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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome to CCBC Message from the President Vision, Mission, Values, & Goals Campus Map Academic Calendar Accreditation Statement Becoming a Student Admissions Requirements Registration Financial Information Academic Information Academic Support Student Life Programs of Study Continuing Education Division Degree Plans Associate Degrees - Transfer Associate Degrees - Career Certificates Diplomas Course Descriptions Administration & Faculty


INFORMATION Community College of Beaver County 1 Campus Drive Monaca, PA 15061 Campus Locations Center Township Campus 1 Campus Drive Monaca, PA 15061 Aviation Sciences Center 125 Cessna Drive Beaver Falls, PA 15010 Website www.ccbc.edu Important Telephone Numbers Center Township Campus 724-480-2222 Aviation Sciences Center 724-480-3600 Information & Registration Center 724-480-3500 Toll Free 1-800-335-0222 Policy on Nondiscrimination Community College of Beaver County does not discriminate in admission or employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, qualifying disability, veteran’s status, age, or national origin. Accreditation Community College of Beaver County is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-2680 / 267-284-5000 • Fax 215-662-5501 • www.msche.org The Middle States Accreditation attests that the Commission on Higher Education considers the institution to be offering its students the educational opportunities implied by its objectives. CCBC is also approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and is certified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for education and training of veterans. This certification enables veterans to receive VA benefits while attending classes. Catalog Disclaimer This catalog is published for informational purposes. The information in the catalog is not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. Community College of Beaver County reserves the right to change, at any time, without notice, graduation requirements, fees and other charges, curriculum course structure and content, and such matters as may be within its control, notwithstanding any information set forth in this catalog. Community College of Beaver County will make every effort to keep students advised of such changes.


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WELCOME TO CCBC

GREETINGS FROM THE PRESIDENT Community colleges occupy a unique place in the landscape of higher education in America. We provide access to learning opportunities for all members of our community. Whether you never completed high school, you recently graduated from high school with honors or you haven’t attended school in many years, we have programs and services that help to make your goals for the future become a reality. Our commitment to serve this broad range of educational needs is a public trust that has caused us to create an open and inviting learning atmosphere reflecting the values and aspirations of those we serve. For more than 40 years, CCBC has provided opportunities for individuals to achieve their personal and career goals through educational programs, learning opportunities, and support services. Over the past year, enrollment with CCBC has reached record levels as more and more students recognize the value and the quality of the educational opportunities we provide. With a major renovation and modernization of the campus now completed, we have expanded our ability to effectively serve the needs and aspirations of our students and our region. As President, I believe our communities should be extremely pleased with the learning opportunities the College provides. Whether you are a high school student or recent high school graduate searching for your future career, a working adult seeking to prepare for a better job, or a person seeking educational challenges or additional knowledge, I invite you to explore the opportunities available at CCBC. You will find outstanding dedication and support from our employees, and we promise to help you feel comfortable and confident on your educational journey. Take time to visit our website and explore the range of learning opportunities available to you, then imagine the potential you could realize by becoming a student. We are the beginning to your road to your future, and I look forward to seeing you at the Community College of Beaver County. Joe D. Forrester, Ed.D.


VISION, MISSION, VALUES, & GOALS VISION Community College of Beaver County will be an active partner in expanding educational opportunities and shaping economic growth.

MISSION Community College of Beaver County will help shape the future by: - Equipping individuals with knowledge and skills to further their education, acquire meaningful employment, and enhance the quality of their lives. - Being a leader in developing partnerships which will promote community development and expand the economic potential of the region. - Creating opportunities for lifelong learning and personal enrichment. - Adapting to the needs of the region.

VALUES We believe that: - The essence of education is to change lives. - The growth of the individual is our primary focus. - We are committed to the success of ALL students. - Our role goes beyond the transmission of knowledge. - Learning is demonstrated by the application of knowledge. - An educated workforce is key to the economic growth and expansion of our region. - Learning is life long. - Quality and integrity are essential for the success of our institution and our students. - ALL employees contribute to the success of our students, making their continued professional development critical. - Critical thinking and technological literacy are essential for personal and professional success. - Innovation enhances learning. - Developing leaders throughout the organization will build the capacity of the college and the community.

INSTITUTIONAL GOALS Student Success - Become a learning community by supporting student success through educational programs provided in diverse and accessible formats. Community and Economic Development - Partner with businesses, organizations, educational institutions, and governmental agencies to enhance economic opportunities for the region. Organizational Development - Create a culture that expects openness, collaboration and mutual respect and embraces innovation and professional development. Resources - Develop and allocate resources which sustain the institution and encourage its growth and development.


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Student Services Center Community Education Center Visual & Fine Arts Center Science & Technology Center Administrative Services Center Health Sciences Center Athletics & Events Center Maintenance Center Learning Resources Center


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ACADEMIC SCHEDULE FALL SEMESTER 2010 Date

Event

March 29, 2010 Monday Fall schedules on campus April 5-June 4, 2010 May 1, 2010 June 1-August 6, 2010 July 30, 2010 August 6, 2010 Friday August 9-August 20, 2010 August 12, 2010 Thursday August 19 & 20, 2010 Thursday/Friday August 20, 2010 Friday August 23, 2010 Monday September 6, 2010 Monday September 10, 2010 Friday September 13, 2010 Monday October 5, 2010 Tuesday October 15, 2010 Friday October 15, 2010 Friday October 23, 2010 Saturday November 1, 2010 Monday November 12 2010 Friday November 15, 2010 Monday November 25-27, 2010 Thursday-Saturday November 29, 2010 Monday December 1, 2010 Wednesday December 3, 2010 Friday December 17, 2010 Friday December 20, 2010 Monday

Fall pre-registration for returning students Deadline for returning students to apply for Financial Aid Fall pre-registration for new students Deadline for new students to apply for Financial Aid Last date for payment of tuition for pre-registration Open registration, all students Freshman Orientation Faculty orientation/meetings Last day to register for classes Day and evening classes begin LABOR DAY HOLIDAY Last day to drop with a 100% refund Verification rosters due Professional Development Day-no classes Spring 2011 schedules on campus Last day to drop a course without faculty permission Deadline for new students to apply for Financial Aid for Spring 2011 Spring 2011 pre-registration begins-returning students Last day to withdraw from classes Spring 2011 pre-registration begins-new students THANKSGIVING VACATION Classes resume Last day to apply for December graduation Last day for payment of tuition for Spring Last day of classes FINAL GRADES DUE-9:00 a.m.

SPRING SEMESTER 2011 Date October 15, 2010 Friday Nov. 1-Dec. 3, 2010 Nov. 15-Dec. 3, 2010 December 3, 2010 Friday Dec. 6 – 22, 2010 January 3 – 7, 2011 January 7, 2011 Friday January 7, 2011 Friday January 10, 2011 Monday January 17, 2011 Monday January 28, 2011 Friday January 28, 2011 Friday March 1, 2011 Tuesday March 4, 2011 Friday March 7 – 12, 2011 Monday-Saturday March 21, 2011 Monday April 4, 2011 Monday April 8, 2011 Friday April 22 & 23, 2011 Friday-Saturday May 3, 2011 Tuesday May 9, 2011 Monday May 12, 2011 Thursday May 12, 2011 Thursday

Event Spring 2011 schedules on campus Spring 2011 returning student registration Spring 2011 new student registration Last day for payment of tuition for Spring Semester Open registration, all students Open registration, all students Faculty orientation/meetings Last day to register for classes Day and evening classes begin Martin Luther King Day-no classes Last day to drop with a 100% refund Verification rosters due Last day to apply for May graduation Last day to drop a course without faculty permission Spring Break Summer and Fall 2011 schedules on campus Fall & Summer 2011 pre-registration begins Last day to withdraw from classes Easter Break-no classes Finals begin Last day of classes FINAL GRADES DUE-9:00 a.m. Commencement


SUMMER SEMESTER 2011 Date Event March 21, 2011 Monday Summer & Fall schedules on campus April 4, 2011 Monday Summer & Fall pre-registration begins April 21, 2011 Thursday Last day for payment of tuition – all sessions May 13, 2011 Friday Last day to register for classes-13wk, 12wk, and 1st 6wk sessions May 16, 2011 Monday Classes begin - 13 wk, 12wk, and 1st 6 wk sessions May 23, 2011 Monday Last day for 100% refund – 1st 6 wk session May 31, 2011 Tuesday Last day for 100% refund – 13 wk and 12 wk sessions May 30, 2011 Monday Memorial Day - no classes June 3, 2011 Friday Last day to drop without faculty permission-1st 6wk session June 16, 2011 Thursday Last day to withdraw – 1st 6 wk session June 24, 2011 Friday Last day of classes – 1st 6 wk session June 24, 2011 Friday Last day to drop without faculty permission 12 wk session June 24, 2011 Friday Last day to register for 2nd 6wk session June 27, 2011 Monday First day of classes – 2nd 6 wk session June 28, 2011 Tuesday Final grades due – 9:00 a.m. – 1st 6 wk session June 29, 2011 Wednesday Last day to drop without faculty permission - 13 wk session July 4, 2011 Monday Independence Day Observance - no classes July5, 2011 Tuesday Last day for 100% refund – 2nd 6 wk session July 15, 2011 Friday Last day to drop without faculty permission – 2nd 6 wk session July 22, 2011 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes – 12 wk session July 27, 2011 Wednesday Last day to withdraw from classes – 13 wk session July 28, 2011 Thursday Last day to withdraw from classes – 2nd 6 wk session August 1, 2011 Monday Last day to apply for August graduation August 5, 2011 Friday Last day of classes – 12 wk & 2nd 6 wk sessions August 9, 2011 Tuesday Final grades due – 9:00 a.m. – 12 wk & 2nd 6 wk sessions August 12, 2011 Friday Last day of classes-13wk session August 16, 2011 Tuesday Final grades due – 9:00 a.m. – 13 wk session August 18-19, 2011 Thursday-Friday Faculty Orientation


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ADMISSION STATUS AND REQUIREMENTS Community College of Beaver County operates as an open door admission institution providing educational opportunities to all individuals who can benefit from such an experience. The College grants general admission to anyone who wishes to begin college studies.

Students who carry 12 or more credit hours in one semester are considered full-time students. Students who carry 1 to 11 credit hours in one semester are considered part-time students. CCBC will use the following classifications to classify students enrolling at the College. Students in each classification will be required to submit a completed Admissions Application and additional documentation as identified below as a condition of enrollment with the College. HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE Those individuals seeking to enroll in credit certificate and/or degree programs and indicating high school graduation as their highest level of educational attainment will be accepted for enrollment under the category of High School Graduate. Such individuals will be required to submit the following to the Registrar’s Office: • Admissions Application • Official transcript documenting high school graduation forwarded directly from the high school to the College GED Recipient Those individuals seeking to enroll in credit certificate and/or degree programs and indicating successful completion of the General Education Development (GED) exam as their highest level of educational attainment will be accepted for enrollment under the category of GED Recipient. Such individuals will be required to submit the following to the Registrar’s Office: • Admissions Application • Official copies of the GED Certificate INDIVIDUAL APPROVAL Those individuals seeking to enroll in credit certificate and/or degree programs that have not graduated from high school or successfully completed the GED Certification may be accepted for enrollment on the basis of their ability to benefit from participation in college studies. This status will termed “Individual Approval”, and individuals seeking to enroll under this classification will be required to: • Complete an admissions interview (to determine ability to benefit from college studies) TRANSFER STUDENT Those individuals seeking to enroll in credit certificate and/or degree programs who have previously attended another college or university will be accepted for enrollment under the category of Transfer Student. Such individuals will be required to submit the following to the Registrar’s Office: • Official transcripts for all colleges/universities previously attended forwarded directly from the Registrar at the college/university where the credits were earned COLLEGE GRADUATE Those individuals seeking to enroll in credit certificate and/or degree programs and who have previously graduated with an Associate degree, Bachelor’s degree, or graduate degree from a community college, college, or university will be accepted for enrollment as a College Graduate. Such individuals will be required to submit the following to the Registrar’s Office: • Official transcripts from the institution awarding the degree forwarded directly from the Registrar at the college/ university awarding the degree


PROVISIONAL ADMISSION Under certain conditions, individuals who have interest in temporary enrollment with the College but who do not anticipate completion of a certificate or degree may be permitted to enter the College under a provisional admissions status. The Provisional Admission categories are as follows: DUAL ENROLLMENT High school students who have completed their sophomore year in high school and who are approved by their local school district to participate in an approved dual enrollment program will be allowed to enroll as a Dual Enrollment Student. Individuals accepted under this status may enroll for no more than two courses per semester and will not be eligible for financial aid benefits or enroll in developmental courses. Dual Enrollment Students must submit the following: • A form signed by their parent or legal guardian and the high school principal or designee specifying the courses in which the individual may enroll • Official high school transcript • Completion of the appropriate CCBC course placement exam EARLY ADMISSION High school students who seek to enroll for college credit courses without participating in an approved dual enrollment program many be accepted for enrollment at the College through the Early Admission Status. Individuals accepted under this status may enroll for no more than two courses per semester and will not be eligible for financial aid benefits. Such individuals must submit the following: • Request for Early Admission form signed by their parent • Official high school transcript • Completion of the appropriate CCBC course placement exam TRANSIENT STUDENT An individual enrolled in a certificate/degree program with another college/university and wanting to take courses through CCBC to partially satisfy graduation requirements from the other institution may be permitted to enroll as a Transient Student. Individuals permitted to enroll under this status will not be required to provide official transcripts for registration purposes. Individuals accepted under this status who then seek to enroll in a subsequent semester will be re-classified as a Transfer Student and will be required to satisfy the appropriate admissions requirements.

SPEICAL ADMISSIONS AVIATION STUDENTS Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Community College of Beaver County (CCBC) Collegiate Training Initiative (CTI) Program. The FAA has established a formal placement relationship with CCBC. ATC graduates who meet specified high academic standards and other FAA employment criteria may be hired by the FAA and assigned to terminal and en-route FAA Air Traffic facilities throughout the United States and its territories. It is essential that students are aware of the realities associated with the FAA/CCBC placement program. A Statement of Understanding must be signed before official acceptance can be granted into the CCBC ATC program. Students are encouraged to arrange an admissions interview.


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ADMISSION STATUS AND REQUIREMENTS NURSING AND PRACTICAL NURSING STUDENTS The Nursing programs have restricted admissions and a required testing sequence. To enroll in a Nursing program at CCBC, complete the following steps:

1. Complete an Admissions Application. 2. File an official copy of your high school record (transcript) or GED test scores with the College. Contact the appropriate official of the last high school you attended, and request that a copy of your high school record be sent to the Registrar’s Office. 3. Nursing students are required to take a Nursing pre-admission exam for eligibility/admission to these programs. The Information and Registration Center will announce the testing schedule for this exam prior to the selective admission process for the Nursing program. 4. After acceptance to a program, taking the College’s Placement Test in English and/or reading may be required.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS All F-1 visa students are required to enroll in and maintain 12 or more credits per semester and must maintain an overall grade point average of 2.0. Failure to do so will constitute a violation of visa status. (Enrollment in summer school is optional.) Students wishing to graduate or transfer in a two-year period will need to complete at least 15 credits per semester. International students are required to maintain the same academic standards as do other students and shall be subject to the same rules for probation and disqualification. 1. International Student Application Form 2. Affidavit of Support - must be completed by the student’s sponsor and must prove that the student has sufficient financial resources to meet all expenses during their period of attendance at CCBC. 3. TOEFL Test (ability to speak English as a foreign language) - must be taken and a minimum of 500 or higher must be achieved on the paper-based test; 173 or higher on the computer-based test; 61 or higher on the Internet-based test. 4. Transcripts officially translated into English must be sent by the foreign student from his/her high school. 5. Students transferring from one college to another must send a Transfer Eligibility Form and copies of their I-94, visa page in their passport, and their I-20A-B form (24 credits and 2.0 grade point average are needed to transfer). 6. Medical insurance - All international students require health insurance and must show proof each semester at registration. Heath insurance may be purchased in the student’s home country. Minimum coverage is as follows: • $30,000 minimum hospitalization per year • $250,000 lifetime payment • Identification card or official letter from the insurance company • 6 month coverage (no month to month coverage) When all necessary documents and requirements are met, CCBC will issue an I-20A-B Form 60 to 90 days prior to the semester. The I-20 Student Immigration Form is sent by CCBC to all student immigrants wanting admission. The form indicates: • Student’s field of study • Length of course • Date to report to the college The I-20 Form also allows you to apply for a student visa called the F-I, which must be kept with your passport. International Student Application Forms and requirements are requested by June 15 for the fall semester, November 15 for the spring semester and March 15 for the summer semester.


SERVICEMEMBERS OPPORTUNITY COLLEGES CCBC is a member of Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC), affirming the College’s commitment to fair, equitable, and effective policies and practices that recognize and deal with the special conditions faced by military students who want to obtain a college education. As an SOC college, CCBC can help active servicemen and women earn a college degree while he or she is in the Service in a variety of ways. Criterion include maximizing transfer credit awarded, limiting academic residency requirements, awarding credit for nationally recognized tests acceptable to the College, and awarding credit recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE) for military training and experience when applicable to servicemembers’ degree programs. To receive credit, a copy of the service member’s training record should be forwarded to the Registrar’s Office for evaluation. SOC, a consortium of national higher education associations, functions in cooperation with the Department of Defense (DoD), the Military Services including the National Guard, and the Coast Guard to help meet the voluntary higher education needs of service members. For more information on Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges visit their website at www.soc.aascu.org.

CREDIT ACCEPTANCE CCBC will accept a maximum of 45 credits through Credits by Examination, CLEP, transfer courses, Advanced Standing, and military programs or any combination thereof if the credits are applicable to the student’s degree program. To receive credit for Advance Standing, students must write a short letter requesting Advance Standing for their respective class or classes and attach the appropriate documentation of that class. All the materials should be submitted to the Registrar’s Office for evaluation. Additionally, students must enroll for and successfully complete a minimum of 15 credits of program coursework at CCBC in order to have the Credits by Examination, CLEP, transfer courses, or Advanced Standing credits placed on their transcript. ADVANCED STANDING Various industry certifications and ratings are recognized by CCBC as having equivalent knowledge and competencies as the indicated course(s) listed below and can be used towards the requirements of a degree or certificate. Business & Technologies – Advanced Standing for Industry Certificates Industry Certificate CCBC Course Credits/Total CISCO Module I CISN100 CISCO I -Networking Fundamentals 5/5 CISCO Module II CISN110 CISCO II - Routing Protocols & Concepts 5/5 CISCO Module III CISN215 CISCO III - LAN Switching & Wireless 5/5 CISCO Module IV CISN220 CISCO IV - Accessing the WAN 5/5 A+ Certificate CISN200 Client Operating Systems 3/6 CISN105 PC Hardware 3 HelpDesk Institute Certificate CISN208 HelpDesk Concepts 3/3 Microsoft Desktop Support Technician (MDST) CISN200 Client Operating Systems 3/6 CISN105 PC Hardware 3 MOS Word Expert Certificate (2007 or later) OFFT120 MS Word MOS Expert 3/3 MOS Excel Expert Certificate (2007 or later) OFFT125 MS Excel MOS Expert 3/3 MOS Access Certificate


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CREDIT ACCEPTANCE (2007 or later) OFFT130 MS Access MOS Certificate 3/3 MOS PowerPoint Certificate (2007 or later) OFFT175 MS PowerPoint 3/3 MOS Outlook Certificate (2007 or later) OFFT170 MS Outlook MOS Certificate 3/3 Internet and Computer Core Certification (IC3)/ all 3 exams (2007 or later) CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3/3 International Computer Drivers License (ICDL)/ all 7 modules (2007 or later) CIST 100 Introduction to Information Technology 3/3 all 7 modules (2009 or later) ServSafe Certificate CULA110 Sanitation Principles 1/1 (2009 or later) ADVANCED STANDING FOR FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION (AVIATION SCIENCES) Students who have successfully passed a Federal Aviation Administration written exam and/or have earned any certificates/ratings through the Federal Aviation Administration could possibly be eligible for advanced standing into the Air Traffic Control, Professional Piloting, or Aerospace Management programs at Community College of Beaver County.

Class Documentation AVIP160 Private Pilot Proper Certificate/Rating and letter of competency from FAA Flight Examiner AVIP110 Flight Theory FAA written scores for Private Pilot Airplane AVIP136 Theory of Instrument Flight FAA written scores for Instrument Airplane AVIP160 Commercial Pilot Theory FAA written scores for Commercial Pilot Airplane AVIP230 Commercial Flight I Proper Certificate/Rating and letter of competency from FAA Flight Examiner AVIP231 Commercial Flight II Proper Certificate/Rating and letter of competency from FAA Flight Examiner AVIP232 Instrument Flight Proper Certification Rating and letter of competency from FAA Flight Examiner AVIP233 Multi-Engine Flight Proper Certificate/Rating and letter of competency from FAA Flight Examiner AVIC236 Advanced ATC III FAA control tower operator certificate

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Credit for certain courses may be established through a proficiency exam. Students who wish to be considered for credit by examination should visit the Registrar’s Office for the Credit by Examination Forms. Students pursuing credit by exam should not register for the course in which they hope to establish credit. In addition, students should not have taken the course, or its equivalent, previously either at CCBC or another school. Full-time students receiving financial aid should note that opting for credit by exam may influence and reduce their financial aid awards. Additionally, students must enroll for and successfully complete a minimum of 15 credits of program coursework at CCBC in order to have the credits earned through examination placed on their transcripts. The credits will appear on the transcript designated “Credit by Examination.” Students who have received credit by examination for a course are permitted to subsequently register for the course. However, the last grade issued will be the only grade included in their cumulative quality point average. For these purposes, the “last grade’ refers to A, B, C, D, or F only.

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) The College Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board is recognized by CCBC. This program enables individuals who have acquired education in a non-traditional way to become eligible for credit consideration on the basis of performance on the College Level Examination. In accepting CLEP credits, credits shall


be limited to the selective specialized subject area examinations and not include the general examinations except for the General Examination English Composition with Essay. The College will accept the minimum cut-off score recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE) for awarding credit. Although CLEP examinations are not offered at CCBC, they are available at several local colleges and universities for a fee. Students interested in taking CLEP examinations should contact the Counseling Office. An official copy of the CLEP score report should be forwarded to the Registrar’s Office. The USAFI program offers college-level courses to military personnel. Using the guidelines established by the American Council on Education, advanced standing and college credit allowance for USAFI courses are determined on an individual basis by CCBC. Credit for Life Experience Through the Credit for Life Experience program, students may be authorized by the Registrar’s Office to substitute life experience for formal classes related to their program of study. Students should not have taken the course(s) for which they are applying to receive life experience credit, either at CCBC or another school. Additionally, students must enroll for and successfully complete a minimum of fifteen credits of program coursework at CCBC in order to have the credits earned through life experience placed on their transcript. Students who have received credit for life experience are permitted to subsequently register for the course. Visit the Registrar’s Office for assistance and advice. To be considered for credit for life experience, it is necessary that you compile a portfolio that will remain the property of the College. You should complete a portfolio for each class in the college catalog that you wish considered for credit for life experience. When you begin to compile your portfolio, the best place to start is with the master syllabus for the particular course for which you are requesting the credit. If you are requesting credit for more than one course, you must detail what in your experience applies to each course. In addition to the course content, a close review of the objectives for the course will help you coordinate your experience with courses. You will need to produce a portfolio that demonstrates experience in the content field and the attainment of the course objectives. Documentation that is acceptable in support of your request: • A narrative in which you outline your case clearly and in detail by paralleling course objectives with your personal experiences • A chart through which you parallel personal experience with course objectives • Job descriptions • Employer evaluations • Letters of documentation from employers and colleagues • Documents that you have produced by way of work assignments or personal initiative • Certificates of completion or documentation for any relevant training together with the content of the training and the number of hours of training • Résumé Your portfolio should be submitted to the Registrar’s Office. The Registrar will review your portfolio in conjunction with Division Directors and faculty and issue a decision. The decision of the Registrar is final.

UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES INSTITUTE (USAFI) The USAFI program offers college-level courses to military personnel. Using the guidelines established by the American Council on Education, advanced standing and college credit allowance for USAFI courses are determined on an individual basis by CCBC.


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RESIDENCY The Board of Trustees has established the following policy regarding student residency:

1. The burden of proof for establishing residency or a change in residency rests with the student. 2. Residency refers to domicile, which is the place where one intends to and does, in fact, permanently reside. 3. Residence in Beaver County prior to registering as a student is required to establish domicile. 4. Any student who changes residence during a semester will not have his tuition adjusted during that semester, but may be entitled to such adjustment the following semester. 5. A minor (under age 18) is presumed to live at the address of his/her parents or guardian. 6. A student is presumed a resident named in the certified statement of residence on the admissions application. 7. Establishing an address for the purpose of attending college does not establish domicile. Where a student permanently lives (“residency”) determines his or her tuition charges at Community College of Beaver County and are defined as follows: In-County Students - Any permanent resident of Beaver County is classified as a “resident” student and is eligible for in-county tuition rates. In-State Students - To be considered a Pennsylvania resident a student must maintain continuous residence in the state for a period of 12 months prior to registration as a student. The tuition rate for in-state students is double the in-county rate. Out-of-State Students - The tuition for an out-of-state student is triple the in-county rate. International Students - International students must pay out-of-state tuition and fees. Reclassification of residency does not apply to international students. A student may appeal residency classification by filing a written petition to the Student Records Office for committee review. If a student is not satisfied with the decision made by CCBC, the student may take a written appeal to the office of the Secretary of Education, 333 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333. The decision made by the Secretary is final. PROOF OF RESIDENCY At the time of class registration and tuition payment, all students are required to show “proof of residency” in the form of: 1. Pennsylvania driver’s license. 2. Proof of payment of local wage tax or school tax. 3. If required, other documents determined and approved by the Registrar. PROCEDURE FOR RECLASSIFICATION OF RESIDENCY Prior to registration, students whose tuition would be affected by a change in residency must present proof of actual address to the Student Records Office. If a student’s registration has already been processed and the tuition has been calculated, no changes will be permitted to the student name/address information file until after the refund period. PENALTIES FOR MISREPRESENTING RESIDENCY Applicants claiming residency in Beaver County are required to provide validated proof. Fraud is a felony punishable in the criminal court under Pennsylvania Law. Air Traffic Control, Professional Pilot, Police Technology, and Nursing applicants should take special note because of future licensing procedures. Should a student misrepresent his or her residency status, the following actions will be taken by the College: 1. The student’s account will be adjusted and the student will be required to pay the corrected amount. 2. If the student refuses to pay the corrected amount, the student will be administratively withdrawn from present classes and be prevented from attending future classes. 3. The release of grades, diplomas, or degrees will be prohibited until the student’s corrected account is paid in full.


REGISTRATION Students are expected to register for classes before the first day of the semester they wish to attend. After filing for admission and completing required placement tests, students may register for classes by following the recommended procedure. Contact the Counseling Office to discuss class choices. Counselors assist students in completing course registration and resolving academic or career concerns. They can also refer students to appropriate offices for non-academic assistance. At the time of class registration all students are required to show “proof of residency”: • Pennsylvania driver’s license • Proof of payment of local wage tax or school tax • If required, other documents determined and approved by the Registrar. Placement Testing Placement tests are a series of short exams in math, English and reading, which are taken before registering for classes in the first semester. Placement tests help counselors match students’ abilities with their first English or math classes attempted at CCBC. Students who do not place into college level courses in math and English must enroll and successfully pass the developmental courses in those subjects before enrolling in college coursework. Exemptions include the following: • Students who have already have a college degree • Students who have already taken college level English or math courses and received a grade of “C” or better • Students who have transient clearance from their home institution allowing them to enroll in specific courses at CCBC. • You scored 450/Critical Reading, 450/Writing, or 450/Math on the SAT exam within the past five years. • You scored 19/Reading, 18/English, or 22/Math on the ACT exam within the past five years. Documentation must be provided (i.e. official transcripts) regarding the above circumstances when you apply for admission to the College. After the documentation has been reviewed, you will be notified of your exemption or denial. Cross Registration CCBC students may enroll in courses at either Geneva College or the Beaver Campus of Penn State University during the academic year (fall and spring semesters) according to the cross registration policy of the Beaver County Council of Higher Education. Students are permitted to register for one course per semester by the cross registration process. This cross registration is available to full-time students only who need or desire courses which are not offered or available at CCBC. Students will be charged tuition by CCBC for the total credits for which they are enrolled. Written permission must be granted. Students may apply for permission to the Registrar’s Office at CCBC. Course Load To complete the requirements for an Associate within two years, a student should enroll for 15-18 credits per semester. Recommended course loads and course sequences are shown in the degree plan for each program of study. Students who carry 12 semester credits are still considered full-time students. The maximum course load required by any curriculum is 19 semester hours. Students who wish to carry more than 18, but less than 22 credit hours, must request prior approval from a counselor. Students desiring to carry 22 or more hours are required to secure prior approval of the Registrar. Repeating a Course A student is permitted to repeat a course. The last grade issued will be the only grade included in the student’s cumulative quality point average. For purposes of this policy “the last grade” means A, B, C, D, or F, only.


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CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS FRESHMAN/SOPHOMORE STATUS Students who have succesfully completed 29 or less credit hours are classified as freshmen. Students who have accumulated 30 or more credit hours are classified as sophomores. CHANGE OF PROGRAM OR MAJOR Students are required to declare a major for each period of enrollment. When a student decides to change his/her major, the student must file a change of major with the Information and Registration Center (IRC) ADDING OR DROPPING COURSES Following the registration process, students may modify their class schedule through the ADD/DROP process. Dates during which these changes can be made are shown in the Academic Calendar. To add or drop a course a student must complete the Change of Schedule (drop/add) Form and secure approval from a college counseloror faculty advisor. No grades will be reported for any course dropped during the dates given. CLASS PARTICIPATION AND ENROLLMENT CERTIFICATION Through a variety of state and federal regulations, the College is required to certify its official enrollment for each semester/term. As part of this certification process, faculty are required to certify student participation and to report any student who has not attended at least one class session or otherwise participated in required class activities during the census period. Following the census period for each semester/term, the Registrar’s Office will distribute a copy of an enrollment report for each course section offered to the appropriate faculty. The enrollment report will show those students officially enrolled as of the census date. When the certified enrollment report is received by the Registrar’s Office, action will be initiated to officially withdraw those students certified as having not attended or participated in required class activities during the census period. Students so withdrawn will be sent formal written notification of their withdrawal and will be informed of the appropriate appeals process to request reinstatement.

WITHDRAWAL STUDENT INITIATED WITHDRAWAL After the Add/Drop period, a student who wishes to withdraw from any or all classes, in good standing from CCBC must complete and submit a Withdrawal Form to the Information and Registration Center. Students may withdraw from one or more courses or from the College at any point through the first eight weeks of class during a regular 15 week semester and the student will receive a grade of “W”. For sessions of less than fourteen weeks, the deadline will be prorated and published separately as part of the calendar for the session. Beginning with the ninth week of class and extending through the twelfth week of class, a student may withdraw only with written permission of each instructor. The student must obtain a Withdrawal Form from the Information and Registration Center, complete the required information, obtain the instructor’s signature and return the form to the Information and Registration Center. ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL The College reserves the right to cancel the registration of any student at any time for just cause, whether academic, disciplinary, or financial. The withdrawal action will be initiated by the appropriate department preparing a withdrawal request, attaching supporting documentation and forwarding the request to the appropriate Vice President for review and approval. The Vice President will forward all approved requests to the Registrar for processing, and the Registrar will notify the student, in writing, of the withdrawal action. The Registrar will also advise appropriate faculty of the action withdrawing the student. Students involuntarily withdrawn will not be eligible for a refund of tuition and fees. and will receive a grade of “AW’.


FACULTY WITHDRAWAL Faculty of the College may withdraw students enrolled in their class under two sets of circumstances during the course of the semester. The first case will occur in conjunction with the process of roster certification. If a faculty member finds a student listed on her/his roster of officially enrolled students and the student has not attended at least one class session during the certification period, the faculty member must indicate the student’s failure to attend to the Office of the Registrar. Upon receipt of this notification, the Office of the Registrar will withdraw the student from the indicated class. The student’s registration record will be reduced by the credit hour value of the course from which s/he is being dropped, and financial assistance awards will be adjusted accordingly. The record of enrollment in the course will not appear on the student’s transcript, and the credit hour value of the course will not be used in calculating satisfactory academic performance. Following the roster certification period, faculty may initiate a withdrawal for any student identified by a faculty member as not pursuing the objectives of the course. To utilize this withdrawal option, the faculty member must have defined in the course syllabus distributed to students at the beginning of classes the criteria that will be used in measuring progress toward achievement of the course objectives. These requirements may include statements defining the expectations for attendance, tests to be taken, reports to be submitted, projects to be completed, presentations to be made and other activities required for the student to complete the course. When, on the basis of a combination of these benchmarks, the faculty member determines that a student has ceased to pursue the objectives of the course, he/she may initiate a withdrawal of the student by notification to the Office of the Registrar. It is noted the decision to withdraw the student must be based on a combination of the benchmarks taken collectively rather than failure to achieve any one benchmark. It is also noted that students who continue to pursue the objectives of the course and who are not successfully achieving the requirements established through the benchmarks may not be withdrawn using this procedure. Withdrawals under this procedure must occur prior to the end of the twelfth week of the regular semester. Upon receipt of notification of a withdrawal from a faculty member, the Office of the Registrar will process the withdrawal and notify the student of the action taken. For administrative tracking purposes, the grade of “WF”, noting withdrawn by faculty, will be entered into the student records system. A final grade of “W” will be recorded on the final grade roster for the semester and may not be changed by the faculty member unless a reinstatement action has been completed. The grade of “W” will appear on the student’s transcript and will be used as defined in the College’s grading procedures in determining satisfactory academic progress by the student. Following notification to the student, the student may request a reinstatement by the faculty member. The appeal must be initiated within ten days from the date the withdrawal was processed by the Office of the Registrar. The student must make a direct appeal to the faculty member initiating the withdrawal action, and it will be the faculty member’s determination as to whether the student can complete the required work and can therefore be reinstated. Where the appeal is accepted, the faculty member must issue a reinstatement notification to the Office of the Registrar. If the appeal is denied by the faculty member, the student may appeal further following the guidelines established in the College’s grade appeal process.


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FINANCIAL INFORMATION TUITION The tuition and fee shown at present represent the rates established by the Board of Trustees for 2010-2011. The tuition and fee rates for 2011-2012 will be approved by the Board of Trustees not later than June 20, 2011 and will be published appropriately. Tuition rates are based on residency. Three rates apply: $92.50 per credit hour - Beaver County Resident $185.00 per credit hour - Other PA Resident $277.50 per credit hour - Non PA Resident FEES A capital fee is charged to all non-Beaver County residents. The capital fee defrays the cost of facilities including property, buildings, and equipment operated by the College. • $20 per credit - Other PA Resident • $40 per credit - Non PA Resident General Student Fee - $11 per credit hour The general student fee funds the cost of student services, publications, academic support services, student activities, security, and library. Technology Fee - $13 per credit hour A non-refundable fee of $13 per credit is charged to help defray the operating, software and equipment costs of providing student access to technology in support services and academic programs. Laboratory Fee - $10 per credit hour in courses with a laboratory component The non-refundable $10 per credit laboratory fee covers the cost of expendable laboratory supplies and maintenance of laboratory equipment in those science and technology courses that include a laboratory. Re-registration Fee - $25 A non-refundable re-registration fee of $25 will be charged to students whose course schedule has been deleted for failure to make a payment or financial aid arrangements by the payment deadline. Late Registration Fee - $25 A non-refundable fee of $25 will be charged to students who register after the class has started. Schedule Revision Fee - $5 per change Students who add/drop courses will be charged a $5 fee per transaction. The fee does not apply to changes resulting from cancelled courses or other administrative schedule changes. Returned Check Fee - $25 A fee of $25 will be charged for all checks returned by the bank. Deferred Payment Fee - $50 A $50 fee is charged for participation in the deferred payment plan. Deferred Payment Plan/Late Fee - $100 A $100 fee is charged for failure to make payment on the deferred payment plan by the due date. Transcripts - $5 each for immediate access copies Graduation Fee - $25


Credit by Examination Fee - $75 The fee is $75 per exam for courses of 1-3 college credits. For courses or 4 credits or more, the charge is $75 plus $25 for each credit above three. The maximum charge will be $200. General Education Diploma (GED) Test - $60 ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENT FEES In those programs that require the use of specialized materials or technology and simulation equipment, the coursespecific academic enhancement fee will be assessed as follows to defray the cost associated with program delivery. AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL AVIC 239 Facility Rating I $600 AVIC 240 Facility Rating II $600 VIC 251 Non-Radar Lab $600 AVIC 256 Radar Lab $900 AVIC 247 Approach Control I $800 AVIC 248 Approach Control II $800 COMPUTER INFORMATION CISN 100 CISCO I – Networking Fundamentals $100 CISN 105 PC Hardware $50 CISN 110 CISCO II – Routing Protocols & Concepts $50 CISN 215 CISCO III - LAN Switching & Wireless $50 CISN 220 CISCO IV – Accessing the WAN $50 CISN 230 Wireless Networking $50 CIST130 Introduction to Agile Robotics $50 CISF 200 Disaster Recovery $100 CISF 120 Computer Forensics & Investigation $100 POLICE ACADEMY CRIM113 Lethal Weapons $150 CRIM114 Lethal Weapons Refresher $150 PLIC111 Firearms $100 CULINARY ARTS CULA 100 Introduction to Culinary Arts/Baking Fundamentals I CULA 115 Principles of Cooking/Baking Fundamentals II CULA 120 Advanced Principles of Cooking CULA 200 Line Cooking/Buffet $100 per course FINE ARTS FINE 100 Art Appreciation $50 FINE 110 Drawing $50 FINE 111 Painting $50 FINE 125 Photography: Film & Light $50 FINE 205 Design & Sculpture $50 FINE 220 Digital Photography $50 FINE 101 Art History I $100 FINE 102 Art History II $100 FINE 115 Digital Imaging $100 FINE 225 American Art History $100


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FINANCIALS INFORMATION NURSING Clinical Nursing course $200 Practical Nursing courses $200 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY OFFT 120 Microsoft Word-MOS Expert $65 OFFT125 Microsoft Excel-MOS Expert $65 OFFT130 Microsoft Access-MOS Certification $65 OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook-MOS Certification $65 THEATER THEA101 Theater Arts I $25 THEA102 Theater Arts II $25 VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS VISC 115 Digital Imaging $100 VISC 130 Digital Video I $100 VISC 122 Web Design $100 VISC 135 Digital Video II $100 VISC 125 Photography $ 50 VISC 220 Digital Photography $ 50

TUITION PAYMENTS AND REFUNDS BILLING AND PAYMENT SCHEDULE Payments of all tuition and fees due is required prior to the start of classes. Dates establishing deadlines for tuition and fee payments for early registration are noted in the Academic Calendar. An Individual is not considered to be registered until tuition and fee obligations are paid. For the student’s convenience, tuition and fees can be paid by cash, check, money order, or by American credit/debit cards. A $25 returned check fee will be assessed per check returned by the bank to CCBC.

THIRD PARTY TUITION PAYMENTS AND BILLINGS REFUNDS Students who are receiving funding from a Third Party, including but not limited to OVR, Job Training of Beaver County, Friendship Ridge, Head Start, 529 plans and other outside scholarships, need to provide documentation of their eligibility. Students who provide this documentation will have their registrations held and will not be deleted from their courses for nonpayment. The college will follow the necessary steps to obtain the funding from the third party. Any balance that is not paid by the agency is the responsibilty of the student. Students should be aware that if they receive funding from a third part after their financial aid is completed may have their aid reduced due to third party funding. Students withdrawing from credit course offerings are eligible for tuition refunds as follows: • 100% - withdrawal prior to the end of the third week of the semester • No refund - withdrawal after the third week of the semester. • 100% - if a class is cancelled by CCBC Refunds will be made on the basis of tuition and fee charges. For summer sessions, the refund policy is prorated on the length of the term. Refunds will only be made after a written withdrawal is processed through the Student Records Office. Official date for determination of refund will be the date the withdrawal form is received by Student Records. All withdrawals received during the refund period will result in no academic penalty.


Please allow at least four weeks for processing of refund checks. REFUND POLICY FOR TITLE IV RECIPIENTS Community College of Beaver County follows established federal guidelines for the treatment of students who withdraw from the college. A student who completely withdraws may no longer be eligible for the full amount of Title IV funds that the student was originally scheduled to receive. A student is only eligible to receive the amount of Title IV aid he/she has earned based on the time spent in academic attendance. Financial aid must be prorated based on the percentage of the semester attended. If the amount disbursed to the student is greater than the amount the student earned, unearned funds must be returned by the student. This prorated calculation applies to all students who withdraw through the 60% point of each payment period. TUITION PAYMENT PLAN CCBC offers a tuition payment plan. Any student who is taking at least three credits in the fall or spring semesters is eligible for the tuition payment plan. The payment plan is also available to students taking at least three credits in the 12 or 13 week summer sessions. The plan allows students to pay 1/3 of the total tuition and fees by the established deadline and the remaining balance is due 8 weeks into the semester. Students must complete the Tuition Payment Plan Agreement form for each semester they wish to use the plan. Additional information as well as the Tuition Payment Plan Agreement form is available in the Financial Aid Office. For more information, please contact the Financial Aid Office at 724-480-3501.

FINANCIAL AID State and federal grant and loan funds are available to all students who meet the established guidelines. Students must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. There is no charge to the student for filing the FAFSA. Every student is encouraged to apply for financial aid to determine if he or she has a financial need to meet the costs of a college education. Financial need is the difference between the estimated expense of attending college and the determined contribution of the student and his/her family. The family and/or student are the primary source of paying for a college education. Financial aid is available to regular degree or certificate seeking students who qualify for assistance in paying for educational costs. Students are allowed to receive financial aid up to the established cost of education. It is the responsibility of every student to contact the Financial Aid Office at CCBC with any questions relating to the processing and/or awarding of their financial aid. Returning, new, and transfer students are also responsible for following through with all financial aid requirements in order to insure that their financial aid is fully processed prior to the start of each semester. The federal school code for CCBC is 006807. CCBC’s financial aid forms may be obtained online at http://my.ccbc.edu. STATE SPONSORED FINANCIAL AID PROGRAM Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA) Grant This grant is for Pennsylvania residents only. The various points to consider for a PHEAA Grant are as follows: • There is a deadline date for filing an application in all grant programs. • You must show financial need. You or your parents will be required to submit information concerning financial status. • The grant is for those students who plan to be enrolled at least half-time. • The deadline to file an application for PHEAA Grant is May 1. • Students must file the FAFSA in order to qualify for a PHEAA Grant.


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FINANCIAL AID FEDERAL AID PROGRAMS Federal Pell Grants Federal Pell Grants can provide a maximum of $5,550 per academic year for eligible students who are enrolled in a degree program. The student must be registered for courses that apply to the student’s declared major. FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS (FSEOG) This is an institutionally administered grant to qualified students. To be eligible, a student must show exceptional financial need. The grant is up to $300 per academic year. FEDERAL WORK STUDY Work Study is a federally funded program that allows students to earn a paycheck while attending college. Through the Federal Work Study Program, a student may be given part-time employment at the College and be paid up to $7.25 per hour. To be eligible, one must be enrolled in a degree program, show financial need, and be willing to assume the responsibility of employment. Students can apply for work study online at http://my.ccbc.edu. ACADEMIC COMPETITIVE GRANT This program is available to full-time students who are Pell Grant eligible and have completed a rigorous program of study in high school as defined by their state. Students must submit complete grade transcripts in order to be considered for the grant and must maintain a 3.0 QPA in order to continue to be eligible. The grant is valued at $750 for the first year and $1,300 for the second year. DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM Starting with the 2010-2011 academic year, all schools will be required to participate in the Federal Direct Loan Program in order to provide loans to students and parents. Loan funds will now come from the US Department of Education. This program replaces the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), which used private lenders and banks. The FFELP Master Promissory Note (MPN), which was good for ten years is now invalid and cannot be used. If you are a returning student or a new student planning to borrow through one of these loan programs for the upcoming school year, you are now required to complete a new MPN online at www.studentloans.gov in order to have a loan originated. Students must also apply for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.ed.gov and submit the necessary paperwork. For dependent students (as per the FAFSA) loans can range up to $5,500 for the first year (3,500 subsidized plus $2,000 unsubsidized) and $6,500 the second year ($4,500 subsidized and $2,000 unsubsidized). For the independent students, loans can range up to $9,500 for the first year ($3,500 subsidized plus $6,000 unsubsidized) and $10,500 for the second year ($4,500 subsidized and $6,000 unsubsidized). First time borrowers of the Federal Direct Loan Program must complete an entrance interview before a loan can be originated by CCBC at www.studentloans.gov. Repayment of subsidized loans does not begin until a student reduces the course load per semester (below six credits), withdraws from college, or graduates. Quarterly interest payments are required with the unsubsidized loan. For students wanting to apply for alternative loans, contact the Financial Aid Office for a listing. A student borrower must earn at least 24 credits in order to progress from freshman to sophomore status. Normally, the preferred standard of 30 credits will be used to establish sophomore status.


DIRECT PLUS LOANS (PARENT LOANS) The Direct PLUS Loans are for parents of dependent students whose educational costs are greater than the borrowing need of the Direct Loan program. The application for these loans is available online at www.studentloans.gov . In order to qualify for a Direct PLUS Loan parents must meet credit approval. The parent of a dependent student may borrow up to the cost of education minus other aid per student each year for a FPLUS Loan. ACADEMIC PROGRESS RELATED TO STUDENT AID CCBC is required by federal regulations to establish and maintain a standard for academic progress for a student who receives Title IV funds. Programs include the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Work Study, Direct Loan, and Direct PLUS. A student’s permanent academic record will be reviewed after each semester of enrollment to determine academic progress. A student must successfully complete a minimum of 75% of all credits attempted. Withdrawal (W), Incomplete (I), and Failure (F)will be considered attempted credits for financial aid purposes. If withdrawal from a class (or classes) does not bring the student below full-time status, the withdrawal(s) will not be calculated into credits attempted or the Quality Point Average (QPA). Students who withdraw from a class (or classes) or change their status after receiving aid during any two semesters will be considered as lacking satisfactory academic progress. Students who have successfully completed an Associate’s Degree may petition the Financial Aid Office for an extension of student aid benefits. The rate of progress for completion of degrees, diplomas, or certificates of part-time students will be adjusted to reflect their enrollment status. Full-time enrollment is based on 12 credits per semester. Minimum quality point averages must be maintained on the basis of semester completion as listed below. A student must maintain the following QPA: • End of first semester or 9 credits - 1.5 QPA minimum • End of second semester or 18 credits - 1.7 QPA minimum • End of third semester or 27 credits - 1.9 QPA minimum • End of fourth semester or 36 credits - 2.0 QPA minimum Any student who does not achieve a minimum of a 2.0 QPA at the end of the second academic year or the completion of 36 credits will not be eligible to receive Title IV funds. Any student who does not complete their program of study within 150% of standard completion time will not be eligible to receive Title IV funds. Completion time is measured in credit hours (i.e. a 66 credit Associate Degree has a maximum completion time of 99 credits). With the exception of the 2.0 QPA/36 credit minimum and the 150% completion standard, any student who does not maintain the minimum standards as defined in this section will be placed on financial aid probation for the next enrollment period. The student will be notified of his/her probationary status. The student is eligible to receive aid during the period of probation but his/her academic record will be evaluated at the end of the enrollment period to determine future eligibility. Students on academic probation will not be permitted to use financial aid to preregister for future enrollment periods. Probationary semester grades must be reviewed by the Financial Aid Office before any aid will be credited for future enrollment.


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FINANCIAL AID

Any student who does not reach the minimum standards stated after a semester of probation will not be eligible for financial aid for future enrollment until the standards are met at the student’s expense.

Any student receiving a QPA of less than 1.5 for a single semester will be placed on financial aid probation even though the cumulative totals exceed the minimum. Any student who receives 0.0 for a semester must meet with a Financial Aid Officer to discuss the reasons for the lack of progress before any aid will be credited for future enrollment. The Financial Aid Office can reduce the number of hours worked per week of any work study student who is placed on financial aid academic warning. A student who withdraws from all classes for which financial aid was used to pay tuition will be placed on probation for the next enrollment period. Federal financial aid may not be awarded for repeated courses in which the student originally received a passing grade. All students receiving financial aid will be expected to attend class on a regular basis. Failure to do so could jeopardize future disbursements or considerations for financial aid. Students denied aid due to non-academic progress may appeal in writing listing justification for the appeal. Appeals should be made in writing and addressed to the Director of Student Financial Services within 45 days of denial of aid. ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR STATE PROGRAMS A full-time student may receive a maximum of four semesters of PHEAA (State) grants at CCBC. PHEAA State Grants require successful completion of 12 credits per term if full-time and 6 credits per term if part-time. Courses repeated for which a student previously had a passing grade cannot be considered as additional credits attempted when measuring academic progress. ACADEMIC FORGIVENESS FOR FINANCIAL AID The academic forgiveness policy is designed for a student who has not been previously reinstated through the appeal process. A student will be granted academic forgiveness one time only and may not appeal for further financial aid eligibility. Any student who is placed on non-academic program who is unable to enroll at his/her own expense can be reinstated on a probationary status under the following guidelines: 1. The student must sit out for one full academic year (this includes all postsecondary institutions). 2. The student must apply for financial aid for the new academic year. 3. The student must meet with a financial aid officer to discuss the reasons for lack of progress. 4. The student will be reinstated for one semester only on a probationary status. Future funding will be dependent on grades earned during the probationary period. 5. Students may be reinstated one time only. TOTAL WITHDRAWALS FROM THE COLLEGE Students who are planning to completely withdraw from the College must notify the Financial Aid Office of their intentions. If a student completely withdraws from the College (either officially or unofficially) before completing 60% of the semester, the College must calculate according to a specific formula the portion of the total scheduled financial assistance the student earned and is therefore entitled to receive. If a student received (or the College received on their behalf) more assistance than he/she earned, the unearned excess funds must be returned to the Department of Education. This means that a student may have to repay federal monies that have already been disbursed to them. Once a student has completed more than 60% of the semester, they have earned all (100%) of their assistance.


VETERANS BENEFITS Students who are eligible for Veterans benefits under the Montgomery GI Bill (including Chapter 30, Chapter 1606 or Chapter 35) or the Post 9/11 GI Bill can apply online at http://www.gibill.va.gov. Once you have completed your application you will receive a certificate of eligibility from the VA notifying you of what benefits you qualify for an the time frame you use those benefits. Students should bring their certificate of eligibility to the Financial Aid office. Students will be asked to complete a Veterans Enrollment Form for each semester they are registered for courses and using their benefits. The Financial Aid office will use this information to certify your enrollment with the VA. Students who are eligible for other VA benefits including Federal Tuition Assistance or Education Assistance Program should contact their unit to applyfor these benefits. Once a student is approved for other VA benefits they sould contact the financial aid office and provided documentation of their eligibility. Students who are receiving VA benefits must adhere to the following guidelines. All veterans must complete the Veterans Enrollment Form every semester they attend. Veterans must immediately report any change in their enrollment status to the Financial Aid Office. Failure to provide any enrollment information will cause a delay in receiving benefits. 1. All certified courses must apply to a student’s major and be necessary for graduation. 2. Veterans must notify the VA and the school in writing of all changes in their schedule, and must include the last date of attendance. Be reminded that if a change in schedule results in overpayment, the veteran is liable to repay that amount to the Veterans Administration. 3. Veterans may not receive payment for any courses repeated if they received a “D” or better that first time. In any event, they may not repeat a course more than once. 4. Veterans must maintain progress in all of their academic work. The school is required to report to the VA all veterans who do not maintain standards of academic progress. Any veteran on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will be reported to the VA. Any student who receives all “Fs” or “Ws” for any single semester will be reported to the VA. All “W” grades will be converted to “Fs” in computing a grade point average for all veterans. The quality point average on the official transcript will not reflect a penalty for “W” grades. The QPA (Quality Point Average) will be used to determine whether a veteran is in good academic standing according to the following school policy: • End of first semester or 16 credits - 1.5 QPA minimum • End of second semester or 30 credits - 1.7 QPA minimum • End of third semester or 47 credits - 1.9 QPA minimum • End of fourth semester or 60 credits - 2.0 QPA minimum Any semester with a QPA of less than 1.5 will also result in Academic Probation. Lack of certification does not prohibit a veteran from enrolling, only from using VA benefits until completing VA approved counseling. If it becomes necessary for the school to notify the VA of academic deficiency, the veteran will be informed in writing. Information on reinstatement to receive VA benefits is available at the Financial Aid Office. 5. Veterans are responsible for notifying the VA in writing of any changes of address or changes in the number of dependents. 6. Any veteran who receives a deferment for tuition is reminded that educational benefits are paid to defray the cost of your education. Tuition must be paid as soon as checks are received. 7. Any monies accepted by a veteran that result in an overpayment may constitute fraud, a punishable offense. The ultimate responsibility to keep the VA informed of your status resides with you. 8. Whenever a veteran changes a program, he or she must apply for change of program before receiving further benefits. 9. Once a veteran has completed a program for which he or she has VA approval, the veteran must apply for a change of program before receiving further benefits. 10. All questions regarding VA benefits or guidelines presented above should be directed to the financial aid office. 11. All veterans must complete a Veterans Enrollment Information Form at the Financial Aid Office each semester that they plan to attend. Students who have questions regarding their benefits can contact the VA at 1-888-GIBILL-1, online at


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BECOMING A STUDENT FINANCIAL AID http://www.gibill.va.gov or visit the financial aid office. These guidelines are developed to implement VA regulations and are subject to change. FINANCIAL AID CHECKLIST Each student must secure, complete, and submit the appropriate applications for financial assistance. The following checklist may be used as a guide in completing the application process. Each student’s financial aid file must be complete before any financial aid will be awarded. • File a 2010-11 FAFSA/Renewal Application. • File a CCBC Financial Aid Student Information Form for 2010-11. • If required, submit additional information to PHEAA. • Review the Student Aid Report (SAR) received from Pell Grant for accuracy. • If required, complete the verification process. Forms are available online at http://my.ccbc.edu. • Review award notice received from PHEAA. • Review a financial award letter received from CCBC.

TYPE OF  AID  

SOURCE

Federal Pell  Grant  

Federal Govt.  

FSEOG Federal   Supplemental   Educ.  Opport.   Grant  

Federal   Govt.  

FWSP Federal  Work   Study  Program  

Federal Govt.  

Federal Stafford   Loan  Program   (Subsidized)        

State Guarantee   Agencies  &   Banks  

(Unsubsidized)

FPLUS Federal  Parents   Loan  for   Undergraduate   Students  

State Guarantee   Agencies  &   Banks  

FEDERAL              AID              PROGRAMS   AWARD  AMOUNTS  

Yearly award  may  range   from  $400  to  $4731  as   determined  by  a  federal   formula.  

Yearly awards  range  from   $150  to  $600  based  on   financial  need  and   available  funds  

Yearly awards  range   from  $1,000  to   $4,290  at  CCBC  based   on  financial  need  and   available  funds.  

WHO IS  ELGIBLE  TO   APPLY  

Any student  intending  to   enroll  at  CCBC  in  a  degree   program    

Applicants must  be  U.S.   citizens  or  eligible  non-­‐ citizen  and  have   documented  financial  need.  

$3500 maximum  first  year   $4500  maximum  second   year.  Note:  Amounts  and   type  subject  to  approval   A  student  must  be  enrolled   by  Financial  Aid  Office,   on  at  least  a  half-­‐time  basis   bank  and  guarantor.   and  must  be  a  U.S.  citizen  or   eligible  non-­‐citizen.     An  additional  $4000  for   independent  students   Up  to  cost  of  education  

Students enrolled  at  least   half-­‐time  who  pass  the   necessary  credit  approval.  

HOW TO  APPLY   Complete  Free   Application  for   Federal  Student  Aid   (FAFSA).    

Must re-­‐apply  each   year.    

Note: Students  must   also  complete   separate  FWSP   applications.   Complete  FAFSA    

Complete loan   applications.    

Must re-­‐apply  each   year.   Forms  available  from   state  guarantee   agencies  and  select   banks.  


TYPE OF  AID   PHEAA  Grants   PA  Higher  Educ.   Assistance   Agency  

State Vocational   Rehab.  Educ.   Assistance  

SOURCE

AWARD AMOUNTS  

State of  PA  

Yearly awards  range   from  $200  to  $4200   at  CCBC  

State &     Federal   Govt.  

Variable: Determined   by  Office  of   Vocational   Rehabilitation  (OVR).  

GI Bill  Benefits   (Title  38,  CH  32)  

Veterans Admin.  

Dependents Veterans  Benefits   (Title  38,  CH  35)  

Veterans Admin.  

VA CH  106   Educ.  Benefits  

STATE            AID              PROGRAMS  

Veterans Admin.  

A Student  must  be  at  last  a   half-­‐time  undergraduate   student  in  a  two-­‐year   associate  degree  program   and  a  U.S.  citizen,  PA   resident,  high  school  grad  or   GED  recipient.   Must  show  presence  of   mental,  physical,  or   emotional  disability.   Variable:  Determined  by   Office  of  Vocational   Rehabilitation  (OVR).  

VETERANS    BENEFITS   Variable  tuition  and   fee  costs  at  minimum.   Variable  Determined   by  the  Veterans   Administration.  

Montgomery GI  Bill   (CH  30)  

Veterans Admin.  

Variable: Determined   by  Veterans   Administration.  

VA Vocational   Educ.  Benefits   (CH  31)  

Veterans Admin.  

Tuition, fees  and   living  allowance.  

WHO IS  ELIGIBLE  TO   APPLY  

Veterans of  the  Armed  Forces   with  180  days  services  prior   to  1/1/77  and  discharged   other  than  dishonorable.   Dependents  of  deceased  and   disabled  veterans.   Reservists  from  eligible   programs.  

Persons entering  military   service  on  or  after  July  1,   1985  or  individuals  who   meet  certain  eligibility   requirements  under  the  old   GI  bill  (CH  34).  

Disabled veterans  with  a   service  connected  disability.  

HOW TO   APPLY   Complete  Free   Application  for   Federal  Student   Aid  (FAFSA).   Contact  local   OVR  for   applicatioin   forms  10  to  12   weeks  prior  to   enrollment.  

Applicable forms   are  available  at   CCBC’s  Veterans   Office  and  the   Financial  Aid   Office.   Copies  are  also   available  through   the  Veterans   Affairs  Regional   Office  in   Pittsburgh.  

Veterans Affairs   Regional  Office   in  Pittsburgh.  


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FINANCIAL PROGRAMS & SCHOLARSHIPS TUITION ASSISTANCE INITIATIVE With unemployment rising and layoffs continuing within our community, CCBC has created an incentive program encouraging displaced workers to enter the College for purposes of retraining and developing new job skills. CCBC’s Tuition Assistance Initiative is available to individuals who satisfy residency requirements in Beaver County and can document that they have been affected by a layoff or plant closing during a specific time period. The program will provide a waiver of tuition for one semester. Participating students are to be responsible for payment of appropriate fees, books, materials, and supplies. Senior Citizen Tuition Waiver Tuition for all students, age 65 years or older, will be waived for credit and non-credit courses on a space available basis. Other costs (textbooks, lab, flight, and other fees, etc.) must be assumed by the individual. In the event that a class becomes full, Beaver County senior students will have first priority. Out-of-county seniors will be asked if they would like to pay for the class. Academic Excellence Scholarship The Academic Excellence Scholarship is awarded each year to students residing in Beaver County who have graduated from a Beaver County high school in the top 10% of their class. The award covers tuition and fees for the Fall and Spring semesters and has second year renewal opportunity. Students remain responsible for payment of books and other educational costs. Adam B. Braddock Memorial Scholarship This scholarship honors the memory of Adam B. Braddock, who died in a tragic aircraft accident in 2008. The purpose of the fund is to provide annual dollars that will be used to provide a source of scholarship assistance for up to two full-time students enrolled in a course of study associated with the aviation sciences programs offered at the College. Applicants must be a full-time student in the aviation program, have a minimum GPA of 3.0, and submit a 250-word written essay stating personal goals and why the scholarship would benefit them. CCBC Foundation Scholarship The College will award a limited number of scholarships to full-time students from Beaver County who has completed at least 24 credits with a 2.5 or higher grade point average. This scholarship is valued at $1,000 yearly. Applications may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office. Deadline for applications is May 1. Dan Donatella Aviation Scholarship The purpose of this endowment is to annually provide funds that will be used to provide a source of scholarship assistance for a full-time student enrolled in a course of study associated with the Aviation Sciences program offered at CCBC. The scholarship is made possible by the family and friends of Dan Donatella in honor of his retirement from fifty years of public service to the people and communities of Beaver County and in recognition of his life-long passion for aviation. The amount available to be awarded each year shall be no less than $1,000.00. To qualify, a student must be a full-time, second year student enrolled in an Aviation Sciences program. Applicants will be evaluated on academic record, in-flight performance and commitment to the profession. Financial need will not be a consideration for awarding this scholarship. Officer James Naim Memorial Scholarship Officer James Naim was killed on March 15, 2001 while on duty as an Aliquippa police officer. As a graduate of CCBC, he was committed to education and to helping people in need. In the summer of 2002, the proceeds from a memorial event held by the non-profit organization BRAVE Riders (Bikers Remembering Action Valor and Excellence) created the Officer James Naim Memorial Scholarship Fund to perpetuate the memory of his life and honor his sacrifices and commitment to his community. Preference will be given to those applicants who demonstrate a genuine desire to pursue a career in law enforcement, public safety, or community service and have declared a major in Criminal Justice, Police Technology, Fire Science, EMT, or other public-safety related field. Applications as well as additional information on eligibility requirements can be found at either the Financial Aid Office or the Information and Registration Center. The deadline to apply is August 15.


Presidential Academic Scholarship Award Each year CCBC awards Presidential Academic Scholarships to outstanding high school seniors. The top student meeting eligibility requirements from each high school in Beaver County qualifies. The award is a full-tuition scholarship and covers tuition and standard fees (excluding flight fees) for the Fall and Spring semesters and has second year renewal opportunity. Students remain responsible for payment of books and other educational costs. Wolves Club Scholarship Funded by the Wolves Club of Aliquippa, and matched by the CCBC Foundation, this scholarship, in the amount of $1,200, is awarded to one or more students each year. Students from Aliquippa, Center Area, and Hopewell Area are eligible to apply. The Waddell/Keppel Scholarship Radiologic Technology $500 awarded annually. Student, must be a non-traditional student, 25 years of age or older that has not completed a degree and had at least a 2-year lapse in continuous education. Student must be enrolled in the Radiation Technology program at CCBC and have a GPA of 3.0 at the end of the first semester. ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS CCBC offers athletic scholarships. For information, contact the CCBC Athletic Director. Additional Scholarships Through endowment by friends of the College and concerned community agencies, other resources are available to students to assist them with their educational pursuits. The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Social Security, and the Railroad Retirement Act are examples of the programs offering support to qualified students. Inquiries should be directed to the government agency authorizing these programs.


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ACADEMIC INFORMATION

FERPA NOTIFICATION Student Records- Consistent with the requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), students are advised that the College has designated the following student information as public information that may be disclosed for any purpose without student consent: • Name • Major field of study • Dates of attendance • Degrees and awards received • Previous institution(s) attended • Participation in officially recognized sports and activities • Weight and height of members of athletic teams For each period of enrollment, students may request that directory information be withheld from release by completing the appropriate for with the Information Resource Center (IRC). Students who believe their FERPA rights have been violated may file a complaint, in writing, with the Vice President for Learning and Student Success for investigation. ACADEMIC FORGIVENESS Any student who has not attended CCBC for a period of three years or longer may file a written request for academic forgiveness with the Information Resource Center (IRC).. The request for academic forgiveness can be for any or all previous terms with no Q.P.A. requirement; or for D or F grades only. However, the overall Q.P.A. must be below a 2.0. If the request is approved, the respective grades from the previous attendance would not be calculated into the overall Q.P.A.; however, all grades will remain on the transcript and be properly noted. Approved academic forgiveness will not appear on the student’s transcript until he/she has earned at least an additional 12 credits with a Q.P.A. of 2.0 or higher. A student is only eligible for academic forgiveness one time and once approved, the decision cannot be reversed. Also, no tuition or fee refunds can be made.


EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY Community College of Beaver County does not discriminate on the basis of sex, age, race ethnicity, sexual preference or disability in admissions or program access. If a student believes s/he has been the victim of discrimination, the student must file a written complaint with the Vice President for Learning and Student Success for investigation. These requirements also apply to requests for accomodation under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and/or the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. COMPUTER AND TECHNICAL RESOURCES The College’s computer systems, all computers, computer files, and storage units (disks, CDs, jump drives, etc.), electronic devices and electronic mail provided in its offices or elsewhere and material contained within them are College property. All individuals are permitted to use College computers and technical resources for class purposes or other College-approved uses. The College administration will develop, implement, and enforce computer and technical resource use guidelines for the implementation of this policy. DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES Developmental courses are specially designed to help students who need to improve their academic skills prior to enrolling in college-level classes. The decision to require developmental courses is determined by in-house diagnostic testing, faculty perception of weakness in a given area, or the student’s awareness of needing help to become fully prepared. The developmental classes may require lab work in addition to lecture hours. Developmental courses differ in several respects from college level courses: • The grading system is unique, including letter grades of A, B, C, and R. The letter grade R indicates the instructor recommendation that the student repeat the developmental course. • The credits acquired for developmental courses do not satisfy requirements for graduation and are not reflected in the QPA. However, students are required to successfully complete required developmental courses. Developmental courses include: DEVS 012 - Improvement of Reading Skills DEVS013 - Critical Reading DEVS015 - Introduction to College Writing DEVS020 - Improvement of Mathematical Skills DEVS021 - Fundamentals of Algebra DEVS030 - Study Skills TESTING AND PLACEMENT While CCBC is an open admission institution, the College requires placement testing of all entering students to determine their readiness to succeed in college-level courses. Students whose placement scores do not indicate a skill level appropriate for college-level courses will be required to enroll in appropriate developmental courses to enhance their skills. WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM CCBC believes that discipline-based research and writing skills are important for success in any career. Therefore, certain courses, normally those required in the second year of programs,are designated WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM courses.


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ACADEMIC INFORMATION

These courses are intended to showcase students’ continued application of skills acquired during first year writing courses. In addition, a WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM assignment is now required for all graduates as part of their graduation eFolio. The following list presents the WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM courses available for each major at CCBC. Accounting BUSM256 - Microeconomics Aerospace Management AVIP201 - Business/Aviation Law Air Traffic Control Terminal AVIP240 - Facility Rating II Air Traffic Control En-Route AVIC255 - Radar Lecture Biological Sciences BIOL205 - Ecology Business Administration BUSM256 - Microeconomics Business Communications BUSC220 - Team Development Business Management BUSM256 - Microeconomics CIS Tracks (Computer Forensics, Networking, Web Programming) CISN200 - Client Operating Systems Criminal Justice CRIM232 - Criminal Evidence Culinary Arts (degree) CULA210 or CULA211 - Internship Early Childhood Education (degree) ERCH200 - Diversity and Inclusion in Early Childhood Education Preparation - Secondary Level (grades 7-12) EDUC225 - Diversity Issues in Education Entrepreneurship BUSM265- Enterprise Funding Fine Arts FINE210 - Design Humanities Any LITR Elective


Humanities/Social Science Any LITR Elective BUSM256 - Microeconomics PSYC201 - General Psychology II PSYC212 - Psychology of Gender PSYC215 - Organizational Psychology SOCI210 - Contemporary Social Problems SOCI231 - Cultural Diversity Human Resource Management BUSC220 - Team Development Natural Science BIOL205 - Ecology MATH161 - Calculus II Nursing NURS276 - Nursing V-ADN Office Technology Tracks (Administrative Assistant, Medical Administrative Assistant) OFFT130 - Microsoft Access-MOS Certification Police Technology PLIC155 - Principles of Criminal Investigation, Report Writing, and Case Preparation Pre-Engineering MATH161 - Calculus II Professional Pilot AVIP139 - Aircraft Engines and Structure Theory Radiologic Technology RADS165 - Pathology Social Science PSYC201 - General Psychology II PSYC212 - Psychology of Gender Differences PSYC215 - Organizational Psychology SOCI210 - Contemporary Social Problems SOCI231 - Cultural Diversity in the American Society Social Work SOCI231 - Cultural Diversity in the American Society Upper Elementary - Middle-Level Education (grades 4 - 8) EDUC225 - Diversity Issues in Education Visual Communications: Digital Media Design and Web Design New Media VISC 201 – Interactive Design


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SPECIAL TOPICS Occasionally, course offerings include Special Topics in Liberal Arts, Business, Science, and Technologies. These courses are indicated by a program prefix code preceding the course number. Special Topics are created to increase the students’ knowledge in a particular discipline or to enhance knowledge in a diverse field of study. Special topics are offered at the discretion of the Division Directors. Credits earned in Special Topics courses can be applied as elective requirements toward graduation. Students should consult college counselors for details. INDEPENDENT STUDY Consistent with requirements of the agreement between the College and the Society of the Faculty, the College will consider creating Independent Study Courses under the following conditions: A student proposes a project designed to explore topics not covered in the regular program curriculum A student needs a course to meet the requirements for graduation in the current semester and no acceptable substitute course is available from the inventory of scheduled courses, as determined by the appropriate Division Director. If either of these conditions exists, a student must request the authorization of an Independent Study through a faculty member in the discipline of the subject matter to be addressed in the course. If a faculty member is willing to conduct the Independent Study with the student, s/he must recommend creation of the Independent Study to the appropriate Division Director. If a full-time faculty member is unwilling to offer the Independent Study, the student may request an Independent Study through an appropriately qualified part-time instructor. The request for approval must be forwarded to the appropriate Division Director for consideration. A syllabus stipulating the educational outcomes, the work to be completed by the student, and evaluative measures utilized to determine student success must accompany the request. An Independent Study will not be considered authorized until approved by the appropriate Division Director. Approved requests for Independent Study will be forwarded to the Registrar’s Office who will create the independent study section. Copies of the approval and its accompanying syllabus will be maintained in the office of the Division Director . GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS General Education is the knowledge and skills that prepare students for immediate academic, personal, and professional endeavors as well as for a life of learning. General Education requirements at CCBC include the following: Communication Proficiency - requires the skilled presentation of ideas through appropriate media and in a manner suitable to the audience. Requirements for Communication Proficiency are: complete an approved project assigned in either WRIT101 English Composition I or in a course with one of the following prefixes: • COMM • FINE • FILM • FREN • MUSI • SPAN • THEA • WRIT201 Information Literacy - recognizes the need to integrate authoritative resources with an existing knowledge base. Requirements for Information Literacy are: complete an approved project assigned in either WRIT102 English Composition II or WRIT103 Writing for Business and Technology (depending on your major) or in a course with one of the following prefixes:


• JOUR • LITR • PHIL Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning - employs empirical and mathematical processes and scientific methods in order to arrive at conclusions and make decisions. Requirements for Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning are: complete an approved project assigned in a course with one of the following prefixes: • BIOL • CHEM • MATH • PHYS Cultural Literacy - delineates the patterns of individual and group dynamics that provide structure to society on both individual and global levels. Requirements in Cultural Literacy are: you will complete an approved project assigned in a course with one of the following prefixes: • ANTH • GEO • HIST • POLS • PSYC • SOCI • BUSM225 Technology Literacy - enhances the acquisition of knowledge, the ability to communicate, and productivity. Requirements in Technology Literacy: complete an approved project assigned in CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology. COURSE PURSUIT It is the responsibility of each student to regularly attend and effectively pursue the stated objectives for each course in which s/he is enrolled. The instructor for each class will provide the student with a course syllabus at the beginning of each semester, and the syllabus will delineate the criteria for demonstrating pursuit of the course objectives. In making a determination of pursuit of the course objectives for each student enrolled, the instructor will consider class attendance; failure of the student to appear for exams, presentations or other required class activities defined in the syllabus; and failure of the student to submit required papers, projects and/or reports. When, on the basis of a combination of these factors, the instructor determines a student has ceased to pursue the objectives of the course, s/he may withdraw the student from enrollment in the class. No withdrawals within the context of this procedure will be initiated later than the twelfth week of classes. The faculty member will submit the withdrawal notification to the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar will notify the student of the withdrawal actio, and the student will receive a letter grade of “W” for the course. Students withdrawn in this manner may request to be reinstated in the course through appeal to the appropriate instructor. Such appeals must be initiated, in writing, within 10 days from the date on which the withdrawal was processed by the Registrar. If the instructor agrees to reinstate the student, s/he will submit a reinstatement notification to the Office of the Registrar for processing. If the instructor denies the request for reinstatement, appeals may be initiated in a manner consistent with the grade appeals process. ACADEMIC PROGRESS AND GOOD STANDING For students participating in certificate/degree programs offered for college credit, the following definitions and processes will determine satisfactory academic progress and good standing.


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GOOD STANDING To remain in good standing and demonstrate satisfactory academic progress, a student must earn a minimum semester/term QPA of 2.0 and maintain a cumulative of QPA of 2.0 or above. Full-time students will be defined as those students completing at least 12 semester credit hours. Those students with a semester QPA of 3.2 to 3.7499 will be placed on the Dean’s List for the semester. Those with a semester QPA of 3.75 or above will be placed on the President’s List for the semester. Criteria for part-time student placement on either the Dean’s List or the President’s List are described in separate procedures. ACADEMIC PROBATION Any student who earns a semester/term QPA or a cumulative QPA of less than 2.0 will be placed on academic probation. This status indicates the student remains eligible for continued enrollment with the College. As a condition of enrollment, the student must receive academic counseling and may not enroll for more than 12 semester credit hours until a return to good standing is achieved. A student will remain on academic probation so long as the semester/term QPA and/or cumulative QPA is below 2.0 unless placed on academic suspension. ACADEMIC SUSPENSION Any student on academic probation who does not maintain a minimum semester/term QPA of 2.0 or higher will be placed on academic suspension for a period of one semester. Following the period of suspension, the student may apply to the Office of the Registrar for special permission to enroll. As a prerequisite of approval, the student must participate in academic counseling and may not enroll for more than 12 semester credit hours. S/he may also be required to take placement tests, repeat courses previously completed, participate in tutoring and/or other assistive services, enroll for remedial courses and/or take a reduced course load as recommended by the student’s academic counselor. Students granted special permission to enroll must do so in person at the Information and Registration Center on campus. During the period of enrollment under special permission, the student must successfully complete all courses for which they have officially enrolled and earn a semester/term QPA of 2.0 or higher. Where these criteria are not met, the student will be returned to academic suspension for two consecutive semesters. After completing the period of suspension, the student may again petition for special permission to enroll under the terms and conditions stated previously. If the student does not successfully complete all the courses for which s/he enrolled while under special permission status, s/he will be returned to academic suspension for 1 calendar year. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY Academic dishonesty occurs when a student represents words or ideas as their own, shares homework or exam questions or answers with others without the instructor’s permission, or presents an artifact produced by another (whether hand-made or computer generated) as their own. Academic dishonesty also occurs when a student assists another student in pursuing the above activities without instructor permission. Further information about academic dishonesty, including penalties, is included in the Student Handbook. ATTENDANCE The College maintains that class attendance is necessary and that students are expected to attend all classes. The student should be aware that unexcused and/or excessive absences may affect final evaluation. Students are responsible to make up any missed work. GUESTS Students who wish to have a guest (non-enrolled individual) attend a class may do so only with the advance permission of the instructor of that class. Repeated class attendance by a non-enrolled individual is prohibited. DISTANCE LEARNING Online courses at CCBC allow students to create flexible schedules for classes that require little or no time on


campus. These courses are based on the same course content and materials that serve as the foundation for our oncampus classes. However, students rely on the Internet and email to supplement textbooks for much of the instruction. Online courses and on-campus courses have the same rigor. Only their delivery system and the method in which you interact with your instructor are different. For online classes, course content and other communication between students and instructor are accomplished primarily through the Internet-based Blackboard course management system and email, although video and traditional means are used as required. You will find many programs include online course offerings and are indicated as such in the course schedule each semester. To preview CCBC’s online courses through the Blackboard web site, visit http://blackboard.ccbc.edu and login as a guest. Depending upon the course and instructor, some classes, known as hybrids, will periodically be required to meet on-campus for testing and other work. Check the course schedule each semester for meeting dates/times of offered hybrid courses. Students must have regular access to a computer with Internet connection and a web browser to successfully complete online courses. Common web browsers, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, will easily support online learning. You will also need access to standard support software, such as Microsoft Office and spreadsheet software such as Excel for business courses. CCBC does not provide support for home systems or connectivity problems. Support for accessing online courses and training can be accessed at through the CCBC homepage, email, or by phone. Before electing to register for online classes you should consider your ability to successfully complete the course through this electronic medium.


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GRADES In the evaluation of student success, the Community College of Beaver County will use the following grading structure for courses bearing semester credit hour values: A=Superior B=Above Average C=Average D=Below Average F=Failing

4 Quality Points per Semester Hour 3 Quality Points per Semester Hour 2 Quality Points per Semester Hour 1 Quality Point per Semester Hour 0 Quality Points per Semester Hour

The Quality Points received by students earning the above specified grades will be used to determine the student’s semester Quality Points Average (QPA) and cumulative QPA. In making this calculation, the number of quality points received per course will be multiplied by semester credit hour value of each course for which a performance grade was received. The total quality points received will be divided by the total credit hours completed to determine the Quality Point Average. In addition to the grades defined above, the College utilizes the following grades to describe student progress: AU=Approved Audit CR=Credit NC=No Credit I=Incomplete R=Repeat P=Passing W=Withdrawal AW=Administrative Withdrawal

No credits awarded Successful completion of a course with no quality points awarded. Completion of a course without earning semester credit hours or quality points. Course requirements not completed but in progress. Completion of course with re-enrollment required to earn credit hours associated with the course. Aviation only, successful completion of a course with no quality points awarded. Withdrawn from the course prior to completion (student initiated) Withdrawn from the course prior to completion (faculty initiated)

For purposes of awarding quality points and calculating the Quality Point Average, the grade of CR will reflect the award of credits completed, but the credits will not be used in calculation of the QPA. For the grades AU, NC, W, and AW, no quality points will be awarded and the grades will not be used in calculating the QPA. AUDIT A student may request to be allowed to enroll for a course with the intent of receiving a performance grade for the course or to receive the credit hours for the course in satisfying the requirements for graduation. When enrolling for an Audit, the student will be permitted to attend the class and participate in class activities. However, s/he will not be required to complete tests, submit papers or reports, or complete other activities required of students taking the class for credit. This type of enrollment will be reflected on the student transcript with a grade of “AU.” For a student enrolling as an Audit to earn credit for the course and have the credits applied to a degree/certificate program, it will be necessary for the student to re-enroll for the course and complete all work required to earn a performance grade. INCOMPLETE GRADE In those cases where a student has been consistently in pursuit of completion of the course objectives and requires additional time to complete the course requirements, the faculty member may agree to award an “I” grade indicating Incomplete. This grade will require a written agreement between the faculty member and the student indicating the specific work to be completed and the timeline for completion. The student may be allowed up to four months to complete the required work and submit it to her/his faculty member for evaluation. Following the submission of the required work, the faculty member will assign a final grade and issue a grade change notification to the Office of the Registrar. Until the grade change is received, the student transcript will reflect a grade of “I” which for purposes of calculation of the QPA will be treated as an “F.” Once the change of grade has been processed, the QPA for the semester in which the “I” grade was received and the cumulative QPA will be recalculated appropriately. If the grade is not converted within four months, the grade posted to the transcript will become an “F.”


REPEAT GRADE The option for a grade of “R” may only be used in the grading of courses within developmental education. The grade will designate that the student made progress toward achievement of the course objectives but has not fully demonstrated the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully complete the course. In courses where an “R” grade is assigned, the semester credit hours for the course will not be shown as completed and will not be used in calculation of the QPA. Students may not progress to college level courses with either an “R” or “NC” grade. It will be necessary for the student to re-enroll in the course and complete the course objectives in order to receive an performance grade. The grade of “R” may only be awarded once for any particular course, and if the student does not re-enroll and complete the requirements of the course within the semester, the grade will convert to a grade of “NC.” NOTICE TO STUDENTS A performance grade of “D” will generally enable you to receive credit for having satisfied the minimum criteria required to complete the course and to progress to the next course required in your degree/certificate program major. However, students are advised that many colleges and universities will not accept a class in which a grade of “D” was earned in transfer, and you may be required to take the course again at the institution to which you transfer. ACADEMIC HONORS Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Organized in 1918, the international Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society has recognized and promoted scholastic achievement among students of community, technical, and junior colleges. To qualify for membership students must complete 12 college level credits and have a Q.P.A. of 3.5 or higher to join. A Q.P.A. of 3.0 is necessary to remain a member. Phi Theta Kappa’s four hallmarks are scholarship, leadership, service, and fellowship. Members are distinguished by the Phi Theta Kappa stole and tassel, which is worn at Commencement. PRESIDENT’S LIST AND DEAN’S LIST RECOGNITION The Quality Point Average (QPA) for students will be calculated at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters and at the end of the Summer term for all courses taken during the various sessions. Full-time students (i.e. those completing at least 12 semester credit hours) will be eligible for academic recognition by being named to the President’s List or the Dean’s List for that semester/term. To be placed on the Dean’s List, a student must complete at least 12 credit hours with a semester/term QPA of at least 3.25 but less than 3.75. The honor will automatically be posted to their academic record. To be placed on the President’s List, a student must complete at least 12 credit hours with a semester/term QPA of 3.75 or higher. The honor will automatically be posted to their academic record. Students completing at least 12 credit hours may also be placed on the President’s List or the Dean’s List on the basis of their cumulative QPA. When a student who has been enrolled on a part-time basis completes a cumulative total of 12 semester credit hours and her/his cumulative QPA meets the requirements specified for the Dean’s List or the President’s List she/he may initiate a request to be placed on the appropriate list through the Registrar’s Office. The request and the student’s academic record will be reviewed, and where the student has satisfied the requirement, the honor will be recorded on the student’s academic record. When the student has completed an additional 12 credit hours s/he may again request to be recognized for her/his academic achievement.


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GRADUATION GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The student is responsible for satisfying requirements for graduation. Students should review program requirements with their academic advisors/counselors. In addition, the following requirements must be met by students planning to graduate: • Complete all academic and general education requirements, including the e-folio curriculum requirements, and any other requirement specified for the major, degree, diploma, or certificate program for which the student is applying. These requirements must be completed no later than 30 calendar days from the end of the term in which the application for graduation is submitted. • Attain a final, cumulative quality point average of 2.00 or better for all work applied toward graduation. • Satisfy all conditions for a complete and accurate student file with the Information Resource Center (IRC). • File an application for graduation with the Information Resource Center (IRC) by the following deadline dates: August 1 for August graduation; December 1 for December graduation; and March 1 for May graduation. Note: Applicants who do not satisfy requirements/obligations are notified by the College Registrar. • Pay the graduation fee of $25. • Meet all financial obligations/bills owed to the college including Library or parking fines, fees, etc. Students who transfer credits from other colleges into their CCBC major must: • Complete a minimum of 15 semester hours of credit at CCBC. • Complete at least 9 of the last 15 semester hours required prior to graduation at CCBC.

TRANSCRIPTS The college transcript is an official record of a student’s academic work. To secure your transcripts, a student must: • Submit a written request to the Information Resource Center (IRC). • Allow a minimum of three working days for the transcript. • Pay any necessary transcript fee. In special circumstances the Information Resource Center (IRC) will process same day requests. To accommodate this special handling students must: • Submit a written request to the Information Resource Center (IRC) indicating immediate need. • Pay a special handling transcript fee of $5 per transcript. No transcript or other enrollment information will be released by the College if the student owes any financial balance to the school.

TRANSFER AND ARTICULATION Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Center (PA TRAC) provides a seamless statewide transfer and articulation system. It also requires Pennsylvania’s 14 community colleges and the 14 universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) to adopt mandatory equivalency standards for the purpose of creating at least 30 hours of foundation courses that can be easily transferred to any of the participating institutions (see chart below), and to establish an electronic portal for providing public access to transfer information.


Students who successfully complete courses from the approved Transfer Credit Framework can transfer those credits to any of the participating colleges and universities and have them count towards graduation. Interested students should visit www.patrac.org. PARTICIPATING INSTITUTIONS PA COMMUNITY COLLEGES Bucks County Community College Butler County Community College Community College of Allegheny College Community College of Beaver County Community College of Philadelphia Delaware County Community College Harrisburg Area Community College Lehigh Carbon Community College Luzerne County Community College Montgomery County Community College Northampton Community College Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Reading Area Community College Westmoreland Community College STATE-RELATED INSTITUTIONS Lincoln University PA STATE SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION UNIVERSITIES Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania California University of Pennsylvania Cheyney University of Pennsylvania Clarion University of Pennsylvania East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania Edinboro University of Pennsylvania Indiana University of Pennsylvania Kutztown University of Pennsylvania Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania Mansfield University of Pennsylvania Millersville University of Pennsylvania Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania West Chester University of Pennsylvania


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TRANSFER AND ARTICULATION ARTICULATED CREDITS FOR CTE PROGRAM OF STUDY GRADUATES In accordance with the Perkins statewide articulation agreement between CCBC and Secondary schools with PDE– Approved Career and Technical Education Programs of study, CCBC will award college level credits to students who complete the secondary school Program of Study and meet all the student criteria, including submittal of proper documentation, as outlined in the Agreement. CCBC credit opportunities available through this initiative may be found at www.collegetransfer.net. Upon submittal of the required documentation, CCBC will abide by credit validation mechanisms as identified in the PDE articulation agreement with respect to admissions, college preparedness, award of credit, and time limitations. Additionally, students must enroll for and successfully complete a minimum of 15 credits of program coursework at CCBC in order to have the articulated credits placed on their transcript. During the admissions process, any student who desires to receive articulated credit should contact the CCBC Perkins Postsecondary contact in the College’s counseling office or counselingoffice@ccbc.edu, prior to registering for their first semester. The Perkins contact will coordinate the student’s submittal of the necessary documentation and forward to the registrar’s office for authorization. ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS BETWEEN CCBC AND OTHER ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS Articulation agreements are formal arrangements ensuring that certain credits from two-year degree programs at CCBC will be accepted for credit at specific four-year colleges. Several of these agreements entitle students to direct acceptance to junior level status at the four-year college. Others allow direct transfer of many courses. See the Counseling Office for specific guidance. Articulation agreements are subject to change. Please contact the Registrar’s Office for the most current information. AGREEMENT WITH: CCBC PROGRAM College/University CCBC Program PASSHE Universities: Bloomsburg University of PA 30 credits Under PA TRAC California University of PA Cheyney University of PA Clarion University of PA East Stroudsburg University of PA Edinboro University of PA Indiana University of PA Kutztown University of PA Lock Haven University of PA Mansfield University of PA Millersville University of PA Shippensburg University of PA Slippery Rock University of PA West Chester University of PA


ECEAWPA Schools: Butler County Community College California State University Carlow University Clarion University Community College of Allegheny County Community College of Beaver County Indiana University of Pennsylvania Penn Highlands Community College Slippery Rock University Westmoreland County Community College

Early Childhood Education

Bethany College

A.A. & A.S. to B.A. & B.S.

California University of PA

Criminal Justice

Carlow University Nursing Edinboro University of PA Criminal Justice Liberal Arts Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute P.P., Aerospace Management Professional Pilot Florida Institute of Technology

Professional Pilot

Franklin University (all online)

Degree Completion (all majors)

Geneva College Business/Aviation Criminal Justice to Sociology Degree Completion program (Human Resource Management & Organizational Development) Geneva College

Degree Completion (all majors)

Indiana University of PA Criminal Justice Respiratory Care Business Education Preparation La Roche College Nursing Middle Tennessee State University

Professional Pilot

Mountain State University

Degree Completion (all majors)

Penn State-Beaver Social Science Point Park University Business Criminal Justice


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Police Technology Robert Morris University Nursing Business Administration Criminal Justice Slippery Rock University of PA Nursing Applied Science Strayer University Degree Completion Thomas Edison State College

Aviation

University of Pittsburgh Nursing Administration of Criminal Justice Youngstown State University A.A.S., A.A., & A.G.S. Office Services & Administration Marketing Information Systems Marketing Management Personal Admin. Office Systems Management Health & Human Service Engineering Technology OTHERS AGREEMENT WITH: CCBC PROGRAM Institution CCBC program Beaver County Career & Technology Center

Advanced Standing – Culinary Arts

New Life Academy of Information Technology

Web Programming

Pennsylvania Child Care Association

Early Childhood Education

South Side High School

Accounting

Western Area Career & Technical Center

Culinary Arts

ELIGIBILITY Students are eligible to receive the Academic Passport if s/he has one of the following: An Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree from a community college in Pennsylvania or Lackawanna College with a minimum 2.0 grade point average in all coursework and at least 30 credits of liberal arts courses. OR At least 12 college level credits with a minimum 2.0 grade point average at another PASSHE university. If s/he has earned at least 12 college level credits with a minimum 2.0 grade point average at one of Pennsylvania’s 14 community colleges OR Lackawanna College, and wish to transfer to a PASSHE university prior to obtaining the Academic Passport, the student can still apply for admission and his/her liberal arts credits will be used to meet university lower division requirements.


ACADEMIC SUPPORT COUNSELING The Counseling Office provides academic, career, transfer, and personal counseling services for both day and evening students. The college counselors are committed to maintaining an environment that is conducive to the personal, social, and intellectual development of CCBC students. Counselors share the academic advising function of course registration. Counselors meet with incoming first semester students to interpret placement test scores and identify appropriate course selections for their academic and vocational goals. Full-time faculty also provides academic advising for course selection and areas related to their expertise. Counseling services are provided Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. An evening counselor is available MondayThursday from 4:30 p.m.-7 p.m. CAREER CENTER The Career Center assists all registered students and alumni with career planning and all aspects of conducting a successful job search. The staff assists students by helping them to develop strategies in order to obtain employment. Services offered by the center include assistance with job search skills; resume writing, business etiquette, and interview techniques. The center is located in the upper level of the Student Services Center and has information to assist students throughout their decision-making and job-hunting activities. Resources include computer software, books, periodicals, and specialty web sites. These materials are available to conduct research, explore career options, obtain occupational descriptions, find job openings, and prepare for interviews. Office hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Phone: 724-480-3437 or career.center@ccbc.edu TUTOR CENTER The Tutor Center provides tutors and individualized instruction for students in a variety of subject areas, test preparation and review and expansion or review of class material. Students can also learn strategies for academic success, such as note taking, time organization, and study techniques. Additional assistance is available for students with limited English proficiency. A learning lab is located next to the Tutor Center. The learning lab computers and software are user-friendly and cover a wide range of subjects, including Microsoft Office, plato skills, mathematics, typing, MLA and APA Software, which correlate as much as possible with the college curriculum. The Tutor Center is located in the upper level of the library. Tutoring schedules vary by semester and are available in the library, in the Titan Talk student newsletter, and at http://my.ccbc.edu. ACT 101 PROGRAM The ACT 101 Program provides eligible students with free academic and personal support to assist, inspire, and encourage them to achieve their goals. All ACT 101 students will receive a year-long package of services from the ACT 101 staff, including counseling, tutoring assistance, and mentoring. The ACT 101 student academic monitoring system provides continuous contact with each ACT 101 student so that problems causing students to withdraw from college can be discovered and resolved at an early stage. It is believed that early intervention through this academic monitoring system will decrease the possibility of students withdrawing from college and, therefore, increase their chances of achieving academic success. To be eligible for ACT 101 program services, students must be full-time residents of Pennsylvania and must meet certain economic and academic criteria. Institutional norms are used to establish educational criteria.


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At Community College of Beaver County, student eligibility is determined after a student has taken the College placement test. Students scoring below the College cut-off levels in any of the four subjects (reading, English, basic math, and elementary algebra), and meeting economic eligibility qualify to participate in the program. All ACT 101 students are advised to take developmental course work to eliminate their academic deficiencies. The ACT 101 counselors, tutors, and staff devote many hours to counseling, tutoring and encouraging the ACT 101 student. For further information, contact 724-480-3414. SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Community College of Beaver County is committed to offering a quality education to all individuals and to providing access to everyone with the ability to benefit from a program of higher education. It is the mission of the Supportive Services Office, located in the upper level of the Library, to arrange and provide services for students with disabilities, learning challenges, and limited English proficiency. In order to receive accommodations, students with disabilities must first make their disability known to the Supportive Services staff and then request the service or services needed at least three weeks prior to the beginning of each semester. Eligibility for services will be determined by the Dean of Academic Support Services. Eligibility is based on presentation of appropriate documentation of the disability from a licensed professional. Once identification and eligibility has been determined and approved, the Supportive Services Office may then arrange and provide appropriate, reasonable accommodations. Services include, but are not limited to, escorting, special testing accommodations, note taking assistance, adaptive equipment use, and other reasonable academic accommodations. Students with limited English proficiency may also request services in order to achieve academic success. English Language Learners (ELL) may work under the direction of specialists who will plan an individual program to meet students’ needs. For further information, or to make an appointment, contact the Supportive Services Office at 724-480-3502, or 7-1-1 PA Relay, or email supportive.services@ccbc.edu. LIBRARY Located on the upper level of the Learning Resource Center, the library houses more than 50,000 titles including fiction, non-fiction, children’ s literature, reference books, and audiovisual materials. B-VR-PAC, the library system online catalog, allows users to search the entire collection onsite or remotely. In addition, a number of online databases are available on and off-site for course-related or personal research. A direct link to Access PA allows patrons to search libraries throughout the state for material not available locally. Patrons may also make use of interlibrary loan services to obtain such material. The library has computers with Internet access and Microsoft Office 2007 software. All users must present a valid Beaver County Library System card at the Customer Service Desk to be permitted access to library computers. There is also a photocopy machine, TV/VCR/DVD units with headphones, and a microfilm reader/printer available. Classrooms where librarians provide course-related group instruction on the use of print and electronic resources are housed in the library. Individual assistance is also provided to help patrons and students navigate the library website and make good use of library resources. Reading rooms and large tables are available for study groups while study carrels are provided for individual use.


GED TESTING General Educational Development (GED) Testing is a program designed to prepare individuals who do not have a formal high school education to take a series of tests in order to qualify for a High School Equivalency Diploma. All residents of Pennsylvania may take the GED tests. An applicant must be: • 18 years of age or older • Not enrolled in an approved or licensed secondary school • Testers that are of the ages 16 to 18 must have a letter of withdrawal from a school district superintendent as well as an additional letter of request from one of the following: • An employer who requires a high school equivalency for job opportunities • A college, trade school, or university official who accepts applicants on the basis of GED test scores • A recruiting office for individuals who are required to have a high school diploma or equivalency to enter a branch of the armed forces • A director of state institutions for residents, patients, or inmates requesting testing before their anticipated release or discharge from the institution • PA has a compulsory school age of 17, thus individuals that are 16 must have: • A letter from the superintendent stating that they are withdrawn from the school and are permitted to obtain a GED • A work permit • One of the five additional letters of request listed above In addition, all testers must have a valid PA Photo ID. Tests are offered in Spanish as well as English. Audio and large print versions are also available for applicants with documented learning disabilities. The GED Chief Examiner administers all tests. To schedule required appointments and/or inquire about fees, contact the GED Testing Center at 724-480-3434.

KEYS (KEYSTONE EDUCATIONAL SUCCESS) This program has been designed in conjunction with the PA Department of Welfare to provide support and services to PA TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and some food stamp recipients enrolled in a community college. Further information can be obtained at 724-480-3430.

STUDENT LIFE STUDENT ORIENTATION New and transfer students are encouraged to participate in the student orientation program to become acquainted with the College and the campus. Student Orientation give a new/transfer student the opportunity to meet administrators, faculty and staff, get initial understanding of the CCBC environment and outline resources that will be useful during the first weeks on campus. STUDENT PARKING & HOUSING All students are expected to become familiar with the College motor vehicle regulations; copies are available at the Security Office located in the Student Service Building. All financial obligations incurred as a result of parking or traffic violations are considered debts to CCBC. CCBC is a commuter college with no on-campus residence halls. The Information Resource Center (IRC) assists students who require housing by providing a list of contacts for room/house rentals. However, CCBC does not inspect the accommodations provided by the private owners nor in any way, direct or implied, recommend or approve the properties listed. For Aviation students, the College has a housing agreement with Penn State-Beaver to use their residence halls on a space available basis.


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STUDENT LIFE

TITAN CAFÉ A cafeteria is in the Student Services Center. The facility offers light lunches, sandwiches, soups and salads, and refreshments throughout the fall and spring semesters for students, faculty, and staff. The Titan Café is open MondayFriday from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Breakfast is available until 10 a.m. each day. In addition, the College provides vending services in most campus buildings. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSTORE The Barnes & Noble CCBC Bookstore sells textbooks, school supplies, laptops, back packs and other items related to student studies. In addition the Bookstore also carries reference materials, study aids, gift cards and beauty supplies, candy, CCBC attire, nursing student supplies and scrubs, and giftware. Please note that CCBC textbooks and merchandise are also available on our website www.ccbc.bncollege.com. The Bookstore buys back books from students all year if the student has a valid student ID card. The best time to sell back is during finals. Students can save 50% of the selling price if the same text is used the following term, the book is in re-saleable condition, and the store requires more to meet demand. If this is not the case, the Bookstore will give students the latest national pricing. The refund policy for textbooks states that students will receive a full refund if the textbook is returned within the first week of class in your original form of payment with a receipt. With a proof of schedule change, a full refund will be given in the original form of payment with a receipt during the first 30 days of classes. No refunds will be given on textbooks without a receipt. Textbooks must be in original condition. For general merchandise full refunds are granted in the original form of payment with a receipt for items returned within 30 days of original purchase. Without a receipt, a merchandise credit will be issued at the current selling price. Cash back on merchandise credits will not exceed $5. All merchandise must be in original condition. The Bookstore’s regular store hours are Monday-Thursday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Fridays from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Summer hours are Monday-Thursday 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Fridays from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Hours of operation are extended during the first week of classes. Please contact the Bookstore or view the special back to school hours on the website. The Bookstore accepts Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, Barnes & Noble Gift Cards and cash. Student financial aid is accepted for three weeks in the fall and spring terms. Please check with the Bookstore for the dates of availability. CAMPUS CHILDCARE CENTER The Campus Childcare Center is located in the Health Sciences Center and is managed by Civic Senior Citizens, Inc., is licensed by the state of Pennsylvania and maintains full-time professional supervision. The center is open Monday-Thursday from 6:30 a.m.-10:00 p.m. and on Fridays from 6:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Breakfast and lunch are provided daily. Scheduled holiday breaks are defined in the Childcare Handbook. The following rates apply: Employees Full-time care (6 hours or more) - $22 per day Part-time care - $16.50 per day Students Full-time care (6 hours or more) - $18 per day Part-time care - $12 per day


Community Full-time care (6 hours or more) - $25 per day Part-time care - $19 per day RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Students at CCBC have an obligation to conduct themselves appropriately, both on and off campus. Students are expected to abide by the laws governing the community (federal, state, local) as well as to the regulations prescribed by the College. The Board of Trustees of CCBC has policies and regulations pertaining to student conduct and misconduct and the disciplinary procedures of the College. These policy statements are published as “Students Rights and Responsibilities”. Copies are available in the office of the Vice President for Learning and Student Success. Each student is expected to become familiar with the policy statements regarding student conduct and college disciplinary procedures. Smoking on Campus Smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings. Smoking may be permitted in selected, outdoor areas as designated by the President. STUDENT CONDUCT Community College of Beaver County is committed to maintaining a safe environment for all students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a lawful and legal manner. Any student who commits or attempts to commit an act of misconduct shall be subject to disciplinary procedures. The College administration will will enforce the student conduct policy. The policy is made available to students in the Student Handbook. SEXUAL HARASSMENT CCBC is committed to the maintenance of a working and academic environment free from sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates federal, state and local laws. CCBC will not tolerate any behavior by an employee or student, which constitutes sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature under the following policy: • Submission of such conduct is an explicit or implicit condition of employment or academic success; • Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for an employment or academic decision; • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or academic environment. Sexual harassment is a serious matter. A charge of sexual harassment is not to be taken lightly by a Complainant, Respondent, or any other member of the College community. Violators of this policy will be subjected to disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, reprimand, suspension, termination of employment, or expulsion from CCBC. Students with questions or concerns, or who wish to file a sexual harassment complaint, should contact the Vice President for Learning and Student Success, located in the Community Education Building. All inquiries will be kept strictly confidential.


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STUDENT COMMUNICATIONS Student Handbook - Published annually and updated annually, the CCBC Student Handbook contains general information, policies, and athletic and events schedules. It can also viewed online. Titan Talk - Titan Talk is a weekly newsletter published by the Student Activities Office and distributed throughout the fall and spring semesters. It contains a range of information important to students by addressing such topics as financial aid, changes in office hours, library and bookstore announcements, club information, government regulations affecting students, and special campus events. Emerge - CCBC encourages and honors creativity and showcases noteworthy short fiction, poetry, and art in Emerge, the College’s literary and art magazine. Emerge is published on a two-year cycle and often embodies a particular subject or theme. Submissions are open to all full-time and part-time students as well as alumni. Students, faculty, and staff assist in preparing the publication. For more information, contact the Director of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Email - All CCBC students are provided a web-based email account through CCBC. This account will allow students to check their e-mail form from any Internet connected computer and will remain active throughout the student’s enrollment. Wireless Campus - A wireless computer network is available on campus. Students can connect in all major buildings on campus as well as the Aviation Sciences Center. Please note that use of the wireless network is subject to the institutional procedures for Acceptable Use of Information Technology and the institutional procedures for Wireless Network Access. If you need help connecting to the wireless network, contact the IT Helpdesk at 724-480-3399 or email helpdesk@ccbc.edu. STUDENT AMBASSADORS The CCBC Student Ambassador program allows Presidential and Academic Excellence Scholarship recipients the opportunity to volunteer on campus. They serve as College representatives to prospective students, their families and the community-at-large. Student Ambassadors volunteer their time as a part of the scholarship requirements by participating in recruitment events, student activities, conducting campus tours, and assisting with freshman orientation and various other campus events throughout the year. The student gains valuable leadership and interpersonal skills as well as earning volunteer community service hours. HEALTHCARE SERVICES CCBC assumes no responsibility for medical treatment of its students. However, the College has made arrangements for Medic Rescue at the student’s expense in the case of serious accident or illness. In case of an emergency, contact the Department of Public Safety at 724-480-3555.


STUDENT ACTIVITES The Board of Trustees has authorized a student activities program at Community College of Beaver County to complement the academic program. Activities include Student Government, athletics and student clubs and organizations. The official policy governing student organizations is available from the Student Activities Office. Students are welcome to form clubs and organization based on their own interest and hobbies. For more information, contact 724-480-3462. STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA) Officers and representatives are elected by the students and operate within a constitution written by the student body. Student Government Association coordinates the student activities program, recommends the issuance of charters to new clubs and organizations, and represents student views on issues of current importance at the College. CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS Alpha Eta Rho - A national aviation fraternity established to further the cause of aviation, instill a confidence in aviation, and promote contact between aviation students and those engaged in the profession. A.N.T.S. (Adult Non Traditional Students) - A service organization geared to the non-traditional student. Its purpose and function is to provide encouragement, mutual support, and assistance to students returning to the academic world. Cheerleaders - Open to all students. The purpose of the cheerleader organization is to build team spirit, increase crowd involvement, develop a sense of good sportsmanship among the students, and strive to build and maintain positive relationships with other colleges. Computer Club - The Computer Club provides students with opportunities to expand computer awareness, to acquire knowledge of the ever-changing computer field, and to enhance leadership skills. The Computer Club is open to all students interested in computers. Creative Writers Club - The purpose of the CCBC Creative Writers Club is to encourage writing creativity at Community College of Beaver County; to provide an outlet/community for student writers at CCBC; to provide encouragement and constructive criticism with the intention of helping members to improve their creative writing; and to establish a forum for discussion of members’ written works. Criminal Justice Club - A service organization instituted to promote interest in the field of criminal justice. Activities include field trips, lectures and fundraising. Proceeds from fund raising activities have been donated to victims programs, the Women’s Center and the county jail. Membership is open to all CCBC students. CrossSeekers - Open to all interested students regardless of denominational background. The organization provides opportunities for Bible study, fellowship, service, and discussion. Drama Club - Offers students an opportunity to experience acting, writing, lighting, sound, musical scoring, publicity, property and stage management. It affords students an opportunity to act as good will ambassadors in the community by promoting the magic of the theater and encourages students to form liaisons with other local college drama clubs. History Club - The purpose of the History Club is to provide an effective means of communication between the student body, the faculty, and the administration on matters pertaining to the history department; assist with the planning, promotion, and implementation of all historical activities on the campus as requested; and to provide a learning experience for the development of historical understanding. H.O.P.E (Helping Others Prosper Everywhere) - The purpose of H.O.P.E. is to provide the opportunity for CCBC Social Work majors and the CCBC community at large to engage in community service projects and activities; to encourage


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graduates of the CCBC Social Work program to mentor and share experiences with current CCBC Social Work students; Incorporate opportunities to hear guest speakers and attend related events and field trips for social work/community service learning experiences ; to heighten awareness and educate the general population regarding the needs of the local community; to provide opportunities for students interested in careers in social work or other human services fields to expand his/her experience and knowledge base. Humanities Forum - The purpose of the Humanities Forum is to provide faculty and students with an organization in which, the group can discuss, analyze, argue, enjoy, contemplate, and learn about the humanities. The serves the student community by providing a cultural outlet in which club members can write creatively, perform, see films, visit museums, listen to artists, poets, and musicians, read and critique books. Multi-Cultural Club - An organization open to all students to develop and build students’ knowledge in the fields of government, economics, education, and technology; to maintain relationships with other organizations throughout the area; and to broaden understanding of cultural heritages. Music Club - The Music Club provides students with a musical outlet. Students can study music, learn to play various types of music, perform in front of an audience, and learn to critique musical pieces. Students also have the opportunity to learn about all aspects of the music industry and interact with students who have the same interests. The Music Club is open to all students regardless of musical talent or preference. P.A.W.S. (Pets Are Worth Saving) - P.A.W.S. is open to all students and college employees. The organization’s intent is to engage the CCBC student body, faculty, and staff in creating awareness of the plight of animals and to gain support for the Beaver County Humane Society. This organization will serve as an outreach group, assisting the Humane Society with volunteer work, and conducting fundraising events. Phi Theta Kappa - The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa shall be to recognize and encourage fellowship among two-year college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa shall provide opportunity for the development of leadership and service. Students who have completed 12 college level credits with a QPA of 3.5 or higher are invited to join. Tau Pi Rho (TPR) - A nursing organization open to all freshman and sophomore nursing students. The purpose of the club is to promote the interaction of freshman and sophomore nursing students, while enhancing their personal and social development. Functions include social activities, charitable projects, and community service projects. Visual Arts Club - The purpose of the Visual Arts Club is: to provide an effective means of communication between the student body, the faculty, and the administration on matters pertaining to the Visual Communications Department; assist with the planning, promotion, and implementation of all activities on the campus as requested. It also provides learning experiences that involve creative, visual and aesthetic projects and events. Warcraft Gamers Organization - The purpose of the Warcraft Gamers Organization is to discuss the many aspects of the World of Warcraft online game; interact with others to make playing more enjoyable; discuss strategies for various classes; help others achieve in-game goals; learn about new game developments and updates; and participate in the club’s in-game events. Membership is free to all students, credit and non-credit alike, who are currently enrolled at Community College of Beaver County and who have an interest in any of the purposes of the World or Warcraft online game.


ATHLETICS CCBC sponsors both intercollegiate and intramural athletic programs. Intramurals provide students with an opportunity to practice and develop their abilities while enjoying various sports. Intramural activities are open to all students. Tournaments have been conducted in over fifty activities, such as bowling, wrestling, pool, chess, flag football, table tennis, and handball. In addition, new activities are organized around student interests each semester. Community College of Beaver County provides opportunities for students to participate in intercollegiate athletic activities. At present, teams maintained are men’s basketball, women’s volleyball, and women’s softball.


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PROGRAMS OF STUDY CREDIT PROGRAMS The programs offered by Community College of Beaver County are designed to provide a quality education to those students who plan to enter the job market immediately or transfer to a four-year college or university. Students may choose from “Transfer” or “Career” programs that award an Associate Degree, diploma, or certificate. Those enrolled in diploma and certificate programs may consider applying their earned credits toward the Associate in General Studies Degree. Associate in Applied Science Degree programs are designed to provide two-year training toward job entry skills or freshman and sophomore curricula transferable to a four-year college or university offering comparable curricula. Associate in Arts and Associate in Science Degree programs are specifically designed for graduates to transfer to a four-year college or university with entrance at the junior-year level. The Associate in Applied Technology Degree is designed for the further education of Beaver County Career and Technology Center students. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE Accounting Administrative Assistant Aerospace Management Air Traffic Control (terminal or en-route) Business Communications Business Management Computer Forensics Criminal Justice Culinary Arts Culinary Arts Management Digital Media Design Entrepreneurship Human Resource Management Networking Nursing Office Technology Administrative Assistant Medical Administrative Assistant Police Technology Professional Pilot Radiologic Technology Web Design New Media Web Programming ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE Business Administration Dance and Dance Education Fine Arts Humanities Humanities/Social Science Social Science Social Work ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE Biological Sciences Early Childhood Education Education Preparation - Secondary Level (grades 7-12)


Natural Science Pre-Engineering Upper Elementary - Middle-Level Education (grades 4-8) ASSOCIATE IN GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE In certain instances, students who have amassed 24 credits in an area that the College recognizes as a specialization, but which does not conform to any other specific degree, may apply for graduation with an Associate of General Studies Degree. In addition to 24 credits in a specialization, students must successfully complete: English Composition I 3 Credits English Composition II 3 Credits or Writing for Business & Technology 3 Credits (Business or Technology specializations only) Introduction to Information Technology 3 Credits Humanities 6 Credits Social Science 6 Credits Math/Science 3/4 Credits Approved Electives 12 Credits ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED TECHNOLOGY DEGREE Beaver County Career & Technology Center Cooperative Education program. Beaver County Career and Technology Center (BCCTC) and the Community College of Beaver County have established a cooperative educational program to give CTC graduates the opportunity to further their education by using their credits to earn an associate degree from CCBC. Students who complete any one of 15 approved programs at the BCCTC are then eligible to receive 24 credits towards an associate degree. They can then enroll at CCBC and receive the degree after completing the appropriate requirements. Approved CTC programs include the following: AMT/Robotics Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Automotive Body Repair Automotive Mechanics Carpentry Cosmetology Drafting & Design Technology Electrical Occupations Electronic Greenhouse/Landscaping Logistics & Materials Management Machine Tool Technology Masonry/Bricklaying Plumbing & Heating Welding To be eligible for the program, BCCTC graduates must first pass the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI) provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. CCBC will accept the BCCTC credits for up to two years after graduation. Students who qualify for this program must meet all admission requirements for CCBC and take the placement test. CCBC will charge tuition and fees to students for CCBC coursework; Beaver County AVTS will charge adult students for AVTS coursework.


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DIPLOMA PROGRAMS Early Childhood Education Practical Nursing CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Accounting Specialist Air Traffic Control Child Development Associate (CDA) Cisco Networking Certification Cook’s Assistant Certificate Computer Support Specialist Culinary Arts Customer Service Representative Entrepreneurship Human Resource Assistant Medical Transcription Multiskilled Health Technician .NET Nanotechnology Specialization Certificate Office Technology Administrative Assistant Medical Administrative Assistant Pharmacy Technician Police Technology Robotics and Embedded Systems Teacher’s Certification in Yoga Web Design New Media Web Programming

CONTINUING EDUCATION (NON-CREDIT COURSES) Continuing Education is a multi-faceted division of Community College of Beaver County. This branch recognizes the community’s need for lifelong learning, training, and personal enrichment. Continuing Education offers a wide range of non-credit courses, programs, seminars, and workshops for the general public and private organizations. Program areas include professional development, business/industry, allied health, education, economic development, office and computer technologies, cultural and recreational events, as well as many customized job-training courses. Non-credit courses are held in three different sessions throughout the year on campus and at various other locations throughout the region. The Division provides a wide variety of online, non-credit courses, and an extensive “Saturday for Kids” program is also available. Admission is open to all persons who are at least 18 years of age or older. Informal in nature, the Division has no entrance requirements with the exception of the Allied Health programs and the Professional Certificate programs. Each person who attends 75% of his/her scheduled class hours receives a class completion certificate. (Exceptions include Professional Certificate programs.) NON-CREDIT COURSE FEES Non-credit tuition fees are based on the direct costs required to offer the program to the public. Tuition for all students, age 65 years or older, will be waived for non-credit courses except where noted on a space available basis. Other costs (materials, textbooks and application, lab, flight, and assessment fees) must be assumed by the individual. In the event that a class becomes full, Beaver County senior students will have first priority.


Out of county seniors will be asked if they would like to pay for the class. To receive a full tuition refund, written notification must be submitted to the Continuing Education Division prior to the first class session. To receive a 50% refund, written notification must be submitted prior to the second class session. No refunds will be granted after that date. Refunds are not granted for lab fees. Continuing Education reserves the right to cancel any class. Allied Health Services The Continuing Education Division offers quality Allied Health programs designed to prepare individuals for health careers and update skills of the health professional. Customized, on-site training programs are also available to meet the specific needs of a facility. Business & Technology Services Business & Technology Services are designed to assist existing and prospective small business owners. The Division has developed a special series of non-credit courses to give potential and current business owners/ managers the skills and knowledge that can foster success. Courses, workshops, and seminars and provide programs to keep the business owner competitive in a rapidly changing business climate. Workforce Development CCBC offers customized workforce training that can be created to meet a company’s specific training needs. On-site or on campus, CCBC will create a class that will not only meet the scheduling needs of the employees but will provide them with skills needed to do their job well. Training can be conducted in the areas of industrial equipment, computer applications, and safety requirements within a company as well as on communication courses such as team building, conflict resolution, effective management, and more. CCBC is also a WEDnetPA Partner and can assist a business in applying for a WEDnetPA Guaranteed Free Training Grant. For funding eligibility, visit the website at www.wednetpa.com. Information Technology certification-based training for professionals and businesses seeking to upgrade the expertise of their workforce is also available. Training is conducted on-campus or on-site at the business with the use of CCBC’s Mobile Computer Lab. The lab consists of Dell laptop computers that allow instructors to deliver training at any company, anywhere. Small Business Owners and Entrepreneurs According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, over the past decade, small businesses have created 60 to 80 percent of the net new jobs. Community College of Beaver County places great emphasis on developing training and partnerships to assist small business owners and entrepreneurs. Online Certificate Programs Enhance your career opportunities in the comfort of your own home and using your own computer through CCBC’s partnership with Gatlin Online Educational Services and an exciting selection of online non-credit certificate programs. For additional information, visit www.gatlineducation.com/ccbc.


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DEGREE PLANS ELECTIVES As you review CCBC programs of study, you may come across requirements referred to as “Elective.” There are various types of electives categories. The most basic specifies an actual discipline, such as “Math Elective.” Others offer more variety is the courses from which you may choose, such as “Liberal Arts Elective” of Social Science Elective. You will find information below that can assist you in your registering for courses. The tables below list course prefixes, and these can be used when consulting the Course Descriptions in the back of the catalog when you are selecting courses. PREFIXES FOR LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES ANTH BIOL CHEM COMM FILM FINE FREN GEOG HIST HPER JOUR LITR

MATH MUSI PHIL PHYS POLS PSYC SOCI SOCW SPAN THEA WRIT

PREFIXES FOR HUMANITIES ELECTIVES COMM FINE JOUR MUSI SPAN WRIT

FILM FREN LITR PHIL THEA

PREFIXES FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES ANTH HIST PSYC SOCW

GEOG POLS SOCI

Also: Social Science and Humanities/Social Science majors may also use BUSM 255 & BUSM 256 as Social Science electives. In addition, Humanities/Social Science majors may also use EDUC courses for Social Science electives. PREFIXES FOR NATURAL SCIENCES ELECTIVES BIOL MATH

CHEM PHYS


COURSE EXCLUSIONS The following courses cannot be selected as electives by Biological Sciences or Natural Science majors: BIOL105 Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL106 Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL110 Human Ecology and Heredity BIOL201 Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL202 Human Anatomy and Physiology II CHEM100 Introduction to Chemistry CHEM105 Principles of Biological Chemistry MATH110 Mathematics of Business MATH112 Elementary Mathematics for Education I MATH114 Elementary Mathematics for Education II The following courses cannot be selected as electives by Fine Arts, Humanities, Humanities/Social Science, or Social Science majors: MATH110 Mathematics of Business MATH112 Elementary Mathematics for Education I MATH114 Elementary Mathematics for Education II The following course cannot be selected as an elective for any Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree programs: EDUC100 Succeeding in College Developmental courses (DEVS) cannot be selected as electives for any College degree program. BASIC LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES TERMS Liberal Arts and Sciences is a general term that refers to a variety of disciplines normally offered at colleges meant to establish basic skills for two-year vocational programs and to serve as the first two years of a Bachelor’s degree, into which students can transfer upon graduation. The Arts include language, literature, philosophy, and performing and fine arts (theater, film, music, painting drawing, etc.). The Arts are also commonly referred to as the Humanities. Sciences include social sciences (history, sociology, psychology, etc.) and Natural Sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, math, etc.).

TRANSFER PROGRAMS Transfer Programs prepare graduates for transfer to four-year colleges and universities by requiring a broad basis of coursework. Upon successful completion of any of the following degree programs, you will be prepared to enter a program leading to a baccalaureate degree. Biological Sciences Business Administration Dance and Dance Education Early Childhood Education (degree) Education Preparation - Secondary Level (grades 7-12) Fine Arts Humanities Humanities/Social Science


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Natural Science Pre-Engineering Social Science Social Work Upper Elementary - Middle Level Education (grades 4-8) BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60/62 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences Graduates in Biological Sciences are provided with the first two years of study toward a four-year degree in areas such as biology, pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, pre-dental, wildlife biology, forestry, and forensic science.

Courses in biology, chemistry, math, and the humanities serve as a core to provide you with a comprehensive curriculum. This core approximates those courses that Biological Sciences majors would take during their first two years at a four-year institution. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 17 Credits Code Course Credit BIOL101 General Biology I 4 CHEM101 General Chemistry I 4 MATH130 College Algebra 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 14/15 Credits BIOL102 General Biology II 4 CHEM102 General Chemistry II 4 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 Math Elective 3/4 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 16 Credits BIOL205 Ecology 4 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 History Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3


Fourth Semester - 13/14 Credits BIOL210 Genetics 4 COMM201 Public Speaking 3 History Elective 3 Math/Science Elective 3/4 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Degree Offered Associate in Arts Credits Required 60/61 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies Graduates of the Business Administration program are prepared for entry into a four-year institution offering the baccalaureate degree in business. Students complete liberal arts requirements and specific business courses in accounting and economics. They can select two business electives in order to provide an additional head start into the field of business. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 BUSM255 Macroeconomics 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits ACCT111 Managerial Accounting 3 BUSM256 Microeconomics 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Business Elective Or Liberal Arts Elective 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits Math Elective 3 (MATH130 or higher) SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 PSYC101 General Psychology 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Business Elective Or Liberal Arts Elective 3


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Fourth Semester - 15/16 Credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 Business Elective OR Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Business Elective 3 Science Elective 3/4 DANCE AND DANCE EDUCATION Degree Offered Associate in Arts Credits Required 60/61 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences The program in Dance and Dance Education prepares graduates for transfer to a four-year school or university at which they can pursue careers in either dance performance or dance education. Some students may wish to open their own dance school or teach at a similar venue after achieving the two-year degree. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester – 16 Credits Code Course Credits DANC100 Introduction to Dance 3 DANC110 Modern Dance I 2 DANC115 Ballet I 2 DANC120 Pointe/Variation I 1 DANC160 Improvisation 2 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 Second Semester – 13 credits DANC125 Partnering 1 DANC150 Modern Dance II 2 DANC155 Ballet II 2 DANC165 Jazz 2 DANC170 Pointe/Variation II 1 DANC215 Dance Composition 2 WRIT102 English Composition II 3


SECOND YEAR Third Semester – 15/16credits DANC200 Modern Dance III 2 DANC205 Ballet III 2 DANC210 World Dance 2 DANC220 Dance in Art and Education 3 HPER245 Holistic Health 3 Science Elective 3/4 Fourth Semester - 16 credits DANC230 Modern Dance IV 2 DANC235 Ballet IV 2 DANC260 Dance Internship 6 Liberal Arts or EDUC Elective 3 Liberal Arts or EDUC Elective 3 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (degree) Degree Offered Associate in Science Credits required 60 - 62 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences The Early Childhood Program is designed to equip individuals with knowledge and skills to work with young children, ages birth through eight, based on nationally recognized standards. Students will learn to work with young children in group settings such as childcare facilities, preschools, Early Head Start and Head Start programs, family home daycares, early intervention programs and various other settings. Students will learn through classroom discussion and instruction, hands on activities and 280+ hours of observation and field experience. With the educational background and skills acquired, graduation will qualify the student for an assistant teaching position. With experience the graduate may be considered for supervisory positions such as group supervisor, lead teacher, or director. After graduation, students may consider opening their own childcare facility or family home daycare or transfer to a four year institution to earn a baccalaureate. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 credits Code Course Credits CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 ERCH100 Introduction to Early Childhood Education* 3 ERCH105 Children’s Development, Health 3 and Safety PSYC101 General Psychology 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3


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Second Semester - 15/16 credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 ERCH101 Observation & Guidance 3 ERCH103 Creative Content in Early Childhood 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 HUM___ Humanities Elective 3 EDUC201 Praxis Prep 1** SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15/16 credits ERCH205 Language & Literature 3 ERCH106 Early Childhood Curriculum*** OR EDUC220 Teaching English Language Learners 3 ERCH212 Caring for Infants and Toddlers 3 MATH112 Elementary Math for Education I 3 Science Elective (w/lab for transfer) 3/4 Fourth Semester - 15 credits ERCH250 Early Childhood Field Experience 3 ERCH210 The Early Childhood Professional*** OR MATH114 Elementary Math for Education II 3 HIST___ U.S. History Elective 3 ERCH200 Diversity and Inclusion 3 EDUC230 Introduction to Special Education 3 *ERCH100 is pre/co requisite for all other ERCH courses. **Praxis Prep 1 is required for transfer to four year institutions. ***ERCH106 and ERCH210 are suggested for non-transfer or vocational track students. Program Policies Prior to entering the internship, students must have: 1. Act 33/34 clearance (current within the past 6 months). 2. Current certification in first aid and infant and child CPR. 3. A physical examination with findings indicating that the applicant can undertake the Early Childhood Education program. 4. A negative Mantoux test or negative chest X-ray. 5. Two letters of reference from non-family members. 6. An application for internship submitted to the Early Childhood Education faculty, the program facilitator, or the division director. • A student must earn a grade of a “C” or greater in all early childhood courses to continue in the program. • Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 for all courses in the early childhood program to enroll for the internship course. • Students out of the program for five years or more may be required to repeat selected courses on the guidance and direction from the Division Director.


EDUCATION PREPARATION - SECONDARY LEVEL (GRADES 7-12) Degree Offered Associate in Science Credits Required 60/61 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences The Education Preparation - Secondary Level program serves students interested in transferring to an Education program at a four-year college or university in three ways: 1. students are introduced to a broad spectrum of knowledge through Liberal Arts and general education requirements; 2. students are introduced to the expectations of a career in Education; 3. students are able to pursue personal interests and strengths through electives. The program integrates a core of readily transferable Liberal Arts classes with classes preparatory for a career in Education. In addition, the Education Preparation - Secondary Level program serves students who seek immediate entrance in the workforce by preparing them to be hired as teacher assistants, childcare workers, and library assistants. All education students at the Community College of Beaver County are required to have field experience and observation hours. The Pennsylvania Department of Education requires the following three background checks, before participation in field experience and observations: Pennsylvania State Police Request for Criminal Records Check (Act 34), Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 151), and Federal Criminal History Record Information (CHRI). The procedures for obtaining the three reports may be accessed at the Pennsylvania Department of Education website (www.pde.state.pa.us/) or by contacting CCBC Education faculty. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 COMM201 Public Speaking 3 EDUC105 Foundations of Education 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 16 credits EDUC125 Instructional Technology 3 EDUC201 Praxis I Preparation 1 PSYC106 Human Growth & Development 3 WRIT 102 English Composition II 3 History Elective 3 Math Elective 3


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SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 14 credits EDUC205 Field Experience I 1 EDUC220 Teaching English Language Learners 3 PSYC205 Educational Psychology 3 Literature Elective 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Fourth Semester - 15/16 credits EDUC210 Field Experience II 3 EDUC225 Diversity Issues in Education 3 EDUC230 Introduction to Special Education 3 Math Elective 3 Science Elective 3/4 FINE ARTS Degree Offered Associate in Arts Credits Required 60 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences Graduates of the program in Fine Arts are prepared to transfer into a college or university program leading to a baccalaureate degree. If you are interested in becoming a fine artist, an art teacher, a museum administrator, an archival or antique restorer, a commercial artist, or a graphic designer, our Fine Arts major will appeal to you. Our art courses and liberal arts core are comparable in content and skills development with the first two years of study at four-year institutions. Our studio courses in drawing, painting, design, and computer graphics will present creative experiences to develop your skills in conceptualization, composition, and craftsman-like execution. In addition, these courses will include sequenced assignments leading you to produce quality artwork for your portfolio, which will showcase your talent and versatility for college transfer or job application. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit FINE101 Art History I 3 FINE110 Drawing 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 History Elective 3


Second Semester - 15 credits FINE102 Art History II 3 FINE111 Painting 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 History Elective 3 Psychology Elective 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 credits BIOL110 Human Ecology and Heredity 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 FINE210 Design Or 3 FINE105 Digital Illustration SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 Liberal Arts Elective Or VISC Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 15 credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 FINE115 Digital Imaging 3 Mathematics Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective Or VISC Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective Or VISC Elective 3 HUMANITIES Degree Offered Associate in Arts Credits Required 61/63 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduates of the program in Humanities degree are prepared to transfer into a college or university program leading to a baccalaureate degree and, after that, a career in a variety of fields. Our Humanities courses include those in English, Fine Art, Foreign Language, Music, and Philosophy. By choosing the Humanities major, you will be preparing yourself for careers that emphasize creativity, communication and analysis.


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Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 History Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Second Semester - 15/16 Credits WRIT102 English Composition II 3 History Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 Psychology Elective 3 Mathematics Or Computer Elective 3/4 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 16 Credits SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 Humanities Elective 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 15/16 Credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 Humanities Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 Science Elective Or Mathematics Elective 3/4 Liberal Arts Elective 3 HUMANITIES/SOCIAL SCIENCE Degree Offered Associate in Arts Credits Required 61/63 Contact John Gall Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences Graduates of the program in Humanities/Social Science are prepared to transfer into a college or university program leading to a baccalaureate degree. The program is designed especially for those students who plan to continue their education but who have not yet decided upon a major to pursue. The number of electives in this program allows the student to investigate those courses that may be of personal interest.


Courses will be comparable to those offered at four-year institutions in content and expectations, and the degree will transfer into a wide range of majors. The Humanities courses emphasize creativity, communication, and analysis. The Social Science courses emphasize patterns of individual behavior, social interaction, and our relationship to the world in which we live. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16 Credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 History Elective 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Second Semester - 15/16 Credits WRIT102 English Composition II 3 History Elective 3 Psychology Elective 3 Science Elective 3/4 Liberal Arts Elective 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15/16 Credits SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 Humanities Elective 3 Mathematics Elective 3/4 Social Science Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 15 Credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 Humanities Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 NATURAL SCIENCE Degree Offered Associate in Science Credits Required 62/64 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences


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Graduates of the program in Natural Science are prepared to transfer to a college or university and major in a chemistry, physics, or math program leading to a baccalaureate degree.

Science majors can pursue career opportunities a wide variety of fields including health care, education, conservation, engineering, finance, computing, research and can be mathematicians, statisticians, and analysts.. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16 Credits Code Course Credit MATH130 College Algebra 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 History Elective 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Second Semester - 17 Credits CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 MATH155 Pre-Calculus 4 PSYC106 Human Growth & Development 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 Lab Science Elective 4 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 16/17 Credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 Humanities Elective 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Math/Science Elective 3/4 Fourth Semester - 13/14 Credits SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 Humanities Elective 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Math/Science Elective 3/4 PRE-ENGINEERING Degree Offered Associate in Science Credits Required 61 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies


With a shortage of qualified engineers in the United States, demand is high in this profession. The Pre-Engineering Associate in Science program at CCBC is designed to prepare students for transfer into a four-year engineering discipline. The program offers courses in liberal arts with an emphasis on mathematics and physical sciences. Courses are comparable in content and expectations to the first two years of an engineering program in a fouryear institution. Engineers can pursue careers in areas of business, research and development, education, health professions, industry, government, and computer information systems. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16 Credits Code Course Credit CHEM101 General Chemistry I 4 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 MATH130 College Algebra OR MATH115 Statistics 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Liberal Arts Elective OR CIST130 Introduction to Agile Robotics 3 Second Semester - 14 Credits CHEM102 General Chemistry II 4 COMM201 Public Speaking 3 MATH155 Pre-Calculus 4 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 14 Credits CIST150 C++ Programming OR CIST160 Visual Basic I 3 Liberal Arts Elective* OR CIST140 Electronics I 3 MATH160 Calculus I 4 PHYS101 College Physics I 4 Fourth Semester - 17 Credits MATH161 Calculus II 4 PHYS102 College Physics II 4 Liberal Arts Elective* OR CIST145 Electronics II 3 Social Science Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective* 3 *Limit: Only 3 credits can be taken as HPER electives.


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DEGREE PLANS TRANSFER PROGRAMS SOCIAL SCIENCE Degree Offered Associate in Science Credits Required 61/62 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences Graduates of the program in Social Science are provided with the first two years of study for professions such as law, social service, divinity, psychology, sociology, history, economics, and anthropology. Graduates can transfer to a college or university program. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 History Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 History Elective 3 Mathematics Elective 3 Psychology Elective 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 16 Credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Social Science Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 15/16 Credits Science Elective 3/4 Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 SOCIAL WORK Degree Offered Associate in Arts


Credits Required 62 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences Graduates of the Social Work program are prepared as agency-based, generalist social workers who will be able to provide services that promote the well-being of individuals, families, groups and communities. Professional practice settings for entry level generalist social workers include child welfare, family preservation, mental health/mental retardation, drug and alcohol, juvenile justice, gerontology (elderly services), shelters for battered women, homeless shelters, community food banks, neighborhood citizen organizations, hospitals, and rehabilitation facilities. The Social Work Associate Degree Program educates students to be effective and knowledgeable professional social workers prepared for practice in the twenty-first century. The Social Work program serves students who seek immediate entrance in the workforce by preparing them to be hired as social and human service assistants; occupational therapists assistants and aides; physical therapists assistants and aides; and nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides. Curriculum FIRST YEAR Code Course Credit First Semester-15 Credits CIST100 Intro to Information Technology 3 PSYC101 General Psychology 3 SOCW150 Intro to Social Work and Welfare 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Math Elective 3 Second Semester-15 Credits SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 SOCW155 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3 SOCW160 Interventive Methods I 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester-16 credits CRIM210 Juvenile Delinquency 3 SOCW170 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 SOCW180 Child Welfare 3 SOCW200 Social Work Practicum I 3 SOCW210 Social Work Seminar I 1 SOCW220 Interventive Methods II 3


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DEGREE PLANS TRANSFER PROGRAMS Fourth Semester-16 credits COMM101 Oral Communications OR COMM201 Public Speaking 3 CRIM120 Narcotics & Drug Abuse 3 SOCI231 Cultural Diversity in the American Society 3 SOCW205 Social Work Practicum II 3 SOCW215 Social Work Seminar II 1 Liberal Arts Elective 3 UPPER ELEMENTARY - MIDDLE-LEVEL EDUCATION (GRADES 4-8) Degree Offered Associate in Science Credits Required 63/64 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences The Upper Elementary - Middle-Level Education program is designed to meet changing requirements in Pennsylvania teacher certification. It combines a selection of education courses and liberal arts electives, including the general education core, which prepares students in areas of communication proficiency, information literacy, technology literacy, scientific and quantitative reasoning, and cultural literacy. Graduates may transfer to four-year schools to pursue Grades 4-8 Pennsylvania teaching certification. Students are prepared for related positions as teacher assistants, childcare workers, therapeutic staff support, or social work assistants. All education students at the Community College of Beaver County are required to have field experience and observation hours. The Pennsylvania Department of Education requires the following three background checks, before participation in field experience and observations: Pennsylvania State Police Request for Criminal Records Check (Act 34), Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 151), and Federal Criminal History Record Information (CHRI). The procedures for obtaining the three reports may be accessed at the Pennsylvania Department of Education website (www.pde.state.pa.us/) or by contacting CCBC Education faculty. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 credits Code Course Credits CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 COMM201 Public Speaking 3 EDUC105 Foundations of Education 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3


Second Semester - 16 credits EDUC125 Instructional Technology 3 EDUC201 Praxis Preparation I 1 HIST___ American History Elective 3 MATH135 Statistics 3 PSYC106 Human Growth and Development 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 17 credits EDUC205 Field Experience I EDUC220 Teaching English Language Learners LITR218 Literature for Children MATH112 Elementary Math for Education PHYS105 Physical Science PSYC205 Educational Psychology

1 3 3 3 4 3

Fourth Semester - 15/16 credits EDUC210 Field Experience II 3 EDUC225 Diversity Issues in Education 3 ERCH230 Introduction to Special Education 3 MATH114 Elementary Math for Education II 3 Science Elective (BIOL, CHEM) 3/4


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CAREER PROGRAMS Career degree programs provide solid technical skill development for immediate entry into the workforce after graduation. In addition, diploma and certificate programs offer fast-track training and specific skill development. Accounting Accounting Specialist Aerospace Management Air Traffic Control (terminal or en-route) Business Communications Business Management Child Development Associate (CDA) Test Preparation Cisco Networking Certification Computer Forensics Computer Support Specialist Cook’s Assistant Criminal Justice Culinary Arts (degree and certificate) Culinary Arts Management Customer Service Representative Digital Media Design Early Childhood Education (diploma) Entrepreneurship (degree and certificate) Human Resource Assistant Human Resource Management Integrated Systems Technology (degree and certificate) Medical Transcription Multi-skilled Health Technician Nanotechnology Specialization .NET Certificate Networking Nurse Aide Nursing Office Technology: Administrative Assistant (degree and certificate) Office Technology: Medical Administrative Assistant (degree and certificate) Pharmacy Technician Phlebotomy Police Technology (degree and certificate) Practical Nursing Professional Pilot Radiologic Technology Robotics and Embedded Systems Teacher’s Certification in Yoga Web Design New Media (degree and certificate) Web Programming (degree and certificate)


ACCOUNTING Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60/61 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies Accounting is one of the fastest growing employment fields in America today, and the future job outlook for good accountants is excellent. The accounting curriculum is designed to fill this need by offering students the necessary accounting theories and skills for entry into the accounting profession. Graduates of this program may attain positions such as: accountant, accounting manager, office manager, small business manager, accounting clerk, payroll clerk, accounting assistant, bank account representative, accounts payable/accounts receivable clerk, accounting office assistant. Please note second year Accounting courses (ACCT211, 212, 215, 216) are only offered as evening courses. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15/16 Credits Code Course Credit ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 BUSM255 Macroeconomics 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits ACCT111 Managerial Accounting 3 COMM101 Oral Communication OR COMM201 Public Speaking 3 CIST106 Software Productivity Tools 3 BUSM256 Microeconomics 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3


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SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits ACCT200 QuickBooks 3 ACCT211 Intermediate Accounting I (Evening) 3 ACCT215 Tax Accounting I (Evening) 3 BUSM205 Business Law I 3 MATH110 Mathematics of Business OR MATH130 College Algebra OR MATH135 Statistics OR MATH160 Calculus I 3/4 Fourth Semester - 15 Credits ACCT212 Intermediate Accounting II (Evening) 3 ACCT216 Cost Accounting I (Evening) 3 BUSM200 Business Finance 3 PSYC101 General Psychology 3 BUSM270 Business Internship OR Business Elective 3 ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST Certificate Program Credits Required 24 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies This certificate program is designed for those students who seek entry-level positions in the accounting field, or those already employed in the field who seek to enhance their skills. It is geared towards students who want to concentrate on accounting certification or preparation for the CPA exam. Please note that second year Accounting courses (ACCT211, 212, 215, 216, 225) are only offered as evening courses. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 3 Credits Code Course Credit ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 Second Semester - 3 Credits ACCT111 Managerial Accounting

3


SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 9 Credits ACCT200 QuickBooks 3 ACCT211 Intermediate Accounting I (Evening) 3 ACCT215 Tax Accounting I (Evening) 3 Fourth Semester - 6 Credits ACCT212 Intermediate Accounting II (Evening) ACCT216 Cost Accounting I (Evening)

3 3

Fifth Semester (summer) - 3 credits ACCT225 Auditing (Evening) 3 AEROSPACE MANAGEMENT Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 61/63 Contact Carmen Romeo at 724-480-3604 Division Director, Aviation Sciences The Aerospace Management Program is designed to prepare students for mid-management in various areas of the aerospace industry including airport management, air carrier operations, commuter airlines, corporate aviation, aviation-related government agencies, and fixed-based operations. Aerospace Management combines a theoretical background in business and aviation to diversify career options. The course of study has a heavy emphasis in management, marketing, accounting, and economics, which aids the graduate in entering the aerospace industry and other business fields. The successful graduate of the Aerospace Management Program is awarded the Associate in Applied Science Degree and is prepared to function at the mid-management level in various aerospace industries or agencies. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16 Credits Code Course Credit ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 AVIP110 Flight Theory 4 AVIP123 Aeronautical Knowledge 3 BUSM255 Macroeconomics 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester -15/16 Credits Aviation Elective 3/4 ACCT111 Managerial Accounting 3 BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3


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SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15/16 Credits Aviation Elective 3 AVIP200 Aerospace Operations Management 3 BUSM108 Entrepreneurship 3 BUSM245 Principles of Marketing 3 Math Elective OR Science Elective 3/4 Fourth Semester - 15 Credits Aviation Elective 3 AVIP201 Business/Aviation Law 3 BUSC210 Organizational Behavior 3 Humanities Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL (TERMINAL) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 62/63 Contact Carmen Romeo at 724-480-3604 Division Director, Aviation Sciences Air Traffic Control Terminal provides training in the application of non-radar/radar air traffic control procedures as well as control tower operator training and experience. CCBC provides terminal students actual tower experience through training within our own student-operated tower. This program is designed to offer students aviation subjects related to air traffic control (ATC). Flight instruction is provided by one of the College’s approved fixed-based operators, who are also FAA and VA approved providers. Associate Degree graduates in Air Traffic Control Terminal may look forward to a career as an air traffic control specialist with the federal government, private industry, or military services. Additional opportunities exist in the rapidly expanding fields of general and commercial aviation. Prerequisites to entering the program include a current second-class medical certificate for ATC and no speech impediments. Contact the Aviation Sciences Department or your family physician for referral to aviation physicians in your locality. Physicians must be approved by the FAA in order to administer the required medical certificate. A person with a waiver for a medical certificate is required to consult with the Aviation Department.


Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16/17 Credits Code Course Credit AVIP106 Private Pilot OR AVIP107 Recreational Pilot 3 AVIP110 Flight Theory 4 AVIP123 Aeronautical Knowledge 3 MATH130 College Algebra OR PHYS105 Physical Science 3/4 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 17 Credits AVIC236 Advanced ATC Procedures 4 AVIP121 Aviation Meteorology 3 AVIP136 Theory of Instrument Flight 4 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 Social Science Elective 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 16 Credits AVIC239 Facility I 6 AVIC247 Approach Control I 4 PHIL205 Logic 3 Social Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 13 Credits AVIC240 Facility II 6 AVIC248 Approach Control II 4 AVIC260 Air Traffic Control Internship OR CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL (EN-ROUTE) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 62/63 Contact Carmen Romeo at 724-480-3604 Division Director, Aviation Sciences En-Route Air Traffic Control provides training in the application of non-radar/radar en-route air traffic control procedures. This program is designed to prepare students to meet FAA hiring qualifications. In addition, the program offers students aviation subjects related to air traffic control (ATC). Flight instruction is provided by one of the College’s approved fixed-based operators who are FAA and VA approved providers.


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Associate Degree graduates in Air Traffic Control may look forward to a career as an air traffic control specialist with the federal government. Prerequisites to entering the program include a current second-class medical certificate for ATC and no speech impediments. Contact the Aviation Sciences Division or your family physician for referral to aviation physicians in your locality. Physicians must be approved by the FAA in order to administer the required medical certificate. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16/17 Credits Code Course Credit AVIP106 Private Pilot OR AVIP107 Recreational Pilot 3 AVIP110 Flight Theory 4 AVIP123 Aeronautical Knowledge 3 MATH130 College Algebra OR PHYS105 Physical Science WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 17 Credits AVIC236 Advanced ATC III 4 AVIP121 Aviation Meteorology 3 AVIP136 Theory of Instrument Flight 4 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 Social Science Elective 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 16 Credits AVIC250 Non-Radar Lecture 5 AVIC251 Non-Radar Lab 5 PHIL205 Logic 3 Social Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 13 Credits AVIC255 Radar Lecture 5 AVIC256 Radar Lab 5 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies


The Business Communications Associate Degree program incorporates an effective combination of knowledge and skills in communications, business, and computer applications. Acquiring these skills enhances your abilities in pursuing careers that require effective and ethical communications in our ever-changing business world. This program addresses the diversity in communication options available to today’s people-oriented, business professionals. As well as having a solid foundation of computer and business knowledge, the program will provide you with the opportunity to present and receive information through various communication techniques such as application journals, interviewing, public speaking, team presentations and electronic communications. The curriculum emphasizes the importance of providing effective communication with both internal customers as well as quality customer service communication to external suppliers and customers. This entails both verbal and non-verbal skills, including perception, language, listening, and conflict management. A student in Business Communications, is prepared to advance in some of the following careers: communications specialist, public relations assistant, media specialist, marketing analyst, training coordinator, and customer service agent. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 credits Code Course Credit BUSC105 Professional Relations 3 BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 VISC110 Understanding Media 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 credits BUSH210 Organizational Behavior 3 BUSM115 Customer Relationship Management 3 BUSC220 Team Development 3 VISC115 Digital Imaging 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 credits BUSC110 Interpersonal Communication 3 BUSC205 Leadership 3 VISC105 Digital Illustration 3 VISC130 Digital Video I 3 MATH110 OR Higher OR Science Elective 3


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Fourth Semester - 15 credits BUSH270 Business Internship OR BUSH230 Event Planning and Management 3 BUSM245 Principles of Marketing 3 VISC122 Web Design 3 VISC220 Digital Photography 3 SOCI231 Cultural Diversity OR SOCI or PSYC elective 3 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60/61 Contact Deborah Micheals Division Director, Business & Technologies The Business Management Associate Degree enables the student to acquire a broad understanding of all functional areas of a typical business (Accounting, Finance, Human Resources, Production, Information Systems, Marketing) operating in today’s dynamic environment. As a current employee in a management discipline, this program will help the student prepare for advancement. If preparing for entry into the business management field, this program will help the student prepare for entry into a first-line management position, such as assistant manager, supervisor, office manager, group leader, or project manager; in areas of advertising, benefits administration, finance, human resources, insurance, retailing, transportation, wholesaling, and communication. Throughout this program we emphasize the management topics of leadership, motivation, communication, and team building. Furthermore, you will be taught techniques for effective decision-making and methods for setting strategic and tactical goals, planning and organizing activities, leading employees, and controlling operations in organizations. This well-rounded curriculum will set you on the path to success in the business world. Curriculum First Semester – 15 credits Code Course Credit ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 BUSM255 Macroeconomics 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3


Second Semester – 15/16 credits ACCT111 Managerial Accounting 3 CIST106 Software Productivity Tools 3 BUSM256 Microeconomics 3 MATH 130 College Algebra or higher 3/4 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3 Third Semester- 15 credits BUSM110 Introduction to E-Commerce 3 BUSM260 Project Management 3 BUSM205 Business Law I 3 COMM101 Oral Communications OR COMM201 Public Speaking 3 PSYC101 General Psychology 3 Fourth Semester BUSH241 Human Resource Management 3 BUSM108 Entrepreneurship 3 BUSM200 Business Finance 3 BUSM245 Principles of Marketing 3 BUSM270 Business Internship OR Business Elective 3 CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE (CDA) TEST PREPARATION Credits Required 9 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences A Child Development Associate (CDA) is a person nationally recognized as having the skills to meet the specific needs of children and work with parents and other adults to nurture children’s physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth in a child development framework. CCBC’s Child Development Associate educational opportunity fulfills the formal coursework portion of the CDA credentialing process. After completion of the required coursework, the student is eligible to apply to the Council for Professional Recognition to continue the assessment and credentialing process. The program includes a series of courses that will prepare students and professionals alike to sit for exams leading to certificates as a Preschool Child Development Associate (P-CDA) or an Infant/Toddler Child Development Associate (I/T-CDA). Each preparatory sequence consists of three, 3-credit courses needed to meet the requirements of the Child Development Associate National Credentialing Program. Also, by completing four courses, the student can prepare for the exams for both credentials. Upon completion of the program, students are prepared for the CDA assessment. These nine credits can also transfer into our degree program to have you well on your way towards earning an Early Childhood Education Associate in Applied Science Degree.


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Students who have completed the Preschool and/or Infant/Toddler CDA (Child Development Associate) Credential through the college’s Continuing Education Division will be recognized as having equivalent knowledge and competencies as indicated in the ERCH 100-Introduction to Early Childhood course (3 credits). Curriculum Preschool Child Development Associate (P-CDA) Required Coursework Code Course Credits ERCH100 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 ERCH200 Diversity and Inclusion in Early Childhood 3 ERCH210 The Early Childhood Professional 3 Infant/Toddler Child Development Associate (I/T - CDA) Required Coursework Code Course Credits ERCH100 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 ERCH212 Caring for Infants and Toddlers 3 ERCH210 The Early Childhood Professional 3 CISCO NETWORKING Certificate Program Credits Required 20 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies A sequence of four courses for this program is offered at CCBC at an established local Cisco Networking Academy using the Cisco Networking Academy Program curriculum. The courses are Web-based, multimedia content and include online assessment and evaluation, hands-on experience, and lectures and case studies. Upon successful completion of the program, students receive a joint certificate from CCBC and the Cisco Networking Academy and will be eligible to take the CCNA certification exam. Graduates will be prepared to pursue the following careers: IT manager, network specialist, network manager, and network designer. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 5 Credits Code Course Credit CISN100 CISCO I –Networking Fundamentals 5 Second Semester - 5 Credits CISN110 CISCO II – Routing Protocols & Concepts

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SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 5 Credits CISN215 CISCO III – LAN Switching & Wireless

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Fourth Semester - 5 Credits CISN220 CISCO IV - Accessing the WAN

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COMPUTER FORENSICS Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 64 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Computer Forensics program is designed to provide students with skills in acquisition, validation and discrimination, extraction, reconstruction, and reporting. Classrooms are equipped with the necessary computer hardware, operating systems, and investigative software, students learn about criminology, data recovery, computer operating systems, network security, and cyber crime investigations. Students may be required to pass a criminal background check prior to enrolling in the CIST260 Internship. Graduates may obtain employment as a support center analyst, security analyst, forensic investigation assistant, computer forensics specialist, network technician, and network security analyst. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 17 credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CISN100 CISCO I - Networking Fundamentals 5 CISN105 PC Hardware 3 CRIM100 Administration of Criminal Justice 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 17 credits CISN110 CISCO II – Routing Protocols & Concepts 5 CISN200 Client Operating Systems 3 CIST160 Visual Basic I 3 MATH110 OR Higher OR Science Elective 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technologies 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 18 Credits CISF210 Network Security 5 CISN205 Server Operating Systems 4 CRIM212 Interview & Interrogation 3 CRIM230 Criminology* 3 CRIM131 Criminal Law 3


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Fourth Semester - 12 Credits CISF200 Disaster Recovery 3 CISF120 Computer Forensics & Investigation 3 CIST260 Internship OR CISN230 Wireless Networking OR Criminal Justice Elective 3 CRIM232 Criminal Evidence 3 * Serves as Sociology-General Education Course COMPUTER SUPPORT SPECIALIST Certificate program Credits Required 31 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies Computer Support Specialists provide technical assistance and support to customers and other users that deal with hardware and software issues. The Specialist resolves computer issues by telephone or by direct end user desktop. Students will learn to analyze problems and provide technical support for hardware, software, and systems. In addition, the skills of answering telephone calls, troubleshooting, and providing guided assistance will be covered. Studies will include computer hardware, software, networks, operating systems, help desk concepts, troubleshooting, and customer service. This course covers aspects of the Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST), Help Desk Institute (HI) and various ComTIA certification exams. Graduates of this program work as help desk support technicians, customer support technicians, technical support specialists, and Microsoft certified desktop support technicians. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit CISN100 CISCO I – Networking Fundamentals 5 CISN105 PC Hardware 3 CISN200 Client Operating Systems 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 OFFT101 Keyboarding Introduction 1 Second Semester - 16 Credits CISN205 Server Operating Systems CISN208 Help Desk Concepts CISN230 Wireless Networking CIST160 Visual Basic I OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook-MOS Certification

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COOK’S ASSISTANT Certificate Program Credits Required 16 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Cook’s Assistant program recognizes students who have satisfactorily completed the first year of the Culinary Arts classes. Students with little or no culinary experience will be able to move immediately into the workforce upon graduation. With small class sizes, the student will receive personal attention and learn commercial kitchen functions, food characteristics, and preparation techniques in a fully equipped commercial kitchen. Additionally, the training in sanitation will prepare the student for the ServSafe Certification, a much needed and well-compensated requirement in the food service industry. Curriculum First Semester – 7 credits Code Course Credits CULA100 Introduction to Culinary Arts I 6 and Baking Fundamentals CULA110 Sanitation Principles 1 Second Semester -9 credits CULA115 Principles of Cooking and Baking Fundamentals II 6 CULA112 Nutrition in Menu Planning 3 CRIMINAL JUSTICE Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60/61 Contact John Nallo at 724-480-3616 Division Director, Public Service Occupations This program to help the student acquire the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the Criminal Justice field. Through this course of study, the student becomes familiar with the theory and use of lethal weapons, investigative techniques including forensic and crime lab analysis, criminal law, and many other topics essential to effective administration of justice. Upon program completion the student is prepared for an entry-level position in the diverse fields of local, state, and federal policing, corrections, probation and parole, juvenile corrections, substance abuse counseling, and crime victim counseling. Aside from the vocational studies, this program provides the student with a balance of academic courses to prepare the student for advancement in a select occupation. English, Mathematics, and Social Science components ensurea well rounded education.


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The optional internship enables you to put the knowledge to work in a real world environment. Through this internship, the student gains practical experience on-the-job while earning credits. This option allows the student to increase his/her skill and confidence while enhancing employment opportunities after graduation. . Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CRIM100 Administration of Criminal Justice 3 CRIM131 Criminal Law I 3 CRIM212 Interview & Interrogation 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 credits CRIM210 Juvenile Delinquency 3 CRIM125 Correctional Administration 3 Criminal Justice Elective 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15/16 credits CRIM230 Criminology 3 CRIM215 Police Ethics & Problems 3 Criminal Justice Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 Math/Science Elective 3/4 Fourth Semester - 15 credits COMM101 Oral Communications OR COMM201 Public Speaking 3 CRIM232 Criminal Evidence & Procedure 3 Criminal Justice Elective 3 Criminal Justice Elective 3 POLS101 American National Government 3 CULINARY ARTS (degree) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 61 Contact Deborah Michaels at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies


The Culinary Arts AAS degree program prepares students with little or no culinary experience to move immediately into the workforce upon graduation as advanced line cooks or entry-level management positions in finer restaurants while earning a degree. No other local culinary school offers this option. With small class sizes, the student will receive personal attention as s/he learns commercial kitchen functions, food characteristics, and preparation techniques in a fully equipped commercial kitchen. All students perform every laboratory project, ensuring competence and confidence in new culinary skills. Additionally, the training the student receives in sanitation will prepare him/her for the ServSafe Certification, a much needed and well-compensated requirement in the food service industry. In addition to these vocational skills, the student will gain academic knowledge that will give insight into restaurant and hotel management, increasing value to prospective employers. The student will earn 12 credits toward a certificate through a business internship where s/he will apply the new skills and knowledge in real world settings. Upon completion of this program, the student will be fully prepared for immediate entry into the field of culinary arts. The program prepares students for careers such as: cook, baker, assistant chef, sous chef, assistant manager, assistant pastry chef, caterer, food service inspector, and manager. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester – 16 credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CULA100 Introduction to Culinary Arts 6 and Baking Fundamentals I CULA110 Sanitation Principles 1 MATH110 Math of Business OR 3 MATH130 College Algebra WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester -15 credits BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 CULA115 Principles of Cooking 6 and Baking Fundamentals II CULA112 Nutrition in Menu Planning 3 WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology OR WRIT102 English Composition II 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester – 15 credits PSYC OR SOCI elective 3 CULA120 Advanced Principles of Cooking 6 CULA210 Internship I OR CULA211 Internship II 6


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Fourth Semester - 15 credits CULA200 Line Cooking & Buffet 6 CULA210 Internship I OR CULA211 Internship II 6 Select one course from the following (total of 3 credits): BUSH241 Human Resource Management 3 BUSH230 Event Planning & Management 3 BUSM115 Customer Relationship Management 3 CULINARY ARTS (certificate) Certificate Program Credits Required 34 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Culinary Arts Certificate program prepares students with little or no culinary experience to move immediately into the workforce upon graduation as advanced line cooks in finer restaurants. With small class sizes, students receive personal attention while learning commercial kitchen functions, food characteristics, and preparation techniques in a fully equipped commercial kitchen. All students perform every laboratory project, ensuring competence and confidence in culinary skills. Additionally, the training received in sanitation will prepare you for ServSafe Certification, a much needed and wellcompensated requirement in the food service industry. The student earn nine credits toward a certificate through business internships where the student will apply the new skills and knowledge in real world settings. Upon completion of this program the student will be fully prepared for immediate entry into the field of culinary arts with positions such as cook, line cook, assistant baker, pastry baker, and bread baker. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester – 7 credits Code Course Credit CULA100 Introduction to Culinary Arts 6 and Baking Fundamentals I CULA110 Sanitation Principles 1 Second Semester -9 credits CULA115 Principles of Cooking and Baking Fundamentals II CULA112 Nutrition in Menu Planning

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SECOND YEAR Third Semester – 12 credits CULA120 Advanced Principles of Cooking CULA210 Internship I

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Fourth Semester - 6 credits CULA200 Line Cooking & Buffet

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CULINARY ARTS MANAGEMENT Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 61 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies Considered a high demand occupation by labor and industry, the Culinary Arts Management program combines the skills of culinary arts with business management. The program is designed for those interested in food service supervision or management. Culinary classes are in depth and include principles of kitchen functions, culinary calculations, and food preparation techniques in a fully equipped commercial foods kitchen. The program also includes ServSafe certification training, a must for every manager. In addition, business classes such as Business Law, Entrepreneurship, Managerial Accounting, and Human Resource Management provide students with the necessary background in management. Upon completion of this program, students will be prepared for entry-level management or for advancement within their current food service employment. The program prepares students for careers such as assistant manager, caterer, food service inspector, assistant chef, or manager in a restaurant, institution, food management company, or other hospitality area of interest. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester – 16 credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CULA100 Introduction to Culinary Arts 6 and Baking Fundamentals I CULA110 Sanitation Principles 1 MATH110 Math for Business OR MATH130 College Algebra 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester -15 credits BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 CULA115 Principles of Cooking 6 and Baking Fundamentals II CULA112 Nutrition in Menu Planning 3 WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology OR WRIT102 English Composition II 3


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SECOND YEAR Third Semester – 15 credits ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 CULA120 Advanced Principles of Cooking 6 BUSM205 Business Law 3 BUSM108 Entrepreneurship 3 Fourth Semester - 15 credits CULA200 Line Cooking & Buffet 6 SOCI231 Cultural Diversity OR SOCI elective OR PSYC elective 3 Select two courses from the following (total of 6 credits) BUSH230 Event Planning & Management BUSH241 Human Resource Management BUSM115 Customer Relationship Management BUSM245 Principles of Marketing

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CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE Certificate Offered Credits Required 30 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies This program tackles important issues facing customer service providers and customer service managers with a thorough understanding of the customer service industry. Students enrolled in this certificate program, which provides flexible scheduling through its open-entry/open-exit classroom environment, will gain knowledge of communications skills and develop expertise in Internet, e-mail and Microsoft Office software. Customer Service Representative curriculum will teach students to integrate an organization’s service philosophy and strategy with its systems and its people-management policies to enable it to succeed in the 21st century business environment. Graduates of the program will be taught skills to prepare them to work as a customer service representative in a variety of businesses and other related occupations including account manager, clerk, teller, and salesperson. Students completing the Microsoft Office courses will be eligible to take the exam for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification, the globally recognized standard for desktop skills with the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Outlook).


Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit BUSC110 Interpersonal Communications 3 OFFT110 Internet for Office 3 OFFT120 Microsoft Word-MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT125 Microsoft Excel-MOS Expert Certification 3 BUSC205 Leadership 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits BUSC220 Team Development BUSM115 Customer Relationship Management OFFT150 Office Communications OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook-MOS Certification OFFT175 Microsoft PowerPoint-MOS Certification

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DIGITAL MEDIA DESIGN Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies Digital Media Designers work in a world of integrated media and they are concerned with how messages, information, or entertainment are visually presented to an audience. Students will develop skills in photography, basic audio and video production, graphic and typographic design, and digital technology through hands-on experience. They design interactive CDrom, DVD, Flash, Shockwave, and webbased projects for individuals or corporate clients. The Visual Communications-Digital Media Design program is project oriented and focuses on the creation of a variety of media tools that include interactive media, presentation design, video production, web page design, and web animation. Students interested in the Visual CommunicationsMedia Design program must have a strong interest in art and digital presentation media. The Digital Media Design program places a portfolio in the hands of students. This portfolio can be used to seek employment or entrance into a baccalaureate or art institution. Objectives of the Digital Media Design program are: • To offer an intensive experience in digital media design education and to provide the tools necessary to build on that experience. • To link the traditional concepts of digital media design with the latest in technology that enable the student to be a more competent and efficient designer. • To help the student develop a marketable digital media design portfolio or prepare for further study.


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Career Opportunities: Employment is typically found in graphic design firms, corporate art departments, educational

media graphics departments, advertising or news agencies, publishing houses and pre-press companies. Companies that specialize in new media, such as website development, computer animation and interactive media are also sources of employment for graduates of the Visual Communications-Digital Media Design program. Entry-level job titles are multimedia designer, interactive designer, web page designer, videographer, computer animator, media designer, or producer. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 FINE210 Design 3 VISC110 Understanding Media 3 VISC115 Digital Imaging 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits BUSC220 Team Development 3 VISC122 Web Design 3 VISC200 Kinetic Aesthetics 3 VISC125 Photography: Film & Light OR VISC220 Digital Photography 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits MATH110 OR Higher OR Science Elective 3 VISC105 Digital Illustration 3 VISC130 Digital Video I 3 VISC208 Digital Animation 3 VISC215 Scriptwriting 3 Fourth Semester - 15 Credits PSYC105 Social Psychology OR PSYC elective OR SOCI elective 3 VISC135 Digital Video II 3 VISC201 Interactive Design 3 VISC240 Digital Portfolio 3 VISC260 Visual Communications Internship OR VISC218 Media Design Entrepreneurship 3


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (diploma) Diploma Offered Credits required 36 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences This one year fast track program will prepare the graduate for immediate employment working with young children ages birth through eight. The Early Childhood diploma program is ideal for the individual who may have already obtained a college degree in another field and need to add early childhood coursework to fulfill job requirements. Students will learn through classroom discussion and instruction, hands on activities and 200+ hours of observation and field experience. With the educational background and skills acquired, graduation will qualify the student for an assistant teaching position. Curriculum First Semester - 18 credits Code Course Credit ERCH100 Introduction to Early 3 Childhood Education* ERCH102 Creative Experience 3 ERCH105 Children’s Development, 3 Health and Safety ERCH200 Diversity and Inclusion in 3 Early Childhood ERCH205 Language & Literature 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 18 credits ERCH101 Observation & Guidance 3 ERCH106 Early Childhood Curriculum 3 ERCH210 The Early Childhood Professional 3 ERCH215 Preschool Math and Science 3 ERCH220 Internship/Diploma 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 *ERCH100 is pre/co requisite for all other ERCH courses. Program Policies Prior to entering the internship, students must have: 1. Act 33/34 clearance (current within the past 6 months). 2. Current certification in first aid and infant and child CPR. 3. A physical examination with findings indicating that the applicant can undertake the Early Childhood Education program. 4. A negative Mantoux test or negative chest X-ray. 5. Two letters of reference from non-family members. 6. An application for internship submitted to the Early Childhood Education faculty, the program facilitator, or the division director. • A student must earn a grade of a “C” or greater in all early childhood courses to continue in the program. • Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 for all courses in the early childhood program to enroll for the internship course.


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DEGREE PLANS CAREER PROGRAMS • Students out of the program for five years or more may be required to repeat selected courses on the guidance and direction from the Division Director. ENTREPRENEURSHIP (degree) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60/61 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Entrepreneurship Associates in Applied Science program provides students with the skills to start their own venture, work with others to identify business opportunities, join entrepreneurial ventures, or work for an established organization. Entrepreneurs are often in demand by growth-oriented companies wanting to incorporate their vision and innovation in their firms and by companies seeking individuals who have the ability to solve problems creatively and improve productivity. Regardless of size, all businesses need managers who can identify opportunities, obtain resources, plan, organize, direct, and control work to accomplish business objectives. Topics covered during the course work include entrepreneurial thinking and opportunity recognition, developing a business plan, obtaining resources, managing finances, strategic planning, selecting managers and employees, organizing and designing the business, managing technology and successfully dealing with managerial challenges. Students will also take courses to gain an overall understanding of business such as accounting, legal issues, sales and marketing and computer information systems. This program requires that the student complete a Entrepreneurship Internship. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester Code BUSM106 BUSM120 CIST100 MATH 130 WRIT101

Course Entrepreneurial Thinking, Creativity and Opportunity Recognition Small Business Management Introduction to Information Technology College Algebra or higher English Composition I

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Second Semester ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 BUSM108 Entrepreneurship 3 CIST106 Software Productivity Tools 3 COMM210 Public Speaking 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3


SECOND YEAR Third Semester ACCT200 QuickBooks 3 BUSC205 Leadership 3 BUSM110 Introduction to E-Commerce 3 BUSM205 Business Law I 3 BUSM260 Project Management 3 Fourth Semester BUSH220 Compensation and Benefits 3 BUSM265 Enterprise Funding 3 BUSM245 Principles of Marketing 3 BUSM270 Business Internship 3 SOCI231 Cultural Diversity 3 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (certificate) Certificate Program Credits Required 24 Contact Deborah Micheals Division Director, Business & Technologies The Entrepreneurship certificate program provides students with the skills to start their own enterprise, work with others to identify business opportunities, join entrepreneurship ventures, or work for an established organization. Entrepreneurs are often in demand by growth-oriented companies wanting to incorporate their vision and innovation in their firms and by companies seeking individuals who have the ability to solve problems creatively and improve productivity. Regardless of size, all businesses need managers who can identify opportunities, obtain resources, plan, organize, direct, and control work to accomplish business objectives. Topics covered during the course work include entrepreneurial thinking and opportunity recognition, developing a business plan, obtaining resources, managing finances, strategic planning, selecting managers and employees, organizing and designing the business, managing technology, and successfully dealing with managerial challenges. Entrepreneurship students will also take courses to gain an overall understanding of business such as accounting, basic management, sales and marketing, and computer information systems. In addition, students will focus on a particular elective course chosen from a variety of topics to better fine tune the program to fit their selected areas of interest. Students with the certificate have the opportunity for employment as a sole proprietorship starting their own business, manager of an existing small business; accounting office clerk, or sales person.


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Curriculum FALL offering BUSM105 Entrepreneurial Thinking, Creativity and Opportunity Recognition 3 BUSM120 Small Business Management 3 BUSM205 Business Law I 3 SPRING offering ACCT110 Financial Accounting 3 BUSM108 Entrepreneurship 3 BUSM265 Enterprise Funding 3 Pick TWO courses (6 credits) from the following list: ACCT200 QuickBooks 3 (F) BUSC205 Leadership 3 (F) BUSM110 Introduction to E-Commerce 3 (F) BUSM260 Project Management 3 (F) BUSH220 Compensation and Benefits 3 (S) BUSM245 Principles of Marketing 3 (S) BUSM270 Business Internship 3 (S) CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 (F/S) OFFT120 Microsoft WORD* (F/S) OR OFFT125 Microsoft EXCEL* 3 (F) *These courses will not apply toward the Associate Degree in Entrepreneurship. (F) – Fall (S) - Spring HUMAN RESOURCES ASSISTANT Certificate Program Credits Required 24 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that the number of jobs for human resources assistants is expected to grow at a rate of 11% through the year 2016. Positions in Human Resources include human resource assistants, personnel assistants, personnel specialist, human resource representative, events coordinator, and customer service representative. The Human Resources Assistant Certificate program provides a flexible selection of core courses for those just entering the field and for those wanting to expand their knowledge of specialty areas. Students are able to select courses that best reflect their interest or level of experience.


Human resources (HR) assistants provide a variety of functions depending on the nature and scope of the organization. HR Assistants provide support to managers and recruiters and participate in maintaining HR records, preparing reports and conducting research. Assistants may also participate in various business operations, such as recruitment, examinations, compensation, benefits, payroll, training & development, reward systems, and employee relations. Curriculum Fall Semester - 12 Credits Code Course Credit BUSH215 Training & Development (online) 3 BUSH225 Strategic Staffing (online) 3 Select any 2 courses from the following group: BUSC205 Leadership (Fall) 3 BUSC110 Interpersonal Communications (Fall) 3 BUSM112 Principles of Management (Fall and Spring) 3 VISC110 Understanding Media (Fall and Spring) 3 OFFT120 MOS Word (Fall and Spring) 3 OFFT125 MOS Excel (Fall) 3 Spring Semester - 12 Credits BUSH220 Compensation & Benefits (online) BUSH240 Employment Law (online)

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Select any 2 courses from the following group: BUSH210 Organizational Behavior (Spring) 3 BUSC220 Team Development (Spring) 3 BUSM115 Customer Relationship Mgmt (Spring) 3 BUSH241 Human Resource Management (Fall and Spring)3 BUSH230 Event Planning & Management (Spring) 3 OFFT155 Office Procedures (Spring) 3 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60 Contact Deborah Michealsat 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies This degree program is ideal for those seeking entry level human resource management positions as human resource recruiters, trainers, interviewers, team leaders, and facilitators, but is also an excellent professional development curriculum for those already working in the management or human resources fields. The Human Resource Management program will help the student gain insight into many aspects of the field while focusing on the business’s most valuable resource...people. This degree program will prepare the student for most entry-level human resource management positions in product, service, or public industry.


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The student will also be introduced to the essential core functions of human resources, including recruitment and selection. Qualified students may opt to participate in a business internship to gain experience in a real world setting and enhance their value to perspective employers. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit BUSC105 Professional Relations 3 BUSM112 Principles of Management 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 VISC110 Understanding Media 3 WRIT 101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits BUSH210 Organizational Behavior 3 BUSH241 Human Resource Management 3 CIST106 Software Productivity Tools 3 BUSC220 Team Development 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits BUSC110 Interpersonal Communications 3 BUSC205 Leadership 3 BUSH215 Training and Development 3 BUSH225 Strategic Staffing 3 MATH110 OR Higher OR Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 15 Credits BUSH220 Compensation and Benefits 3 BUSH230 Event Planning and Management 3 BUSH240 Employment Law 3 BUSM115 Customer Relationship Management OR BUSM270 Business Internship 3 SOCI231 Cultural Diversity OR SOCI or PSYC elective 3 INTEGRATED SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY (DEGREE) Degree Offered Associate in Science Credits Required 60


The Integrated Systems Technology in Advanced Manufacturing program is designed to address the growing need among high-tech manufacturing firms. Program courses provide a foundation in skills and knowledge related to content areas specific to the industry – electrical, electronic, mechanical, and fluid technology. The program emphasizes operation, troubleshooting, and maintenance of high-tech equipment. Program design provides content that supports vertical and lateral progression in integrated systems manufacturing. The curriculum is offered in a modular format that can be adapted to the education and career goals of the student. The first year of the program (IST Certificate program) incorporates the fundamentals of an IST entry-level generalist. The third semester (Associate degree program) allows the student to select either the Electrical Track or the Mechanical Track specialty areas. This program supports the registered Apprenticeship program (Journey Papers) as outlined by the Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Graduates may enter a variety of technician-level occupations such as Electromechanical Technician, Industrial Technician, Instrument and Control Technician, Instrument and Electrical Technician, Machinery Maintenance Technician, Multi-skilled Maintenance Technician, Precision Instrument Technician, and Engineering Assistant. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit ISTM100 Integrated Systems Fundamentals 3 ISTM110 Industrial Mechanics 5 ISTM120 Industrial Electrical Systems 4 ISTM130 Power Transmission 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits ISTM140 Programmable Logic Controllers 5 ISTM150 Instrumentation Systems 4 ISTM160 Fluid Power 3 ISTM170 Machining & Safety 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits Choose either the Electrical or Mechanical Track ELECTRICAL TRACK ISTM210 Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers ISTM230 Electrical Motors ISTM250 High Voltage Electrical

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OR MECHANICAL TRACK ISTM220 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 5 ISTM240 Welding Principles & Applications 5 ISTM260 Mechanical Maintenance & Troubleshooting 5


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Fourth Semester - 15 Credits CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology* 3 Humanities or Social Science Elective* 3 Math or Science Elective* 3 WRIT101 English Composition I* 3 WRIT102 English Composition II* OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technologies* 3 *May be taken online – Check CCBC course schedule INTEGRATED SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY (CERTIFICATE) Certificate Offered Credits Required 30 The Integrated Systems Technology in Advanced Manufacturing program is designed to address the growing need among high-tech manufacturing firms. Program courses provide a foundation in skills and knowledge related to content areas specific to the industry – electrical, electronic, mechanical, and fluid technology. The program emphasizes operation, troubleshooting, and maintenance of high-tech equipment. Program design provides content that supports vertical and lateral progression in integrated systems manufacturing. The curriculum is offered in a modular format that can be adapted to the education and career goals of the student. The first year of the program (IST Certificate program) incorporates the fundamentals of an IST entrylevel generalist. The third semester (Associate degree program) allows the student to select either the Electrical Track or the Mechanical Track specialty areas. This program supports the registered Apprenticeship program (Journey Papers) as outlined by the Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Graduates may enter a variety of technician-level occupations such as Electromechanical Technician, Industrial Technician, Instrument and Control Technician, Instrument and Electrical Technician, Machinery Maintenance Technician, Multi-skilled Maintenance Technician, Precision Instrument Technician, and Engineering Assistant. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit ISTM100 Integrated Systems Fundamentals 3 ISTM110 Industrial Mechanics 5 ISTM120 Industrial Electrical Systems 4 ISTM130 Power Transmission 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits ISTM140 Programmable Logic Controllers 5 ISTM150 Instrumentation Systems 4 ISTM160 Fluid Power 3 ISTM170 Machining & Safety 3 Note: All Certificate courses apply toward the Associate degree in Integrated Systems Technology.


MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION Certificate Offered Credits Required 30 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The medical transcription program will prepare students to transcribe medical dictation with accuracy, clarity, and timeliness, applying the principles of professional and ethical conduct. Students are given a background in medical terminology, and human physiology with an emphasis on skill training in keyboarding, application software, and office procedures. Students will be taught the grammar, punctuation, and medical terminology necessary for the important task of translating and transcribing the voice-recordings of doctors and physicians into permanent records. The coursework provides course content that will prepare the student to take the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification exams (Word, and Outlook) the globally recognized standard for desktop skills. Graduates of the program can work as medical transcriptionists in hospitals, offices of physicians, medical and diagnostic laboratories; outpatient care centers; and offices of physical, occupational, and speech therapists. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit BIOL105 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 OFFT100 Keyboard Techniques 3 OFFT110 Internet for Office 3 OFFT120 Microsoft Word-MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT140 Medical Terminology 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits BIOL106 Anatomy and Physiology II OFFT150 Office Communications OFFT155 Office Procedures OFFT165 Electronic Medical Transcription OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook-MOS Certification

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MULTI-SKILLED HEALTH TECHNICIAN Certificate Offered Credits Required 18 Contact Linda Gallagher at 724-480-3492 Associate Vice President for Assessment, Nursing & Allied Health


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The Multi-skilled Health Technician curriculum is a 12-month Certificate Program, which combines the skills of a nurse aide, phlebotomist, and EKG technician. A specific course can be taken to master a skill or the entire curriculum can be completed to produce a multi-skilled health care individual. Students who successfully complete the nurse aide course are eligible to sit for the PA registry exam for nurse aides. Likewise, students who successfully complete the courses Introduction to the Medical Laboratory and Clinical Phlebotomy are eligible to sit for the ASCP National Registry exam for phlebotomists. Upon successful completion of the Multi-skilled Health Technician Program, graduates are prepared to seek employment in hospitals, clinics, physicians’ offices, public health agencies, sub-acute care facilities, and long-term care facilities. Special Requirements for the Multi-skilled Health Technician Program Upon admission the student is required to furnish: • High school transcript or GED certificate • Criminal History/Child Abuse Record clearances • Physical exam report with titers, immunizations, 2-step tuberculin screening test, and functional abilities Advanced Standing for Multi-skilled Health Technician Program Evidence of enrollment on the PA nurse aide registry or registration in phlebotomy is required for the student to be eligible for advanced standing. Advanced standing will be granted after the student successfully completes 12 credits in the Multi-skilled Health Technician curriculum. Accrediting agency for the phlebotomy program: National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720 Rosemont, IL 60018 773-714-8880 Curriculum First Semester - 9 credits Code Course Credit MSHT100 Nurse Aide 6 MSHT104 Communication Skills for Health Care Workers 3 Second Semester - 6 credits MSHT102 Introduction to the Medical Laboratory MSHT103 Clinical Phlebotomy

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Third Semester - 3 credits MSHT105 Electrocardiography 3 NANOTECHNOLOGY SPECIALIZATION CERTIFICATE Certificate Offered Contact Deborah Michaels at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies Community College of Beaver County is a member of the Pennsylvania Nanofabrication Manufacturing Technology (NMT) Partnership project with Pennsylvania State University (Penn State). The Nanotechnology Specialization Certificate program provides students with a fifth semester, 18-credit Nanotechnology capstone experience at the Penn State Materials Research Institute. Students who have completed a degree in Biological Science, Natural Science or Pre-Engineering have an opportunity to apply for admission to the certificate program.


The Capstone program at Penn State includes hands-on training in clean room protocols, material processing and characterization, hardware training, safety, and environmental training, and computer simulation. Typical opportunities for employment for graduates include: materials research technician, etch technician, clean room technician, laboratory technician, fabrication technician, deposition technician, nanofabrication technician. Certificate Admission Requirements: AS degree in Biological Science, Natural Science, or Pre-Engineering Completion of the following required courses: BIOL101 General Biology I 4 CHEM101 General Chemistry I 4 CHEM102 General Chemistry II 4 MATH130 College Algebra 3 PHYS101 General Physics I 4 BIOL102 General Biology II OR PHYS 102 General Physics II 4 For consideration, students must have completed these courses with at least a “C” grade and achieved a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or higher in these required courses. Required Courses at Pennsylvania State University – 18 credit Capstone Semester NANO211 Material, Safety, and Equipment Overview for Nanotechnology 3 credits NANO212 Basic Nanotechnology Processes 3 credits NANO213 Materials in Nanotechnology 3 credits NANO214 Patterning in Nanotechnology 3 credits NANO215 Material Modification in Nanotechnology 3 credits NANO216 Characterization, Testing of Nanotechnology Structures and Materials 3 credits Note: Community College of Beaver County (CCBC) participates in the Nanofabrication Manufacturing Technology (NMT) partnership with PSU. CCBC students can attend the Capstone Semester at the Nanofabrication Facility at PSU. .NET Certificate Certificate program Credits Required 15 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies This curriculum is designed to teach students how to develop and maintain department-level applications, components applications, Web applications, desktop client applications, and server applications using .NET IDE. This curriculum is also designed to assist students in preparing for Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD) Certification for Microsoft.NET. Graduates from this program can work as a .NET programmer, programmer analyst, software developer, and quality assurance programmer. NOTE: CISW programming courses are only offered as DAY courses.


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Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 6 Credits Code Course Credit CIST160 Visual BASIC I 3 CISW101 Web Scripting Languages (Day) 3 Second Semester - 3 Credits CISW206 Database: ASP (Day) 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 3 Credits CISW214 Database: SQL (Day)

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Fourth Semester - 3 Credits CISW215 Database: Crystal Report Writer (Day)

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NETWORKING Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Computer Networking curriculum prepares students with the skills necessary to design, implement, maintain, and administer LANs and WANs. The curriculum includes courses in software application tools, PC hardware, Cisco Networking Academy, network security, disaster recovery, wireless networking and operating systems, and installation and configuration. Graduates of this program may obtain employment as PC support specialists, network technicians, and network administrators. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First semester - 15 credits Code Course Credit CISN100 CISCO I – Networking Fundamentals 5 CISN105 PC Hardware 3 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 OFFT101 Keyboarding - Introduction 1 WRIT101 English Composition I 3


Second Semester - 14 Credits CISN110 CISCO II - Routing Protocols & Concepts 5 CISN200 Client Operating Systems 3 MATH110 OR Higher OR Science Elective 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3 SECOND YEAR Third semester - 14 credits CISF210 Network Security CISN205 Server Operating Systems CISN215 CISCO III – LAN Switching & Wireless

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Fourth Semester - 17 Credits CISF200 Disaster Recovery 3 CISN220 CISCO IV – Accessing the WAN 5 CISN230 Wireless Networking 3 CISN208 Help Desk Concepts OR CIST260 CIS Internship 3 Social Science Elective 3

NURSE AIDE Certificate Offered Credits Required 6 Contact Linda M. Gallagher at 724-480-3492 Associate Vice President for Assessment, Nursing & Allied Health In one semester, this fast track program will prepare an individual for employment as a nurse aide. The nurse aide is a direct caregiver. Two major areas of responsibilities include assisting the client with activities of daily living and performing responsibilities associated with the client’s health care. This program is state-approved. Only graduates of a state-approved nurse aide program are eligible to take the nurse aide examination for enrollment on the Nurse Aide Registry in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Upon completion of this program, the graduate will be fully prepared for entry into the field of health care at acute care facilities such as hospitals, long-term care facilities like nursing homes, and home health care agencies, which refers to in-home visits of clients. Curriculum First Semester – 6 credits Code Course Credits MSHT100 Nurse Aide 6


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NURSING Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 70 Contact Linda Gallagher at 724-480-3492 Associate Vice President for Assessment, Nursing & Allied Health The Community College of Beaver County Nursing Program offers an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) to become a Registered Nurse. The nursing curriculum includes general education as well as nursing courses. Students receive clinical laboratory experience in a variety of hospitals and health related agencies in the Beaver, Allegheny, and Lawrence County areas as part of each of the nursing courses. Audio-visual, patient simulation and computer laboratory activities, demonstrations, skills practice in the College’s nursing laboratory, and small group discussions supplement the nursing content. This program is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) and has full approval status from the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing. The NLN Accrediting Commission, 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326/Telephone: 404-975-5000, www.nlnac.org, is a source of information regarding tuition, fees, and length of nursing program. The ADN graduate receives an Associate in Applied Science Degree and is eligible to write the National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX-RN) to become a Registered Nurse (RN). The graduate participates with other members of the health team in planning and giving safe care in a variety of healthcare settings. With work experience and on-going education, the graduate may develop the ability to assume responsibility for administering and/or directing the care of a group of patients and possesses the foundation to pursue a baccalaureate degree in nursing. Please note: The Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing may refuse, suspend or revoke any license in any case where the Board shall find that the applicant: • Has been convicted or has pleaded guilty or entered a plea of nolo contendere or has been found guilty by a judge or jury of a felony or a crime or moral turpitude, or has received probation without verdict, disposition in lieu of trial or an Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition in the disposition of felony charges, in the courts of this Commonwealth, the United States, or any other state, territory or country; • Has committed fraud or deceit in securing his or her admission to the practice of nursing or to nursing school; • Is unable to practice professional nursing with reasonable skill and safety to patients by reason of mental or physical illness or condition or physiological or psychological dependence upon alcohol, hallucinogenic or narcotic drugs or other drugs which tend to impair judgment or coordination, so long as such dependence shall continue. For a complete list of reasons why the Board may refuse a professional nursing license to an applicant, please see the RN Law on the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing website. Criteria for Admission into the Nursing Program A. High School Requirements Completion of the following with a “C” or better: 4 units of English 3 units of social sciences 2 units of mathematics (one of which is Algebra) 2 units of science (one of Biology and one of Chemistry) with a related laboratory or the equivalent


OR Successful completion of the G.E.D. Test. Persons out of High School for five or more years: Unless college level courses in Chemistry or Biology (not Human Biology) have been completed with a grade of “C” or better within the five years prior to admission to the program, such courses will be required for acceptance. (CHEM105, Principles of Biological Chemistry is strongly recommended.) B. Entry Requirements • Nursing pre-admission examination score at 75 percent or greater; applicants will be ranked for admission based upon the examination score. • Grades of “C” or greater in all courses required in the Nursing program. • Q.P.A. of 2.5 or greater in nursing program courses. • Mathematics Diagnostic Test (DT) for nursing applicants (administered on campus, free of charge). Math DT score may require applicant to complete one of the following developmental courses prior to full admission to the program: Math Review; Improvement of Math; or Fundamentals of Algebra. C. Full Admission Status Full admission is contingent upon completion of the following: • Any required placement testing and developmental coursework, • Professional CPR certification course • Physical examination, which indicates that the applicant can undertake the program in nursing. • Criminal record and child abuse clearances, which allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in public schools, long-term care facilities, and hospitals. • Attainment of a Q.P.A. of 2.5 or greater in nursing program courses, which are taken at CCBC (transfer courses are not included in the computation of the CCBC quality point average). • Grades of “C” or greater in all courses required in the Nursing program. • Healthcare Insurance is recommended for all persons accepted into the nursing program. Applicants assume the costs of the above examinations, criminal record & child abuse clearances, and healthcare insurance. Program Progression 1. Applicants enrolled in the Nursing Program a. Q.P.A. of 2.0 or greater (Only those courses that are included in the Nursing curriculum will be considered in determining the Q.P.A.) b. A grade of “C” or greater in all courses required in the Nursing program c. Satisfactory clinical performance d. Satisfactory completion of support courses 2. Applicants who are Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) seeking advanced placement a. Satisfactory score on the NLN Nursing Acceleration Challenge Exam b. Score of 90% or greater on a drug calculation proficiency exam before the first scheduled class c. The applicant must complete the following courses, or their equivalent, with a grade of “C” or greater prior to being considered for admission: BIOL201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I BIOL202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II PSYC101 General Psychology I PSYC106 Human Growth and Development* The three additional courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or greater prior to beginning the fall semester of the second year: WRIT101 English Composition I CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology BIOL215 Microbiology d. Attainment of a Q.P.A. of 2.0 or greater in nursing core courses which are taken at CCBC (Transfer courses are not included in the computation of the CCBC quality point average for admission and progression.)


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e. LPNs must purchase their own Professional Liability insurance Placement into Nursing III ADN will be on a SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS. The previously listed requirements are minimum criteria. Applicants who meet minimum criteria will be considered for admission into the program. However, meeting minimal criteria does not guarantee admission into the program. Available spaces will be divided equally between re-admission applicants and LPN advanced placement applicants.

Re-admission The number of re-admissions to the Nursing Program (inclusive of all levels) will be limited to a maximum of one (1) per applicant, in addition to their initial matriculation. Re-admission is decided on an individual basis. All requests for re-admission should be made in writing to the program director. Students who fail or withdraw from NURS170, Nursing I, must reapply to the program. They will be ranked by nursing pre-admission examination score with all applicants. Placement into the Nursing Program will be on a SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS. Available spaces will be divided equally between re-admission applicants and LPN advanced placement applicants. Students out of the program for five (5) years or more may be required to repeat selected courses on the guidance and direction from the Division Director. Transfer Students Will be considered on an individual basis with guidance and direction from the Division Director. Placement will be on a SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS after readmission and LPN applicants are admitted. Program Policies Nursing students are assigned to a variety of clinical agencies for clinical practice. They must assume all responsibilities for transportation to and from the agencies to which they are assigned. A student must earn a grade of ‘C’ or greater in all courses in the Nursing program to continue in the program. A student who performs unsatisfactorily in the clinical laboratory will automatically fail the respective course/rotation regardless of theory grade. All students entering or re-entering the nursing program anytime after NURS170 must successfully complete a drug calculation proficiency exam with a grade of 90% before the first scheduled class of their respective semester. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 17 Credits Code Course Credit BIOL201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 NURS170 Nursing I 7 PSYC106 Human Growth & Development 3 Second Semester - 17 Credits BIOL202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 NURS171 Nursing II 7 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Third Semester (Summer Session) - 8 Credits BIOL215 Microbiology 4 NURS270 Nursing III - ADN 4 SECOND YEAR Fourth Semester - 13 Credits NURS275 Nursing IV - ADN WRIT102 English Composition II

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Fifth Semester - 15 Credits NURS276 Nursing V - ADN NURS278 Community Health Nursing SOCI101 Principles of Sociology

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OFFICE TECHNOLOGY: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT (degree) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3492 Division Director, Business & Technologies The emphasis throughout the curriculum is on the administrative assistant as a vital member of an office team. The program will offer students the opportunity to develop skills necessary to organize data using spreadsheet and database management software, interact with clients, vendors, and the general public, plan meetings, supervise the office, handle purchasing, and train other workers. Office Technology will train students to become proficient computer users in Microsoft Office. Students enrolled in the program, which provides flexible scheduling through its open-entry/open-exit classroom environment, will participate in hands-on, real life work situations in order to become a skilled office professional upon graduation. Studies will range from office procedures to developing expertise in Internet, e-mail, and Microsoft Office software. Additional coursework integrates Microsoft Office applications into projects and the students will gain experience through an internship. Students completing required courses will be eligible to take to the exam for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification, the globally recognized standard for desktop skills with the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Outlook). Graduates of the program can work as: administrative assistants, executive secretaries, office managers, administrative support, project coordinators, and receptionists. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit OFFT100 Keyboard Techniques 3 OFFT110 Internet for Office 3 OFFT120 Microsoft Word-MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT125 Microsoft Excel-MOS Expert Certification 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3


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DEGREE PLANS CAREER PROGRAMS Second Semester - 15 Credits OFFT150 Office Communications 3 OFFT155 Office Procedures 3 OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook-MOS Certification 3 PSYC101 General Psychology 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits BUSC110 Interpersonal Communications 3 BUSC205 Leadership 3 CIST170 Dreamweaver 3 OFFT130 Microsoft Access-MOS Certification 3 Math Elective (MATH110 or higher) 3 Fourth Semester - 15 Credits OFFT160 Electronic Transcription 3 OFFT175 Microsoft PowerPoint-MOS Certification 3 OFFT205 Microsoft Office Applications Advanced 3 OFFT250 Office Technology Internship OR BUSH220 Compensation and Benefits 3 BUSH230 Event Planning and Management 3 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT (certificate) Certificate Program Credits Required 30 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3492 Division Director, Business & Technologies Office Technology at Community College of Beaver County will train students to become proficient computer users in all Microsoft Office applications. Students enrolled in this certificate program, which provides flexible scheduling through its open-entry/ open-exit classroom environment, will participate in hands-on, true-to-life work situations in order to become a skilled office professional upon graduation. Studies will range from standard office skills and office procedures to developing expertise in Internet, e-mail, project management, and Microsoft Office software. This program, which offers certificates in either Administrative Assistant or Medical Administrative Assistant, also affords students the opportunity to develop skills necessary to organize data using spreadsheet and database management software, interact with clients, vendors, and the general public, plan meetings, supervise the office, handle purchasing, and train other workers. Throughout the curriculum, emphasis is on the administrative assistant as a vital member of an office team. Graduates of this program are prepared for positions such as: administrative assistant, office manager, executive assistant, and secretary.


Students completing required courses will be eligible to take the exam for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification, the globally recognized standard for desktop skills with the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Outlook). Curriculum First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit OFFT100 Keyboard Techniques 3 OFFT110 Internet for Office 3 OFFT120 Microsoft Word -MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT125 Microsoft Excel -MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT130 Microsoft Access -MOS Expert Certification 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits OFFT150 Office Communications OFFT155 Office Procedures OFFT160 Electronic Transcription OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook -MOS Certification OFFT174 Microsoft PowerPoint -MOS Certification

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OFFICE TECHNOLOGY: MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT (degree) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 61 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3492 Division Director, Business & Technologies The emphasis throughout the curriculum is on the administrative assistant as a vital member of an office team. The program will offer students the opportunity to develop skills necessary to organize data using spreadsheet and database management software, interact with clients, vendors, and the general public, plan meetings, supervise the office, handle purchasing, and train other workers. Office Technology will train students to become proficient computer users in various software applications. Students enrolled in the program, which provides flexible scheduling through an open-entry/open-exit classroom environment, will participate in hands-on, real life work situations in order to become a skilled office professional upon graduation. Studies will range from office procedures to developing expertise in Internet, e-mail, and software applications. Additional coursework integrates the software applications into projects. The students will be given the opportunity to gain work experience through an optional internship. The coursework provides course content that will prepare the student to take the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification exams (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook), the globally recognized standard for desktop skills.


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Graduates of the program are prepared for the following positions: medical administrative assistant, medical office assistant, medical receptionist, medical records assistant, medical secretary, medical office manager, administrative support supervisor, and administrative services supervisor. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16 Credits Code Course Credit BIOL105 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 OFFT101 Keyboarding Introduction 1 OFFT120 Microsoft Word - MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT140 Medical Terminology 3 OFFT110 Internet for Office 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits BIOL106 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook - MOS Certification 3 OFFT180 Medical Coding 3 OFFT185 Medical Billing 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business and Technology 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits BUSC110 Interpersonal Communications 3 BUSC205 Leadership 3 OFFT130 Microsoft Access - MOS Certification 3 OFFT125 Microsoft Excel - MOS Expert Certification 3 PSYC101 General Psychology I 3 Fourth Semester - 15 Credits OFFT155 Office Procedures 3 OFFT165 Medical Electronic Transcription 3 OFFT175 Microsoft PowerPoint - MOS Certification 3 OFFT250 Office Technology Internship OR BUSH220 Compensation and Benefits 3 OFFT205 Microsoft Office Applications Advanced 3 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY: MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT (certificate) Certificate Program Credits Required 31 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3492 Division Director, Business & Technologies


The Medical Administrative Assistant track will prepare graduates to work in a variety of hospitals and other healthcare-related businesses and settings. Students enrolled in this certificate program, which provides flexible scheduling through its open-entry/open-exit classroom environment, will participate in hands-on, true-to-life work situations in order to become a skilled office professional upon graduation. Studies will range from standard office skills and office procedures to developing expertise in Internet, e-mail, project management, and Microsoft Office software. This program, tailor made for today’s healthcare office professional, will provide the knowledge to efficiently handle medical coding, billing, and terminology, and electronic medical transcription. Mastering such skills will give you the edge today’s employers are looking for in medical administrative assistants. Graduates of the program are prepared for positions such as: medical administrative assistant, medical office assistant, medical records assistant, and medical secretary. Students completing required courses will be eligible to take the exam for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification, the globally recognized standard for desktop skills with the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Outlook). Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 16 Credits Code Course Credit OFFT101 Keyboarding Introduction 1 OFFT110 Internet for Office 3 OFFT120 Microsoft Word -MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT125 Microsoft Excel - MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT130 Microsoft Access - MOS Expert Certification 3 OFFT140 Medical Terminology 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits OFFT155 Office Procedures 3 OFFT165 Electronic Medical Transcription 3 OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook - MOS Certification 3 OFFT180 Medical Coding 3 OFFT185 Medical Billing 3 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN Certificate Offered Credits Required 24 Contact Linda M. Gallagher at 724-480-3492 Associate Vice President for Assessment, Nursing & Allied Health The Pharmacy Technician program at CCBC will prepare students for future careers in a variety of employment settings including hospitals, health care agencies, community pharmacies, and pharmaceutical companies.


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Our program is designed to train students in processing prescriptions and medical orders; compounding sterile and non-sterile products such as IV solutions, suspensions, ointments, and creams; and in assisting with over-the-counter drugs and health care products. They will also learn how to perform retail duties such as pricing, inventory control, billing, and preparation of patient profiles. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will be awarded a certificate of completion by the College and will be prepared to sit for the national Pharmacy Technician Certification Examination sponsored by the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board. Admissions Requirements • High school transcript or GED certificate • Criminal record check with no history reported • Physical examination with titers, immunizations, 2-step tuberculin screening test, and functional abilities Curriculum First Semester - 9 credits Code Course Credit PHAR100 Pharmacy Technology I 3 PHAR110 Pharmacology I 3 PHAR115 Pharmacy Calculations 3 Second Semester - 9 Credits MSHT104 Communication Skills for Healthcare Workers 3 PHAR120 Pharmacy Technology II 3 PHAR125 Pharmacology II 3 Third Semester - 6 Credits PHAR160 Pharmacy Experiential Learning

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PHLEBOTOMY Certificate Offered Credits Required 6 Contact Linda M. Gallagher at 724-480-3492 Associate Vice President for Assessment, Nursing & Allied Health In one semester, this fast track program will prepare an individual for employment as a phlebotomist. Phlebotomy involves the practice of drawing blood for clients and taking the blood specimens to the laboratory to prepare them for testing. The phlebotomy courses include topics such as anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system and blood-drawing techniques. Students will have hands-on training in drawing blood through vein punctures and skin punctures. After students complete the program, they may take the national certification examination that credentials them as certified phlebotomists [ PBT (ASCP)]. Program graduates will be fully prepared for entry into the field of health care with employers such as laboratories, donor centers, physician offices, hospitals, clinics, outpatient facilities, and public health departments.


Curriculum Code Course Credit MSHT102 Introduction to the Medical Laboratory 4 MSHT103 Clinical Phlebotomy 2 POLICE TECHNOLOGY (degree) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 65/68 Program Director John Nallo at 724-480-3616 Public Service Occupations The Police Technology program is a the basic for law enforcement training. The Beaver County Municipal Police Training Academy partners with the College to provide vocational and academic training leading to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. The program is designed to meet Municipal Police Officers Education and Training Commission requirements through the Beaver County Municipal Police Training Academy and academic degree requirements through CCBC. The Police Technology curriculum provides the 750 hours of training mandated by the Municipal Police Officers Education and Training Commission in anticipation of employment as a municipal police officer. Upon completion of the certificate portion of the program, graduates can apply for a waiver of Act 120 training, and upon successful completion of the State Certification Exam can be employed as municipal police officers, probation officers, campus police officers, park rangers, and federal law enforcement officers. Certificate Curriculum First Semester - 17 credits Code Course Credit PLIC103 Introduction to the Academy 2 & Introduction to Law Enforcement in Pennsylvania PLIC105 Physical and Emotional Readiness 2 PLIC120 Law and Procedures 6 PLIC128 Defensive Tactics & Handling 3 Arrested Persons PLIC135 Motor Vehicle Law & Accident 4 and Collision Investigation Second Semester - 18 credits PLIC145 Patrol Procedures and Operations 3 PLIC155 Principles of Criminal Investigation, 4 Report Writing & Case Preparation PLIC160 Human Relations 2 PLIC162 Crisis Management & Families in Crisis 3 PLIC165 Basic Firearms 3 PLIC167 First Aid & CPR 2 PLIC170 Operation of Patrol Vehicles 1


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Academic Curriculum First Semester - 15/18 credits CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CRIM125 Correctional Administration 3 PSYC101 General Psychology 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Mathematics Elective OR Science Elective 3/4 Humanities Elective 3 Second Semester - 15 credits COMM101 Oral Communication OR COMM201 Public Speaking 3 CRIM120 Narcotics & Drug Abuse 3 SOCI101 Principles of Sociology 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3 Social Science Elective 3 POLICE TECHNOLOGY (certificate) Certificate Offered Contact John Nallo at 724-480-3616 Division Director, Public Service Occupations The Beaver County Municipal Police Training Academy partners with CCBC to provide vocational skills that lead to a certification in Police Technology. The Police Technology curriculum provides students with the 750 hours of training mandated by the Municipal Police Officers Education and Training Commission in anticipation of employment as a municipal police officer. This program is designed to meet the Municipal Police Officers Education and Training Commission’s instructional requirements for currently employed officers as well as those seeking employment in police enforcement. Topics covered during the two semesters of study include physical and emotional readiness; defense tactics and handling arrested persons; motor vehicle law; patrol procedures and operations; report writing and case preparation; basic firearms; and first aid and CPR. Upon completion of this program, students newly hired as police officers can apply for a waiver of Act 120 schooling based on their successful completion of the Commission’s criteria. Certificate Curriculum First Semester - 17 credits Code Course PLIC103 Introduction to the Academy & Introduction to Law Enforcement in Pennsylvania PLIC105 Physical and Emotional Readiness PLIC120 Law and Procedures PLIC128 Defensive Tactics & Handling Arrested Persons PLIC135 Motor Vehicle Law & Accident and Collision Investigation


Second Semester - 18 credits PLIC145 Patrol Procedures and Operations PLIC155 Principles of Criminal Investigation, Report Writing & Case Preparation PLIC160 Human Relations PLIC162 Crisis Management & Families in Crisis PLIC165 Basic Firearms PLIC167 First Aid & CPR PLIC170 Operation of Patrol Vehicles PRACTICAL NURSING Diploma Offered (PN) Credits Required 50 Contact Linda Gallagher724-480-3492 Associate Vice President for Assessment, Nursing & Allied Health In just three semesters, achieve eligibility to become a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) and give safe nursing care to patients under the direction of a registered nurse, physician, or dentist. Participate in clinicals in a variety of hospital and healthcare settings to gain valuable real world experience. The PN program totals three semesters (spring, summer, and fall) in length and may be completed in one calendar year. The PN graduate receives a Diploma and is eligible to write the National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX - PN) to become a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). The LPN gives safe nursing care under the direction of a registered nurse, physician, or dentist. Opportunities for employment are found in all types of health care agencies, such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, clinics, private homes, and visiting nurse agencies. Criteria for Admission into the Practical Nursing Program A. High School Requirements High school diploma or successful completion of the G.E.D. test. B. Entry Requirements • Nursing pre-admission examination at 70th percentile or greater. Applicants will be ranked for admission based upon the examination score. • Grades of “C” or greater in all courses required in the practical nursing program. C. Full Admission Status Full admission is contingent upon completion of the following: • Any required placement testing and developmental coursework, • Professional CPR certification course • Physical examination which indicates that the applicant can undertake the program in nursing. • Criminal record and child abuse clearances which allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in day care centers, public schools, and long-term care facilities • Attainment of a Q.P.A. of 2.5 or greater in nursing core courses, which are taken at CCBC (transfer courses are not included in the computation of the CCBC quality point average). • Grades of “C” or greater in all courses required in the Nursing program. • Healthcare Insurance is recommended for all persons accepted into the nursing program. Applicants assume the costs of the above examinations, criminal record & child abuse clearances, and healthcare insurance.


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Program Progression 1. Q.P.A. of 2.0 or better (Only those courses that are included in the Core Curriculum will be considered in determining the Q.P.A.) 2. A grade of “C� or greater in all courses required in the Nursing program 3. Satisfactory clinical performance 4. Satisfactory completion of core curriculum courses Re-admission The number of re-admissions to the Nursing Program (inclusive of all levels) will be limited to a maximum of one (1) per applicant, in addition to their initial matriculation. Re-admission is decided on an individual basis. All requests for re-admission should be made in writing to the program director. Students who fail or withdraw from NURS 150 Practical Nursing I must reapply to the program. They will be ranked by Nursing pre-admission examination score with all applicants. This reapplication will be considered the one readmission application. Placement into the Nursing Program will be on a SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS. Students out of the program for five (5) years or more may be required to repeat selected courses on the guidance and direction from the Division Director. Transfer Students Will be considered on an individual basis with guidance and direction from the Division Director. Placement will be on a SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS. Program Policies To complete the PN Option, the student must have met the 1,500 hour requirement of the Practical Nurse Act (Law). Curriculum Spring Semester - 19 Credits Code Course Credit BIOL201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 NURS150 Practical Nursing I 9 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Summer Semester - 16 Credits BIOL202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II NURS155 Practical Nursing II PSYC106 Human Growth & Development

4 9 3

Fall Semester - 15 Credits NURS160 Practical Nursing III PSYC101 General Psychology I

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PROFESSIONAL PILOT Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 63 Contact Carmen Romeo at 724-480-3604 Division Director, Aviation Sciences


This program is designed to offer aviation subjects related to professional piloting. Each student completing the program successfully will have obtained a minimum of a commercial pilot certificate with a multi-engine land and instrument rating. The student will obtain flight instruction from the one of the College’s approved fixed-based operators, who are also FAA and VA approved providers. Airplane fees and flight fees for pilot courses are in addition to tuition costs. Prerequisites to entering the program include a second- class medical certificate and no speech impediments (a firstclass medical certificate is encouraged). A person with a waiver for a medical certificate is required to consult with the Aviation Department. Program Requirements Professional Pilot students completing the associate degree at CCBC are required to have the following FAA flight certifications: • Private Pilot Certificate • Commercial Pilot Certificate • Instrument Rating • Multi-Engine Rating The average student will earn these flight certifications in approximately 250 hours of flight time. Additional Ratings Students can earn additional ratings through successful completion of optional courses. • Fundamentals of Instructing • Basic Ground Instructor • Advanced Ground Instructor • Instrument Ground Instructor • CFIA • CFII • CFIA-M Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 17 Credits Code Course Credit AVIP106 Private Pilot 3 AVIP110 Flight Theory 4 AVIP123 Aeronautical Knowledge 3 PHYS105 Physical Science 4 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits AVIP121 Aviation Meteorology 3 AVIP136 Theory of Instrument Flight 4 AVIP232 Instrument Flight 2 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 WRIT102 English Composition II 3


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SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 15 Credits AVIP125 Advanced Aeronautical Knowledge 3 AVIP139 Aircraft Engines & Structures Theory 3 AVIP140 Commercial Pilot Theory 3 AVIP230 Commercial Flight I 3 Social Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester - 16 Credits AVIP138 Aerodynamics 3 AVIP150 Human Factors in Aviation 3 AVIP231 Commercial Flight II 3 AVIP233 Multi-Engine Flight 1 AVIP238 Aircraft Systems 3 Humanities Elective 3 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 73 Contact Joyce E. Cirelli M.S.,R.T. (R) at 724-480-3474 Director, School of Radiologic Technology According to the US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, employment of radiologic technologists is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2014, as the population grows and ages, increasing the demand for diagnostic imaging. Radiography programs require, at a minimum, a high school diploma or the equivalent. High school courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology are helpful. The programs provide both classroom and clinical instruction in anatomy and physiology, patient care procedures, radiation physics, radiation protection, principles of imaging, medical terminology, positioning of patients, medical ethics, radiobiology, pathology, and digital imaging. Federal legislation protects the public from the hazards of unnecessary exposure to medical and dental radiation by ensuring that operators of radiologic equipment are properly trained. Under this legislation, the Federal Government sets voluntary standards that the States may use for accrediting training programs and certifying individuals who engage in medical or dental radiography. Upon successful completion of the program the student is eligible to sit for the Registry exam from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists for Certification. Various career opportunities are available after graduation. Radiographers are currently employed in hospitals, private physicians’ offices, clinics, sales, industry, and military service. Ample opportunity for professional growth and advancement exists in specialty areas such as Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy, Computerized Automated Tomography (CT), Special Procedures, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), as well as management and education. Program Admission Requirements Enrollment in the Radiologic Technology program is based on a select admissions process. Students applying to the program must: Be at least 18 years of age or older within six months after entry into the program.


A. High School Requirements Completion of the following with a “C” or better: 4 units of English 3 units of social sciences 2 units of mathematics (one of which is Algebra) 2 units of science (one of Biology and one of Chemistry or Physics) with a related laboratory or the equivalent 1 computer science course OR Successful completion of the GED Test Persons out of high school for five or more years: Unless college level courses in Chemistry, Biology or Physics have been completed with a grade of “C” or better within the five years prior to admission to the program, such courses will be required for acceptance. B. Entry Requirements Radiology pre-admission examination at 65 percent or greater; applicants will be ranked for interviews based upon the examination score. Grades of “C” or greater in all courses required in the radiology program. Q.P.A. of 2.O or greater in all courses required in the radiology program. C. Full Admission Status Full admission is contingent upon completion of the following: Any required placement testing and development coursework. Professional CPR certification course. Physical examination which indicates that the applicant can undertake the program in radiologic technology. Criminal record and child abuse clearances, which allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in health care facilities and clinics. Complete an observation period prior to finalizing acceptance into the program. Attainment of a Q.P.A. of 2.0 or greater in radiology core courses, which are taken at CCBC (transfer courses are not included in the computation of the CCBC quality point average). Grades of “C” or greater in all courses required in the radiology program. Healthcare Insurance is recommended for all persons accepted into the radiology program. Applicants assume the costs of the above examinations, criminal record and child abuse clearances, and healthcare insurance. Selected students are granted admission to the program on the basis of past academic record, pre-entrance examination and evaluation at time of the personal interview. Physical Requirements All applicants must be in good physical condition. Those accepted must have a physical examination as well as complete a Physical Requirements Form before entering the program. All applicants should: • Have sufficient sight to observe condition of patients from behind a control panel and to evaluate films (either naturally or through correction). • Be able to stand and walk for 80% of the clinical day. • Have verbal and written skills in English sufficient to communicate with patients, co-workers, and physicians. • Have verbal skills sufficient for instructing patients. • Have hearing sufficient to respond to patient needs, interact with patients, and respond to audible sounds from equipment. • Have motor skills sufficient to manipulate equipment and respond to emergencies. • Be able to work with both hands and fingers to perform movements such as seizing, holding, grasping, and turning.


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• Be able to perform frequent lifting, carrying, pushing, and pulling of objects weighing more than 30 pounds. • Be able to lift and transfer patients safely to and from the radiographic table. • Have sufficient intellectual and emotional skills to exercise discretion. ARRT Code of Ethics The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) has established a Code of Ethics, which all students must follow. Any individual who has been involved in a criminal proceeding or who has been charged or convicted of a crime may file a pre-application with the ARRT in order to obtain a ruling on the impact of the situation on their eligibility for registration. A charge or conviction of, a plea of guilty to, or a plea of nolo contendere (no contest) to an offense, which is classified as a misdemeanor or felony, constitutes a conviction for ARRT purposes. A student accepted to the program, who has not yet begun their studies, may file a Pre-Application Review of Eligibility with the ARRT. Any student enrolled in the program must submit the Application for Certification along with required documentation to the ARRT at the following address: American Registry of Radiologic Technologists 1255 Northland Drive St. Paul, MN 55120-1155 Phone: 651-687-0048 Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 18 Credits Code Course Credit BIOL201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 RADS100 Patient Care I 3 RADS110 Fundamentals of Radiologic Science 3 RADS120 Clinical Practice I 2 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 17 Credits BIOL202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II RADS130 Radiographic Procedures I RADS140 Radiation Protection & Biology RADS145 Radiation Production & Characteristics RADS150 Clinical Practice II WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology

4 3 3 2 2 3

Third Semester (Summer Session) - 12 Credits RADS160 Radiographic Procedures II 4 RADS165 Pathology (WAC) 4 RADS170 Clinical Practice III 4


SECOND YEAR Fourth Semester - 14 Credits PSYC106 Human Growth & Development 3 RADS200 Imaging Equipment I 3 RADS205 Exposure I 2 RADS210 Patient Care II 3 RADS220 Clinical Practice IV 3 Fifth Semester - 12 Credits COMM201 Public Speaking 3 RADS202 Imaging Equipment II 2 RADS207 Exposure II 2 RADS215 Advanced Procedures & Registry Prep 2 RADS230 Clinical Practice V 3 ROBOTICS AND EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Certificate Offered Credits Required 31 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies Robotics and Embedded Systems is an inter-disciplinary program that is designed to instruct students in the analysis, design, and development of automated systems using a variety of robotic platforms. Students will study topics in autonomous robotics, remote-control robotics, computer programming, mathematics, electronics, digital microprocessors, and sensor operation. The program is designed to provide both theoretical and practical application in the study of embedded systems. Students will be prepared for employment as a robotic technician, field service technician, electronic technician, and animatronics technologist in a variety of industries as embedded systems are expanding into almost all industries including manufacturing, defense, and health care. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CIST130 Introduction to Agile Robotics 3 CIST140 Electronics I 3 CIST150 C++ Programming 3 MATH130 OR Higher 3 Second Semester Code Course Credit PHYS105 Physical Science 4 CIST 135 Integration of Embedded Systems 3 CIST 145 Electronics II 3 BUSC 220 Team Development 3 CISN 200 Client Operating Systems 3


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TEACHER’S CERTIFICATION IN YOGA Certificate Program Credits Required 15 Contact John Gall at 724-480-3543 Division Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences Teacher’s Certification in Yoga is a program based upon the standard 200-hour training in yoga for yoga teaching certification. This program has five formal courses: Yoga I, Yoga II, Yoga III, Holistic Approaches to Health, and Yoga IV. Yoga III and IV are internships. The student will be trained in the physical asanas and vinyasas of yoga, the philosophical and historical aspects, terminology and language of yoga, including development of the knowledge of Sanskrit, the nutritional and aruyvedic health philosophy, anatomy in terms of muscular and skeletal relationships, holistic health, the founders of yoga, including Sri Pattabhi Jois and Patangali, the various types and elements of yoga, including ashtanga and hatha techniques, and teacher techniques. The training involves physical, philosophical, and pedagogical involvement. Courses are typically offered so that students can complete the program in 16 months. Curriculum 15 credits Code Course Credit HPER130 Yoga I 3 HPER140 Yoga II 3 HPER230 Yoga III 3 HPER240 Yoga IV 3 HPER245 Holistic Approaches to Health 3 WEB DESIGN NEW MEDIA (DEGREE) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 60 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Visual Communications Web Design New Media program will prepare students to become capable new media web designers creating original interactive media with a strong visual style and the level of web programming that is appropriate to the new media project’s concept and goals. With the emphasis on new media design skills, the program addresses the ever-evolving nature of visual communications within the new media environment. Students will gain project and goal-oriented skills in design creation, layout and presentation involved with all the major new media formats, including mobile broadcast and dynamic web site programming. The interdisciplinary project based curriculum focuses on the creation of a variety of interactive media tools that include gaming, entertainment, and other types of media. Students interested in the Visual Communications–Web Design New Media program must have a strong interest in web based technologies, have an aptitude for problem solving in an individual and collaborative


group setting, excellent aesthetic judgment, and the ability to meet deadlines and project specifications. Career Opportunities: The Visual Communications Web Design New Media program curriculum prepares graduates for entry-level employment in this rapidly changing field. Employment is typically found in gaming, entertainment media, virtual reality, corporate, design, and academic interactive departments. Companies that specialize in new media, such as website development, computer animation and interactive media are also sources of employment for graduates of the Visual Communications Web Design New Media program. Entry-level job titles are multimedia designer, interactive designer, web page designer, animator, freelance media artist, media designer or interactive media producer. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester – 15 credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CISW101 Web Scripting Languages (Day) 3 FINE210 Design 3 VISC115 Digital Imaging 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester- 15 credits BUSC220 Team Development 3 MATH/Science Elective 3 VISC122 Web Design 3 VISC220 Digital Photography 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR 3 WRIT10 Writing for Business & Technologies SECOND YEAR Third Semester-15 credits CIST170 Dreamweaver 3 CISW201 Java I (Day) 3 CISW210 E-Commerce Applications 3 VISC130 Digital Video I 3 VISC208 Digital Animation 3 Fourth Semester- 15 credits CISW206 Database – ASP (Day) 3 PYSC105 Social Psychology OR PSYC or SOCI Elective 3 VISC201 Interactive Design 3 VISC240 Digital Portfolio 3 VISC260 Visual Communication Internship OR VISC218 Media Design Entrepreneurship 3


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WEB DESIGN NEW MEDIA (CERTIFICATE) Certificate Offered Credits Required 24 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies The Visual Communications Web Design New Media certificate supplements educated working designers who are interested in adding new media web design to their portfolio and resume. Students will create original interactive media with a strong visual style and the level of web programming that is appropriate to the new media project’s concept and goals. With the emphasis on new media design skills, the certificate addresses the ever-evolving nature of visual communications within the new media environment. Students will gain project and goal-oriented skills in design creation, layout and presentation involved with all the major new media formats, including mobile broadcast and dynamic web site programming. The interdisciplinary project based coursework focuses on the creation of a variety of interactive media tools that include gaming, entertainment, and other types of media. Students interested in the Visual Communications–Web Design New Media certificate must have solid computer skills (CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology can be taken for this Certificate). Students must also have a strong design background, an interest in web based technologies, have an aptitude for problem solving in an individual and collaborative group setting, excellent aesthetic judgment, and the ability to meet deadlines and project specifications. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester Code Course Credit CIST170 Dreamweaver 3 CISW101 Web Scripting Languages (Day) 3 FINE210 Design 3 VISC115 Digital Imaging 3 Second Semester CISW205 Programming in C# (Day) CISW206 Database – ASP (Day) VISC122 Web Design VISC220 Digital Photography WEB PROGRAMMING (DEGREE) Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science Credits Required 61 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies

3 3 3 3


The Web Programming curriculum provides students with the theoretical and hands-on experience in software application tools, computer programming languages, system analysis, website design, and web software design. The program includes courses in Microsoft Office, Java, web and digital design, E-Commerce applications, and web database programming. Graduates of this curriculum may obtain employment locally and nationally as Visual Basic programmers, Java programmers, web programmers, and database programmers. NOTE: Second year programming courses are only offered as DAY courses. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 15 Credits Code Course Credit CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology 3 CIST160 Visual Basic I 3 CISW101 Web Scripting Language (Day) 3 VISC115 Digital Imaging 3 WRIT101 English Composition I 3 Second Semester - 15 Credits CISN200 Client Operating Systems 3 CIST106 Software Productivity Tools 3 CISW206 Database: ASP (Day) 3 WRIT102 English Composition II OR WRIT103 Writing for Business & Technology 3 MATH110 OR Higher OR Science elective 3 SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 16 Credits CISN205 Server Operating Systems CIST170 Dreamweaver (Day) CISW201 Java I (Day)

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CISW210 E-Commerce Applications (Online) 3 CISW214 Database: SQL (Day) 3 Fourth Semester - 15 credits CISW205 Programming with C# (Day) 3 CISW215 Database: Crystal Report Writer (Day) 3 CISW202 Java II (Day) 3 CIST260 Internship OR VISC122 Web Design 3 SOCI or PSYC Elective 3 WEB PROGRAMMING (CERTIFICATE) Certificate program Credits Required 15 Contact Deborah Micheals at 724-480-3515 Division Director, Business & Technologies This curriculum is designed to provide students application software development theories and practices using Java programming language. The program was created to provide students with training in Java syntax and structure, in-depth object oriented terminology and programming techniques, and application development. Graduates may obtain employment as programmers, programmer analysts, software developers, and web application developers. NOTE: CISW programming courses are only offered as DAY courses. Curriculum FIRST YEAR First Semester - 6 Credits Code Course Credit CIST160 Visual Basic I 3 CISW101 Web Scripting Languages (Day) 3 Second Semester - 3 Credits CISW205 Programming in C# (Day)

3

SECOND YEAR Third Semester - 3 Credits CISW201 Java I (Day)

3

Fourth Semester - 3 Credits CISW202 Java II (Day)

3


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ANTHROPOLOGY ANTH101 Principles of Anthropology Basic methods, topics, and vocabulary of anthropology are studied. Institutions such as religion, medicine, and the family are approached through ethnographical methods. Prehistoric man, physical anthropology, and selected case studies in cultural anthropology are considered. ANTH105 Cultural Anthropology The emphasis is on the influence of culture on behavior. Various research methods will be examined, including cross cultural, ego-centered, family studies, and ethnographic studies. The major theories of cultural anthropology will be critically examined, and case studies will be reviewed. Institutions such as marriage, the market, religion, and the arts will be studied in their cultural settings. Prerequisite: SOCI101 or ANTH101 AVIATION AVIP103 Recreational Pilot This course includes the actual flying experience with FAA approved fixed base operators. Students will receive a minimum of 30 hours of instruction including dual, solo, and briefing. Successful completion will result in receipt of the Recreational Pilot Certificate. Persons wishing to receive credit for previous flying must make arrangements with the coordinator of the program. Students are required to have a valid second class medical certificate to enroll in this course. AVIP106 Private Pilot (Flight Lab) This course includes actual flying experience with a CCBC approved fixed base operator. Students will receive a minimum of 40 hours of flight instruction including dual, solo and briefing. Successful completion will result in receipt of the Private Pilot-Airplane Certificate (no limitations). Persons wishing to receive credit for previous flight time must make arrangements with the CCBC Aviation Director or the coordinator of the aviation program. Students are required to have a valid second class medical certificate to enroll in this course. AVIP107 Recreational Pilot (Flight Lab) This course includes actual flying experience with a CCBC approved fixed base operator. Students will receive a minimum of 35 hours of flight instruction including dual, solo and briefing. Successful completion will result in receipt of the Recreational Pilot – Airplane Certificate (no limitations). Persons wishing to receive credit from previous flight instruction must make arrangements with the CCBC Aviation Director or the coordinator of the aviation program. Students are required to have a valid second class medical certificate to enroll in this course. AVIP110 Flight Theory The principles of flight, basics of air traffic control, weather facts, navigational procedures and airplane operations as pertinent to the Private Pilot Certificate are studied. Upon successful completion of this course, the student has sufficient knowledge to pass the FAA written examination for the Private/Recreational Pilot Certificate, which will be the final exam. Co requisite: AVIP123 AVIP112 Fundamentals of Instructing This course is designed to cover subject matter that would be related to instructor training rather than aeronautical training. Subjects to be covered are the ground instructor qualities; motivation; the learning process; the pattern of instruction; planning; and presenting and explaining. Completion of the course will be the passage of the FAA Fundamentals of Instruction for Ground Instructors exam.


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AVIP114 Basic Ground Instructor Included in this course are a comprehensive study of aviation weather; air navigation (pilotage dead reckoning, and radio); single engine airplane operations, including fundamental aerodynamic principles of flight, and performance data; regulations for student and private pilots; general and visual flight rules; and the Airman’s Information Manual. Successful completion will be passage of the FAA Exam for the Basic Ground Instructor Certificate, which will be the final exam. AVIP121 Aviation Meteorology This course places special emphasis on interpretation of meteorology phenomena affecting aircraft; basic concepts of aviation meteorology; temperature, pressure, moisture, stability, clouds, air masses, fronts, thunderstorms, icing and fog. The course covers analysis and use of weather data for flight planning and safe flying; interpretation of weather maps, reports and forecasts. Prerequisite: AVIP110 Co requisite: AVIP136 AVIP123 Aeronautical Knowledge This course is designed to provide the basis for Air Traffic Control Training. The student will learn the language of air traffic controllers, and will become familiar with the operating principles of navigational equipment pertinent to pilots and controllers. Co requisite: AVIP110 AVIP124 Advanced Ground Instructor The course provides in-depth coverage of subjects introduced in AVIP114. Topics include: operating procedures and performance principles of small twin-engine airplanes; privileges and limitations of airline transport and commercial pilots; and certification requirements. Successful completion will be passage of the FAA Advanced Ground Instructor Certificate which will be the final exam. Prerequisite: AVIP114 or equivalent AVIP125 Advanced Aeronautical Knowledge This course covers FAA regulations on safe flight, weight and balance problems, and use of the Aeronautical Information Manual. Medical facts and accident reports are studied. Fundamentals essential to safe flight will be studied, including instruments used for aviation safety and the evaluation and interpretation of their indications. Prerequisite: AVIP110 or equivalent Co requisite: AVIP140 AVIP136 Theory of Instrument Flight This course includes basic radio fundamentals as used by the instrument pilot. A description and practical use of various radio aids to safe aerial navigation, including Very High Frequency Omni Direction Range (VOR), Instrument Landing System (ILS), Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) and others. Instrument charts and instrument approach charts as adapted to radio navigation and the application of the Aeronautical Information Manual are studied. The FAA Instrument Rating-Airplane written examination may be the final exam. Co requisite: AVIP121 AVIP137 Instrument Ground Instructor A comprehensive knowledge of subjects covered in AVIP114 and AVIP124, plus the instrument flight rules; IFR Altitudes; Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, the instrument flight operations requirements of FAR 135; the instrument flight procedures; enroute charts; IFR planning; and common IFR weather producers are included in this course. Successful completion will be passage of the FAA Instrument Ground Instructor Certificate which will be the final exam. Prerequisite: AVIP114 or AVIP124 AVIP138 Aerodynamics This course is an analysis of the physics of flight, including the application of basic aerodynamics to the wing and airfoil; the analysis of lift and drag components relative to the wing platform and airplane performance; application of aerodynamic effect of turbo jet engines; and the principles of propulsion.


AVIP139 Aircraft Engines & Structures Theory This course is designed to place emphasis on the fundamental principles of aircraft engines, including engine theory; materials and methods of construction; lubricants; and lubrication systems; and superchargers. General engine operation procedures and performance diagnosis are also studied. This includes the principles of aircraft structures, including stresses operating on airframe structures, purpose, types and construction of airframes. AVIP140 Commercial Pilot Theory This training course provides the student with the necessary aeronautical knowledge and prerequisite as specified in the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) for the commercial pilot - airplane written examination. Topics of discussion are FAR; airplane performance; aerodynamics; airplane engines and systems; and physiology. The final exam for the course will be the FAA Commercial written examination. Prerequisite: AVIP110 or equivalent Co requisite: AVIP125 AVIP150 Human Factors in Aviation This course provides the student with a detailed introduction to aspects of aviation safety and the associated components of pilot psychology, human factors, aircraft technology and aero-medical physiology. Emphasis will be on resource management in single pilot and multi-crew member operations. Human Factors in Aviation is designed for the advanced pilot, air traffic control, and aerospace management student to recognize the degree of importance human factors play in the aviation industry. In order to obtain this focus, a detailed study, through a series of lectures, will map out the error chain that results in most accidents/incidents. Special emphasis will be placed upon psychology. Prerequisite: AVIP139 and AVIP238 AVIP200 Aerospace Operations Management This course is designed to provide the student with specific knowledge about aerospace management functions including airport funding processes, facilities planning, and certification requirements; personnel development and training; communications and accounting systems; airport and aircraft security and safety programs; and aerospace small business operations including corporate flight departments and fixed base operations. AVIP201 Business/Aviation Law This course covers the principles of law as applied to business and the aviation industry including contracts, negotiable instruments, personal property, sales, real property, risk and liability, mortgages, leases and leasebacks, bankruptcy and business torts. Selected landmark and current cases in aviation will be studied. AVIP230 Commercial Flight I (Flight Lab) This is the first half of two phases of actual flight training from an FAA approved fixed base operator in preparation for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate. A minimum of 60 hours of flight instruction and briefing as required. Prerequisite: AVIP106 or valid FAA Private Pilot Certificate AVIP231 Commercial Flight II (Flight Lab) This is a continuation of AVIP230. It is the second half of two phases of actual flight training from an FAA approved fixed base operator leading to the successful completion of the FAA Commercial Pilot – Airplane Certificate. A total of 60 hours of flight instruction is provided, including dual, solo flight and oral instruction and briefing. Successful completion will be passage of FAA required flight test for Commercial Pilot - Airplane Certificate. Prerequisite: AVIP230 Co requisite: AVIP232


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AVIP232 Instrument Flight (Flight Lab) The necessary actual flight instruction from an FAA approved fixed based operator to qualify for the FAA Instrument Pilot Rating is performed and includes a minimum of 40 hours of instrument flight and 10 hours of oral instruction and briefing. Successful completion will be passage of the FAA required flight test for an instrument pilot rating. Prerequisites: AVIP106 and qualify for total flight hours under FAA part 61 or 141 for an Instrument Rating. AVIP233 Multi-Engine Flight (Flight Lab) Actual flight training from a FAA approved fixed base operator that is required to pass the FAA MultiEngine Pilot – Airplane rating (no limitations) is performed. All flight time is given in modern twin engine aircraft and is designed to give the advanced pilot greater depth of aircraft experience. A minimum of 20 hours of instruction is provided, including 10 hours of dual flight and 10 hours of oral instruction and briefing. Prerequisite: As required by FAA approved fixed base operator. AVIP234 CFIA (Flight Lab) This course prepares the experienced pilot for the airplane FAA Certificate Flight Instructor Certificate. A minimum of 35 hours of instruction is provided, including 10 hours of dual flight and 25 hours of oral instruction and briefing. Prerequisites: AVIP231 or a Commercial Pilot Certificate and AVIP232 or an instrument rating. AVIP235 CFII (Flight Lab) This course prepares the experienced Instrument Pilot to pass the FAA requirements for the airplane Instrument Flight Instructor Certificate. A total of 35 hours of instruction is provided, including 10 hours of dual flight and 25 hours of oral instruction and briefing. Prerequisites: AVIP231, AVIP232, or a current FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with an instrument rating. AVIC 236 Advanced Air Traffic Control Procedures Procedures for conducting control of air traffic are emphasized. Procedural use of regulations and basic air traffic control procedures are covered, such as aviation terms, definitions and abbreviations; general procedures, weather information, radio communications, including proper phraseology and descriptions, altimetry, flight progress strips and their markings, abbreviations and symbols; airport traffic control procedures, instrument operations, special VFR procedures, radar operations and emergency procedures. Prerequisite: AVIP123 or equivalent experience AVIP237 CFIA-M (Flight Lab) This course prepares the experienced multi-engine pilot to pass the FAA requirement for Certified Flight Instructor Airplane-Multi-Engine Rating. A total of 35 hours of instruction is provided, including 10 hours of dual flight in a multi-engine airplane and 25 hours of oral instruction and briefing for the FAA flight test. Prerequisites: AVIP231, AVIP232, AVIP233 or a current FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate-Airplane with an Instrument and Multi-Engine Rating. AVIP238 Aircraft Systems This is a detailed study of the theory of the operation of aircraft hydraulic, electrical, fuel, oil, pressurization, antiicing, and instrument systems. It also covers the various sources of basic power for the operation of aircraft systems as well as the functional application of mechanisms operated by these systems. A few specific aircraft systems will be studied in detail. 3-0-3


AVIC239 Facility I The student receives actual on-the-job training in an operational air traffic control tower. Training includes area and airport familiarization, proper microphone technique and phraseology, the control and management of aircraft on the airport, posting and relay of flight data and aviation weather information. Supervised by experienced and certified air traffic controllers throughout the training process, the student is provided an ideal environment for transitioning from classroom theory to the practical application of air traffic control procedures. Prerequisites: FAA Control Tower Operator Written Exam, at least a current Second Class Airman’s Medical Certificate and successful completion of AVIP121, AVIP123, AVIP136 and AVIP236 AVIC240 Facility II This course is a continuance of Facility 1. The student receives actual on-the-job training in the provision of advanced airport traffic control services and procedures. Successful completion of this course is a demonstration by the student that he/she is capable of providing all required air traffic control services during normal Beaver County Airport traffic conditions without assistance from instructor personnel. Prerequisites: AVIP106. Successful completion of AVIP239 and at least a current Second Class Airman’s Medical Certificate AVIC242 Surface Aviation Weather Observer This course addresses the theory and application of basic aviation weather observing procedures provided by certified weather observers. Initially, each aspect of weather observing shall be discussed item by item from the Weather Service Observations Handbook #8 (WSOH8) and selected items from the FAA Orders 7900.5 and 7110.10. During the latter stages of the course, students shall formulate and disseminate aviation weather observations in a real time environment in the Aviation Sciences Center tower laboratory and Beaver Non-Federal Control Tower. A student will take and pass the National Weather Service/Federal Aviation Administration Supplemental Aviation Weather Station (SAWRS)/Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Station (LAWRS) examination with a score of 80% to successfully complete this course. AVIC247 Approach Control I This course addresses the theory and basic applications of radar and non-radar air traffic control services provided by approach control facilities within the general vicinity of controlled airports. Subject areas include radar fundamentals; strip marking procedures; radar and non-radar separation minima and methods; phraseology; coordination requirements; general radar services; special radar operations; VFR/SVFR/IFR operations; and emergency situations. During the latter stages of the course, students participate in simulation exercises designed to develop basic skills in the application of air traffic control procedures in an integrated, multi-position/facility environment. Prerequisite: AVIP236 or equivalent experience AVIC248 Approach Control II This is a continuation of AVIC247. . After an initial review of the subjects addressed during the preceding semester, students participate in simulated air traffic control exercises designed to develop more advanced skill levels in the application of air traffic control procedures pertinent to approach control facility operations. The exercises increase in complexity as the semester progresses. Throughout the course student performance is evaluated by FAA rated air traffic control instructors. Prerequisite: AVIC247 or equivalent experience AVIC250 En-Route Non-Radar Lecture Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), this course addresses the theory and mechanics of en-route (Air Route Traffic Control Center) non-radar procedures. Included are airspace environment, strip preparation, strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and separation rules used in the en-route ATC environment. Prerequisite: successful completion of AVIC236 Co requisite: En-route Non-Radar Lab


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AVIC251 En-Route Non-Radar Lab Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), this course addresses the basic application of en-route (Air Route Traffic Control Center) procedures in a simulated en-route non-radar ATC environment. Included are strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and the practical application on non-radar separation rules. Prerequisite: successful completion of AVIC236 Co requisite: En-route Non-Radar Lecture AVIC255 En-Route Radar Lecture Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), this course addresses the theory and mechanics of en-route (Air Route Traffic Control Center) radar procedures. Included are airspace environment, strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and separation rules used in the enroute ATC environment. Prerequisite: AVIP106. Successful completion of Non-Radar Lecture and Non-Radar Lab Co requisite: En-route Radar Lab AVIC256 En-Route Radar Lab After initial review of the subjects addressed in the preceding semesters, students will participate in simulated enroute air traffic control exercises designed to develop advanced skills in the application of procedures pertinent to en-route facility operations. The exercises will increase in both volume and complexity as the semester progresses. Throughout the course, student performance is evaluated by the instructors. Prerequisite: successful completion of Non-Radar Lecture and Non-Radar Lab Co requisite: En-route Radar Lecture AVIC260 Air Traffic Control (ATC) Internship This course is designed to give the ATC student a supervised on-the-job experience in various aspects of the air traffic control environment. Students will spend a minimum of one hundred and thirty five hours (135) at a FAA terminal or field facility observing and participating in airport/approach/departure/ satellite/ enroute/non-radar and radar air traffic control operations. The student will complete a daily journal and three-page summary of the experience. This course will fulfill the requirement of the ATC curriculum general education elective. Prerequisites: Successful completion of AVIC236 Advanced ATC and recommendation by the ATC Coordinator. Recommendation will be based on GPA, attendance, and demonstration of performance in the ATC curriculum. Students will have successfully completed 15 credits in ATC major, QPA of at least 3.0, sophomore status 30 total credits completed. BIOLOGY BIOL101 General Biology I Course addresses the science of biology with emphasis on cellular physiology, cell structure, mitosis, and meiosis, basic genetics development, and organismic biology. BIOL102 General Biology II This is a continuation of BIOL101 with emphasis on taxonomy, evolution, ecology, and animal behavior. Field study will be an integral part of the semester’s work. Prerequisite: BIOL101 BIOL105 Anatomy & Physiology I This is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a detailed description of cell and tissue structure and the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.


BIOL106 Anatomy & Physiology II This is a continuation of BIOL105. Topics include the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: BIOL105 BIOL110 Human Ecology & Heredity Course studies the interaction of man with his environment. Such topics as overpopulation, pollution, behavior, drugs, and evolution will be discussed in terms of how they affect the well-being of man. Resource speakers and field trips will be an integral part of the course. No prior science background is necessary. BIOL115 Human Life Science Course examines basic human anatomy and physiology. Topics include respiration, circulation, hormonal control, nervous control, fluids and electrolytes, and the human muscular and skeletal systems. The fundamentals of human genetics will also be presented. BIOL201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Course is a basic study of human anatomy and physiology. Topics include levels of organization, body divisions and cavities, basic biochemistry, cell structure and metabolism and histology. Structure and physiology of the following systems include integumentary, muscular, skeletal, respiratory, and urinary. Fluid and electrolyte balance is also discussed. The laboratory is an integral part of the course. BIOL202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II Course is a continuation of BIOL201. Structure and physiology of the following systems are included: nervous and its divisions – endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, and reproductive. Other topics including the composition of blood, immunity, human genetics, and development are also discussed. The laboratory is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: BIOL201 BIOL205 Ecology Course studies the interaction of organisms in their environment are studied with emphasis on population dynamics, species interactions and ecosystem energetics. The laboratory will emphasize an analytical approach to ecology with field study. Prerequisite: BIOL102 or BIOL115 or BIOL202 BIOL210 Genetics Course studies patterns of hereditary transmission from parent to offspring. Classical genetics as well as molecular genetics will be discussed. Laboratory investigations will demonstrate basic genetic crosses, radiation effects on the genetic material, and the chromosome pattern of man. Prerequisite: BIOL101 or BIOL115 or BIOL201 BIOL215 Microbiology Microscopic forms of life are considered with emphasis on bacteriology as it applies to numerous areas in industry, health, and sanitation. Laboratory activities consist of staining and culturing techniques as are used in identification of various organisms and analysis of water, food, and dairy products. The microscope will be used for observation of microbes. Prerequisite: BIOL102 or BIOL115 or BIOL202


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BUSINESS ACCT110 Financial Accounting The accounting cycle in various types of enterprises is examined. Included is the practical application of the principles learned. ACCT111 Managerial Accounting This course is a continuation of Accounting I with emphasis on the use of accounting data in decision making, cost accounting and statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT110 ACCT200 QuickBooks QuickBooks® is used to model automated accounting systems and demonstrate their use in maintaining accounting information and improving decision making from both the business owner and accountant’s perspective. The software will be used to create an appropriate chart of accounts, record all transactions including payroll for a complete business cycle and customize standard reports for various types of enterprises. The use of information generated by the system to improve decision-making will be discussed. ACCT 211 Intermediate Accounting 1 This course will examine the relationship of the conceptual framework and generally accepted accounting principles to the preparation of financial statements and their use in decision-making. Analysis of asset accounts and the implication of account balances will be discussed in detail along with the reporting issues associated with the Balance Sheet presentation of assets. Prerequisite: ACCT 111 ACCT 212 Intermediate Accounting II This course will examine the relationship of the conceptual framework and generally accepted accounting principles to the preparation of financial statements and their use in decision-making. Analysis of liability and equity accounts and the implication of account balances will be discussed in detail along with the reporting issues associated with the Balance Sheet presentation of liabilities and equity. Special consideration is given to revenue recognition issues, accounting changes and full disclosure requirements in the era of Sarbanes-Oxley. Prerequisite: ACCT 211 ACCT215 Tax Accounting Accounting principles of tax accounting are stressed including types of returns, includable and excludable income, expenses, deductions, inventory methods and depreciation. Prerequisite: ACCT111 ACCT216 Cost Accounting I Techniques and procedures used in cost determination; process and job order methods, standard costs and cost analysis and control is included in this course. Prerequisite: ACCT111 ACCT225 Auditing Students study the nature of auditing, risk, ethics, internal controls, fraud, and statistical sampling. Prerequisites: ACCT110, ACCT111, ACCT211 BUSC105 Professional Relations Course provides an overview of general principles of human behavior for understanding the job behavior of the individual employee. The individual’s goal of personal satisfaction and productivity on the job are profiled in the following professional development themes: self-understanding; methods of motivation; the contribution of goal setting on both work and personal life; decision-making skills; job stress and burnout; managing job conflict; developing effective working relationships; adjusting to organizational life; dealing with counterproductive people; working within a group; leadership and influence; and improving personal productivity.


BUSC110 Interpersonal Communication Course provides an introduction to the communication process that occurs between people. Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to develop, maintain, and evaluate dyadic relationships through language, perception, self-disclosure, listening and nonverbal communication. Emphasis will be placed on building effective interpersonal relations in a business environment. BUSC200 Quality Management This course focuses on consumer-driven companies that possess a quality orientation. Students will examine the new management model in a variety of settings utilizing Baldrige criteria. Students will also research Baldrige award winning companies, analyze their quality-oriented processes, and discuss consumer issues as they apply to any organization. BUSC205 Leadership This course will provide a firm foundation of leadership theory, practical and applied knowledge, and experience in leading a team, task force, or activity and in developing communication and problem-solving skills, as well as a source for future use. This course provides the student with the understanding and the skills necessary to lead effectively in a variety of settings. Specifically, the course will prepare the student for leadership responsibilities in their professional, community service, or educational endeavors. The student will also acquire experience on how leadership is practiced and gain insights and information to enhance his or her leadership skills. BUSC220 Team Development This course provides the student with the understanding and the skill necessary to communicate effectively in any group situation. Specifically, the course will prepare the student for intensive team and group interaction that he/she will experience in both personal and career scenarios. It will also provide a firm foundation of team-oriented knowledge, experience in developing group problem-solving skills, and a resource for future use. BUSH210 Organizational Behavior The course focuses on the behavior of people, individually and in groups, who make up organizations as well as the behavior of the organizations themselves. Students will be introduced to the latest concepts, practices, and applications found in organizational behavior from motivational techniques to organizational processes. Through the effective evaluation and application of organizational behavior factors, students will be able to develop, train, and motivate individuals to become performance conscious employees. BUSH215 Training and Development The course includes the most up-to-date developments in training and research and in practice, including the strategic role of training and the use of new technologies in training. Students will discover a real balance between research and real company practices. They will receive a solid background in the fundamentals of training and development - needs assessment, transfer of training, designing a learning environment, methods, and evaluation. In addition, the role of training is broadened to include its strategic nature, the changing nature of the workplace, and availability of technology. BUSH220 Compenstation and Benefits This course introduces the compensation and benefits concept of Human Resources by highlighting the importance of aligning an organization’s compensation plan to its strategic goals. The compensation and benefits options of various types of employment opportunities are considered with emphasis on appropriateness in various human resource settings. BUSH225 Strategic Staffing In a global economy, recruitment has become a competitive and complex pre-employment process essential to a successful selection of competent candidates. Recruitment efforts have extended the applicant pool to an international arena. Recruitment options will be explored as well as opportunities for selection of the most capable and available candidates. Effective and efficient interviewing requires advanced preparation and a structured approach. In addition to carefully constructing job-related questions, interviewers must ensure compliance with applicable laws and must also make certain that their assessments and recommendations remain unbiased. Students will learn how to prepare for job interviews, create a positive interviewing environment, conduct legal and unbiased interviews, and identify the best qualified candidate for the position.


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BUSH230 Event Planning and Management The course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on successful planning, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing, implementing, and evaluating large scale events. BUSH240 Employment Law The course examines the developing body of modern employment law, its impact on human resource functions, and its history and its legal framework. The course addresses the importance of the employment relationship. Students will examine the statutory, regulatory, and common law requirements which govern employment law. The legal issues underlying the selection, hiring, promotion, and termination of employees will be addressed along with equal opportunity, discrimination issues, affirmative action, contract negotiations, workers’ compensation, occupational health and safety, immigration laws, and major acts such as Title VII or Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Family Medical Leave Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. BUSH241 Human Resource Management The course provides both the theoretical and the practical aspects of Human Resource Management (HRM). It is based upon the concept that there is an increasing demand for a more skilled and better motivated workforce. Also stressed are the changing roles of government, legal requirements, and intensifying foreign competition. Prerequisite: BUSM112 BUSM106 Entrepreneurship Thinking, Creativity and Opportunity Recognition The course investigates the relationship between entrepreneurial thinking and the opportunity to ignite the creative spark that leads to idea generation and new venture creation. Topics include: entrepreneurial thinkers and their contribution to society, creativity, critical thinking, innovation, opportunity recognition, opportunity evaluation, global entrepreneurship, and marshalling resources in the face of risk to pursue opportunities. Students will assess their skills, talents, education, and work experiences for potential business ideas. They will also examine their external environment to identify trends and needs in the marketplace for potential opportunities. Students will then screen business ideas by evaluating their match with their strengths and skills, and personal, professional, and financial goals. An initial market feasibility assessment will be conducted. BUSM108 Entrepreneurship The course explores the challenges and problems of small business operations including business plans and funding, forms and records, financial problems, ordering and inventory, layout of equipment and offices, methods of improving business, and employer-employee relations. BUSM110 Introduction to E-Commerce This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of E-Commerce with an emphasis on understanding the foundations of this field. Specifically, technology, internet business models, establishing customer equity, and media convergence are explored as they apply to developing and sustaining a successful strategy for a company involved in E-Commerce. BUSM112 Principles of Management The course is a study of the essential managerial functions - planning, organizing, influencing, and controlling. The principles and techniques of management learned in each chapter are put into practice by applying them to cases of actual business problems. BUSM115 Customer Relationship Management The course covers the various theories of customer relationship management, customer management techniques, and how to interpret trends in relationship building, including socioeconomic and demographic changes. The course content also includes the elements of and potential impact of an effective two-way communication.


BUSM120 Small Business Management Principles and practices involved in and necessary for owning and operating a small business. Areas of study include assessment of qualification for business ownership, market determination, site locations, capital and credit requirements, risk management and insurance, record keeping and personnel management. The purpose of this course is to provide information to prospective and new small business operators. BUSM200 Business Finance The course is an introduction to financial management. The topics covered include the individual and corporate tax structure as they relate to the financial environment, the stock and bond markets, and overview of financial institutions, interest rates and the cost of funds, interpreting financial statements and determining future financial needs, the relationship between risk and returns, the time value of money, the capital budgeting process, and bond preferred stock and common stock valuation. Prerequisites: ACCT111 BUSM205 Business Law I The principles of law are applied to business action including contracts, negotiable instruments, personal property, sales, real property, mortgages, leases, bankruptcy, and business torts. BUSM206 Business Law II This is an advanced course of the legal aspects of business transactions plus ancillary areas such as descendant’s estates, real estate, torts, evidence, general consumer law, criminal law, and domestic relations. Prerequisites: BUSM205 BUSM220 E-Commerce Applications The course is designed to focus on the essential aspects of E-Commerce software development tools. Topics include standard features of E-Commerce software; common data and software threats; E-Commerce security through use of encryption and secure protocols and methods; electronic payment systems; as well as cultural and ethical issues. Students will convert a conventional business to an E-Business using popular E-Commerce software. Prerequisite: CIST100 BUSM223 Advertising The course examines the advertising process, media specifics, and situations and decisions of creative advertising. Advertising concepts and strategies are discussed. Radio, television, and print advertising are the specific media emphasized. Finally, situational analysis, decision making, and evaluations for effectiveness are explored. BUSM245 Principles of Marketing The four P’s of the marketing mix, product, place, promotion, and price, are studied and applied to current market issues. The concepts and techniques used in product development, pricing tactics, promoting a product, and in choosing a distribution channel are outlined. Some of the quantitative aspects of marketing analysis are covered. BUSM250 Strategic Electronic Marketing Strategic Electronic Marketing takes a systems and relationships approach to exploring E-business marketing. This course addresses the basic principles that underlie marketing and how E-business marketing techniques are fundamentally changing the traditional marketing process. It prepares students for careers in a rapidly changing environment of dot-com and brick and mortar strategies; non-linear, online, interactive advertising, new product development and distribution processes; and reliance on databases. Prerequisites: BUSM245


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BUSM255 Macroeconomics Macroeconomics examines the aggregate economy with specific focus on unemployment, inflation, business cycles, and growth. Topics include economic reasoning, the economic organization of society, supply and demand, U.S. economic institutions, the world economy, national income accounting, money, banking, and the financial sector, the modern macro debate in reference to the aggregate production/aggregate expenditures model, demand management and fiscal policy, monetary policy, the debate about macro policy, the relationship between inflation, unemployment, and growth, international dimensions of monetary and fiscal policies, exchange rate and trade policy, traditional macro policy, supply-side macro policy, deficits and debt, and transitional economies. BUSM256 Microeconomics Microeconomics is the study of individual choice, and how that choice is influenced by economic forces. It considers economic reasoning from the viewpoint of the individual. Microeconomics focuses on the pricing policies of firms, households’ decisions on what to buy, and how markets allocate resources among alternative ends. Topics include supply and demand elasticities, individual choice and the foundation of supply and demand, production and cost analysis, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly strategic pricing, competition in the real world, politics and economics and the case of agricultural markets, microeconomics policy and economic reasoning, government’s role in the economy, economic impact on the environment, antitrust and industrial policy the distribution of income, the labor market, non-wage and asset income, international trade restrictions, growth and the microeconomics of developing countries, and socialist economies in transition. Prerequisite: BUSM255 BUSM260 Project Management This course covers the topics of contemporary project management utilizing contemporary management methods. There are a variety of project types and sizes used to support learning that come from several companies, of various sizes, in many industries, to promote scalability and universality. Regardless of the project, company, or industry size, project management techniques can be applied to any project. The topics covered include: project selection and prioritization, organizational capability (structure and culture), chartering, stakeholder analysis and planning, defining project scope, constructing work breakdown structures, scheduling, resourcing, and budgeting projects, project risk and quality planning, project kickoff, as well as leading and managing project teams and determining project progress and results. BUSM265 Entreprise Funding Upon successful completion of this course, the student will understand the importance and impact of funding sources for their entrepreneurial venture. This will be accomplished by reviewing the impact of venture capital in every phase of the business venture from idea to exit including planning, teambuilding, protecting intellectual capital, identifying funding sources, raising money, writing funding agreements, and managing through to an IPO or merger and acquisition. Additionally, the student will develop and present a funding proposal. BUSM270 Business Internship This course is designed by the Business faculty to give second year students supervised, on-the-job experience in various aspects of the business environment. Students may enroll in this class for credit as one of their business electives in the Accounting and Business Management curriculum. Prerequisites: Successfully completed 30 credits in their major, a Q.P.A. of at least 3.0, or recommendation from the faculty. Business faculty written approval is required prior to registration. CHEMISTRY CHEM100 Introduction to Chemistry The student will review the nature of the atom, matter, and energy, plus scientific concepts and processes, which provide a sound background to enter a freshman Chemistry I course. The course is designed for students who wish to enter health or chemistry-related majors. Topics will include measurements in chemistry, the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, molar considerations, clinical questions, acids and bases, gases, and redox reactions.


CHEM101 General Chemistry I This course involves an understanding of the principles of measurement, chemical equations, stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, periodic relationships, and the chemistry of the common elements. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or CHEM100 CHEM102 General Chemistry II This is a continuation of CHEM101 with special emphasis on chemical reaction, chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electro-chemistry, acid-base chemistry, and reduction-oxidation reactions. General concepts of organic chemistry will also be reviewed. Prerequisite: CHEM101 CHEM105 Principles of Biological Chemistry This course introduces students to the compounds of carbon and the role that these compounds play in living organisms. COMMUNICATION COMM101 Oral Communication In order to assess their strengths and weaknesses in oral communication, students network to initiate conversation, view themselves in a pre- and post-taping (oral resume), participate in an information panel discussion, practice the art of persuasion, and prepare mock interviews. Moreover, students keep journals to track growth in their communication objectives and goals. COMM201 Public Speaking The emphasis is on speech preparation and delivery in a variety of speaking experiences designed to improve the speaker’s capability through the application of correct speech practices. COMM210 Understanding Media This media literacy course will focus on how after more than a century of electric technology, we have extended our central nervous system itself in a global embrace, abolishing both space and time as far as our planet is concerned. Are we rapidly approaching the final phase of the extensions of man – the technological simulation of consciousness as Marshall McLuhan predicts? Will the creative process of knowing be collectively and corporately extended to the whole of human society, much as we have already extended our senses and our nerves by the various media? Students will decide whether the extension of consciousness, so long sought by advertisers for specific projects, will be a “good thing”. Students will finally discuss and establish their own point of view as to how this theoretical extension of consciousness through media will affect their use of it as a Graphic or Digital Media Designer. COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS/TELECOMMUNICATIONS CISF120 Computer Forensics and Investigation This course teaches students the fundamentals of computer forensics and investigation. Topics include principles of computer investigations, current computer forensics software tools, digital evidence controls, computer forensic analysis, email investigations, recovering image files, writing investigation reports, and becoming an expert witness. CISN105, CISN200 and CISF210 CISF200 Disaster Recovery This course is designed for students, managers and staffers in all types of organizations that need to prepare to respond to a disaster and restore normal operations afterward. Topics include method used to develop a disaster recovery plan and procedures, assessing risks in the enterprise, prioritizing systems and functions for recovery, organizational relationships in disaster recovery, procedures for responding to attacks on computers, implementing disaster recovery plans, developing test scenarios, and living through a disaster. Prerequisite: CISF210


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CISF210 Network Security This course provides students with an in-depth coverage of all current risks and threats to an organization’s data along with a structured way of addressing the safeguarding of these critical electronic assets using hands-on and practical techniques for working in the security field in the twenty-first century. Topics include authentication, attacks and malicious code, remote access, e-mail, web security, wireless and instant messaging, firewalls, intrusion detection, and cryptography, and other related topics. This course may be used for preparing student for CompTIA Security+ certification exam. Prerequisites: CISN110, CISN200 CISN100 CISCO I – Network Fundamentals This course is designed to introduce students to computer networking fundamentals. Topics include binary numbering systems, electronics and signals, network cabling and testing, network topologies, close study of OSI and TCP/IP network models, IP addressing including sub-net masking, and basic network design. The course covers the CCNA Semester 1 training material. This course, in conjunction with CISN110, CISN215, and CISN220 may assist students in preparation for Cisco Network+ and CCNA certification exams. CISN105 PC Hardware The course is intended for students in the Multimedia, and Information Science Programs who want more information on maintaining and managing their computers; or for those students who want to prepare for the Computing Technology Association’s A+ Certification. Some of the areas that will be covered include troubleshooting fundamentals; basic and preventative maintenance techniques; computer upgrades; operating systems; networking and Internet connections; printer connections and interfaces; types of RAM; data recovery; and the various multimedia options available for today’s PCs. Today’s emerging technologies will be stressed throughout the course. CISN110 CISCO II – Routing Protocols and Concepts This course is the study of advanced networking concepts. WAN and the function of routers, router components, protocols and configuration, ISO images, IP addressing, network troubleshooting, introduction to network security and management, and introduction to residential networking. The course covers the CCNA Semester 2 training material. This course, in conjunction with CISN 100, CISN 215, and CISN 220 prepares students for the Cisco Network + and CCNA certification exams. Prerequisite: CISN100 CISN200 Client Operating Systems This course is designed to teach students the salient functions, features, installation, configuration, and maintenance of the latest Microsoft operating system as a client operating system. The course also introduces students to other currently available client operating systems. This course, in conjunction with CISN205, may assist students in preparation for MCSA and MCSE certification exams. CISN205 Server Operating Systems This course is designed to teach students phases of configuration, administration, and operation of Microsoft’s latest Network Operating System. The topics include NOS capabilities, network protocols, archive directory and security, server installation and configuration, performance options, managing accounts and disk quotas, RAS, VPN, managing Internet and interoperability, server monitoring, and optimization, and trouble shooting. The course also introduces students to other server operating systems such as Linux. This course, in conjunction with CISN200, may assist students in preparation of MCSA and MCSE exams. Prerequisite: CISN200 CISN208 Help Desk Concepts The course will introduce students to the service concepts, skills sets, career paths, and operations of the help desk industry. Tracking options, reporting issues, support software, and management tools will be covered.


CISN215 CISCO III – LAN Switching and Wireless This course introduces and extends students knowledge and practical experience with various LAN design, configuration, and maintenance of switches. Topics include LANs, VLANs, IPX, IGRP. The course covers Semester 3 of CCNA training material. This course, in conjunction with CISN100, CISN110, and CISN220 may assist students in preparation for Cisco Network+ and CCNA certification exams. Prerequisite: CISN110 CISN220 CISCO IV – Accessing the WAN This course introduces and extends students knowledge and practical experience with various WAN design, configuration, and maintenance of switches. Topics include WAN designs, PPP, ISDN, Frame Relay, remote access technologies, VPN, network management, developing network security and management strategies, Network+ and CCNA certification exam reviews. The course covers the CCNA Semester 4 training material. This course, in conjunction with CISN100, CISN110, and CISN215 may assist students in preparation for Cisco Network+ and CCNA certification exams. Prerequisite: CISN215 CISN230 Wireless Networking The course will introduce students to the concept of wireless networking and home network setup using single computers and/or laptops, as well as PDA’s and other network devices. Prerequisite: CISN100 CIST100 Introduction to Information Technology A computer course designed to introduce students to personal computers. Topics include basic concepts of computer operations, storage media, software categories, Windows operating system, computer communication devices, and Internet. The course also includes introduction to Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. CIST106 Software Productivity Tools This course provides students with advanced skills using the software productivity tool Microsoft Office. Through a series of business-based projects, students will learn to use advanced application features, such as macros, OLE, and multimedia capabilities in advanced database, financial, and marketing applications. The course may also provide the students with the skills required to take the Microsoft MOS Certification Exams. Prerequisite: CIST100 CIST130 Introduction to Agile Robotics This course is designed around the fundamental understanding of the systems that make up robots and the development of workplace competencies. The cornerstone of the class involves solving engineering design problems. The teacher will be placed in the role of a facilitator/mentor, the student in the role of project manager/problem solver. Students will build, program, and debug agile robots in remote control and autonomous modes. CIST135 Integration of Embedded Systems This course is designed as a continuation of the Introduction to Agile Robots course. Advanced robotic topics including sensors, embedded systems, and artificial intelligence will be studied. This course uses a team-oriented approach for complex problem solving. Prerequisite: CIST130 CIST140 Electronics I This course uses a hands-on learning approach to study the theory and practical applications of digital electronics. Emphasis is placed on general system principles, basic electronic concepts, practical applications, and troubleshooting. Digital and analog theory as well as introduction to circuit design, industrial electronics, basic mechanics, motor control, and robotics will be studied.


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CIST145 Electronics II This course is the second in a two-course series that uses a hands-on learning approach to study the theory and practical applications of digital electronics. Emphasis is placed on general system principles, basic electronic concepts, practical applications, and troubleshooting. Digital and analog theory as well as introduction to circuit design, industrial electronics, basic mechanics, motor control, and robotics will be studied. Prerequisite: CIST140 CIST150 C++ Programming This course uses a hands-on learning approach to study the theory and practical applications related to hardware, software and programming using C++ programming language. Students are introduced to data types, variables, arithmetic operations, data structures, looping structures, decision structures, functions, and arrays. Algorithms for sorting and searching arrays are explored. Pointers, strings, structured data and file operations are mastered. Advanced concepts related to classes, inheritance, and polymorphism are studied. This course will use the C++ language within the Visual Studio.NET programming environment where students will write, debug, and successfully run programs in Console, Web, or Graphical User Interfaces. CIST160 Visual BASIC I Visual Basic I is designed to teach students introductory concepts of programming in an event driven environment. Students will be taught how to create user-friendly Graphic User Interfaces (GUI) for simple application programs. Visual Studio 2008 is the IDE used to develop applications. Web applications and Mobile Device applications will be developed as students work through the course material. Specific topics include variables, arithmetic, relational, and logical operators, forms, standard controls and their properties, decision structures, and looping structures. CIST170 Dreamweaver This course is designed to teach students how to develop and maintain Web pages for educational and professional purposes using FrontPage and Dreamweaver software applications as well as the underlying HTML code. Students will learn how to generate a Web site incorporating Web page development, hyperlinks, tables, forms, templates, style sheets, layers, image maps, navigation structures, frames, and introductory animation. CIST260 Internship This course is designed to give second-year students supervised, on-the-job experience in various aspects of the business technologies environment. All students will be required to spend a minimum of six hours per week at the firm where he/she is assigned. Each student will meet with a faculty member before his or her assignment to establish goals and then several times throughout the semester to assess student progress. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 30 credits in course of study with QPA of 3.0 or better and faculty approval CISW101 Web Scripting Languages This course is designed to teach students the concepts and techniques used in creating applications using Web Scripting Languages. The students will learn how to create interactive Web application as well as information extraction and manipulation using HTML, VB Script, JavaScript. Topics include the role of scripting languages on the Web; working with variables; functions and events; expressions and operations; decision-making; repetitions; dynamic HTML and animation, built in functions in scripting languages, as well as Client-side input data validation. CISW201 Java I This course introduces the student to computer programming. Using the JAVA-based language and scripts students will write programs that run on the Internet or World Wide Web. Prerequisite: CISW101 CISW202 Java II A continuation of CISW201, Java I, this course prepares students to advance in their abilities to not only program applications, but also to begin to understand server-based applications using JAVA. Language, scripts, and more complex constructs are taught in order to understand what is required to write industrial/ commercial strength applications for the Internet and World Wide Web. Prerequisite: CISW201


CISW205 Programming in C# The course introduces the student to computer programming. Using the C# based language in a Visual Studio.NET programming environment, students will write programs that run in Console, Web, or Graphical User Interfaces. Prerequisite: CISW 101 CISW206 Database: ASP The course is intended for students who want to learn how to create database-driven Active Server Pages that solve common business E-Commerce problems. Through various projects using Visual Studio 2008 and ASP.NET 3.5, students will learn how to build rich Internet applications by coding the client-side and server-side ASP scripts for a variety of web applications while learning details on Web controls, CSS, event handlers, validation, SQL, ADO.NET, data binding, and security. Prerequisites: CISW101 CISW210 E-Commerce Applications The course is designed to focus on the essential aspects of E-Commerce software development tools. Topics include standard features of E-Commerce software; common data and software threats; E-Commerce security through use of encryption and secure protocols and methods; electronic payment systems; as well as cultural and ethical issues. Students will convert a conventional business to an E- Business using popular E-Commerce software. Prerequisite: CIST100 CISW214 Database: SQL The course is intended for students who want to learn how to create and maintain complex Database applications using Relational Database Structures concentrating on SQL. Database concepts are learned using Oracle Express and Access database management software. Through various projects, students will learn how to model, design, create, and maintain a relational database. Together the Oracle, Microsoft Access and Visual Studio.NET Integrated Development Environment are used to develop, create, and maintain advances Database Web Applications. Prerequisites: CISW206 CISW215 Database: Crystal Report Writer The course is designed to teach students how to use Crystal Reports to generate and integrate Database reports within a .NET application. The course uses Visual Studio.NET 2008 as the IDE including embedded Crystal Reports to learn report writing concepts and techniques. Parameters, Functions, Stored Procedures, and various report writing techniques will be explored. Relational Database concepts will be emphasized as students work through the course material. Prerequisite CISW214 CRIMINAL JUSTICE CRIM100 Administration of Criminal Justice The course is an overview of the American criminal justice system dealing with the role of the police, courts, and correctional institutions. The course also covers constitutional limits of police power, the trial process and sentencing structure, and the functions of the numerous agencies within the criminal justice system. CRIM105 First Aid & CPR/First Response Theory and practice of general first aid techniques are covered, including the treating of illness, wounds, shock, and emergency rescue. Also included will be Hazmat Response; identification and treatment of communicable diseases; and identification of local health organizations.


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CRIM112 Lethal Weapons - Theory A course in private security training mandated under PA Act 235. The subject areas to be covered are constitutional authority; justifications; authority of arrest; laws of evidence; PA Crimes Code; armed & unarmed defense; and statements and confessions. Pass/Fail Grading Prerequisite: Departmental approval CRIM113 Lethal Weapons - Firearms This is the second segment in private security training mandated under PA Act 235. This course is for all security personnel who carry firearms. A lab fee is required. Pass/Fail Grading Co requisite: CRIM112 CRIM114 Lethal Weapons Refresher The refresher course is mandated under State law for those certified under Act 235 to renew their certification every five years. Pass/Fail Grading Prerequisites: CRIM112, CRIM113 CRIM115 Child Abuse This course is designed to educate the student regarding the subject of abuse and neglect of children. The course will discuss the various types and indicators of abuse and neglect as well as prevention issues. Pennsylvania laws will be discussed as will current community, state, and federal efforts to deal with this problem. CRIM120 Narcotics & Drug Abuse This course includes the study of narcotics, dangerous drugs, and the people who abuse them; implementation, evaluation, and coordination of drug control programs; and consideration of private treatment programs, civil commitment procedures, public education programs, and medical treatment programs. CRIM122 Principles of Security and Crime Prevention This course covers the historical, philosophical, and legal background of security. The role of security in modern society including industrial, transportation, commercial, and government agencies is discussed. CRIM125 Correctional Administration Organization, objectives, and functions of a correctional agency will be studied. Principles of Administration relating to the sound and efficient operation of correctional facilities will be discussed with emphasis on the special problems encountered in the field. CRIM131 Criminal Law I The laws of arrest, use of force, interrogation, and evidence are studied. Pennsylvania law applicable to the law enforcement officer will be emphasized. CRIM206 Forensic Criminal Investigation This course is a comprehensive examination of criminal investigations in the public forum. Focus will be on investigative techniques and processes and the range of skills necessary for successful performance and management of criminal investigations. Fundamentals of investigative theory witness and suspect interviewing, evidence gathering and analysis, the role of constitutional rights, and the link between the investigative and prosecutorial agencies will be explored. CRIM208 Computer Crime This course will make students aware of a nontraditional crime – computer crime. It will enlighten them as to what constitutes a violation of computer technology and the diversity of criminal activities associated with computers. Topics to be covered include computer fraud, computer forgery, theft of information, and computer vandalism.


CRIM210 Juvenile Delinquency The course topics include biological, psychological and sociological factors in juvenile delinquency; a survey of theories of juvenile delinquency; and modern trends in prevention and treatment. CRIM212 Interview & Interrogation The course covers fundamentals of the interviewing process and interrogative technology, taking into consideration the nature, methods, and principles of interviewing with emphasis on role playing in interviews. CRIM215 Police Ethics & Problems This course introduces the student to the psychological and sociological factors affecting law enforcement and community response. Critical issues examined will include dissent and civil disobedience; discriminatory and selective law enforcement; police militancy; police ethics; and the effects of stress and job burnout in the criminal justice profession. CRIM230 Criminology The course deals with the nature and causation of crime; approaches to the study of crime, its treatment and prevention; sociology of criminal law; current theories and research on the nature of criminal behavior. CRIM232 Criminal Evidence and Procedure This is a comprehensive analysis of the rules of evidence. Particular subjects include judicial notice presumptions; the nature of real and circumstantial evidence; burden of proof; province of court and jury; documentary evidence; confessions; admissions; and witnesses. The course will give particular emphasis to evidence in criminal cases. Prerequisites: CRIM100 CRIM235 Organized Crime This course is a study of the development, structure, and operation of organized crime in the United States today. Emphasized will be the major crime families, the extent and types of their criminal activities, as well as present efforts utilized to combat organized crime in both the public and private sectors. CRIM237 Probation, Pardon, & Parole Probation, pardon, and parole are examined as judicial process and executive function. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical approach to probation, pardon, and parole. Contemporary methods such as work release programs, halfway houses, and parole clinics are examined. CRIM250 Directed Studies This is a seminar for advanced criminal justice students who will study and analyze typical criminal justice problems. Extensive library work is required along with independent study of various problems. Special seminars may be considered for course credit at the discretion of the criminal justice coordinator. Prerequisites: WRIT101, WRIT102 CRIM260 Criminal Justice Internship The Criminal Justice Internship affords second-year students an opportunity to work with a local law enforcement or criminal justice agency. Cooperating agencies include the Sheriff’s office, a local magistrate, a police department, Juvenile and Adult Probation, and Drug and Alcohol Services. CULINARY ARTS CULA100 Introduction to Culinary Arts and Baking Fundamentals I The course provides an introduction to working in a commercial foods kitchen including safety principles; operation; care and cleaning of tools and equipment; basic food handling; and receiving and storage techniques. Baking and basic food preparation principles are covered with an emphasis on measurement and culinary calculations, following recipes, and ingredient characteristics and integration. Customer service techniques are introduced.


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CULA110 Sanitation Principles This course examines sanitation principles and practices for the commercial foods kitchen. Students will apply the principles learned here to all other laboratory or intern settings. CULA112 Nutrition & Menu Planning This course provides an introduction into the science of nutrition and its relationship to culinary arts food preparation and menu planning. Students will explore foods and their nutrients; the human digestive system; and the role food preparation techniques have in the preservation of nutrients. Students will also explore and plan menus for special diet requirements. CULA115 Principles of Cooking and Baking Fundamentals II This course covers preparations of leading, small and specialty sauces; soups; stocks; pasta; rice; potatoes; and vegetables. Additional baking principles are covered. Prerequisites: CULA100, CULA110 CULA120 Advanced Principles of Cooking Preparation of meats, fish, shellfish, and poultry utilizing dry and moist heat cooking methods will be emphasized. Topics include basic cutting and trimming of sub primal cuts of beef and pork; disjointing and de-boning of chicken; shellfish pre-preparation; and pre-preparation of foods for the various cooking techniques. Prerequisites: CULA115 CULA200 Line Cooking and Buffet This course covers preparation of foods to order with emphasis on line cooking; expediting of food orders; and menu planning to facilitate speed and labor efficiency. Includes customer service techniques; menu planning; food cost analysis; placing an order; food specifications; planning labor schedules; and execution of several buffet meals utilizing methods of preparation for task documentation. Prerequisites: CULA120 CULA205 Culinary Arts Internship Certificate The purpose of the Food Preparation and Services Internship is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply tasks to live situations. Students who have satisfactorily completed all classes listed may be recommended for internship experience. Individual internship plans will be developed for each student after recommendation by and consultation with the lab instructors. Students may select a minimum of 2 sites for internship, one of which must be an institutional setting. Students may select from a list of emphasis areas proposed by each site. CULA210 Culinary Arts Internship I The purpose of the Internship is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply tasks to live situations. Students who have satisfactorily completed all classes listed may be recommended for internship experience. Individual internship plans will be developed for each student after recommendation by and consultation with the lab instructors. Students may select a minimum of two sites for internship, one of which must be in an institutional setting. Students may select from a list of emphasis areas proposed by each site. Prerequisites: CULA115 Co requisite: CULA120 CULA211 Culinary Arts Internship II The purpose of the Internship is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply tasks to live situations. Students who have satisfactorily completed all classes listed may be recommended for internship experience. Individual internship plans will be developed for each student after recommendation by and consultation with the lab instructors. Students may select a minimum of two sites for internship, one of which must be in an institutional setting. Students may select from a list of emphasis areas proposed by each site. Prerequisites: CULA115, CULA120 Co requisite: CULA200


DANCE AND DANCE EDUCATION DANC100 Introduction to Dance This course presents a general overview of dance forms, such as modern, jazz, ballet, and world dance, both in theory and practice. Prerequisite: Program admission DANC110 Modern Dance I Modern Dance I will set the foundation for basic fundamental exercises, techniques, and movement phrases of modern dance. This class introduces the dancers to the concept of proper alignment, a series of exercises that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, and coordination, and develops a physical and kinesthetic awareness of the elements of space, time, and energy. DANC115 Ballet I For the beginning student, the basic terminology, technique, and performance of Ballet are combined. Prerequisite: Program admission DANC120 Pointe and Variation I Students will acquire basic skills in Pointe and Variation in order to complement Ballet classes. Prerequisite: Program admission and approval of instructor DANC125 Partnering This course trains students to dance in pairs through an emphasis on Ballet techniques and movements, balances and lifts. Prerequisite: Program admission and approval of instructor DANC150 Modern Dance II Modern Dance II builds upon the foundation for basic fundamental exercises, techniques, and movement phrases established in Modern Dance I. Dancers practice concepts of proper alignment, perform a series of exercises that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, and coordination, and develop a physical and kinesthetic awareness of the elements of space, time, and energy. Prerequisite: Modern Dance I or permission of the instructor DANC155 Ballet II For the beginning student in second semester, the basic terminology, technique, and performance of Ballet are combined with expectations beyond Ballet I. Prerequisite: Ballet I or permission of the instructor. DANC160 Improvisation Dance Improvisation explores movement through spontaneous problem solving. Movement studies explore improvisational approaches, devices, elements and exercises to gain skills in the art of improvisation, with explorations further developed into more specific concepts and themes into solo and group performances. Improvisation is designed to evoke the student’s creative individuality and sense of ensemble. Prerequisite: Program admission and approval of instructor DANC165 Jazz Jazz is designed for students who plan to focus on complex movement combinations and sequences that stress proper alignment, technique, expressiveness, perception of style, spatial awareness, and musicality. Prerequisite: Program admission and approval of instructor DANC170 Pointe and Variation II Students will practice skills beyond the level acquired in Pointe and Variation I in order to complement Ballet classes. Prerequisite: Pointe and Variation I or permission of the instructor


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DANC200 Modern Dance III Modern Dance III builds upon the exercises, techniques, and movement phrases established in Modern Dance II at an intermediate level. Dancers practice concepts of proper alignment, perform a series of exercises that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, and coordination, and develop a physical and kinesthetic awareness of the elements of space, time, and energy. Prerequisite: Modern Dance II or permission of the instructor DANC205 Ballet III For the intermediate student in first semester, second year, terminology, technique, and performance of Ballet are combined with expectations beyond Ballet II. Prerequisite: Ballet II or permission of the instructor DANC210 World Dance Students are introduced to the purpose, interpretation, and practice of dance from various world cultures. Prerequisite: Program admission and approval of instructor DANC215 Dance Composition Students identify a topic and propose projects to provide the occasion for extended practice leading to performance. Students may work as individuals, pairs, or groups. Prerequisite: Program admission DANC220 Dance in Art and Education This course examines dance conceptually and historically and relates dance to other aesthetic forms. It examines dance as public art, as theatrical performance, and as a topic of study and instruction. DANC230 Modern Dance IV Modern Dance IV continues the intermediate development of the exercises, techniques, and movement phrases established in Modern Dance III. Dancers practice concepts of proper alignment, perform a series of exercises that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, and coordination, and develop a physical and kinesthetic awareness of the elements of space, time, and energy. Prerequisite: Modern Dance III or permission of the instructor DANC235 Ballet IV For the intermediate student in second semester, second year, terminology, technique, and performance of Ballet are combined with expectations beyond Ballet III Prerequisite: Ballet III or permission of the instructor DANC260 Dance Internship The Dance Internship affords second year students an opportunity to work with a local performing companies or dance schools. Students will be supervised by an internship monitor and must meet requirements for placement as stipulated by the internship sites. Sites are chosen by students but approved by the College. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES DEVS001 Whole Numbers and Fractions This is a one-credit course which will cover addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers; simplifying fractions; converting between improper fractions and mixed numbers; adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing fractions; and solving applied problems. It may be combined with three other one-credit courses and would be the same as DEVS020 – Improvement of Math Skills. Students may take one, two, or three of these one-credit courses depending on their evaluation. The three, one-credit modules will better meet the needs of our students than one, three-credit course.


DEVS002 Decimals, Ratios, Proportions, Percent This is a one-credit course which will cover decimals, ratio and proportion, percentage, and various application problems. It may be combined with three other one-credit courses and would be the same as DEVS020 – Improvement of Math Skills. Students may take one, two, or three of these one credit courses depending on their evaluation. The three, one-credit modules will better meet the needs of our students than one, three-credit course. DEVS003 Introduction to Geometry, Statistics, and Algebra This is a one-credit course which will cover units of measurement, elementary algebra and geometry, and common statistical measures. It may be combined with three other one-credit courses and would be the same as DEVS020 – Improvement of Math Skills. Students may take one, two, or three of these one-credit courses depending on their evaluation. The three, one-credit modules will better meet the needs of our students than one, three-credit course. DEVS009 Syntax and Punctuation By participating in this course, students can take a specialized module focusing on their specific developmental writing needs instead of taking the four-credit DEVS015. Syntax and Punctuation will concentrate on improving students’ basic writing skills by studying the guidelines of standard usage and punctuation. Students will complete a series of assignments concerning punctuation, vocabulary building, paragraph construction, building and organizing thoughts, formulating topic sentences, subject-verb/pronoun-antecedent agreement, and sentence structure. DEVS012 Improvement of Reading Skills Designed to upgrade reading and/or study skills, this course directs attention to vocabulary, comprehension, and critical reading skills. Individualized instruction in each area is provided in the assigned reading laboratory. DEVS015 Introduction to College Writing This course introduces the critical reading, logical thinking, and writing skills required of college students. The course prepares students for the precise and formal requirements of academic writing they will encounter in English Composition I by introducing, strengthening, and reinforcing elements of composition ranging from grammar, mechanics, and punctuation to the complexities of clear and coherent sentence, paragraph, and essay construction. Co requisite: Writing Center Lab DEVS020 Improvement of Mathematical Skills This course is designed to develop proficiency in basic mathematics. Topics to be studied include whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, percentage, units of measurement, elementary algebra and geometry, and common statistical measures. Students will also receive instruction in the use of a calculator. Variable lab hours may be assigned. DEVS021 Fundamentals of Algebra This course is devoted to the study of basic algebraic concepts and skills which underlie college-level mathematics and pervade science, engineering, and business. Topics to be studied include signed numbers, equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, graphs, exponents and roots, and quadratic equations. Variable lab hours may be assigned. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ERCH100 Introduction to Early Childhood This course introduces students to early childhood education – the basic knowledge and skills, the attitudes, and the philosophies. Students examine early childhood education in light of its history, pioneers, curriculum, programs, and new trends. Students learn basic child development theories and milestones from birth through age eight. Introduction to assessment, observation, and inclusion, environments that are universally designed, ethical guidelines, professionalism, curriculum models, and partnerships with families are incorporated as foundational skills. Observation visits to early childhood settings are required.


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ERCH101 Observation and Guidance Students will learn about and practice methods of observation, recording information, and interpreting the development of children based on a progression of skill development in emotional, social, large and small motor, cognitive, language arts, and creative areas. Positive, developmentally appropriate strategies and a respectful approach to guiding children are also included. Observation visits to early childhood settings are required. Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100

ERCH103 Creative Content in Early Childhood This course emphasizes creativity in children, teaching and curriculum. Students will learn how to incorporate creativity into all curriculum areas and how to encourage and cherish creativity in every child. Students will also survey science and math concepts as well as the materials and activities used in a preschool classroom. Emphasis is placed on developing teaching skills that maintain curiosity and employ experimentation. Observation visits to early childhood settings are required. Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100 ERCH105 Children’s Development, Health, and Safety This course studies the physical development of young children with respect to nutritional needs, safety considerations, general health requirements, and appropriate classroom experiences to enhance that development. Topics concerning educating children with special needs (assessment, referral, and educational adaptations) are included. Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100 ERCH106 Early Childhood Curriculum This course is an analysis of the preschool curricula including but not limited to Creative, Emergent, Hi Scope, NAEYC approved, and Montessori. Focus will be on the praxis of these various philosophies of education in terms of perceptions of the child, teacher and parents, classroom materials, and environmental design. Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100 ERCH200 Diversity and Inclusion in Early Childhood This course surveys the great diversity that children represent in their ethnic, linguistic, social, and economic backgrounds as well as their overall development. Students are introduced to environmental influences on the child such as home, family, culture, society, and media. Students also consider the importance of family partnerships, the education of children with special needs and the need to address stereotypes and prejudices that children experience. Observation visits to early childhood settings are required. Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100 ERCH205 Language & Literature Students are introduced to concepts of language development and developmental language arts activities. Language acquisition, growth milestones and early communicative capacities from infancy through preschool are explored. This course introduces students to concepts of speaking, listening, writing, reading, and visual literacy. Students also address diversity in the preschool classroom as well as the importance of adult and parental attitudes about young children’s communicative abilities from birth onward. Observation visits to early childhood settings are required. Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100 ERCH210 The Early Childhood Professional Students are introduced to the issues and problems confronting the early childhood professional including curriculum planning, staff relations, home/school interactions, ethical concerns, budgetary considerations, and professional development. Emphasis also will be placed on how to comply with state rules and regulations. Co/Prerequisite: 12 credits of ERCH courses Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100


ERCH212 Caring for Infants and Toddlers This course will explore the stages of development in very young children and their nature and education in child care settings. Included will be the design and implementation of age appropriate toys, activities, and routines. Students will consider health, safety, play, and daily care schedules. Pre or Co requisite: ERCH100 ERCH220 Internship/Diploma This internship requires supervised work with young children in an early childhood setting as appropriate for the diploma in Early Childhood Education. Students will be involved as assistant teachers. Co/Prerequisite: Consent of the department and approval of application Pre or Corequisite: ERCH100 ERCH250 Early Childhood Field Experience This internship requires supervised work with young children in an early childhood setting as appropriate for the associate degree in Early Childhood Education. Students will be involved as assistant teachers. Prerequisite: Consent of the department and approval of application EDUCATION EDUC100 College Success Strategies This course examines skills and learning strategies for success in higher education. By orienting students to academic resources and reviewing policies and procedures typical to institutions of higher education, the course empowers students to reach their educational and professional goals. EDUC105 Foundations of Education This course is a study of the historic and philosophical antecedents of the American school system and its growth, development, and potential. EDUC125 Instructional Technology This course prepares all students whose careers will regularly require them to integrate technology into presentations, although it is particularly directed at teacher education majors. Students will be introduced to various technologybased media, the preparation and equipment needed to use the media, and the proper occasions for its use. Students will learn to integrate projection, digitized, and network and web-based technologies into their presentations. EDUC201 Praxis I Preparation This course is designed to assist students in meeting requirements for admission into Education programs. It provides students in preparing for the Praxis I exam with drills, strategies, and explanations. EDUC202 Praxis II Preparation This course is designed to assist students in meeting requirements for admission into Education programs. It provides students in preparing for the Praxis II exam with drills, strategies, and explanations. EDUC205 Field Experience Students will spend a minimum of 30 hours in a secondary or elementary school setting in fulfillment of observations required by the Department of Education. EDUC220 Teaching English Language Learners As the number of English Languafe Learners (ELLS) continues to grow in our public schools there is an increaded need for highly qualified teachers to instruct them. The course will be an introduction into the varied theories and practices of teaching English Language Learners. This course will look at some prominent research in the field of second language acquisition and apply it to strategies and best practices used in Pennsylvania, as well as other parts of the country. This course will give students an overview to support effective instruction of students who have a first language other than English.


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EDUC225 Diversity Issues in Education Students pursuing careers in education are presented with the issues and resulting challenges that the profession expects to face in the twenty first century. Among the external and internal forces that drive the issues are society and government, student and teacher, parent, and child. Prerequisite: EDUC105 EDUC230 Introduction to Special Education Students are introduced to a wide range of subject matter from the history of special education to challenges facing special education. Students will apply research to create active classroom strategies that illustrate an awareness of the concerns of special education. Prerequisite: EDUC105 FILM FILM101 - Cinema as Art The student explores film as an art form. Included are explanations of film production, film genres, themes, trends, and transitions. The course presents fundamentals of critical responses to viewing films as a medium of communication past and present. FINE ART FINE100 Art Appreciation An appreciation of the visual arts, emphasizing the functions, styles, structure and media of art, art criticism, and performances is presented in this course. FINE101 Art History I This survey class explores visual images and concepts from the Paleolithic Period to the Renaissance, placing special emphasis on the development of order and the use of space in Greek and Roman art and the religious application of art in the Early Christian Period as well as its influence through the Early Renaissance. FINE102 Art History II This survey course investigates the history of visual images and concepts from the revival of Greco- Roman tradition during the Renaissance, through the styles of the rising nations during the Enlightenment, to the varied and conflicting ideas of the present. FINE105 Digital Illustration This course focuses on basic design principles related to the graphic design and advertising field, including study of principles and elements such as composition, abstraction, color, form, and shapes. Understanding the relationship of elements and development of two-dimensional vector based projects for commercial applications using Adobe Illustrator is also stressed. Emphasis throughout the course is on computer desktop design and production techniques used in contemporary communication processes. FINE110 Drawing Standard drawing techniques will be studied in this studio course with emphasis on line, perspective and foreshortening; shading methods; composition; and space, using the various media of pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, crayon, and pastel. FINE111 Painting Traditional and modern skills of the painter’s craft will be the course focus with instruction and practice in color theory; the mixing and application of paint; the uses of light, shadow, and color intensity to achieve depth; and the established concepts of composition in the oil paint medium.


FINE115 Digital Imaging Using Adobe Photoshop, students will solve media problems by producing specific digital graphic solutions while observing the principles of good design. In order to observe how form contributes to message, the student will first research how current industry designers create the essential graphics for their media related projects. Afterwards, the students will gather design elements from various resources (clip art, scanning, hand-drawn elements, self written stories, etc.) to generate original directed designs which conform to and enhance message content. The students will also consider design variables related to various destination, media like monitors, printers and other deliverables. FINE125 Photography: Film & Light Students are introduced to the principles and processes of still photography, with emphasis on the technical and aesthetic aspects of lighting. Coursework includes 35mm camera handling, exposure control, image composition, B&W films, processing, and printing, and using existing and supplemental lighting techniques. Students are required to have access to a good quality 35mm camera (details available through the department) and to purchase their own film and dark room supplies. FINE205 Three-Dimensional Design This is a survey course considering a variety of movements and techniques used in both traditional and contemporary sculpture. Emphasis will be placed on learning to think volumetrically as opposed to linearly, formal issues of balance and composition, the significance of materials, organic and inorganic forms, methods of sculptural design and the design process (from idea to drawing to Maquette to sculpture). During this course, students will create one sculpture exploring organic and inorganic forms; one assemblage sculpture made of found objects; one carved abstract sculpture (intended as a Maquette of a monumental, site-specific piece; and one Bas Relief which will be cast into any variety of cold-poured (i.e. cast stone or plaster)materials. FINE210 Design Utilizing studio practice and study, this course examines the visual elements and compositional principles necessary to the artist. Two-dimensional design problems and knowledge of historical models will stimulate the student’s imagination and creativity as a designer. FINE220 Digital Photography This course will introduce students to digital photography and photographic image manipulation through the use of digital camera and computer technology. Students will build skills and techniques in digital photography and image processing for digital printing, the web, and interactive digital media. Emphasis is placed on acquiring digital photographic skills based on proficient and appropriate use of their camera, software and imaging editing tools. Image formatting possibilities are investigated, along with aesthetic/functional aspects of traditional photography techniques. FINE225 History of American Art The art of the continental United States is surveyed in this course, including the traditional forms of the American Indians, the artifacts of the early European settlers, and the painting, sculpture, architecture, and crafts of the Republic to the present day. FOREIGN LANGUAGE FREN101 French I This is an elementary course for those who have never studied French. There will be an emphasis in the development of the four fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be on vocabulary acquisition and basic grammar structures. FREN102 French II This is an elementary course for those who have successfully completed French I or for those with high school French. Emphasis will be on understanding, reading, speaking, writing, vocabulary acquisition, and basic grammar structures. Prerequisite: FREN101


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FREN103 French III French III is an advanced French course designed for college students who have successfully completed two semesters of college French or who have completed at least three years of high school French. Emphasis is placed on the four language skills with special attention given to reading and writing. Prerequisite: FREN102 SPAN10 Spanish I This is an elementary course for those who have never studied Spanish. There will be emphasis on the development of the four fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Vocabulary acquisition and basic grammar structures will be stressed. SPAN102 Spanish II This is an elementary course for those who have successfully completed Spanish I or for those with high school Spanish. Emphasis will be on understanding, reading, speaking, writing, vocabulary acquisition, and basic grammar structures. Prerequisite: SPAN101 SPAN103 Spanish III This is an intermediate course for those who have completed Spanish II or have completed at least three years of high school Spanish. Continued progress in the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing will be stressed. Prerequisite: SPAN102 HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION HPER103 Aerobics Fitness This is a course to provide the student with an understanding of aerobics fitness principles and the flexibility of its programs. It also provides the opportunity for involvement in various aerobic activities and for self-appraisal of cardiovascular fitness. HPER104 Health and Wellness Health and Wellness is an investigation of the responsibilities of the individual in maintaining physical, mental, and social well-being. HPER115 Introduction to Tennis This course is designed to introduce the student to the various phases of tennis. Techniques, rules, and strategy are stressed. Special attention will be given to the development of fundamental skills to enable one to enjoy tennis as a leisure time activity. HPER117 Golf This course is designed to introduce the student to all phases of golf. It will develop the skills and knowledge that will enable one to use golf as a leisure time activity. HPER130 Yoga I This course introduces the student to Hatha Yoga. The course involves physical exercise, meditation, and the study of yoga history and principles. HPER140 Yoga II Yoga II is designed for the student who has successfully completed Yoga I. It is a combination of Hatha Yoga Principles and Ashtanga Yoga Principles. The student will study advanced yoga theory including drishtis, bandhas, mudras, meditation, and vinyasas. The exercise and theory is based upon Sri Pattabhi Jois’ principles. This is an arduous course based on a student’s deeper commitment to yoga. Prerequisite: HPER130


HPER220 Nutrition This course was designed to introduce key nutritional terminology, recommended dietary allowance guidelines, and analysis of diet and menu choices. Students will be able to read food labels, recognize proper food choices, and apply guidelines to everyday situations. HPER230 Yoga III Yoga III is for the student who has successfully passed Yoga I and II. It is a continuation of the physical experience of yoga, the beginning of accomplishing lesson plans and teaching, and combining anatomy, nutrition, and health concepts with the yoga experience. HPER240 Yoga IV Yoga IV is an internship for students who have successfully passed Yoga I, II, and III. It can be accomplished on or off campus with times designated to meet with the instructor. Yoga IV requires a student portfolio and teaching evaluations. HPER245 Holistic Approaches to Health This course introduces students to the anatomy and physiology of the body systems especially the muscular, skeletal, and joint systems. Alternative medicine approaches such as acupuncture, aromatherapy, ayurveda, hatha yoga, nutrition, herbal medicine, vegan diets, meditation, music therapy, and massage are also discussed in this course. GEOGRAPHY GEOG101 Geography This course surveys the geographic regions of the world by examining various types of natural environments and man’s interrelationships with physical and cultural factors. HISTORY HIST101 Western Civilization I This is a survey course of the civilization of the West, focusing on the development from Paleolithic man to 1500. Political and cultural changes are emphasized. HIST102 Western Civilization II This is a survey course of the civilization of the West concerned with the development from 1500 to present. Political and cultural changes are emphasized. HIST111 U.S. History I This is a survey course of the history of the United States from the discovery of America to 1865. Political, social, and cultural changes are emphasized. HIST112 U.S. History II This is a survey course of the history of the United States from 1865 to the present. Political, social, and cultural changes are emphasized. HIST207 Modern America: U.S. 1898 to the Present Modern America is a course in the political and social history of the United States with emphasis placed on the establishment of the American Empire abroad and the rise of Urban America at home. The course begins with the Spanish-American War in 1898 and concludes with the present. HIST212 Middle Ages This course traces European political, social, and economic history from the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west through the collapse of Medieval Civilization.


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HIST215 African-American History This course traces the social, political, and economic history of the African American from his ancestral roots in West Africa to his present role in American society. HIST216 Vietnam This course traces the United States’ involvement in Vietnam from the end of World War II through its collapse. Particular attention is given to the containment and domino theories, the attempts to quantify warfare, the disparate cultures, domestic politics, and psychological demoralization. HIST218 The 60’s Students survey American history from 1955 to 1974, a period that deals with the disaffection experienced by the young as a result of their frustrations with politics, society, and the war in Vietnam. HIST221 British History: Roman Times to 1603 This is a survey of British history from the Roman Conquest through the reign of Elizabeth I. Major emphasis is on political, economic and social history. Prerequisite: WRIT102 HIST222 British History: 1603 to the Present This is a survey of British history from the death of Elizabeth I to the present. Major emphasis is on the political and social history with the establishment of the British Empire given primary importance. Prerequisite: WRIT102 INDEPENDENT STUDY INDS250 Independent Study Consistent with requirements of the agreement between the College and the Society of the Faculty, the College will consider creating Independent Study Courses under the following conditions: 1. A student proposes a project designed to explore topics not covered in the regular program curriculum 2. A student needs a course to meet the requirements for graduation in the current semester and no acceptable substitute course, as determined by the appropriate Division Director, is available from the inventory of scheduled courses. If either of these conditions exists, a student must request the authorization of an Independent Study through a faculty member in the discipline of the subject matter to be addressed in the course. If a faculty member is willing to conduct the Independent Study with the student, she/he must recommend creation of the Independent Study to the appropriate Division Director. If a full-time faculty member is unwilling to offer the Independent Study, the student may request an Independent Study through an appropriately qualified part-time instructor. In either instance, the request for approval must be forwarded to the appropriate Division Director for consideration. A syllabus stipulating the educational outcomes, the work to be completed by the student, and evaluative measures utilized to determine student success must accompany the request. An Independent Study will not be considered authorized until approved by the appropriate Division Director. Approved requests for Independent Study will be forwarded to the office of the Registrar in order to ensure creation of the independent study section. Copies of the approval and its accompanying syllabus will be maintained in the office of the Division Director approving the Independent Study.


INTEGRATED SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY ISTM100 Integrated Systems Fundamentals The course provides the student with an overview of the various types of manufacturing that takes place in the discrete, hybrid and continuous sectors and of the jobs that must be performed within manufacturing. The course provides an introduction to the techniques and resources that manufacturers employ to improve operations, preparing the student for independent investigating and life-long learning. It provides basic knowledge and skills with regard to blueprint reading, CADD drawing, measurement, and quality assurance. ISTM110 Industrial Mechanics The course covers the principles and applications of the most commonly found mechanical drive and fluid power components in an industrial manufacturing environment. Topics include mechanical power transmission devices, pneumatics, and hydraulics through an intermediate level along with related construction and troubleshooting techniques. Completion of this course provides the student with all of the mechanical skills and knowledge required by the National Center for Integrated Systems Technology (NCIST) Advanced Manufacturing Curriculum in Integrated Systems Technology. ISTM120 Industrial Electrical Systems This course covers the principles an application of alternating (AC) and direct (DC) current electricity, industrial sequential control and electrical controls construction as found in a typical manufacturing environment. Topics include AC and DC circuit analysis and measurement in resistive, capacitive and inductive circuits; AC fixed speed monitor control; control transformers, relays, timers, and counters; mechanical, pneumatic and hydraulic input and output devices; sequencing and logic functions; introduction to component and systems troubleshooting; electrical wiring practices; conduit and raceways; and requirements for conductors, disconnects and raceways as specified by the National Electric Code (NEC). Completion of this course provides the student with all the basic electrical skills and knowledge required by the National Center for Integrated Systems Technology (NCIST) Advanced Manufacturing Curriculum in Integrated Systems Technology. ISTM150 Instrumentation Systems This course covers the four major instrument systems used in industrial applications: pressure measurement, flow measurement, temperature measurement, and level control. ISTM160 Fluid Power This course addresses the knowledge and skills in fluid power required by technicians in industry. The course covers basic fluid power theory and industrial applications of pneumatics and hydraulics, reading schematics, building fluid power circuits, and troubleshooting circuit faults. Students will understand the different types of process pumps, their application, installation, operation, and maintenance. ISTM170 Machining & Safety This course introduces the student to the safe operation of the basic hand tools and machinery that might be found in a commercial or industrial maintenance department. Subjects include the use of metal working bench tools, layout and setup tools, band saws, drill presses, manual milling machines, and the manual lathe. All course material is supplemented with practical hands-on exposure with the machines and operations described. ISTM210 Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers The course presents advanced topics in programmable logic controllers (PLC). Topics include control concepts, control schemes, logic control applications, and troubleshooting techniques. The course covers techniques, applications and interfacing to equipment. Prerequisite: ISTM120, ISTM140 ISTM130 Power Transmission The course covers power transmission knowledge and skills required by technicians in industry. Course covers gears, reducers, bearings and seals, drive belts, drive chains, alignment, adjusting speeds, lubrication, shaft couplings and alignment, and machine set-up.


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ISTM140 Programmable Logic Controllers

This course covers the principles and application of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) as found in a typical manufacturing environment. Topics include principles, functions and operation of PLCs; basic ladder logic programming with relays, timers and counters; digital input and output interfacing; intermediate instructions such as program flow, subroutine, math, and data move; analog interfacing and associated instructions; basic multi-drop networking; operator display station application; use of remote inputs and outputs; and component and systems troubleshooting. Upon completion of this course the student will have exceeded the knowledge and skill requirements of the National Center for Integrated Systems Technology (NCIST) Advanced Manufacturing Curriculum in Integrated Systems Technology. All course material is supplemented with practical hands-on exposure to the items described. The Rockwell Allen Bradley SLC500, DH-485, RSLinx, PanelView 1000, and Panelbuilder 32 products are used in the teaching of this material. Prerequisite: ISTM120 ISTM220 Advanced Fluid Mechanics The course covers advanced concepts, methods, and principles of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on identifying and correcting fluid mechanics issues. Prerequisite: ISTM160 ISTM230 Electrical Motors The course covers principles of motor function, choosing and replacing motors, identifying and repairing motors, and motor maintenance. Motor theory includes DC motors and generators, polyphase induction motors, synchronous motors, and single phase motors. Emphasis is placed on motor characteristics, electrical troubleshooting, maintenance and repair. Prerequisite: ISTM120 ISTM240 Welding Principles & Applications The course provides the student with an overview of the various types of maintenance welding. Emphasis will be placed on safety, quality and workmanship in maintenance welding. Prerequisites: ISTM100 ISTM250 High Voltage Electrical This course covers the essentials of high voltage circuits, high voltage technologies, and safety rules. Reference is made to the National Electrical Code for standards of practice. Prerequisite: ISTM120 ISTM260 Mechanical Maintenance & Troubleshooting This course introduces equipment reliability techniques utilizing periodic, preventative, and predictive maintenance. The course presents a systematic approach to improving efficiency and effectiveness through troubleshooting and problem-solving capabilities. Topics include preventative maintenance procedures and predictive maintenance basics. Prerequisites: ISTM100, ISTM110, ISTM170 JOURNALISM JOUR101 Journalism The course covers fundamental principles of reporting and writing the news, stressing accuracy, brevity, and clarity. Particular attention is given to the principles of reportorial responsibility. Basic skills of editing, rewriting, and interpreting will be stressed.


LITERATURE LITR205 Introduction to Fiction Students will be exposed to a diverse range of major literary voices both at home and abroad, past and present, male and female, majority and minority through careful analysis of highly anthologized and emerging fiction. Students will also gain a working knowledge of literary terminology/devices and be able recognize and analyze their use and importance in fictional works. Prerequisite: WRIT101 LITR207 Introduction to Poetry The student explores the nature and variety of poetic forms. Prerequisite: WRIT102 LITR208 Drama This course is an introduction to dramatic literature and its characteristic forms. The readings will range through selected examples from the Greeks to Theater of the Absurd. Prerequisite: WRIT102 LITR210 Concepts in Literature The course introduces students to the three major forms of literary expression: fiction, poetry, and drama. Significant works from each form will be analyzed to reveal creative techniques, how they represent an author’s time, and how they reflect today’s human condition. Prerequisite: WRIT102 LITR213 Crime Literature Designed to acquaint the student with the methods of logic and the assessment of factual details as embodied in fictional and non-fictional crime literature, this course provides the student with a framework for analysis. The student will compare and contrast creative fiction and nonfiction as rendered by professionals in the criminal justice field. LITR216 Literature of War This course examines, through literature and film, the recurring themes of war, the nature of war, and human reaction to war. The focus of the course is primarily on the American war experience as portrayed by writers and film directors. LITR217 World Literature World Literature focuses on the literature of cultures other than those normally discussed in traditional, Westernbased courses. The literature of Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and Africans and less represented cultures will be studied. Examining their poetry, fiction, nonfiction, songs, and oral traditions will nourish an appreciation of the social and cultural contributions of these cultural groups. Prerequisite: WRIT102 LITR218 Literature for Children Students will be exposed to a broad sampling of major literary voices, genres, and elements associated with past and present as well as traditional and nontraditional children’s literature. Through the careful analysis of highly anthologized and emerging children’s literature, students will gain a working knowledge of the function, importance, and influence of literature for children kindergarten through ninth grade. LITR219 Gothic Literature Students are introduced to the origins and varieties of the Gothic novel before examining plot structures and literary motifs particularly associated with the Gothic literary form. Students will have the opportunity to examine the extension of literary Gothicism into other media such as film and music.


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LITR224 The Literature of the Bible The Bible is presented as living literature. Great themes and forms of literature are discussed as they appear in both Old and New Testaments. Prerequisite: WRIT102 LITR225 World Mythology Representative examples of archetypal story are presented to reveal the enduring themes of human experience. Special emphasis is placed on Greek and Teutonic myth. Prerequisite: WRIT102 LITR240 Shakespeare’s World in Literature and Film The art of Shakespeare is introduced through selected examples from the major tragedies, the histories, and the comedies as studied through Literature and Film. Prerequisite: WRIT102 LITR250 Contemporary Literature Through comparative and critical study of contemporary works, students will experience a range of recent efforts in literature at a broad cultural level. LITR260 American Literature Students will encounter American literature from the Colonial to the Contemporary Periods, with an emphasis on modern and contemporary texts that reflects the American experience of both mainstream and emerging cultures, represents major American literary movements, genres, writers, and works, and explores such issues as the human experience, the American political arena, and common American ideologies. Prerequisite: WRIT102 or permission of the department LITR262 British Literature An introduction to British literature as a reflection of British culture is experienced through selections ranging from the Middle Ages through contemporary major British writers. Prerequisite: WRIT102 or permission of instructor MATHEMATICS MATH110 Mathematics of Business The first part of the course reviews the mathematics fundamental not only to employment in business but also to intelligent participation in consumer life. Topics to be reviewed include fractions and decimals; ratio and proportion; units of measurement; and percentage. The second part of the course is devoted to business applications. Topics include trade and cash discounts; markup; simple interest; payroll; sales and property tax; and elementary statistical notions. MATH112 Elementary Mathematics for Education I The course employs a problem-solving approach to basic mathematical concepts and techniques that constitute the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Problem solving techniques are discussed, including reasoning, pattern recognition, algorithms, estimation, and mental math. Set and function concepts, whole numbers, integers, and rational numbers are explored. Other topics include numeration systems and number theory. MATH114 Elementary Mathematics for Education II The course is a continuation of MATH112 Elementary Mathematics for Education I. The focus of this course is to increase student understanding and skills in the following elementary mathematics curriculum areas: decimals and percents, statistics and probability, geometry and measurement. Emphasis will be on the understanding of these topics, techniques for presenting them to elementary students, and adherence to the state and national standards.


MATH130 College Algebra The functional approach to algebra is stressed with attention to the properties of the real number system; linear functions and equations; exponents; radicals; functions; systems of equations; complex numbers; and quadratic equations. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor Prerequisite: Based on in-house diagnostic testing and high school records MATH132 Foundations of Mathematics The course is especially designed for students in Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science, and Humanities/Social Science programs. Emphasis will be on using graphing and critical thinking skills to solve problems related to the students’ fields of study. MATH133 Video Gaming Math Mathematics of Video Gaming is a general mathematics course. Emphasis will be on probability and statistics, points, lines, graphing, and motion that are used to develop animations. These techniques will be examined using video games such as World of Warcraft and culminate in the development a working video game with a menu page, a game page, and a high score page. MATH135 Statistics The course is an introduction to a field whose ideas and concepts pervade modern society and whose importance in business, technology, science, and research in general is considerable and ever growing. The course consists of three parts, namely, descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics. Prerequisite: Based on in-house diagnostic testing MATH155 Pre-Calculus This course is designed to give students a firm background in algebra and trigonometry in preparation for calculus. Topics include detailed study of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic and trigonometric functions, along with an introduction to matrices and conic sections. Prerequisite: MATH130, in-house diagnostic testing and high school records or permission of the instructor MATH160 Calculus I This course provides an introduction to the ideas and applications of calculus. The major topics studied are limits and continuity; differentiation; applications of differentiation; and integration. Prerequisite: MATH155 MATH161 Calculus II This course is a continuation of MATH160 and completes the introduction to one-variable calculus. Major topics covered are applications of integrals; inverse functions; techniques of integration; and infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH160 MULTISKILLED HEALTH TECHNICIAN MSHT100 Nurse Aide The principles of basic patient care are covered in this course. Emphasis is placed on vital signs; ethics; body mechanics; bed making; bathing; feeding; and infection control to include variations for providing care in the home setting. The course includes a clinical rotation in a long-term care facility. Upon successful completion, the student is eligible to sit for the PA Nurse Aide Competency Exam. [45 hrs. /Lecture, 60 hrs. /Lab, 75 hrs. /Clinical Experience]


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MSHT102 Introduction to the Medical Laboratory This introductory course combines phlebotomy skills with the performance of basic medical laboratory tests while emphasizing quality assurance and patient well-being. In addition, students learn laboratory safety; infection control; ethics; basic instrumentation; and the collection, transportation, and processing of a variety of specimens. Upon successful completion of this course and MSHT103, Clinical Phlebotomy, the student will be eligible to sit for the National ASCP registry exam for phlebotomists. [45 hrs. /Lecture, 45 hrs. / Lab] MSHT103 Clinical Phlebotomy Students are assigned to a clinical facility for 100 hours where they will receive experience in venipuncture, capillary puncture and specimen processing. Scheduling is by appointment. Scheduled times will involve early hours and a variety of shifts. The student must achieve a minimum score of 85% in the venipuncture and capillary proficiency critical of MSHT102 to be assigned to a clinical facility. (Clinical hrs. /100) Prerequisite: MSHT102 MSHT104 Communication Skills for HealthCare Workers This course prepares the student to communicate in the healthcare environment. Emphasis is placed on patient interaction; intra-team communication; meeting the public; requisitions and reports; scheduling appointments; and basic computer skills. MSHT105 Electrocardiography This is a beginning course for those desiring to learn the fundamentals of operating an EKG machine. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the human heart; cardiac conduction system; placement of a 12-lead EKG; errors and artifacts; recognition of abnormalities; critical thinking; safety; and infection control. MUSIC MUSI101 Introduction to Music The student approaches the perception of thought and idea through a study of musical forms. Introduction to general musical terminology is supplementary. NURSING NURS170 Nursing I The purpose of this course is to prepare the beginning nursing student to meet basic human needs, as identified by Maslow, for adult clients in the clinical setting. The focus is on the concepts basic to the nursing curriculum. The individuality of man, the concept of health, and nursing as a discipline are explored. The nursing process is introduced and opportunities are provided to practice beginning skills in applying the nursing process to the adult client. Co/Prerequisite: BIOL201 Co/Prerequisite: PSYC106 NURS171 Nursing II The purpose of this course is to prepare the nursing student to deliver holistic nursing care to adults with health alterations arising from a disruption in homeostasis. The focus is on introducing the concepts of medical-surgical nursing to clients in need of assistance coping with health problems, or recovering from the effects of disease or injury. The theoretical component is implemented utilizing clinical assignments and observational experiences. Prerequisite: NURS170, BIOL201 Co/Prerequisite: BIOL202


NURS270 Nursing III The emphasis is on using the nursing process with greater depth in assessment, analysis, planning, implementation and evaluation. The student will be given the opportunity to continue to administer medications as an integral part of nursing care with increased responsibility for intravenous medications. The student will be caring for an increased number of clients. Opportunities to develop more skill and speed in the implementation phase will be provided. Prerequisite: NURS171 NURS275 Nursing IV This course is divided into three 5-week specialty care rotations. There is flexibility in the scheduling of the sessions and the order of the rotations will vary from one student group to another. During the 5-week sessions the students will be applying the nursing process to clients across the life span. Three of the following four specialty areas will be included in this course: A. Nursing care of children in the pediatric settings B. Nursing care of adults in critical care settings C. Nursing care of adults and children in mental health settings D. Nursing care of the childbearing family in the maternity settings The fourth specialty area will be included in NURS 276. Emphasis will be placed on decision making and establishing priorities for care among these diverse client populations. The student is expected to provide all nursing care for which they are theoretically prepared in each of these clinical laboratory settings. Prerequisite: NURS270, BIOL 215, Co/Prerequisite: WRIT102 NURS276 Nursing V This is the final clinical nursing course in the AND program. The course is divided into three 5-week rotations: A. Remaining fourth specialty area not included in NURS275 B. Nursing care of the adult in the long term setting C. Nurse in transition from student to graduate There is flexibility in the scheduling of the sessions, and the order of the rotations will vary from one student group to another. Students will complete the final specialty care rotation which was not a component of their NURS275 course. During this course they will also have the opportunity to apply the nursing process to a larger number of clients in both acute care and long-term settings. There will be increased emphasis on the role of the nurse as a member of the healthcare team. Prerequisite: NURS275 Co-requisite: NURS278 Co/Prerequisite: SOCI101 NURS278 Community Health Nursing This course provides an overview of the perspective of health as evolving and as defined by the community. It presents the concept of community health nursing as the nursing of aggregates. The course attempts to raise a consciousness regarding social injustices that exist and how these may prevent the realization of health as a right for all. The course addresses the application of the community health nursing process to aggregates in the community. Students will be provided the opportunity to take a field trip to a community health agency to enhance their internalization of these nursing care concepts. Co/Prerequisite: NURS276


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PRACTICAL NURSING NURS150 Practical Nursing I The purpose of this course is to prepare the beginning practical nursing student to meet basic human needs for adult clients in a clinical setting. The focus is on the concepts basic to the nursing curriculum. The individuality of man, health concepts, and nursing as a discipline are explored. The nursing process is introduced and students will practice beginning skills in the application of the nursing process. The performance of basic assessment will utilize technology. This course will enable the beginning practical nursing student to become aware of the nursing role by developing a nursing care plan and implementing this plan with one adult client in the clinical setting. The student will begin to administer oral, subcutaneous, and intramuscullar medications as an integral part of nursing care. Pre or Co requisite: BIOL201, CIST100 NURS155 Practical Nursing II The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to care for maternity clients and their newborn babies, pediatric clients, and clients with medicals surgical conditions requiring hospital and/or long term care. The focus of this course is application of the nursing process to adults and children with more complex alterations in physical and emotional needs. Maternal, newborn, and child care are included with an emphasis on family centered care. Clinical experience is provided to assist the student in the organization of a multiple client assignment and in working with the nursing team. The student will continue to administer medications as an integral part of nursing care with the addition of IVPB medications. Venipuncture may also be performed with supervision. Prerequisite: NURS150 Pre or Co requisite: BIOL202, PSYC106 NURS160 Practical Nursing III The purpose of this nursing course is to prepare the nursing students to deliver holistic nursing care to adults with health alterations arising from a disruption in homeostasis. The focus is delivery of nursing care to the client with medical-surgical alterations in health who need help in coping with health problems or recovering from the effects of disease or injury. The student will continue to administer medication to the clients. Clinical experience is provided in long term care facilities which provide the student with the experience needed for employment. The purpose of the course is to assist the student in making the transition from the role of student to that of a graduate. Prerequisite: NURS155 Pre or Co requisite: PSYC101 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY OFFT100 Keyboard Techniques This course affords the student the opportunity to build keyboarding speed and to improve accuracy. Proofreading and advanced formatting skills are also emphasized. OFFT101 Keyboarding Introduction This course affords the student the opportunity to build keyboarding speed and to improve accuracy. Proofreading and advanced formatting skills are also emphasized. OFFT110 Internet for Office This course is an introduction of the utilization to the Internet and World Wide Web access for solving common office problems. Students will gain experience in the use of browsers and search engines to research, locate, and retrieve information necessary to efficiently operate an office. OFFT120 Microsoft Word - MOS Expert Certification This course is a comprehensive introduction to Microsoft Word 2002. The student will learn how to edit and format documents; work with tables; add graphics; create Web pages; merge documents; create charts and forms; and customize Word. At completion of this course, students will be eligible for the MOS Expert Certification Exam.


OFFT125 Microsoft Excel - MOS Expert Certification The student will learn how to create, edit, and format worksheets; work with charts; pivot tables and lists; create Web pages; and use What-If analysis. At completion of the course, the students will be eligible for the MOS Expert Certification Exam. OFFT130 Microsoft Access - MOS Certification The student will learn how to work with tables, forms, and reports to create advanced forms; sub-forms and reports; data access and pages; and modules. Database maintenance and information sharing between programs is also included. At the completion of the course, the student will be eligible for the MOS Core Certification Exam. OFFT140 Medical Terminology This course is a comprehensive introduction to medical terminology emphasizing the language of medicine today. The focus is on word parts, their usage, and their meaning. Opportunities are provided to master the definition, pronunciation, and spelling of medical terms through a wide variety of practice and reinforcement modes. OFFT145 Customer Service with Technology This course is designed to develop the skills for customer service of businesses. This course explores how customer service can maintain the personal touch using various technologies: e-mail, telephone, or web site. The course focuses on the challenges related to attracting and retaining customers in public or private, domestic or international organizations. OFFT150 Office Communications This course builds on the variety of communications skills required in the office. Editing documents, internet/intranet communications, and presentations for grammatical and technical errors will be emphasized. Techniques for effective interactions both inside and outside the organization will be explored. OFFT155 Office Procedures The integrated office of today requires the planning, implementation, and evaluation of various projects and activities. This course will provide students the opportunity through simulations to manage a series of typical office projects. OFFT160 Electronic Transcription This course enables students to develop machine transcription skills. Operation of transcribing equipment and proper transcribing technique are emphasized. Transcription assignments require students to produce appropriate, error-free documents from dictation. OFFT165 Electronic Medical Transcription This course enables students to develop medical transcription skills. Operation of transcribing equipment and proper transcribing technique are emphasized. Transcription assignments require students to produce appropriate, error-free documents from dictation. Prerequisite: OFFT140 OFFT170 Microsoft Outlook - MOS Certification This course is a comprehensive introduction to Microsoft Outlook. The course includes email communications; scheduling; and managing, integrating, and customizing Outlook with the Internet. At completion of this course, the student will be eligible for the MOS Certification Exam. OFFT175 Microsoft PowerPoint -MOS Certification The student will learn how to edit and format presentations; modify objects; add graphics; create Web pages; enhance charts; link objects; and customize PowerPoint. At completion of the course, the student will be eligible for the MOS Certification Exam.


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OFFT180 Medical Coding This course provides the coding systems for the billing of medical and surgical procedures and services developed by the American Medical Association, the International Classification of Diseases, designed for statistical purposes and indexing of hospital records and for third party reimbursement. The purpose of this course is to provide students instruction in the skills of billing for medical and surgical procedures and services, implementing standard terminology, and uniform coding systems. Prerequisite: OFFT140 OFFT185 Medical Billing This course is an introduction to processing health insurance claims and health insurance plan options. All aspects of medical insurance are covered, including plan options; carrier requirements; state and federal regulations; abstracting relevant information from source documents; accurately completing claim forms; and coding diagnoses and procedures. Prerequisite: OFFT140 OFFT205 Microsoft Office Applications Advanced Office Applications will introduce high-quality work that requires analysis of customer needs, the development of solutions and assessment of technical skills and professional communication skills. Integration of productivity and system tools such as data import and export, file management and integration across platforms will be discussed. Prerequisites: OFFT120, OFFT125, OFFT130, OFFT170 OFFT250 Office Technology Internship This course is designed to give Office Technology students on-the-job experience in various settings of the Administrative Assistant environment. Students enrolled in the course will have hands-on training using technology and facts learned in the Office Technology curriculum. PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY PHAR100 Pharmacy Technology I The role of the pharmacy technician in the general practice of pharmacy is presented in this course. Students learn the procedures for processing prescriptions and medical orders, purchasing and receiving supplies, inventory control, and preparing a patient profile. Other topics include medical terminology, law and ethics, and drug delivery systems. PHAR110 Pharmacology I The course introduces the student to the basic concepts of pharmacology. Major drug categories are discussed with emphasis placed on drug names, actions, dosages, and routes of administration, side effects and dispensing issues. Topics include endogenous substances, anti-microbial agents, pain relievers, and agents used for the treatment of the nervous system and respiratory system. PHAR115 Pharmacy Calculations This course emphasizes the necessary mathematical skills and concepts used by the pharmacy technician to perform calculations for the preparation of medications. Topics covered are basic mathematics, systems of measurements and dosage calculations, including ratios, percents, conversions, and dilutions. PHAR120 Pharmacy Technology II A continuation of Pharmacy Technology I, this course emphasizes sterile and non-sterile compounding, handling of hazardous and toxic materials, and computer application to the retail and hospital pharmacy. Prerequisites: PHAR100, PHAR115


PHAR125 Pharmacology II A continuation of Pharmacology I, topics include drugs used for the treatment of the gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, muscular, skeletal, endocrine, reproductive, hematological, and immune systems. Other agents such as topicals, ophthalmics, otics, chemotherapy, vitamins, and supplements are also addressed. Prerequisite: PHAR110 PHAR160 Pharmacy Experiential Learning Students receive practical experience in both a hospital and a community pharmacy under the supervision of a pharmacist. Students participate in the routine operation of a pharmacy in both settings. Prerequisites: PHAR100, PHAR120, PHAR115, PHAR110, PHAR125, MSHT104 PHILOSOPHY PHIL101 Introduction to Philosophy This is a survey course designed to encourage the student to rediscover philosophical issues of historical importance and to develop philosophical techniques. PHIL201 Contemporary Philosophical Problems Literary and philosophical readings introduce the student to intellectual problems that recur in the 20th and 21st Centuries. PHIL205 Logic The course provides a clear understanding of the basic concepts and methods of Logic. These include truth, inference, validity, and the formation of ideas; assertions; and evaluative expressions about the world. To aid the student, the topic of Logic is placed within the need for rational communication, whether it is needed to reach agreement, to resolve a dispute, to take decisive action, or simply to come to a common understanding. PHIL210 Modern World Religions This course introduces the beliefs and practices of the major world religions as found in modern times. Among the religions to be discussed are Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Polytheism, pantheism, atheism, and monotheism also will be discussed. PHYSICS PHYS101 College Physics I This is an applied physics course for technical students and students needing an algebra-and trigonometry- based physics course for transfer to a four-year college. Included are topics from statics, the strength of materials, kinematics, and dynamics. Emphasis is on application, the theory and practice of the relevant measurement, and on the analysis of mechanical systems. Prerequisite: MATH130 PHYS102 College Physics II This is a continuation of PHYS101. Included are the principles of fluid mechanics; acoustics; thermodynamics; kinetic theory; quantum theory; optics; and nuclear physics. Laboratories emphasize the application of physical theory to practical measurement problems. Prerequisite: PHYS101 PHYS105 Physical Science This is an introductory course in Physical Science emphasizing the Physics and Astronomy aspects of a Physical Science curriculum. Students will be introduced to basic concepts that will give them a grasp of the fundamental quantities used in building models of physical reality.


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PHYS110 Introduction to Astronomy This is an introductory course in the concepts of Astronomy. Emphasis is geared toward the student who wishes to acquire a beginning knowledge of astronomical phenomena. Topics are approached on a qualitative basis by the use of videos, classroom discussions, demonstrations, the World Wide Web, and off-campus activities. PHYS201 Statics Included are the study of force systems, equilibrium force analysis of structures, friction, center of gravity, and moment of inertia. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with a mathematical and scientific basis for the understanding of structural elements. Theories presented are related to practical application in both drafting and A/E practice. POLITICAL SCIENCE POLS101 American National Government This course considers the evolution of the principles, form, and operation of our governmental systems with special emphasis on constitutional issues and the various means for the resolution of conflicts. POLS102 Modern Political Systems This course is a study of important political ideologies and principles upon which modern governments are based with their theoretical sources and practical conclusions. POLS210 American Foreign Policy This course is a survey of American foreign policies from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to today. Emphasis is placed on the development of the United States to the status of a world power. Themes explored include foundations of foreign policies, expansionism, and isolationism, influence of industrial expansionism, imperialism, the two World Wars, and the new balance of powers. POLICE TECHNOLOGY PLIC103 Introduction to the Academy and Introduction to Law Enforcement in Pennsylvania The course introduces the student to the Academy, its mission, rules and regulations, and the role and function of the Municipal Police Officers’ Education and Training Commission (MPOETC). Law enforcement in Pennsylvania and the PA Criminal Justice System is introduced including history and principles and ethic and moral issues. PLIC105 Physical and Emotional Readiness This course covers physical fitness training and stress management. Class emphasis is on physically preparing students to meet the State Police and Training Commission standards for municipal police physical fitness. The class promotes development of life-long physical activity. PLIC120 Laws and Procedures This course covers such topics as criminal law, constitutional law, laws of arrest, civil laws, liquor laws, controlled substance law, search and seizure, and environmental crimes. PLIC128 Defensive Tactics & Handling Arrested Persons This course covers the use of force and the legal issues involved. It also reviews the practical application of tactical self-defense. The mechanics of arrest, restraint, and control are reviewed including handcuffing, transporting prisoners, custody of the mentally ill, booking and lockup, booking and lockup of juveniles, and special problems. PLIC135 Motor Vehicle Law and Accident and Collision Investigation In this course, the PA Motor Vehicle Code is studied in detail including DUI Enforcement/Impaired Operator/ Intoxilyzer Operation. Collision investigation, collision scene traffic direction, and control of hazardous materials are also covered.


PLIC145 Patrol Procedures and Operations This course will cover the role of the patrol in policing the community including procedures, activities and incidents, monitoring and controlling vehicular and pedestrian traffic, vehicle stop techniques, roadblocks and barricades, crimes in progress, crowd control and civil disorder, and crime prevention and reduction. PLIC155 Principles of Criminal Investigation, Report Writing, and Case Preparation This course will focus on the officer as the first responder, how to secure the crime scene, interviewing/interrogation, identifying and collecting evidence, and the identification of suspects. Various crimes will be discussed. Report writing and note taking as well as courtroom testimony and demeanor will be reviewed. PLIC160 Human Relations This course discusses the perceptions of human behavior and discusses communication, cultural diversity, ethnic intimidation, and bias crimes. PLIC162 Crime Management and Families in Crisis This course deals with such topics as: behavior management, crisis intervention, dispute intervention, conflict management, recognizing special needs, and hostage situations, as well as juvenile law and justice. PLIC165 Basic Firearms This course covers the basic information on handling, shooting, and maintaining firearms. It includes 72 hours of practice shooting on a combat range. PLIC167 First Aid & CPR This course covers emergency response training. PLIC170 Operation of Patrol Vehicles This course will instruct students in preventive patrol tactics and emergency vehicle operations. 0-3-1 PSYCHOLOGY PSYCH101 General Psychology I This course examines the scientific study of behavior and mental processes and provides a survey of the major areas of psychology. Important topics and findings from psychology are reviewed. Topics include the role of science in the study of behavior, the biological foundations of behavior, learning, information processing, stress and health, social interaction, development, motivation, emotion, and abnormal behavior. PSYC105 Social Psychology This is the study of the individual’s interaction with his/her environment. Culture; socialization processes; attitudes; values; roles; and communication will be investigated as well as other factors, which influence personality development. PSYC106 Human Growth & Development This course is a survey of human development from conception to senescence. Attention will be given to the physical, motor, emotional, personality, and social growth of the individual in infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and senescence. PSYC201 General Psychology II This course is a survey of major personality theories. Consideration will be given to personality dynamics, development, and assessment. Prerequisite: PSYC101


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PSYC203 Sports Psychology Sports Psychology is the scientific study of people and behaviors in sport and exercise settings with practical applications of psychological principles to enhance sport performance and increase the psychological well-being of athletes. The student will learn about the cognitive, behavioral, and affective reactions of athletes, coaches, and fans in sports settings. Prerequisite: PSYC101 PSYC205 Educational Psychology A course for Pre-Education majors, human learning in the educational setting is presented with theories of learning and teaching, the development of the child, creativity, individual differences, and standardized testing. Prerequisite: PSYC101 PSYC208 Abnormal Psychology The course provides a foundation for understanding abnormal behavior. The class examines the nature of mental disorders and the approaches used to classify and treat them. Prerequisite: PSYC101 PSYC210 - Child Psychology Basic principles of child development from infancy to adolescence will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on physical, intellectual, social, and emotional factors. Prerequisite: PSYC101 PSYC211 Adolescent Psychology This course examines the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and personality development of the adolescent in contemporary society. Prerequisite: PSYC101 3-0-3 PSYC212 Psychology of Gender Differences This course will introduce materials relating to the development of gender. The course will investigate the powerful impact of labeling an individual female or male. The non-physiological aspects of being a female or male and the cultural expectations for masculinity and femininity will be discussed. PSYC215 Organizational Psychology Organizational Psychology involves the study and the application of skills obtained from the field of psychology to the areas of industry and business to assist in the understanding of organizational behavior and the improvement of the quality of work life. Topics include employee motivation, organizational dynamics, industrial psychology, psychological components of personnel selection (assessment and evaluation), employee morale, human needs, employee safety, the older employee, and applications of business coaching/psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC101 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY RADS100 Patient Care I Content is designed to provide an introduction to the origins of medical terminology. A word building system is introduced and abbreviations and symbols are discussed. Also introduced is an orientation to understanding radiographic orders and diagnostic report interpretation. Related terminology is addressed. Content is designed to provide the basic concepts of patient care, including consideration for the physical and psychological needs of the patient and family. Routine and emergency patient care procedures are described, as well as infection control procedures using standard precautions. The role of the radiographer in patient education is identified. Content is designed to provide a fundamental background in ethics. The historical and philosophical bases of ethics, as well as the elements of ethical behavior, are discussed. The student will examine a variety of ethical issues and dilemmas found in clinical practice. An introduction to legal terminology, concepts and principles also will be presented. Topics include misconduct, malpractice, legal and professional standards and the ASRT scope of practice. The importance of proper documentation and informed consent is emphasized.


RADS110 Fundamentals of Radiologic Science Content is designed to provide an overview of the foundations in radiography and the practitioner’s role in the health care delivery system. Principles, practices and policies of the health care organizations are examined and discussed in addition to the professional responsibilities of the radiographer. Content is also designed to familiarize students with the knowledge base necessary to perform standard imaging procedures. Introduction to radiography and radiographic procedures lab will include appendicular skeleton and upper extremity. RADS120 Clinical Practice I Content and clinical practice experiences are designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice, and professional development are discussed, examined and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient preparatory to, during, and following the radiologic procedure. Radiographic procedures focused on during this semester of the program will include the following: KUB, chest, upper extremities, and shoulder exams. RADS130 Radiographic Procedures I Content is designed to provide the knowledge base necessary to perform standard imaging procedures, including basic computed tomography (CT) and special studies. Consideration is given to the evaluation of optimal diagnostic images. Continuation of Fundamentals of Radiologic Science radiography and radiographic procedures lab will include appendicular skeleton lower extremity and spine procedures. Prerequisite: RADS110 RADS140 Radiation Protection & Biology Content is designed to provide an overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation with living systems. Radiation effects on molecules, cells, tissues and the body as a whole are presented. Factors affecting biological response are presented, including acute and chronic effects of radiation. Content is also designed to present an overview of the principles of radiation protection, including the responsibilities of the radiographer for patients, personnel and the public. Radiation health and safety requirements of federal and state regulatory agencies, accreditation agencies and health care organizations are incorporated. Prerequisite: RADS110 RADS145 Radiation Production & Characteristics Content is designed to establish a basic knowledge of atomic structure and terminology. Also presented are the nature and characteristics of radiation, x-ray production and the fundamentals of photon interactions with matter. Prerequisite: RADS110 RADS150 Clinical Practice II Content and clinical practice experiences are designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice, and professional development are discussed, examined and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient preparatory to, during, and following the radiologic procedure. Radiographic procedures focused on during this semester of the program will include the following: lower extremity, pelvic girdle and vertebral column. Prerequisite: RADS120


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RADS160 Radiographic Procedures II Content is designed to provide the knowledge base necessary to perform standard imaging procedures, including basic computed tomography (CT) and special studies. Consideration is given to the evaluation of optimal diagnostic images. This is a continuation of Fundamentals of Radiologic Science radiography, Radiographic Procedures I and radiographic procedures lab and to include digestive, urinary, biliary systems and headwork. Prerequisite: RADS110, RADS130

RADS165 Pathology Content is designed to introduce concepts related to disease and etiological considerations with emphasis on radiographic appearance of disease and impact on exposure factor selection. Students will be required to submit various assignments dealing with the various aspects of disease pathology. Writing intensive study of theories of disease causation and the pathophysio-logic disorders compromising health systems with emphasis on radiographic presentation. Prerequisite: BIOL201, BIOL202, RADS110, RADS 130 RADS170 Clinical Practice III Content and clinical practice experiences are designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice, and professional development are discussed, examined and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient preparatory to, during, and following the radiologic procedure. Radiographic procedures focused on during this semester of the program will include the following: focus on bony thorax and skull studies. Prerequisite: RADS120,RADS150 RADS200 Imaging Equipment I Content is designed to establish a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic, mobile and tomographic equipment requirements and design. The content also provides a basic knowledge of quality control. Prerequisite: RADS110, RADS145 RADS205 Exposure I Content is designed to establish a knowledge base in factors that govern the image production process. Film imaging with related accessories is emphasized. Prerequisite: RADS110, RADS145 RADS210 Patient Care II Content is designed to provide additional concepts of patient care, including consideration for the physical and psychological needs of the patient and family. Routine and emergency patient care procedures are described, as well as infection control procedures using standard precautions. The role of the radiographer in patient education is identified. Patient Care II deals with more complex patient conditions, procedures, and invasive procedures and relates best practice standards to the patient condition and procedure. All of the information in Patient Care I must be applied consistently and critical thinking skills are further developed with an increased knowledge level. Content is designed to provide basic concepts of pharmacology. The theory and practice of basic techniques of venipuncture and administration of diagnostic contrast agents and/or intravenous medications is included. The appropriate delivery of patient care during these procedures is emphasized. Prerequisite: RADS100 RADS202 Imaging Equipment II Content is designed to establish a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic, mobile and tomographic equipment requirements and design. A knowledge base of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology will be presented. The content also provides a basic knowledge of quality control. Prerequisite: RADS110, RADS145, RADS200


RADS207 Exposure II Contents are designed to establish a knowledge base in factors that govern the image production process. Film imaging with related accessories is emphasized. Provide a basis for analyzing radiographic images. Also, included are the importance of minimum imaging standards, discussion of a problem-solving technique for image evaluation and the factors that can affect image quality. Actual images will be included for analysis. With factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system assist students to bridge between film-based and digital imaging systems. Prerequisite: RADS205 RADS215 Advanced Procedures & Registry Prep Content is designed to provide entry-level radiography students with principles related to computed tomography (CT) imaging. There will be an emphasis on specialized positioning and advanced radiographic procedures. This includes cross-sectional anatomy. This course will provide assistance and review material from all radiological science courses, with emphasis on National Certification Examination and career planning. Prerequisite: RADS110, RADS130, RADS160 RADS220 Clinical Practice IV Content and clinical practice experiences are designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice, and professional development are discussed, examined and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient preparatory to, during, and following the radiologic procedure. Radiographic procedures focused on during this semester of the program will include the following: all gastrointestinal studies, urinary system studies and contrast studies. Prerequisite: RADS120,RADS150,RADS170 RADS230 Clinical Practice V Content and clinical practice experiences are designed to sequentially develop, apply, critically analyze, integrate, synthesize, and evaluate concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Through structured, sequential, competency-based clinical assignments, concepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice, and professional development are discussed, examined and evaluated. Clinical practice experiences should be designed to provide patient care and assessment, competent performance of radiologic imaging and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes measurement ensure the well-being of the patient preparatory to, during, and following the radiologic procedure. Radiographic procedures focused on during this semester of the program will include the following: The student demonstrating proficiency of studies in semesters 1-4 (KUB, chest, upper extremities and shoulder exams, lower extremity, pelvic girdle, vertebral column, bony thorax, skull, gastrointestinal studies, urinary system studies, and contrast studies. Prerequisite: RADS120,RADS150,RADS170,RADS220 SOCIOLOGY SOCI101 Principles of Sociology Methods, fields, and vocabulary of sociology are studied, along with the social interaction of persons and groups; the process of socialization; and social structures, such as family, religion, and education. SOCI115 Marriage & Family This course examines the family as a basic institution of society; the interactions and functions of the family; and cultural traditions. Student will engage in sociological analysis of marriage in past and present societies. Current stresses and changes within the family and marriage will be evaluated.


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SOCI210 Contemporary Social Problems This course presents an analysis of several specific forms of contemporary social disorganization. Topics such as social equality and inequality, race relations, family disorganization, and the aging process will be approached from a sociological perspective. Prerequisite: SOCI101

SOCI231 Cultural Diversity in the American Society As reflected in the cultural diversity of the American society, this course is designed to examine race, ethnicity, gender/gender roles, social class, and sexuality from a sociological perspective. Recognizing that the unification and identification of the American society is rooted in its racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity, this course will further analyze from a sociological perspective the historical and contemporary experiences of these diverse groups comprising the American society. Emphasis will be placed on a systematic process of introspection, self-examination, and personal identity understanding and development with regards to issues of race, ethnicity, social class, gender/gender roles, and sexuality. SOCIAL WORK SOCW150 Introduction to Social Work & Social Welfare The historical development of social work and the social welfare system in the United States are examined in this course. The social work philosophy, values and basic methods employed in the field of social work are introduced, including service practice methods for individuals (Micro), families & groups (Mezzo) and the community (Macro). SOCW155 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I This course will focus on the interaction between persons and the social systems they encounter throughout maturation or the life cycle. The course is also centered on the bio-psychological perspective that stresses a multidimensional view of human development and behavior. The transactional relationship between human behavior and pertinent psychological, social, biological, economic, cultural, environmental and institutional forces is stressed. Through the critical examination of various theories, students gain an appreciation for the inherent strengths, complexities and variations in the human experience. Prerequisite: PSYC101 Co requisite: SOCI101 3-0-3 SOCW160 Interventive Methods I This course will concentrate on the generalist interventions: process of working with client systems: engagement, assessment, goal setting, intervention planning, implementation, contracting, intervention applications, evaluation and termination, follow-up (reassessment/ discontinue contact). Students will be exposed to the philosophy, values and methods of the social welfare system. Prerequisites: PSYC101, SOCW150 Co requisites: SOCI101, SOCW155 SOCW170 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II This course is a continuation of Human Behavior and The Social Environment I. The main focus of this course will be on an understanding and analysis of how larger social systems, which include the family, groups, communities and organizations, impact human behavior and development. Particular attention will be given to the effects of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexual orientation on human behavior and development. Cultural diversity in a pluralistic society will also be examined. Prerequisites: PSYC101, SOCI101, SOCW155 Co requisites: SOCW210, SOCW200


SOCW180 Child Welfare This course will present the historical overview of child welfare services in the American Society, and will examine contemporary trends and issues in the field of child welfare. The generalist social work perspective will be employed in terms of understanding the characteristics, strengths, and service needs of families and children in the child welfare system. Families and children will be studied within their social environment and careful attention will be given to various family forms and cultural patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC101, SOCI101, SOCW150 SOCW200 Social Work Practicum I The Social Work Practicum I is an integral component of the social work curriculum. The Social Work Practicum I is designed to provide a forum in which students can apply theories, knowledge, skills and values acquired in the social work foundation courses to an understanding of human behavior in the social environment. Functioning in an approved social service agency, the student will be provided the knowledge and skills under the close supervision of an experienced social worker. The focus of the student’s field placement training will be placed on development of the knowledge, perspectives and skills needed to practice with micro, mezzo and macro systems. Focus will also be placed on assessment/analysis of client needs, client-worker relationships, professional values and ethics, service delivery issues, agency/organizational dynamics and social work supervision. The number of clock hours a student spends in field placement will be determined accordingly. Prerequisites: SOCW160, SOCW150, SOCW155 Co requisites: SOCW210, SOCW220, SOCW170 SOCW210 Social Work Seminar I This Social Work Seminar provides a supervised learning experience in a social service agency and is designed to integrate the knowledge, values and skills presented in the classroom with the field practicum experience. In this seminar, students will be required to critique their own practice skills and discuss the dimensions of social work practice from their emerging professional experiences. Students will also be able to learn from the field placements of other students. Prerequisites: SOCW160, SOCW150, SOCW155 Co requisites: SOCW200, SOCW220, SOCW170 SOCW205 Social Work Practicum II Social Work Practicum II is the second field placement for students in a different social service agency dealing with a different level of social work practice. The course description for Social Work Practicum II is the same as for Social Work Practicum I. Prerequisites: SOCW200, SOCW210, SOCW220, SOCW170 SOCW215 Social Work Seminar II Social Work Seminar II runs concurrent with Social Work Practicum II and is a continuation of Social Work Seminar I. Prerequisites: SOCW210, SOCW200, SOCW160, SOCW220, SOCW150, SOCW155, SOCW170 SOCW220 Interventive Methods II This course is the second course in the two-course series of generalist practice methods. It focuses on the generalist practice skills, interventions, and issues involved in working with client systems consisting of families, small groups, organizations and communities. Prerequisites: PSYC101, SOCI101, SOCW150, SOCW155 Co requisites: SOCW210, SOCW200, SOCW170


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THEATER THEA101 Theater Arts I This course acquaints the student with a composite of acting, voice and speech, movement, directing, production, rehearsal, and performance. It also includes an introduction to literary and historical components of theatrical tradition. The course includes community outreach and culminates in a Fall production. THEA102 Theater Arts II This course presents students with a review of the literary and historical components of theatrical tradition. It also provides students with the opportunity to further polish the skills acquired in Theatre Arts I. Sophisticated levels of acting, voice and speech, movement, production, direction, rehearsal and performance will be developed through participation in a spring production and community outreach. VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS VISC105 Digital Illustration This course focuses on basic design principles related to the graphic design and advertising field, including study of principles and elements such as composition, abstraction, color, form, and shapes. Understanding the relationship of elements and development of two-dimensional vector based projects for commercial applications using Adobe Illustrator is also stressed. Emphasis throughout the course is on computer desktop design and production techniques used in contemporary communication processes. VISC110 Understanding Media This media literacy course will focus on how after more than a century of electric technology, we have extended our central nervous system itself in a global embrace, abolishing both space and time as far as our planet is concerned. Are we rapidly approaching the final phase of the extensions of man – the technological simulation of consciousness as Marshall McLuhan predicts? Will the creative process of knowing be collectively and corporately extended to the whole of human society, much as we have already extended our senses and our nerves by the various media? Students will decide whether the extension of consciousness, so long sought by advertisers for specific projects, will be a “good thing”. Students will finally discuss and establish their own point of view as to how this theoretical extension of consciousness through media will affect their use of it as a Graphic or Digital Media Designer. VISC115 Digital Imaging Using Adobe Photoshop, students will solve media problems by producing specific digital graphic solutions while observing the principles of good design. In order to observe how form contributes to message, the student will first research how current industry designers create the essential graphics for their media related projects. Afterwards, the students will gather design elements from various resources to generate original directed designs which conform to and enhance message content. The students will also consider design variables related to various destination media like monitors, printers, and other deliverables. VISC122 Web Design In this Web page/site development course, students will learn how to use the necessary digital tools for designing web pages. Emphasis will be on how to design an effective web page/site for a specific user in mind. Guidelines, tips, and examples of effective and ineffective web sites will be discussed and viewed. Using effective web page design principles, students will create a web site in class that uses the tools within the Macromedia Suite. Students work with a networked environment to practice and learn web authoring, electronic publishing, and image processing software applications necessary for web sites with varied content and media. Prerequisite: VISC115


VISC125 Photography: Film & Light Students are introduced to the principles and processes of still photography, with emphasis on the technical and aesthetic aspects of lighting. Coursework includes 35mm camera handling, exposure control, image composition, B&W films, processing, and printing, and using existing and supplemental lighting techniques. Students are required to have access to a good quality 35mm camera (details available through the department) and to purchase their own film and dark room supplies. VISC130 Digital Video I Digital Video I is a hands-on introduction to digital video and audio technologies, as well as an examination of the social, cultural, political, and theoretical implications of moving-image production in the digital age. The course will primarily focus on commercial, Hollywood, Independent, and Experimental media. Students will gain competency in digital production and post-production while exploring various formal, conceptual, and structural strategies. The goal is for students to be able to communicate effectively, inventively, and idiosyncratically through digital media. Additionally, students will learn to evaluate digital audio and video within the context of their use. Prerequisite: VISC115 VISC135 Digital Video II This course covers advanced techniques in digital video production, post-production and delivery (i.e. interactive video, streaming media, and video in multimedia). Skills developed in the Digital Video I course will be expounded upon. Readings explore video art and digital and visual culture. Students create/critique digital video projects. Students work in teams, taking on the roles typical of video production crews. Pre-production planning, production, and post-production aspects procedures are emphasized. Prerequisites: VISC115, VISC130 VISC200 Kinetic Aesthetics The word ‘kinetic aesthetics’ in the context is intended to refer to the impact that moving images, and the juxtaposition of those images have on an audience. Students will follow the history of cinematic presentation theories and the way these theories have influenced film & video production and post-production. The presentation of each theory is accompanied by film samples that typify these stylistic forms, and course requirements include final presentation projects that require students to mimic the eclectic form of an aesthetic review. This final project will permit the student to exhibit personal stylistic preferences in digital media presentation. VISC201 Interactive Design Interactive Design provides the resources to produce interactive multimedia products. Students are expected to generate logical, user-friendly interfaces; and, to this end, user-interface standards are presented. Since this is an advanced media course, the student is expected to come to this class with the ability to generate his or her own source materials, including the script, graphics, video, and audio resources, and a plan that identifies and considers the target audience. One final program digital media portfolio will be produced by the student using Macromedia’s Director. Attention will be given to portfolio presentation and distribution methods through practical application and illustration. Prerequisite: VISC115 VISC208 Digital Animation This course expounds on the skills first developed in Digital Imaging by adding motion to the visual field in the form of linear motion, between animation of size and texture, transitions, warps, morphs, and other special effects. Adobe Photoshop is used collaboratively with Adobe Premiere and After Effects in order to create final animation projects. Several techniques for introducing text into the visual field are also introduced. Destination media like video and multimedia video clips are explored and assigned to students. Prerequisite: VISC115 VISC215 Scriptwriting Visualization and writing for a variety of media forms, including Public Service Announcement, audio script, video script, storyboard, treatment, video production packet, and news release. Emphasis is on effective language usage, audience analysis, visual imagery, and evaluation procedures for electronic media. Established communication theories are applied to the production process.


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VISC218 Media Design Entrepreneurship Once students have built a portfolio filled with new media work samples, they need help with how to position themselves for a successful career. In Media Design Entrepreneurship, students will learn the essentials of setting up and managing their own media design/new media business. Students will be guided through everything from how to present their portfolios, find work, and market themselves, to the more daunting tasks of registering a company name, establishing an accounting system, and setting up their own corporation. Whether they’re going freelance, setting up their own shop, or just starting out with a big company, this course will set their career on the right track. VISC220 Digital Photography This course will introduce students to digital photography and photographic image manipulation through the use of digital camera and computer technology. Students will build skills and techniques in digital photography and image processing for digital printing, the web, and interactive digital media. Emphasis is placed on acquiring digital photographic skills based on proficient and appropriate use of their camera, software and imaging editing tools. Image formatting possibilities are investigated, along with aesthetic/functional aspects of traditional photography techniques. VISC240 Digital Portfolio This course is designed to develop students’ strategies for exploring and creating a dynamic digital portfolio for the Internet, DVD, and/or CDROM. The students will explore current tactics and practices used to display their best works and showcase projects completed throughout the Digital Media Design and Graphic Design programs. Students will research sites, create storyboards and prototypes, packaging for the portfolio and resume, and analyze the potential audiences. Concepts, cross-platform developments, and issues concerning aesthetics, interface design and the use of media are addressed. Students will also explore and implement various current techniques for electronic selfpromotion. This the Visual Communications’ departmental capstone course to be completed the last semester of study in order for students to properly prepare a successful portfolio for employment or transfer to a four-year college. VISC260 Visual Communications Internship This course is an individualized activity in a designated enterprise cooperating with the Visual Communications Graphic Design and Digital Media Design program(s). The student will obtain professional work experience with a mass media related organization. Co-requisite: Course proposal must be approved by Instructor and Business & Technologies Director WRITING WRIT101 English Composition I Students will practice expository writing and learn the academic form of the essay and research paper. Students will focus on the development of an academically sound and challenging thesis and resulting essay. The mechanics of writing will be reviewed as needed. WRIT102 English Composition II Designed to train the student in effective writing, this course aims to increase the student’s ability to write with unity, coherence, and logic. It provides additional study and practice in critical and argumentative exposition, library research techniques, and the writing of the investigative paper. Prerequisite: WRIT101 WRIT103 Writing for Business and Technology Designed to train the student in effective writing, this course aims to increase the student’s ability to write with unity, coherence, and logic. It provides additional study and practice in writing letters, proposals, manuals, and reports of a business or technical nature as well as in professional and contemporary research methods. Prerequisite: WRIT101


WRIT201 Creative Writing Workshop This seminar offers intensive work on short stories, sketches, and other creative writing. Individuals and the group analyze works produced. Emphasis is on encouraging creativity, but marketing potential is also considered. Prerequisite: WRIT102 WRIT215 Scriptwriting Visualization and writing for a variety of media forms, including Public Service Announcement, audio script, video script, storyboard, treatment, video production packet, and news release. Emphasis is on effective language usage, audience analysis, visual imagery, and evaluation procedures for electronic media. Established communication theories are applied to the production process.

FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION OFFICERS

JOE FORRESTER (1999) President A.A., Tyler Junior College, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Texas A&M University - Commerce STEPHEN R. DANIK (2003) Vice President for Finance & Operations B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.B.A., Duquesne University NANCY DICKSON (2009) Vice President for Community Relations and Development A.A., Community College of Allegheny County; B.A., Point Park University M.B.A., Point Park University SCOTT F. ENSWORTH (1977) Vice President for Human Resource Development B.A., Geneva College; M.S., LaRoche College JUDY A. GARBINSKI (1987) Vice President for Learning and Student Success/Provost B.S.N., M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh A.B.D., Kent State University


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WALTER LUKHAUP (2009) Vice President for Information Technology B.A., University of Rochester; M.L.S., Syracuse University

ADMINISTRATION SUELLEN AVOLIO (1984) Data Mining Coordinator A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County; B.S., Geneva College CHUCK BIGELOW (2006) Network Manager B.S., Robert Morris University JOYCE E. CIRELLI (2007) Director, Radiologic Technology R.T. (R), Diploma St. Francis Hospital; B.S., University of St. Francis; M.S., Geneva College JANET DAVIDSON (2006) Special Term Director of Student Financial Services B.S., Ball State University KAREN DEICHERT (2008) Associate Vice President, Career and Workforce Development B.S., Slippery Rock University; M.A., Morehead State University JOHN GALL (1997) Director, Liberal Arts & Sciences Division B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University LINDA M. GALLAGHER (1992) Associate Vice President for Assessment/Director of Nursing and Allied Health Diploma, Philipsburg Hospital School of Nursing; B.S.N., Slippery Rock University; M.S.N., University of Pittsburgh JOHN S. GOBERISH (2007) Manager, Continuing Education B.A., Slippery Rock University M.S., Mountain State University ROBERT G. GRIMM (2002) Director, Municipal Police Training Academy Hopewell Police Department, retired; A.A.S., Robert Morris University; B.S., M.S., Strassford University


BRIAN HAYDEN (2009) Executive Assistant to the President and Director, Institutional Research M.P.A., University of Pittsburgh M.P.I.A., University of Pittsburgh CHERYL A. HERRINGTON (1998) Manager, Learning/Library Resources A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County GLORIA M. JACOBS (2001) Manager, Human Resource Development A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County; B.S., Geneva College M.S., Geneva College JANICE M. KAMINSKI (1993) Dean, Academic Support Services B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Geneva College JESSICA M. MARCHIONDA (2001) Director, Resource Development B.S., Edinboro University DEBORAH A. MICHEALS (2003) Director, Business & Technologies Division B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; B.S., Clarion University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh ROBERT MOLLENKOPF (2007) Director of Physical Plant Operations B.E., Youngstown State University ANDREA L. MUMMA (2001) General Ledger Accounting Manager B.S., Youngstown State University JOHN NALLO Director, Public Service Occupations Division U.S. Secret Service, retired; A.A.S., American University; B.S., American University; M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania PAUL PINCHOT (2006) Director, Help Desk B.A., Thiel College


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CARMEN ROMEO (2008) Director, Aviation Sciences B.S., Southern Illinois University RAYMOND J. SCHWEINBERG (1999) Educational Technologies Coordinator A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County DANIEL J. SLATER (1981) Registrar B.S., M.S., Duquesne University VICKI L. SUEHR (1998) Manager, Human Resource Development/ Payroll Information Systems A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County; B.S., M.B.A., Franklin University LESLIE TENNANT (2001) Director, Communications B.A., Waynesburg University ROSE WHELPLEY (2008) Enterprise Applications Manager A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County B.S., Robert Morris University; M.S., California University of PA

FACULTY ALICIA F. ABATE (2008) Assistant Professor, Nursing B.S.N., M.S.N., Waynesburg College FRANK J. ALBERT (1987) Associate Professor, English B.A., M.A., University of Pittsburgh PATRICIA ANDREWS (2007) Assistant Professor, Allied Health B.S., Youngstown State University JACQUELINE BLACK (2006) Associate Professor, Early Childhood Education B.A., Geneva College; M.Ed., Carlow University DONNA M. BOGLE (1989) Assistant Professor, Business A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County; B.S., Indiana University of PA; M.S., LaRoche College


LAURIE BUCCI (2007) Instructor, Radiologic Technology R.T. (R), Penn State University/Mercy Hospital A.A.S.; (M) St. Francis Hospital B.A., American Intercontinental University ANDREW CAMBPELL (2006) Assistant Professor, Networking B.S., Clarion University; M.S., University of Phoenix ROBERT L. CAMPBELL (1988) Instructor, Aviation A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County LAUREN K. CARFAGNA (2009) Assistant Professor, Counseling B.A., Pennsylvania State University M.S., Chatham College MAXINE COLEMAN (2008) Assistant Professor, Nursing B.S., University of Pittsburgh M.B.A., Old Dominion University M.S.N., University of Phoenix ANDREA M. CONNOR (2008) Assistant Professor, Sociology B.A., Carlow University M.S.W., University of Pittsburgh GEORGE DAVID (2006) Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., California University of Pennsylvania MARK W. DEITRICK (1990) Professor, Education B.S., Gannon University; M.A., Slippery Rock University; Ph.D., Robert Morris University National Certified Counselor; Licensed Professional Counselor ESTELLE DELPRINCIPE (1977) Professor, Biology B.S., M.Ed., Slippery Rock University; MT (ASCP)


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LADONNA K. DMITSAK (1989) Professor, Nursing B.S.N., Carlow University; M.S.N., University of Pittsburgh

GLENN EATON (2006) Instructor, Air Traffic Control Enroute A.S., Broward Community College KIMBERLY A. ETZEL (2009) Assistant Professor, Nursing B.S.N., Indiana University of Pennsylvania PATRICIA FOLEY (2004) Instructor, Visual Technologies B.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth University MARYANNE FRABOTTA (2005) Associate Professor, Mathematics B.A., M.S., University of Pittsburgh KAREN GANSKA (1991) Professor, Counseling B.A., M.S., Gannon University HOPE GOSSARD (2006) Assistant Professor, Developmental English B.A., Robert Morris University; M.A., Slippery Rock University DENNIS C. HAGGERTY (1989) Professor, Physics B.S., M.S., Carnegie Mellon University Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh THOMAS C. HEASLEY (1967) Professor, Biology & Chemistry B.S., Edinboro University; M.S., University of Nebraska PEGGY HENNEQUANT (2005) Assistant Professor, Counseling B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Geneva College National Certified Counselor KATHY HINCHBERGER (1990) Professor, Nursing B.S.N., Carlow University; M.S.N., University of Pittsburgh


HEIDIE G. HUTCHINSON (1985) Associate Professor, Computer Information Systems\Telecommunications B.S., Farah University; M.S., University of Pittsburgh ANN ELIZABETH JANSTO (1998) Assistant Professor, Math B.A., Agnes Scott College M.S., Clemson University DANIEL E. KLAUS (1988) Professor, Psychology B.A., University of Missouri; M.S., University of Pittsburgh, Licensed Psychologist CAROLYN W. CLARKE KUPPERMAN (1981) Professor, Criminal Justice B.A., Arizona State University; M.A. Temple University, University of Pittsburgh, Duquesne University DOUGLAS K. LAUFFER (1997) Associate Professor, Computer Information Systems/Telecommunications A.S., Westmoreland County Community College; B.A., B.S., Geneva College; M.S., University of Pittsburgh LEILA MANDEL (2005) Associate Professor, Reference Librarian B.A., Federal University of Rio De Janeiro; M. Ed., University of Toronto; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh JOSEPH J. MANGIE (1985) Associate Professor, CAD/Psychology B.S., The Pennsylvania State University; M.A., West Virginia University CYNTHIA L. MARSHALL (1990) Professor, English B.S., M.A. Slippery Rock University; Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh; Post Doctoral Work Kenyon College-Writing Division Teaching Certification in Hatha and Ashtanga Yoga


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URSULA B. MATUSZAK (1986) Professor, Aviation A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County; B.S., Geneva College

CHRISTINE O’LEARY (2005) Associate Professor, Nursing A.S., Community College of Allegheny County; B.S.N., M.S.N., LaRoche College LANA M. PODOLAK (1989) Professor, Business B.S., Geneva College; M.S., M.B.A., Robert Morris University LOUISE PRYOR (2007) Instructor, Radiologic Technology R.T. (R), Medical Center of Beaver County B.A., LaRoche College; DEBORAH A. REED (1986) Professor, Business A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County; B.S., Geneva College; M.S., Robert Morris University PAUL ROGERS (2004) Assistant Professor, Business B.S., M.B.A., Clarion University LORRAINE M. RORICK (2008) Assistant Professor, CIS/Telecommunications B.S., M.S., University of Pittsburgh FRANCES SCHWEINBERG (2007) Instructor, Radiologic Technology R.T. (R), A.A.S., Western School of Health and Business B.A., American Intercontinental University; JIM SCOTT (2006) Instructor, Air Traffic Control Terminal MARY JO SLATER (2003) Associate Professor, Office Technology Master Instructor Microsoft Office Authorized Instructor-IC3 (Internet Computing Core) A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County B.S., Geneva College M.S., Robert Morris University C. V. SMITH III (2001) Assistant Professor, History and Political Science B.A., Franciscan University; M.A., Duquesne University


ELAINE STROUSS (2006) Associate Professor, Nursing B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Medical University of Ohio SHANNON M. SULLIVAN (2004) Assistant Professor, Nursing A.A.S., Community College of Beaver County; B.S.N., M.S.N., Carlow College KATIE L. THOMAS (2008) Assistant Professor, English B.A., Edinboro University M.A., Slippery Rock University ELIZABETH A. VALICENTI (1975) Professor, Business B.S., Ohio University; M.T. (A.S.C.P.) Youngstown Hospital Association School of Medical Technology; M.S., M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh CHERYL WEBB (2007) Assistant Professor, Nursing B.S., Indiana University; M.S.N., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh PETER C. ZUBRITZKY (1988) Professor, Psychology and Education B.A., Wilkes University; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh Licensed Psychologist; Certified Sports Psychologist

EMERITUS FACULTY BETTY R. MORROW (1967) Emeritus Professor English

TRUSTEES OF THE COLLEGE John M. Biondi, Esq. Cynthia P. Gleason Marta J. Karwoski Helen T. Kissick Fr. Joseph Kleppner, S.T.L., PhD John A. Kochanowski Frederick Retsch Stephen W. Robinson Joseph Tate


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2010

QUALITY& 2011

UNIQUENESS

Beaver Country Community College - College Catalog  

College information and program details for the 2010 - 2011 term.

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