are packed,” Andy says. “Inevitably we’re going to see restaurants and bars popping up on Main Street.” Andy and Larry smile as they discuss the Nick’s projections. They believe in this project, and as the glint in Andy’s eye indicates, believed in it long before anyone else accepted the project as a reality. “National statistics show that, on average, the addition of a second movie screen brings about a 110 percent increase in sales,” Andy says. “Based on our business planning, we think we’re going to be able to do even more than that. Our current space is so constraining that the new space will free us up to have even greater growth. You’re talking, at a bare minimum, 50,000 more people coming to Main Street every year. I can’t say enough about what this move is going to do for us.” Patrons of the new Nick should look forward to a state-of-the-art space with irreplaceable antique features. Prepare to purchase tickets from the Fox’s original 1960s ticket booth. Large columns in the upstairs theater remain, and the art-deco storefront façade has been restored.


2011

“Our current space is so constraining that the new space will free us up to have even greater growth. You’re talking, at a minimum, 50,000 more people coming to Main Street every year. I can’t say enough about what this move is going to do for us.” The new Nick, this economic driving force in the revitalization of Main Street, is coming soon. Construction continues, and fundraising for the Capital Campaign continues as well. The Nick recently started phase two of construction. Both construction and fundraising are about halfway to their goals. That means donors can still help create an entertainment and learning space that we will all undoubtedly be proud to call the home of South Carolina’s nonprofit cinema. “The ‘if’ question about this project is gone,” Andy says. “Now, it’s when is this going to happen?” The Nick’s new marquis, with its neon colors, will soon light the way on Main Street. It will stand for the realization of a dream many years in coming. Linda O’Connor, a USC junior in 1979 when she first leased the Nick to bring old films to Columbia, recently shared with Larry and Andy that her big dream at that time was to eventually take over the Fox.

David W. Robinson

Catalyst Award The David W. Robinson Catalyst Award recognizes organizations in our 11-county service area that have exemplified leadership, creativity, vision and commitment in addressing critical community issues. A founding member of the Community Foundation, Mr. Robinson was a philanthropist and a true champion for our community in the business and legal fields. The Catalyst Award was established in Mr. Robinson’s memory by the Foundation and the Robinson Family in 1994. The 2011 Catalyst Award was presented to Healing Species. In 2000, Cheri Brown Thompson gave up practicing law to write the first ever animal-assisted violence-prevention curriculum to be endorsed by a state board of education. She created Healing Species, an Orangeburg-based education ministry that helps children recognize abuse, get help if needed, and overcome violence and bullying. During the 11-week program, instructors take the rescue dogs into classrooms to interact with children. The evidencebased program has been proven effective and has been replicated through satellite chapters in Texas, Wisconsin, Washington and New Zealand.

“It’s amazing when you put a thought like that out there. You never know what will come of it,” Larry says. S

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sto r i e s

of impact

building communi the puentes project

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ambassadors ity to Serve the Latino Community

It’s a grantee’s worst fear. You’ve written an outstanding proposal for a worthwhile program, gone through a highly competitive year-long application process and received a matching grant from a national foundation. But will you get enough qualified men and women to apply to participate in the two-year community leadership training that is the backbone of the program?

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“That thought did cross our minds,” admits Julie Smithwick-Leone, program director for PASOs, a community-based organization hosted by the University of South Carolina’s Arnold School of Public Health. PASOs works to meet the maternal and child health needs of Latinos across South Carolina. Luckily, this fear was unfounded, as the response was much more than they expected. PASOs requested applications from local men and women to serve as grassroots leaders, called Community Ambassadors, working to improve healthcare for Latinos in Richland and Lexington counties. “We had three times the number of applicants than we had openings for participants in the training,” Julie beams. “We had to do a triple interview process and place people on a waiting list for the program. Their energy and passion to give back has been amazing.”

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) 2010 Local Funding Partnerships chose to fund PASOs’ proposal for the Puentes Project, one of only 12 proposals out of 181 applications selected for funding. The Knight Foundation Advised Fund at the Community Foundation was one of several local funders that helped PASOs qualify for the matching dollars, including New Morning Foundation, the Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina, Palmetto Health, Providence Hospitals and Lexington Medical Center. “The $45,000 received through the Knight Foundation’s fund at the Community Foundation not only helped us develop this project,” Julie says, “but it also drew $45,000 in matching funds from a national funder. In addition, Central Carolina Community Foundation’s reputation as a respected funder in our community helped us garner additional support from local funders.”


the puentes project (puentes means “bridges” in Spanish)

is currently training 34 Community Ambassadors who range in age from 17 to 50 and represent eight Latin American countries. The ambassadors are students, nurses, teachers, farmers and businessmen who are committed to making a difference in their community. Year one of the four-year project is focused on the Community Ambassadors who participate in Puentes curriculum training twice a month and English as a Second Language class twice a week. In addition, they participate in conferences, discussion panels, specialized trainings and other leadership development opportunities. The Ambassadors conduct learning tours with hospital and healthcare services, faithbased and social service organizations, as well as university-affiliated programs, in a collaborative effort to make the services accessible and more culturally appropriate. “The Puentes program and the work of the Ambassadors will benefit our entire community, not just the Latino population,” Mari Borghini, project coordinator, says. “By improving access and communication with health care providers, we are helping some of the most underserved residents of our state learn how to stay healthy. This process creates a healthier, more equitable and more sustainable community for everyone in South Carolina.” During year two of the project, which begins in the spring, Ambassadors will be responsible for community outreach, identification of best practice models and group work in commissions to allow them to specialize in one main aspect of the project. These commissions include youth, project evaluation, local resources and community event planning. “The Ambassadors will help bridge the cultural and language gaps between the community, healthcare providers and policymakers,” Julie remarks. “They will listen to their peers describe their experiences, concerns and ideas to develop strategies to enhance health services.”

Just as important, the program makes a difference in the ambassadors’ lives. “The Puentes project is the second priority in my life, right behind my daughter,” remarks Italia, a program participant. “Through the workshops I have learned about my health and how I can help others around me. Since joining Puentes, my free time is dedicated to learning, meeting with my conversation partner, going to English classes, studying and doing my Puentes homework. I feel useful now!” Although year one isn’t yet complete, the Ambassadors have already impacted the community. Their efforts led to information in local Latino newspapers and on radio about issues that are relevant to their health. The youth commission has become instrumental in helping the S.C. Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy implement a Latino teen pregnancy prevention program. Moving forward through year four, PASOs’ goal is to have the systems in place for the program to remain sustainable after the grant funding is depleted. After the training, conversations, surveys and evaluations take place, Julie is confident that this process will open the door for the Latino population to better access the services and resources available and provide the Ambassadors, in particular, an opportunity to grow. “This process will help us train and develop a new group of grassroots leaders in the Latino community,” says Julie. “These leaders will have a voice and represent our community in a professional manner.” S

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Grants In fiscal year 2011, Central Carolina Community Foundation’s Board of Trustees approved 21 competitive grants totaling $199,860 from community funds to support dropout prevention, homelessness prevention and illiteracy reduction. We award grants primarily to nonprofit organizations that are defined as tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. On the recommendation from our Program and Grantmaking Committee, our Board of Trustees approved changes to our competitive Impact Grant program in 2011. As our focus shifts to our Literacy 2030 and Graduation Imperative initiatives, our Impact Grant program now supports creative and innovative programs that have a measurable, positive impact on dropout prevention and illiteracy reduction. In addition to our discretionary grantmaking, the Foundation oversees several other grant processes including those for the Central Carolina AIDS Partnership, Greater Chapin Community Endowment, Kershaw County Endowment, Orangeburg Calhoun Community Foundation, Sumter Community Foundation, the Knight Foundation Advised Fund, the Academy of Columbia Foundation and Women in Philanthropy. For additional information about any of our grant programs, visit our website at www.yourfoundation.org. c o m m u n i t y i m pa c t

In addition to the grants and scholarships awarded through a competitive process, the Foundation also awards hundreds of grants from our agency endowment, designated, donor-advised and field-of-interest funds each year. The numbers below reflect the aggregate of all grants and scholarships awarded in fiscal year 2011. Animal Welfare (23)......................................................................................... $ 256,474.50 Arts & Culture (81)............................................................................................ $ 484,578.21 Community Improvement & Public Interest (48).................................... $ 962,148.99 Conservation & Preservation (33).............................................................. $ 189,447.89 Economic Development (4)........................................................................... $ 705,000.00 Education (173)................................................................................................. $ 2,018,939.44 Faith-based (133)............................................................................................. $ 891,700.98 Health & Wellbeing (74).................................................................................. $ 1,524,205.67 Housing & Homelessness (53).................................................................... $ 704,201.57 Human Services (144).................................................................................... $ 1,066,849.95 Public Protection (4)....................................................................................... $ 98,000.00 Recreation (9)................................................................................................... $ 130,619.00 Scholarships (42)............................................................................................ $ 122,062.50 Youth Development (24)................................................................................ $ 150,130.14 Total Grants - 845................................................................................... $ 9,304,358.84

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Competitive Grantmaking

COMMUNITY IMPACT GRANTS ADDRESS LOCAL NEEDS BY FUNDING PROGRAMMATIC SERVICES OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS:

Alston Wilkes Society received $9,930 to strengthen the Midlands Community Services Program for homeless ex-offenders. Funding supplemented existing services with consistent transportation and necessary clothing and tools to help clients obtain/ maintain stable housing and employment. Central Carolina Lutheran Outreach Center received $20,000 to offer English as a Second Language (ESL) programming for adults. Funding also assisted with after-school programming for middle school students including dual English/Spanish language study, basic math skills and resiliency/self-esteem components. College Summit received $30,000 to offer their program to high school seniors at Eau Claire High School, C.A. Johnson Preparatory Academy, Lower Richland High School and W.J. Keenan High School.  Programming includes a college-planning course which teaches students skills in organization, planning and self-advocacy to help them graduate from high school and reach their postsecondary destination.

Harvest Hope Food Bank received $10,000 for The Backpack Program, which provides weekly backpacks of child-friendly and nutritious food to fill the gap when free and reduced meals are not available. Funds provide food during weekends and holidays for children who attend Hyatt Park Elementary School.

Lexington School District One Educational Foundation received $13,426 for the Gilbert High School Summer Bridge and Transitional Program. The program targets incoming freshmen students who are at risk of failure and/or dropping out of school and helps prepare them for the demands of high school. Lutheran Family Services received $10,000 for Angel’s House, the first transitional housing facility in South Carolina for female homeless veterans. The program provides affordable transitional housing and helps the women utilize available communitybased support services. Mental Illness Recovery Center Inc. received $30,000 to help continue the Homeless Recovery Center (HRC), a community based drop-in center in downtown Columbia. Through this program, MIRCI gets the most vulnerable individuals who are chronically homeless, and have serious mental illness and substance use disorders, off the streets, engaged in treatment and into permanent supportive housing. Midlands Education and Business Alliance received $10,000 to provide dropout prevention training for sixth to twelfth grade teachers in selected schools in Richland and Lexington County school districts. The training provides teachers with strategies on a variety of issues and topics facing students, enabling them to work toward reduced dropout and absenteeism rates and increased graduation rates. Project Life: Positeen received $10,000 to assist with programming. The Yes I Can Runway program is an alternative program for students who are expelled or suspended from school, while the Summer of Innovation program provides a week-long workshop designed to improve Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education.

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Richland One Middle College Foundation received $17,000 for Richland One Middle College. The curriculum for eleventh and twelfth grade students consists of a comprehensive model of workplace field studies, school-wide days of service learning and dual credit accrual at Midlands Technical College. Salvation Army received $8,604 for the Emergency Basic Needs Assistance program. The program provides the necessary financial assistance and qualified case management to help clients establish and maintain stable housing, increase monthly income, and connect with agencies and resources that can bring about lifelong change. Save the Children Federation Inc. received $40,000 to provide in-school and after-school literacy programming at two elementary schools, BethuneBowman (Orangeburg County) and Manning (Clarendon County) Elementary. This literacy curriculum is specifically designed for children in grades K–5 in rural communities.

Nonprofit Management grants are mini-grants used to attend conferences or workshops, host trainings or meet other management needs:

Columbia Jewish Community Center received $1,000 towards the Steve Terner Camp Scholarship Fund. This scholarship helps provide funding for third through ninth grade students to attend Jewish overnight summer camps. Friendship Community Development Corporation received $1,000 for strategic planning to implement a Family Development Model in the Waverly/Lyons Street and Gonzales Gardens communities. George Rogers Foundation of the Carolinas Inc. received $1,000 for QuickBooks training for staff and board members. Newberry County Literacy Council received $1,000 to attend the International FAST (Families and Schools Together) Conference. Richland County CASA received $900 for a staff member to attend the 12th Annual National Conference on Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation Prevention.

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Sidney Park Outreach Ministries received $1,000 to hold a day-long board training session to focus on Columbia’s homeless population. South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations received $2,280 to provide scholarships to nonprofit representatives to attend the 2011 Annual SCANPO Conference. South Carolina Federation of Women and Youth Clubs Inc. received $1,000 to provide board leadership training on how to address domestic violence. Taw Caw Community Outreach Center received $1,000 for strategic planning. Youth Voices Inc. received $500 to attend the S.C. Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy 2011 Summer Institute.

CCAP Central Carolina AIDS Partnership (CCAP) is a community partnership between Central Carolina Community Foundation and AIDS United. Seven community organizations received funding totaling $150,000 for HIV/AIDS prevention education programs. These grants are made possible by national support from AIDS United and the Elton John AIDS Foundation and local support from the Community Foundation, New Morning Foundation and AIDS Benefit Foundation. Harriet Hancock Center Foundation received $20,000 for the YEAH program. This locally developed intervention is designed to reduce the number of new HIV infections in young men ages 16–24 through a supported peer education program. HopeHealth Inc. received $30,000 to provide the VOICES program to African American men and women who reside in low-income housing communities in Orangeburg County. This video based intervention helps participants to increase their knowledge of the transmission of HIV and reduce risk-related behaviors.


Competitive Grantmaking

Midlands Community Development Corporation received $20,000 for the Total Recovery Network. This will expand current HIV/AIDS prevention and outreach programs for youth ages 13-19 in the greater Columbia, Eastover, Hopkins and Gadsden areas of Richland County through implementation of the Focus on Youth curriculum, Draw the Line/ Respect the Line and Becoming A Responsible Teen programs.

Palmetto AIDS Life Support Services received $40,000 for project WISE and Community Promise. WISE creates an environment in which African American women living with HIV can make positive life changes that will lead to maintenance of risk reduction behavior changes and increase decision making confidence. Community Promise is an STD/ HIV prevention intervention for African American males, ages 17-45, that relies on role model stories and peers from the target population.

YWCA of the Upper Lowlands, Inc. received $20,000 for the Sisters Making Aware Resilient Transitions (SMART) Project. The curriculum is designed to increase condom use among sexually active African American women in two housing communities and the YWCA domestic violence/sexual assault shelter in Sumter.

Regional Endowments As part of their relationship with the Foundation, Chapin, Kershaw, Sumter, Orangeburg and Calhoun have established endowments specific to their areas to better serve local community needs. Each affiliate has set a clear purpose to enable neighbors, leaders, citizens, family and friends to provide for each other and their futures together as a community. A board of local community advisors provides leadership over the resources for the nonprofit organizations in their targeted areas. GREATER CHAPIN COMMUNITY ENDOWMENT AWARDED THE FOLLOWING GRANTS IN FISCAL YEAR 2011: American Legion Post 193 - Chapin received $3,600 to provide scholarships for 12 young men and women to attend Palmetto Boys State and Palmetto Girls State, week-long leadership and citizenship training programs. Explorer Post #11 received $5,000 to train young men and women from ages 14-21 about the function of the fire service as a possible career choice.  Funds helped to purchase new fire-fighting equipment used to provide the training. 

South Carolina Hispanic Outreach received $20,000 to recruit and train promotores (community leaders) in Fairfield, Kershaw, Lexington, Newberry, Richland and Saluda counties for the Latinos Contra SIDA program. These leaders conduct HIV prevention activities among low income Latinos and migrant farm workers in their communities. They also train soccer coaches from Lexington and Richland County Hispanic soccer leagues to conduct HIV Prevention education activities among their players.

Newberry County Memorial Hospital received $1,500 for educational and promotional materials for the Terrific Thursdays in Health program. The program addresses the need for health education due to increasing numbers of overweight and obese individuals so that they can make better health and life choices to manage their health.

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KERSHAW COUNTY ENDOWMENT AWARDED THE FOLLOWING GRANTS IN FISCAL YEAR 2011: The City of Camden received $1,000 for Coloring Kershaw County’s Legends. The program incorporates people, places and legends of Kershaw County into the third-grade Social Studies curriculum through a coloring book created by seventh-grade honor students.

Palmetto Project Inc. received $1,500 for the Carolina Hearing Aid Bank to provide hearing aids to low-income residents in Orangeburg and/or Calhoun counties.

Harvest Hope Food Bank received $1,000 to expand the capabilities of Harvest Hope’s Mobile Pantry Program into Kershaw County. Kershaw County Literacy Association received $1,000 for Read Aloud Kershaw County. The program is offered at Midway and Pine Tree Elementary Schools and helps develop successful, lifelong readers by encouraging children’s love of reading and learning. Reach Out and Read South Carolina received $1,000 to further develop a literacy-friendly waiting area at the Kershaw County Health Department. This area provides families with literacy based activities and resources. Sistercare Inc. received $500 for the Economics Against Abuse program. Staff work directly with survivors of domestic violence, using researchbased economic empowerment models to help them build financial independence and live violence-free.

Project Life: Positeen received $3,000 for Get Up, Get Out – Play. This obesity educational program gives students ages 13–20 an opportunity to participate in weekly sessions focused on exercising, learning to prepare food and monitoring their weight. Reach Out and Read South Carolina received $3,000 to further develop a literacy-friendly waiting area at the Orangeburg Family Health Center. This area provides families with literacy based activities and resources.

The Upton Trio received $1,000 to provide educational chamber music concerts to all third through fifth grade elementary students in Kershaw County public school, along with the Montessori School of Camden and Camden Military Academy. ORANGEBURG CALHOUN COMMUNITY FOUNDATION AWARDED THE FOLLOWING GRANTS DURING FISCAL YEAR 2011: Elloree Heritage Museum & Cultural Center received $3,000 for repair and upgrades to the upstairs porch of the museum building, including adding banisters and railings and replacing structural posts. Harvest Hope Food Bank received $3,000 to expand the capabilities of Harvest Hope’s Mobile Pantry Program into both Orangeburg and Calhoun counties. The program transports food and related items to people living in South Carolina’s rural communities. 26

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South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics received $3,000 to provide scholarships for five campers to participate in the Summer Science Program. The program provides a hands-on experience with science, math and technology for South Carolina middle schoolers through week-long, residential camps.


Competitive Grantmaking

SUMTER COMMUNITY FOUNDATION AWARDED THE FOLLOWING GRANTS DURING FISCAL YEAR 2011:

College Summit South Carolina received $1,710 to support high school seniors in Sumter County. Programming includes a college-planning course that teaches students organization, planning and self-advocacy skills to help them graduate from high school and reach their postsecondary destination. Harvest Hope Food Bank received $1,710 to expand the capabilities of Harvest Hope’s Mobile Pantry Program in Sumter County. The program transports food and related items to people living in South Carolina’s rural communities.

Academy of Columbia Foundation Established as a donor-advised fund with Central Carolina Community Foundation in 2001, the Academy of Columbia Foundation has identified a list of potential partners to enhance and improve the educational opportunities that target children and families in Richland School District One. The grants from this fund are awarded to those partner organizations who are invited to participate in the proposal process. Sandhills School received $11,750 to provide scholarships to 10 Richland One School District teachers to attend an Orton-Gillingham training program. The Orton-Gillingham methodology utilizes phonetics and emphasizes visual, auditory and kinesthetic learning styles. Sandhills School received $2,000 to provide students with “Why America Is Free” curriculum. The multi-week curriculum is a hands-on learning experience in which students explore the 18th century and learn about the events and heroes of the American Revolution as well as the principles upon which America was founded. Tutor Eau Claire received $15,000 for two literacy programs — TEC Tutorial and Preschool Phonemic Awareness. TEC Tutorial provides year-round reading intervention for low-income, school-age children and teens. The Preschool Phonemic Awareness program provides phonemic awareness activities for children attending small Eau Claire daycare centers.

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Knight Foundation Advised Fund The Community Foundation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation have long been philanthropic partners in the Columbia community. The Knight Foundation established their donor-advised fund here in 1993. In 2010, the Knight Foundation announced future grantmaking will focus on fostering an informed, engaged Columbia.

New this year, the Knight Foundation reserved a small amount of funding for Random Acts of Art grants. These mini-grants are used to fund organized ‘spontaneous’ arts events within the community. BeCo Productions received $1,991 to perform African Dancing and Drumming. This arts and cultural enrichment company serves to educate the community about the complexities of the various rhythms and dances from the Senegambia areas in Africa. 

This decision strengthens the Knight Foundation’s focus on ensuring that communities have the information they need to make decisions about their futures. Grants are currently awarded to fund collaborative literacy programs in Richland and Lexington counties. Reach Out and Read received $25,000 to work with 14 medical offices in Richland and Lexington counties to implement the evidence-based program model, School Readiness Initiative. This will create literacy-rich waiting areas and increased school readiness for the more than 12,500 children living in poverty in the two counties. SC Research Foundation received $25,000 for the innovative Puentes project. Through this program, Latino Community Ambassadors in Richland and Lexington counties are taught English as a second language and health literacy skills. Each Ambassador facilitates neighborhood meetings and shares crucial maternal and child health information in a culturally acceptable format, helping others to navigate and gain access to health resources. Midlands Education & Business Alliance (MEBA) received $25,000 for High School 101: A Program for Success. This program provides training and coaching services to Richland and Lexington County parents and public school educators. The training enables parents and educators to help students graduate from high school and be prepared to pursue further education, gainful employment and/or military service.

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Pocket Productions received $6,009 for the 2011-2012 Season of Artrageous. Together with the Arts Institute at USC, this series includes monthly performances that showcase local artists and USC students. South Carolina Philharmonic received $2,000 to take their “Where in the Midlands is Morihiko?” series to Mast General Store.


Competitive Grantmaking

Scholarships The Community Foundation manages various scholarship funds benefitting area college students. Scholarship funds allow our donors to help provide educational opportunities for future generations.  Many of our scholarship funds have been set up in honor or memory of a loved one or someone who has helped the donor become successful in life. A.C. Flora First Five Years Foundation John Bunge Roy Faulks Iesha Guinyard William MacInnis Zack and Rachel Clarkson Scholarship Sadaris Benjamin Donnie Stroman Daughters of the Holy Cross – Sara Hempley Scholarship Celeita McCoy First Choice Members Scholarship Melissa Fowler Diamond Herbert Gilbert Ruritan Scholarship Kayla Marie Black Handel-Carter Assistance Fund LeTesha Livingston William S. and Elizabeth B. Heath Scholarship Lindsay Breitwieser Walker Fickling William B. Foxworth Ja’Keon Green Precious Rivers Dr. Robert Howard/WHS Scholarship Angel Spigner Estelle Jones Memorial Scholarship Celeita McCoy

LinkScholars Program Fund Jhalen Miller Donnie Stroman Dr. William L. McDow Scholarship Caitlin Blackwell Terry A. McCoy Scholarship Senna Desjardins Jacqueline M. Miller Scholarship Lamonda Pete James Taylor NAIFA-SC Scholarship Elizabeth Heath Rogers and Meredith College Scholarship Caroline Beebe Lilie Hudson Michael Meek Meagan O’Keefe Valerie Palmieri Vincent Palmieri Hayley Pemberton Christina Portwood Meagan Rogers Rachel Smith Christopher West Bobbi Rossi Memorial Scholarship – Cardinal Newman Mary Katherine Hall Bobbi Rossi Memorial Scholarship – USC College of Nursing Amanda Friedlander Smart Matters Scholarship Emon Davis H. Eugene Webb Jr. Scholarship Jhalen Miller Woodlands’ Families Scholarship Kimberly Glover Tiffany Huggins

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of community

the Graduation Imperative:

what can 1% do?


If we told you that a 1 percent increase could create $534 million in income, what would you say? If we were talking about raising taxes, your response could vary greatly, but we’re not. We’re referring to the number of college graduates in our community.

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esearch shows that when the percentage of adults with college degrees rises by just 1 percent, a region will realize an increase of more than $534 million in annual income. The Foundation thinks that’s a very significant financial increase for 1 percent.

When the opportunity arose to participate in an initiative to help increase the Midlands’ college graduation rate, our board and staff deemed it a worthwhile effort, as our mission states that we ‘collaborate to develop creative solutions for community needs.’ Graduation Imperative is a regional collaboration that aims to increase two- and four-year college graduation rates and to connect talent within Columbia for a more vibrant community. Anchored around our region’s institutions of higher education, our strategy utilizes community-led initiatives to engage and develop college graduates. Columbia Opportunity Resource (COR), the Community Foundation and the Navigating Good to Great Foundation lead this collaborative effort. Together, we are building strategic partnerships with institutions of higher education, civic and business leaders, lawmakers and the faith-based community.

Graduation Imperative is in its early phases, but we are already hard at work. Thanks to a capacity grant from CEOs for Cities, Leslie Stiles serves as the project manager. Meetings with a group of key players are under way, including representatives from the S.C. Commission on Higher Education, Richland One Middle College, the Midlands Education and Business Alliance, the University of South Carolina, Columbia College, Midlands Technical College and South University. You might ask yourself, just how important is a college degree?

“It’s estimated that 68 PERCENT of all new jobs created between 2010 and 2018 will require a college degree,” says Leslie. “With a current postsecondary degree attainment rate of only 27 percent locally, we won’t have the qualified workers to fill them.”

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According to the Lumina Foundation, South Carolina requires a significant increase in college graduates by the year 2025 to remain competitive in the nation’s job market. Attaining this goal means increasing college success for a wide array of groups, including working adults and students of color as well as low-income and first generation students. The traditional model of a young adult entering college as a full-time student after high school no longer works. Leslie notes, “More than ever, students are entering college later in life, attending part-time and working full-time. This shift continues to grow as economic pressures halt college attendance and graduation.” More and more students cannot complete their higher education because they simply can’t afford it. Others see their friends and family members who have recently graduated working low-paying or part-time jobs that don’t utilize their degree or education. Students think, “Why bother? I’ll just end up in debt with no job to show for it.” “These are valid questions that require both short-term and long-term solutions,” Leslie says. “The fact remains that adults with college degrees make more money, are less likely to face unemployment in their lifetimes and are more likely to have health insurance.” Improving college retention is essential to economic growth and to attract and retain businesses in the Midlands. Companies can’t grow without trained people to fill jobs. Our region’s economic potential rests firmly on our ability to graduate talented, educated workers. It is key that business leaders join us in nurturing the bright, skilled students our communities need. Students working toward graduation will be motivated to finish their degrees and stay in Columbia when they see career opportunities available. Partnerships that create internships, apprenticeships and job shadowing opportunities are crucial.

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By working together to increase opportunities and encourage students to stay in school, we contribute to the success of our region. According to research by nonprofit CEOs for Cities, 58 percent of a city’s success, as measured by per capita income, is attributed to the percentage of the adult population with a college degree. In addition, the organization determined that if the nation’s top metropolitan areas increase graduation rates by just one percentage point, they could generate an extra $1.24 billion per year in national earnings. CEOs for Cities created the Talent Dividend Prize to encourage cities to cultivate their talent and realize their economic potential. They will award $1 million to the metropolitan area that achieves the greatest increase in post-secondary degrees per capita over a three-year period. The Columbia area is one of 57 metropolitan communities across the nation competing to increase post-secondary degree attainment by September 2014 and win the $1 million prize. Our community includes Richland, Lexington, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lee and Saluda counties. “Participating in this challenge boosts our determination to build a better future for our Midlands region,” Leslie says. “As the numbers show, regardless of whether or not we win the prize, increasing our college graduation rates will play a significant role in creating a bright and vibrant Columbia community.” We couldn’t agree more. S


Best of Philanthropy Awards When we think of philanthropy, we often think of very wealthy individuals, families or corporations who generously give of their resources to help others. But philanthropy doesn’t apply only to the wealthy; anyone can be a philanthropist. Ordinary people in our community make significant contributions every day by using their time, talents and treasures to give back to their communities. For the second year, we partnered with Columbia Metropolitan Magazine to present the Best of Philanthropy Awards: Honoring Our Community Champions at our annual celebration in September. Together with more than 200 others, we celebrated the philanthropic endeavors of our Community Champions who make giving back a priority for themselves, their family or their business. These Champions use their time, treasures and talents to improve the lives of others in our community. They don’t seek out recognition for what they are doing; they do it simply because they believe it’s the right thing to do. As our Champions demonstrate, philanthropy comes in many forms and sizes. The winners and their stories were profiled in Columbia Metropolitan Magazine and each was honored with an award and a $500 donation to the charity of their choice. “Honoring these individuals and organizations by celebrating their gifts and service is a wonderful way to fulfill our mission to promote, facilitate and increase philanthropy in the Midlands,” said CCCF President & CEO JoAnn Turnquist. “We look forward to continuing these awards at our annual celebration each year.”

A

C

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Local Business Champion: A. Kristian Niemi, Rosso Trattoria Italia Individual Champions (tie): B. Julia Colson and C. Cheri Brown Thompson

Photos: Bob Lancaster

Student Champions (tie): D. Morgan Polans and E. Gigi Shevchik Group Champions: F. Gilbert Elementary School Relay for Life Team

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Family Champions: G. Ken and Lisa Kasper a story of

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sto r i e s

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talk about giving

A Child’s First Donation Last year, CCCF President & CEO JoAnn Turnquist had a conversation with Catharine Aitken about a new program the Foundation was launching that spring, called Talk About Giving (TAG). The brainchild of Foundation board member Cathy Monetti, TAG is an initiative that seeks to create a new generation of givers by encouraging family conversation about philanthropy.

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“I’d had conversations about donating time and talents with my oldest son, Ian, but we’d never talked about donating our treasure,” remarks Catharine, mother of three young children ages 1–5. “I realized how few people really plan to give their money, which inspired me to have that conversation with him.” Last fall, Catharine wrote to the Foundation to share the experience that followed that conversation.

I wanted to teach Ian a little more about money than how to rack up change for the arcades. So I glued three empty baby food jars to a piece of cardboard and wrote a word on each — ‘Spend,’ ‘Save,’ and ‘Give.’ I instructed him to dedicate 50 percent of his earnings to the spend jar, 25 percent to save and 25 percent to give.

When Ian turned five a few weeks ago, we started giving him an allowance. Remembering what you had told me about the program the Foundation was starting — to teach kids at an early age about giving — I decided to do some research and ask friends how they handled allowances.

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In October, we joined one of Ian’s classmates, Evan, and his family as they participated in Palmetto Health Foundation’s Walk for Life. We walked to honor Evan’s mother who had passed away from breast cancer the previous year. That morning, Ian had 50 cents in his give jar. He found a gold dollar coin his grandfather had given him and deposited it into his spend jar. Then, Ian paused for a moment to look at the three jars and moved two quarters from his spend jar to the give jar. “Now I have four quarters to give for Evan’s mommy,” he said. Ian put his money in a little plastic bag. And when we joined Evan’s Cancer Crushers team at his house later that morning, Ian handed Evan his dollar for the Palmetto Health Breast Center. My son’s first donation… thanks for the inspiration. Catharine and Frank now plan to give each child an allowance, once they reach the age of five, to help them learn about saving money. As evidenced by Ian’s gesture, lessons learned will also be about giving.

“People feel differently about the best way to handle allowances and money, and there is no one correct method,” Catharine says. “What I’ve learned, though, is that parents should always use the subject as a teaching tool.” Catharine found the empty baby food jars the most appropriate method to teach Ian about how to use his earnings.

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“At his age, I felt it was important to have something very tangible, something that he can touch and see,” Catharine says. “Clear jars allow him to actually watch as the coins stack up.” Ian’s parents’ own giving habits influence his willingness to give as much as his jar system does. They make it a point to donate money from their own ‘spend jar’ in situations where Ian can physically see them making the donation. At their community’s fall festival, Ian watched Catharine write a check for charity and hand it to the organization. And Ian’s awareness of philanthropy is growing in other ways. As with many children, he has always loved to throw change into the fountains at Riverbanks Zoo, purely for the fun of tossing a coin in the air and making a wish. “We’d never talked about what that money was being used for,” Catharine says. Then one day while at the zoo, she explained to Ian that the money is used to save animals that are in danger and need help. “He got so excited about that,” Catharine says. “He tried to find every place at the zoo where he could give more.” Their zoo trip ended, but Ian had one quarter left. As they were leaving, Ian approached a little boy at the entrance, held out his quarter and said, “I just saved some animals today. Take this quarter, and you can save some animals too.” Catharine’s honest, frequent conversations with her son about giving undoubtedly impact him in the most positive way. “We tend to think of American children as pretty selfish,” says Catharine. “But since talking with Ian about the impact his money can have when he shares it, all Ian has done with the money in his jars, so far, is give.” A pretty strong endorsement of the power of Talk About Giving, if we do say so ourselves. S

To learn more about Talk About Giving, please visit www.TalkAboutGiving.org, or call the Foundation at (803) 254-5601.

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Partnerships & Initiatives The Community Foundation plays a key role in enhancing the quality of life in the Midlands, not only through its service to donors and its grantmaking, but also through special initiatives that the Board of Trustees views as important in the community. The Community Foundation examines the needs in the community and looks for opportunities to be a convener for innovative projects and collaborations with other organizations. We seek to be a proactive, collaborative leader who can help develop creative solutions that will have a significant, measurable impact on our community.

The Graduation Imperative is a regional collaboration that was formed to increase educational attainment rates and connect talent into the Columbia market for a more vibrant community. Anchored around our region’s institutions of higher education, our strategy focuses on community-led initiatives to engage and develop college graduates. By improving college retention, we will encourage economic growth and development in the Midlands. The Graduation Imperative is led by Columbia Opportunity Resource (COR) and the Navigating Good to Great Foundation, with assistance from CCCF and strategic partnerships with several institutions of higher education. To learn more, visit graduationimperative.org.

Literacy service providers, educators, business leaders, legislators and passionate volunteers are determined to break the intergenerational cycle of low literacy in our state. Literacy 2030 unites these stakeholders under an admittedly aspirational and yet important goal — reaching 100 percent literacy in the Midlands of South Carolina by the year 2030 — and works to connect, equip and support them for the journey.  The first step is to undertake a regional planning process that will bring the community together to address an issue so large that no one organization can solve it alone. The Foundation is working with the national organization Literacy Powerline to assist in this process. In March we will unveil the literacy plan and the next steps to move us toward our goal. For more information, visit literacy2030.org.

Talk About Giving (TAG) is an initiative of the Community Foundation that supports families in raising generous, community-minded children through active involvement in family giving and service. Statistics show that families who give — and who actively teach their children about giving — are more likely to transfer a commitment to giving to the next generation. It is our hope that TAG will encourage parents to start the conversation about giving at an early age and provide tips and resources to assist in doing so. The program provides many resources to start the conversation including daily tips, information, an interactive pledge and the Talk About Giving card game. Find out more at talkaboutgiving.org.

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Donors The support of our donors allows us to continue our philanthropic work in the Midlands community each year. This work is only possible because of the many generous donors who support the Foundation’s mission. We thank each donor who has supported us during the last year. The following donors have contributed $250 or more to support the Foundation’s operations from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. This includes in-kind gifts. FOUNDATION FELLOW $2,500+ AIDS United BB&T of South Carolina Dr. and Mrs. William Babcock Suzan D. Boyd and M. Edward Sellers Kathy Brousseau Colonial Life Columbia Metropolitan Magazine Delta Dental Elliott Davis LLC First Citizens Bank of South Carolina Bruce W. Hughes Mike Kelly Law Group LLC Mott Administrative Endowment Fund Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Nord Cascading Unitrust Escrow Fund Poston Family Fund Schmoyer & Company LLC Estate of Lt. Col. (Ret) Ruth K. Sidisin South Carolina Bank and Trust Southern Wine & Spirits of South Carolina Mary Averill Stanton Administrative Endowment Fund The State Media Company Stivers Subaru Christy and Ken Taucher Donor Advised Fund JoAnn Turnquist Pat and Susie VanHuss Rick and Brenda Wheeler FOUNDATION SUPPORTER $1,000-$2,499 Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Adams Colliers International Cyberwoven LLC Mr. and Ms. Jerry Davis Kirkman and Kathleen Finlay Fisher & Phillips LLP Mr. Sean Hanley David Hodges Lloyd and Doris Liles Donor-Advised Fund Cory Manning and Tina Cundan Ethan and Shannon Nord Palmetto Computer Consulting Mr. Rick Palyok Prysmian Cables and Systems USA LLC Republic National Distributing Company Ronald and Hannah Rogers Mr. Terry Schmoyer Jr. Marshall and Frances Shearouse Fund David and Julianne Sojourner 38

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Nancy Spencer Steele Thomas LLC Robert B. Thompson Hagood and Elizabeth Tighe Samuel C. and Mary E. Baskin Waters Foundation Fund FOUNDATION FRIEND $250-$999 Aleph Wines Corporation Mr. and Mrs. David C. Allison Mr. Marc Antonetti Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Bannon Mac and Leslie Bennett Charlotte and Joe Berry Joe Blanchard Mrs. Natalie C. Britt Mr. Rick Brittain The Brookland Foundation Ms. Linda Bush and Mr. Carrol Josey Cantey & Company Inc. Billy and Nikki Cantey Mr. R. Jason Caskey Mr. and Mrs. Sidney H. Caughman Mrs. Carri Clark-Sorensen Mr. and Mrs. Freeman W. Coggins Jr. Columbia Living Magazine Ms. Aubria Corbitt Mr. Michael C. Crapps M. Elizabeth Crum, Esq. Jimmy Derrick Diamond Creek Vineyards Chris Dionne Bill Ebert Mr. Christopher Edwards Elkins Financial Mr. and Mrs. John S. Goettee Daniel K. Gooch Mike and Robin Gorman The Gourmet Shop Inc. Mr. L. Marion Gressette III Mr. Henry B. Haitz III C. Carroll and Susan B. Heyward Mr. and Mrs. Carey Hite Mr. and Mrs. William C. Hubbard Mr. Ellis M. Knight Mr. Thomas Lash Mr. and Mrs. John H. Lumpkin Jr. McGee Real Estate Company Inc. Mr. Ted O. McGee Jr. Mr. David O. McPherson Dr. and Mrs. Fred Medway Ms. Elizabeth Moffatt Tim and Catherine Monetti Ben and Henriette Morris Family Fund


donors

Steve and Gail Morrison Ms. Kerrie M. Newell The Nord Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Parker The R.L. Bryan Company The Rackes Group Mr. Ben Rast Mr. Henry Redmond Mr. Ben Rex Matthew Richardson Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Rickenman Mrs. Kimberly R. Rochester Curt and Donna Rone Ms. Patricia K. Shelley Ms. Martha Scott Smith Mr. Stewart Sneed Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Staton Howard B. Stravitz Mr. and Mrs. Joe Turbeville Pat and Susie VanHuss Donor-Advised Escrow Fund W. B. Guimarin and Company WXRY Katherine Wells and James Flanagan Mr. Theodore L. Williams Louise McLaurin Womble The following donors have contributed $250 or more to established component funds at the Community Foundation from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011. 3T Unlimited Inc. AIDS Benefit Foundation South Carolina AIDS United Deane and Roger Ackerman The Aloha Trust Gayle O. Averyt BB&T of South Carolina George and Ford Bailey Mr. and Mrs. James F. Bailey Ms. Patricia L. Barnett Beasley Photography Donald Beres Boyd and Cheryl Black Mrs. Jean W. Blount Suzan D. Boyd and M. Edward Sellers Ms. Claire Holding Bristow Mr. and Mrs. James Burns David Burrell Mr. Ashley Byrd Ms. Brenda Byrd Mr. Roger Byrd C. F. Evans & Company Glenda Cannon Edward Cantey Non-Grantor CLUT Mr. Aric Canty Capital Rehabilitation The Margaret G. Carswell Fund Chapin Sunrise Rotary Club Children’s Miracle Network Ms. Margaret G. Clay Coastal Community Foundation of SC

Colonial Life Columbia Film Society Community Foundation of The Lowcountry Inc. Mr. and Mrs. William W. Cram William Crawford Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Creech Senator Ronnie Cromer Cyberwoven LLC DCR Music, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Dade Bill and Peggy Danielson Danville Business Advisors LLC J. Donald Dial Jr. Otha R. and Tanya C. Dillihay Dixon Wells Robert F. and Beverly D. Dozier Dr. and Mrs. Edward W. Duffy Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William DuRant Eastern Carolina Community Foundation Bill Ebert Beverly Edgell William Edmonds Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina Inc. Ellett Brothers Ellis Lawhorne & Sims PA Ms. Melissa Eubanks Ms. Patsy P. Farr Wilson and Claire Farrell Frank A. Floyd Jr. Foundation for the Carolinas Mr. Stephen Frocchi Gignilliat Realty & Management Gilbert Community Club Gilbert Community Park Mr. Dale Goldman Linell and Chris Goodall Isaac Goodwin Ms. Carolyn K. Green Mr. Mark Gregory Mr. and Mrs. James W. Haltiwanger Jr. Mr. Frank Hames Richard C. and Katharine C. Handel Mr. and Mrs. Henri G. Hart Ms. Lillian Hayes James Heard Scotty Heatherly Scott and Emilee Hendrix C. Carroll and Susan B. Heyward Leslie Hipp Dr. and Mrs. Clare C. Hodge Michael and Michelle Hogue Hootie at Bulls Bay Inc. Bob and Ruth Horger William R. Horton and Mary R. Major Bob Howie Ashley and Brian Huff Mr. Arthur T. Hughes Bruce W. Hughes Mr. Thomas Hughes The iRecycle Fund James Jett

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donors

Mr. Cory Jones Mr. John T. Jones Jr. Charles Kahn Edward and Dorothy Kendall Foundation KershawHealth Foundation The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Know Exercise Ms. Barbara Krebs LRADAC Lloyd S. Liles Mark Lipe Lipscomb Family Foundation Inc. Lyn and Gene Long M. B. Kahn Construction Company The M.B. Kahn Foundation Inc. Cory Manning and Tina Cundan John and Mary Jane Martin David Masich Mass Mutual Jamie Young McCulloch McDonald’s Mr. W. M. McDowell Dr. and Mrs. Earl B. McFadden Sally T. McKay Ms. Lee A. McLeod Mike Kelly Law Group LLC Miller-Motte Technical College Ms. Jacqueline M. Miller Miss Duncan Lyman Wellford Scholarship Pageant Miss Florence Scholarship Miss South Carolina Scholarship Organization Robert E. Moffit Mr. and Mrs. Tom Monahan Mrs. Anne Marie Moncure Dr. John Moncure Monday After The Masters Pro-Am Golf Tournament Charles and Mary Monteith Delores C. Monteith Steve and Gail Morrison Rev. Diane A. Moseley Mr. I. Harby Moses Motley Rice LLC Mungo Charitable Fund Deloris Mungo Mr. and Mrs. Steven Mungo The Nash Agency Inc. William H. Neely New Morning Foundation Nexsen Pruet Jacobs & Pollard LLC The Evan W. Nord Charitable Remainder Trust Mr. Robert F. Norton Sue and Lyn Odom Ricky Ott David G. and Joan R. Owen Ms. Lois B. Parsons Diane Hill Perry Miss SC 1982 & L.R. Perry Jr. M.D. Lee D. and Janice B. Petty Mr. Charles Platt Mr. John Popp The Poston Family Fund

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Joe and Pat Powell The R.L. Bryan Company Redd Family Charitable Lead Trust Sarah Redd Mr. Timothy Rice Rogers Townsend & Thomas PC Bill Rogers Ms. Robin Russell Ms. Lillian L. Sachs Mr. Terry Schmoyer Jr. Ann Marie Scott Select Health of South Carolina Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Shaw Ms. Elizabeth Simmons Ms. Louetta A. Slice Wilbur and Diane Smith Snelling Staffing Services Eloise Snyder Foundation Ms. Deb Sofield South Carolina Bank and Trust South Carolina Philharmonic Southeastern Freight Lines Spartanburg County Foundation Bobby Stepp and Meredith Manning Mr. and Mrs. Randall Stewart J. West and Freda S. Summers Donna Thorne and William Shrader Judy Tighe Town of Chapin The Travel Connection of South Carolina LLC UCI Medical Affiliates of SC Inc Pat and Susie VanHuss The Walker Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Claude M. Walker Jr. Dr. Mary Baskin Waters and Mr. Samuel C. Waters H. Dallon Weathers Family Fund Estate of Mary Christine Webb Milford H. Wessinger “FLIP” CRUT Mr. Larry C. Weston, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt Wheeler Susan P. and Stephen K. Wiggins Wilkinson High Class of 1960 Wilson Financial Group Miriam A. Wilson Woodward Financial Advisors Margaret and Chris Yeakel Dr. and Mrs. William F. Young Mohammed Yousefzadeh Mr. and Mrs. George Zara Lee and Nancy Zimmerman Community Foundation staff have made every effort to list information in this report correctly and apologize for any errors or omissions. Please contact our office with corrections.


Memorials Sadly, this last year brought the loss of two individuals whose generosity and service have made our community a better place to live and work. We honor their philanthropic spirit, a spirit that is not forgotten, but will live on through their good works. Among their many other contributions to our community, we would like to recognize these individuals’ support of the Community Foundation. Carolyn M. Holderman Carolyn joined the Foundation staff in 2009 to oversee the BGTIME program through a grant from the Knight Foundation. Even after her paid role ended, Carolyn volunteered her time to continue the work of the program. Lt. Col. (Ret) Ruth K. Sidisin Ruth left a bequest to the Community Foundation in appreciation for our role in starting a certified nursing assistant training program through the Sumter County Adult Education in the early 1990s.

Staff Our dedicated staff is committed not only to the Foundation, but more importantly, to assisting the community as a whole. We work with donors, nonprofits and community partners to create a better quality of life for all. We are always accessible to you, so please don’t hesitate to contact us directly with questions, ideas or concerns. JoAnn M. Turnquist President & CEO joann@yourfoundation.org, x323

Kelly Rogers Staff Accountant kelly@yourfoundation.org, x330

Jo Bull Chief Operating Officer jo@yourfoundation.org, x326

Kristin W. Williamson Interactive Marketing Manager kristin@yourfoundation.org, x328

Tonia E. Cochran Director of Marketing & Communications tonia@yourfoundation.org, x329 Edward E. Conroy, CPA Chief Financial Officer edward@yourfoundation.org, x325 Ellen Shuler Hinrichs Director of Community Philanthropy ellen@yourfoundation.org, x322 Veronica L. Pinkett-Barber Program Officer veronica@yourfoundation.org, x331

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Board and Committee Members The Foundation is fortunate to have committed and dedicated individuals willing to volunteer their time, talents and resources to help us achieve our mission. We thank the following individuals for their service to our Foundation and our community. Board of Trustees J. Hagood Tighe, Esq., Chair Judith M. Davis, Vice Chair Bruce W. Hughes, Secretary/Treasurer Scott R. Adams John Baker** Cheryl L. Behymer* J. Mac Bennett Sharon W. Bryant** R. Jason Caskey Chris D. Christiansen Love Collins III* Aubria Corbitt* Susan Kenney Cotter** Michael C. Crapps Rita Bragg Cullum** Eric M. Elkins John S. Goettee* L. Marion Gressette III Henry B. Haitz III C. Carroll Heyward David G. Hodges Jackie Howie Katharine M. Hubbard* D. Michael Kelly Ellis M. Knight James K. Lehman* John Lumpkin* Ted O. McGee Jr. Catherine R. Monetti Donna C. Northam* Linda O’Bryon** David Peterson** John C. Pollok** Barbara Rackes Ben Rex** George W. Rogers A. Eugene Rountree Terry K. Schmoyer Jr. Martha Scott Smith David C. Sojourner Jr.* Nancy Spencer Susie H. VanHuss *Term ended June 30, 2011 **Term began July 1, 2011

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Central Carolina AIDS Partnership Advisory Board J. Hagood Tighe, Esq., Chair Julie Ann Avin Jo Bull Sheila Clause Juanita Farmer Lewis Hicks Carmen Hampton Julious Deadra Lawson-Smith Michel Moore Pat Patterson Elsa Pardo Donna Richter Jonathan Robertson JoAnn Turnquist Charles Weathers Sr. Wine Festival Advisory Committee Fred Medway, Chair Clarissa T. Adams David C. Allison Richard F. Bannon Ali Borchardt Billy Cantey Freeman W. Coggins Jr. Cory Manning Noelle Norton Rick Palyok Terry K. Schmoyer Jr. Howard Stravitz, Esq. Sandy Strick Bob Thompson Susie H. VanHuss Brenda T. Wheeler Ted Williams Wine Festival YP Gala Committee Joey Cochran, Chair  Ashley Batson C. Mark Bokesch Erin Brenan Nicole Brown Whitney Chisholm  Bill Hefty David Hodges Lauren Johnson Erin McCaskill Sherri Mims Ashley Mulvey Jernell Simmons  Stephanie Stuckey

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Affiliate Organizations

As part of their relationship with the Foundation, Chapin, Kershaw, Sumter, Orangeburg and Calhoun have established endowments specific to their areas to better serve local community needs. A board of local community advisors provides leadership over the resources for the nonprofit organizations in their targeted areas. Greater Chapin Community Endowment Gary Schmedding, Chair Doug Clary, Vice Chair Toni Brown, Secretary Erin Long, Treasurer** Graham Adams** James Burn Thurston Chavis Jr.* Lil Hayes Ray Hunt Chris Koon* Scott MacFarland Fontaine McNamara Suzanne Odom Gregg Ross Bart Teal Robert “Skip” Wilson Jr.* *Term ended June 2011 **Term began October 2011


Kershaw County Endowment Pauline W. Lampshire, Chair Carolyn J. Hampton, Secretary* Gracie Adamson** Harriett C. Brevard* Mary Virginia Clark Hope Cooper* Debra L. Edwards Kay D. Kinard Vivian B. Metze Fred Ogburn Jane M. Peacock Robert J. Sheheen, Esq. C. Howard Varn Jr., DMD Sylvia Upton Wood

Supporting Organizations

*Term ended June 2011 **Term began July 2011

Columbia Jewish Foundation was established to help maintain and support a Jewish community center in the Columbia area that provides social services and recreational programs for use by older adults and the general community.

Orangeburg Calhoun Community Foundation Freda S. Summers, Chair Susan D. Webber, Vice Chair Dodd Buie III Sarah B. Coggins** David L. Coleman Janet F. Fields Trudy R. Frierson Donnie Hilliard Randy Snell* Ann T. Summers Braxton B. Wannamaker Dewall Waters Christopher M. Worley *Term ended December 2010 ** Term began January 2011

Sumter Community Foundation Philip G. Palmer, CPA, Chair Johnny B. Hilton, Vice Chair William E. DuRant Jr., Esq., Secretary John M. Brabham Jr. Kathleen Fox Creech Caron T. DuRant John B. Jackson John T. Jones Jr. Lee A. McLeod* Hubert D. Osteen Jr.* Lorin P. Palmer* Victoria L. Shaw* Larry C. Weston Melissa H. White William F. Young *Term ended June 2011

Local Midlands organizations and individuals have established endowments to focus support on specific areas of interest, including the Columbia Jewish Foundation and the New Morning Foundation. Each of these supporting organizations operates with its own grantmaking criteria.

Columbia Jewish Foundation Board of Directors Harvey A. Helman Bruce W. Hughes Alan B. Kahn Robert M. Kriegshaber   Susie H. VanHuss New Morning Foundation is a non-partisan private-sector longterm initiative to improve young people’s reproductive health education, counseling and clinical services throughout South Carolina. For additional information visit newmorningfoundation.org. New Morning Foundation Board of Directors J. Robert Shirley, President Wilbur E. Johnson, Vice President D. Michael Kelly, Treasurer Traci Young Cooper Barbara Kelley Duncan Bonnie Adams Kapp Robert F. Key, CFA Deborah Livingston Wendi J. Nance Beth Richardson JoAnn Turnquist Charles C. Weathers Sr. H. Dallon Weathers Deborah C. Williamson, dha, msn, cnm

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Consolidated Financial Statements As of June 30 2011 2010 Assets Cash and Cash Equivalents 5,727,250 3,668,506 Investments 70,465,344 54,761,602 Interest in Charitable Trusts and Life Insurance 21,588,732 21,034,083 Other 217,628 250,493 Total Assets $ 97,998,954 79,714,684 Liabilities Liabilities, Miscellaneous 56,520 63,855 Grants Payable 268,614 261,878 Funds Held for Agency Endowments 5,809,636 4,665,589 Funds Held for Supporting Organizations 4,792,708 4,230,671 Total Liabilities $ 10,927,478 9,221,993 Net Assets Unrestricted 50,765,849 37,076,254 Temporarily Restricted 21,473,352 18,861,583 Permanently Restricted 14,832,275 14,554,854 Total Net Assets 87,071,476 70,492,691 Total Liabilities and Net Assets $ 97,998,954 79,714,684 Public Support and Revenue Total Contributions and Special Events 15,551,665 3,503,721 Less: Amounts Received for Agency Endowments (447,568) (167,901) Net Contributions 15,104,097 3,335,820 Total Investment Income 10,780,091 5,381,478 Less: Investment Income for Agency Endowments (1,001,780) (514,067) Net Investment Income (Includes Unrealized Losses) 9,778,311 4,867,411 Revenues from Charitable Trusts 1,889,430 1,400,551 Other Income 77,104 68,517 Total Support and Revenue $ 26,848,942 9,672,299 Expenses Grants and Related Expenses 9,875,753 5,842,905 Less: Grants Disbursed from Agency Endowments (259,561) (224,623) Total Program Services 9,616,192 5,618,282 Investment Management 55,924 53,307 Less: Expenses Allocated to Agency Endowments (5,046) (4,885) Net Investment Management 50,878 48,422 Grants Management and Fundraising 583,187 493,214 Trust Beneficiary Payments 19,900 19,900 Total Grants and Expenses 10,270,157 6,179,818 Increase (Decrease) in Net Assets Net Assets, Beginning of Year Net Assets, End of Year $

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16,578,785 3,492,481 70,492,691 67,000,210 87,071,476 70,492,691


Mission Statement Central Carolina Community Foundation’s mission is to promote, facilitate and expand philanthropy to create a sustainable impact within our community through responsible giving. To fulfill our mission we: • Encourage donors to make effective charitable giving decisions. • Collaborate to develop creative solutions for important community needs. • Nurture and strengthen community organizations. • Build a substantial endowment to provide for community needs for generations to come.

2711 Middleburg Drive, Suite 213 Columbia, SC 29204 803.254.5601 803.799.6663 fax www.yourfoundation.org


2711 Middleburg Drive, Suite 213 Columbia, SC 29204 803.254.5601 803.799.6663 fax www.yourfoundation.org


2011 Annual Report