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Christy L. Coleman Work Samples 4243 Monroe St Apt 1/8 L.A., C.A. 90029 646.528.5260 Christy.Coleman@gmail.com


Christy L. Coleman

4243 Monroe Street; APT 1/8; L.A., CA 90029

Christy.Coleman@gmail.com

646.528.5260

Education Southern California Institute of Architecture, Los Angeles, California; M. ARCH 1 Relevant Courses: Six Semesters of Design Studios, Materials, Properties and Structural Process, Structures I, Structures II, Design Development, Advanced Building Systems, Sustainability, Urban Geography, Planning and Real Estate, Tempering the Environment, Strategies of Representation I, Strategies of Representation II, Strategies of Representation III, Strategies of Representation IV, Architectural Culture I, Architectural Culture II, Introduction to Tectonics, Building Component Design & Fabrication, Casting and Mold-making

Experience Beyond Media – Elena Manferdini & Alexis Rochas, Florence, Italy; 06/2009 Installations

Merletti – Elena Manferdini, SCI-Arc Gallery, Los Angeles, California; 03/2008 Assisted with the assembly of components according to precise location in the canopy. Responsible for quality checking and detecting errors ahead of scheduled implementation.

Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY Major: American Studies (GPA 3.4). Department honors earned with completion of 70-page thesis. Minors: Studio Art, Anthropology

Droopscape – Ball and Nogues, Coachella, California; 05/2007 Assisted with the installation by grounding and securing 30-foot structural tripods using a jackhammer; earth anchors and steel cables; lifting canopy with “cherry-picker” and attaching it to structural members and connecting and fastening over 200 customized Mylar pieces.

Experience Atelier Manferdini, Venice, California; Intern; 05/2008 - 01/2009 Office

• Assisted with a design competition for Guiyang Huaxi, China which was initiated by MAD Architects. Responsibilities included: researching building typology, generating drawings, producing laser cut and 3-D print models, as well as final presentation boards. • Assisted with current proposal for civic center in Malpensa, Italy. Responsibilities included: 3-D modeling and elevating preexisting physical models to presentation quality. • Oversaw solo exhibition of Elena Manferdini: Works in Progress at the Italian Institute of Culture. Responsibilities included: managing all aspects of the show such as exhibition design/layout, budgets, exhibit installation, and the design and layout of the exhibition catalogue. • Produced technical drawings for the fabrication of a necklace commissioned by Bulgari. • Assisted with and co-created designs for a tabletop line for Alessi. Responsible for engineering the design for maximum efficiency in terms of material and production costs. Assisted with several rounds of design development. Produced 3-D prints as well as laser cut study models. Generated technical drawings which were sent to Italy for production. • Created the pattern for a stool carried by Arktura. The stool is currently in the permanent collection at LACMA. Worked through several rounds of design development to modify design and increase material and cost efficiencies. Produced several study models and technical drawings.

Taalman Koch Architects, Los Angeles, California; Intern; Summer 2007 • Drew Construction Documents for residential projects in Hollywood and for an artist’s studio space in Culver City, C.A. • Built physical model for residential project in Santa Monica. Model was used in meetings with the Landmarks Commission and Santa Monica City Council. • Assisted with schematic designs and drew plans and elevations for an “off-the-grid” house.

Everyspace, Brooklyn, New York; Co-Founder; 04/2004 - Current • Co-founded a furniture design collective which aims to design flexible furniture for urban lifestyles. • Liased with fabricators to produce large and small scale furniture objects. • Designed marketing materials including website (www.everyspacedesign.com), press kits, design show exhibition booths at BrooklynDesigns 2005 and 2006. • Everyspace showed at BrooklynDesigns 2005 & 2006 and at Caboom 2007

The New York Times Company, About, Inc., NYC, New York; 05/2000 - 02/2006 Manager, Product Marketing: Reporting to the Director of Marketing; 09/2004- 04/2006 • Acted as liaison between clients, sales and internal departments such as Finance, Editorial and Product Development to create high-yielding, effective advertising programs ($150,000+). • Developed ad products, such as themed packages and the sponsorship of editorial promotions, which leveraged new inventory opportunities thereby generating incremental revenue, 2005 forecast was 15%. • Created sales proposals (valued at $5M) and attained internal approvals for large strategic partnerships with clients. • Responsible for About’s trade marketing efforts including events, general presentation, sell sheets and all trade marketing events. Director, Client Services: Reporting to VP of Sales Operations; 05/2002 - 09/2004 • Effectively developed the operational workflow for Client Services and various departments in the company - proven by the reduction of our in-house spill rate from 13% to less than 3%. • Created sales marketing materials for About and Sprinks: writing and designing About.com’s general presentation, sales pitches and internal/external sales materials. • Creative problem solving to secure revenue, ensure client satisfaction and increase customer retention. • Managed a team of five: three Client Service Account Managers and two Account Coordinators.

Architecture programs from around the world were invited to represent their school with an installation. Responsibilities included: all material research, management of the fabrication team and all aspects of fabrication.

Dragonfly – Emergent, SCI-Arc Gallery, Los Angeles, California; 04/2007 Assembled physical model of the site and the installation for structural analysis by Burro Happold. Assisted with the fabrication and assembly of a several hundred part aluminum installation.

Awards

Gratuated from SCI-Arc with a Service Merit Distinction, Scholarship Selected to represent SCI-Arc at the “House as Manifesto” workshop in Austria SCI-Arc Thesis Scholarship 2009 SCI-Arc Scholarship 2008

Skills

Software: Maya, AutoCAD, Rhino, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, Adobe After Effects, Flash, Mental Ray, Maxwell, Magics, and Surfcam Fabrication: CNC Mill, Laser cutting, 3-D printing

Press

ONRamp 2009 (SCI-ARC publication of selected student works), Apartmenttherapy.com featured Everyspace (April 2007), ReadyMade featured Everyspace (January 2007), Fine Furnishings International featured Connect Seating (July/Aug 2006), Interior Design Magazine featured Pivot Table (April 2006), JANE Magazine featured Pivot Table (September 2005), BKLYN Magazine featured Pivot Table (Fall 2005), Design*Sponge featured several Everyspace products (May, 2005)


Unravelled: Between Field and Figure Architecture has a controversial relationship with figuration and these fluctuations can be traced throughout history. From the floral patterns of early Islamic mosques to the ornamentation and embellishment of Greek Columns, the figure has been ingrained into architectural design. Opposing opinions about the role of figuration in architecture were made mainstream with Modernist ideals and it was Aldof Loos’s text “Crime and Ornament” that solidified and codified these opinions. Through the Modernist Movement, Loos’s legacy yielded concrete structures devoid of ornamentation and figuration which meant office buildings and residential apartments were often times indistinguishable from one another. It is precisely this discrepancy between form and symbol that prompted the Postmodern Movement to begin encoding notations into the building’s skin, giving users and viewers an understanding of the building’s function at first sight. This movement was commonly referred to as “antiintellectual” by scholars and “the duck” or “decorated shed” were ultimately dismissed as one liners. Today, there are new attitudes emerging about

figuration and its potential to determine an entirely new territory for architecture. This thesis aimed to investigate the role of aggregation in invigorating figuration and moving it away from its common criticism of being only a surface treatment or an iconic object. By using aggregation, field and figure will blend such that the viewer will understand that the object – in this case the fish – is at once a distinctly independent object and an integral part of the whole unit. Simultaneously shifting the scale of the fish from that of a brick to that of a room will also make the figure disappear and reappear. This thesis argues that this logic will be the next movement in figuration. With the ability of the unit to oscillate from an indistinguishable object, a field condition, to a distinguished figure or part of the whole – will come infinite possibilities for figuration to reemerge with more complexity. Skills: 3-D Maya modeling, Maya Animations, Maxwell and Mental Ray Renders, Rhino, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, 3-D print models, CNC milled models, Vacuum form models

Above: Snapshots of Riemann grid deformation

Above: Planametric view of fish deformation based on grid

Above: Elevation view of fish deformation based on grid

Above: View of front entrance.

Above: View of exhibition display.

Above: Bird’s-Eye view of pavillion.

Above: Interior view of front entrance.

Above: Physical model showing a detailed portion of the above wall. It is a double-sided CNC mill approximately 3’x2’ in size.


Berkley Museum of Art While Toyo Ito won the bid to design a new home for the Berkley Museum of Art, this studio focused on designing a new museum that created innovative solutions for lighting, museum display, circulation and structural systems. The below diagrams are early studies of lighting and circulation. Working in teams of two, we were challenged to accommodate the complex program of an art museum, while simultaneously integrating the building into the site context. This project was selected by SCI-Arc faculty to advance to design development. While in design development, we not

only articulated detail conditions of the building, but we also analyzed the building in terms of its environmental sustainability. Additionally, we were challenged to rationalize a portion of the design. The diagrams at the bottom right show the variance between actual non planar panels and panels once they were rationalized and made planar. Skills: 3-D Maya Modeling, Maxwell Rendering, Rhino, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, 3-D print models, CNC milling, laser cutting, and vacuum forming

Lobby

Sculpture Garden Bookstore

Temporary Collection

N

Above: First floor plan.

B

B

D

Above: Bird’s-Eye view.

A

B

B D

3-3/8” DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

C

C D

DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

A

3-1/8” DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

A

2-3/4” DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

D A 3”

B

DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

Above: View of entrance from the street. Diagram showing rationalized panalization of portion of building.

DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

31.18

4

"

7' C

144.60

"

3/4 7' 4

D 41.73

B D A DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

10

1/2

C

A 137.01

C

2 3/8”

4' 7/8"

" 3/4

D

D A

36.66 B

4' 7/8 "

10 7' A 137.55

41.45

D 35.92

C B

DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

4' 5 1/8"

4' 5 1 /8" 142.79

3/4

D 35.40

D A 2 5/8”

149.6

"

7'

3/4

A

C

A

10

3' 9 1/8"

143.68

B

"

7'

149.60

3/4 "

3/4

3/4

7' 4

4

4' 7/8"

"

7'

10

36.32 B

31.70

B

7'

3' 9 5/8"

31.23

"

153.64 C

4' 1 1/2 "

2" 1/

4' 9 7/8"

4' 9 7/8"

D 30.41

B

A 2 1/2” DIFFERENCE @ POINT A

10 7' 147.48 A

C D

D A 2-3/4”

153.64 C

4' 5 7/8"

148.78

C B

" 3/4

A

4' 5 1/8"

3/ 4"

6' 10

" 3/4 10

C

B

B

D

C

C

27.7

27.06

10 7'

C 145.6

D 40.78

D 40.34

2" 1/

A

3/ 4"

4 7' 137.77

7' 4

145.60 C

4' 7/8"

4' 7/8"

43

6'

D 34.3955

7' 138.55 A

3' 9 5/8"

"

1/2 4

4' 5 1 /8"

7'

D 34.3955

35.85 B

35.40 B

/4"

C 150.458

3/ 4"

" 3/4 10 6'

4' 7/8"

" 3/4 6'

10

4' 6”

29.5414

A 144.603 4' 1 1/2 ”

C 150.458

6' 10

A 144.603

" 3/4 10

D

D 29.5414

30.4087 B

"

" 3/4 4 7'

" 1/2

C 154.35

A 149.591

30.4087 B

4' 9 7/8"

4

C 154.35

6'

7/8 "

7'

3/4

D 39.77

D 39.10

26.3626 B

4' 9 7/8"

5/8

"

4' 7/8"

6' 10

4

6' 4

3' 9 3/4"

3/ 4" 6' 4

"

7' A 149.591

146.68

A

138.53

7/ 8"

A

35.02 B

4' 7/8"

6' 10

146.68 C

3' 9 1/8"

34.35

139.67

3' 9 1/8"

" D

33.62

7/8 "

7/8 6' 4

4' 7/8"

D

30.08

C 151.36

143.87

"

145.60

34.40 B

1/8"

1/2 10 6' A

C 151.36

6' 4

3/4

4' 5 1/8"

10

4' 5 1/8"

30.42 B

29.54 B

"

6' A

4' 1 5/8 "

" 1/2 10 6' 7/8 "

D

D 28.64

C 155

6' 4

4 7/

8"

4' 6 1/8"

148.02 A

4' 5

26.85 B

C 155

6'

4' 5 1 /8"

3/4

4' 9 7/8"

10

4' 5 1/8

26.3626 B

25.65 B

"

6' A 150.46

4' 9 7/8"

Above: Early lighting study diagrams.

2 1/4”

"

7'

4

3/4

144.60


Advanced Studio: Interstitiality & Pochet This studio focused on designing a Music Conservatory for Education City, Qatar. Working in groups and utilizing parametric software, we were challenged to design a building that had inherent complexity and created space with interstitiality and pochet. We used digital projects to create a system of branches that divided space both planometrically and sectionally - as seen in the below diagrams. We

Floor 1

Floor 2

then used these branches to generate multiple building systems such as: circulation, light wells, interior rooms, and creases along the exterior which allow indirect light into spaces. SKILLS: Maya, Digital Projects, Rhino, Mental Ray & Maxwell Rendering, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, 3-D printing and laser cut models

Floor 3

Floor 4

Floor 5

6.07 6.07

10.69

6.07

10.69

6.07

10.69

13.94

6.07

6.07

9.32

6.07

10.69

6.07 10.69

Section 1

Section 2

10.69

10.69

10.69

10.69

1.81

6.07

2.81

3.26

7.43

Above: Planometric diagrams of branching per floor and the resultant spaces created.

Section 3

Above: Sectional diagrams of branching illustrating network of vertical circulation and division of spaces.

Above: View of entrance from street.

Exterior skin and floorplates

Exterior skin and circulation

Exterior skin and creases

Exterior skin, lightwells and creases

Exterior skin and lightwells

Exterior skin, floorplates and circulation

Above: Diagrams illustrate inter-relationships of all builiding componets which were generenated by branching.

Above: Interior circulation with light wells.

Above: View of interior circulation.


Visual Studies: Metamorphosis This visual studies class began in 2-D by deforming a periodic tessellation geometry - as seen in upper image on the right page. We then began working in groups of two to blend the two tessellations together - as seen in the lower image on the right page. We eventually expanded the pattern to include another group of two, thus yielding a “Metamorphosis� pattern. We then designed a unit that incorporated all four designs and created a 3-D print as seen in the rendering below.

Finally, using the line work from the initial two drawings, we created a flash website that displayed our work generated in the class. This website is seen below - and as users hover over certain tiles, images of the works reveal themselves. SKILLS: Maya, Rhino, Maxwell Rendering, Mental Ray, Magics, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Flash, and 3-D print models

Above: Screenshots of flash web-site created to show all the work we produced in the course.

Above: Single deformed tesselation.

Above: Rendering of four distinct modules combined and eventually 3-D printed.

Above: Combination of two distinct tesellations.


Internship with Elena Manferdini In this internship, I was exposed to numerous industrial design projects such as the Ricami Stool that was designed for Arktura and is shown below. The drawing on the left shows the pattern designed for the perforations and how the pattern unfolds to form the stool. To the right of these drawings is the finished product which was recently added to the permenant collection of Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and is currently on display there. In addition to industrial design, this internship provided an opportunity for graphic design. I was responsible for the design and layout of the exhibition catalouge for her solo exhibition Elena Manferdini: Works in Progress.

Above: Drawings of Ricami pattern of perforation and panels for production.

The drawing at the bottom of this page was used as the cover of the catalogue. Additionally, I assisted with an architectural competition for a residential tower in Guiyang, China as seen on the opposite page. The shown section was submitted for the competition. Finally, a series of models were produced. Digital fabrication techniques to produce these models included laser cutting and 3-D printing. SKILLS: Maya, Rhino, AutoCAD, Maxwell Rendering, Mental Ray, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, Magics, 3-D print and laser cut models

Above: Ricami finished product.

Above: Section of Guiyang Tower.

coverart8_CS2outlines.ai 8/15/2008 2:53:43 PM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Above: Graphic design for cover of exhibition catalogue.

Above: Study model of Guiyang Tower.

Above: Study model of Guiyang Tower- 3-D print.

Above: Study model of Guiyang Tower - laser cut.

Christy Coleman Work Samples  

Graduate portfolio.

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