Page 1

Reid Ecteverry_Christina Hackett_Kelly Keefe_Hayle Lipp_Mike Mansfield_Ian McMurtrey

crandall gym_old natatorium

renovation


CONTENTS CONTENTS 2 SECTION 1.0 1.1 LETTER TO THE CLIENT 3 1.2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 1.3 PROJECT PARTICIPANTS 3 SECTION 2.0 2.1 MISSION STATEMENT 3 2.2 PROJECT GOALS 3 SECTION 3.0 3.1 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 4 3.2 PROGRAM SUMMARY TABLE 4 3.3 ADJACENCY DIAGRAMS 4 3.4 ROOM/EQUIPMENT DATA SHEETS 5 SECTION 4.0 4.1 DEMOLITION PLAN 7 4.2 FLOOR PLANS 9 4.3 FRAMING PLANS 12 4.4 SITE SECTIONS 24 4.5 CROSS SECTIONS 25 4.7 PERSPECTIVES OF RENOVATION 26 SECTION 5.0 5.1 SITE/CLIMATE CONDITIONS 29 5.2 CONTEXT ANALYSIS DIAGRAM 30 5.3 SITE ANALYSIS DIAGRAM 31 5.4 SITE OPPORTUNITES/CONSTRAINTS 31 5.5 SITE DEVELOPMENT MASTER PLAN 32 5.6 1:5 PLAN 33 5.7 PLANTING PLAN 34 5.7 LIGHTING PLAN 35 SECTION 6.0 6.1 SITE DESIGN 36 6.2 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 36 6.3 CONSTRUCTION 36 6.4 STRUCTURAL DESIGN 37 SECTION 7.0 7.1 PRECONSTRUCTION SEQUENCING DIAGRAM 38 7.2 CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY SCHEDULE 39 7.3 PROJECT MILESTONE SCHEDULE 39 SECTION 8.0 8.1 FUNCTIONAL PLANNING BUDGET 40 8.2 COST BREAKDOWN 41 8.3 DESCRIPTION/VALIDATION OF COST MODEL 42 SECTION 9.0 9.1/9.2/9.3 43 SECTION 10.0 10.1 REGULATORY AGENCY REVIEW 43 10.2 BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS 43 10.3 PLUMBING CODE ANALYSIS 45 10.4 LEED CHECKLIST 45 10.5 ASCE 31 Summary 46 SECTION 11.0 11.1 CASE STUDY BUILDINGS 47 11.2 [a] LEED SUMMARY 48 11.3 ARCE APPENDIX 49 11.4 LA APPENDIX 53 11.5 CM APPENDIX 58 11.6 ARCH APPENDIX 59


SECTION 1.0 1.1 LETTER TO THE CLIENT

March 7th, 2011 Dick Zweifel College of Architecture and Environmental Design California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 1 Grand Avenue San Luis Obispo, CA 93410 To: Dick Zweifel Servizi Supremo Inc. is excited to respond to your RFP for the renovation of the Natatorium and Crandall Gym buildings on Cal Poly’s Campus. Servizi Supremo Inc. is a group of design and construction professionals working together to deliver a superior product to its clients. For this Renovation we have centered our design and focus around the idea of “Preserving the Past while Showcasing the Future.” Our team worked together to create a project that not only preserves the historical past of Crandall Gym but allows the CAED to showcase its many disciplines and curriculum. Our team feels confident that the design proposed meets the needs and wants of the project while delivering the most value possible. We are excited to have the opportunity to work with Cal Poly and bring a truly unique building experience. Sincerely, Servizi Supremo Inc. Team Reid Etcheverry: Project Manager Kelly Keefe: Chief Estimator Christina Hackett: Architect Designer Hayle Lipp: Structural Engineer Ian McMurtrey: Architect Designer Mike Mansfield: Landscape Architect

1.2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo and Servizi Supremo Inc. are collaborating in the renovation of Cal Poly’s Crandall Gym and Natatorium. The Natatorium, originally built as an indoor pool facility and currently the Information Technology office, will be transformed into a digital fabrication lab with interdisciplinary classrooms. The historic Crandall Gym, once an old sports gym with offices, will be turned into Cal Poly’s new CAED auditorium and digital fabrication library. The site currently houses a dance studio and old locker room. Both structures will be torn down and a new breeze way will be built for pedestrian circulation that more properly defines the entrance to the CAED College. The site is located on Cal Poly’s South-West end of campus between Cuesta and College Avenue. The site is directly between the College of Architecture and Environmental design and Mustang Stadium. The 82,000 sq. feet of property will be utilized in a way that will provide safe pedestrian traffic and limited vehicular access. This integrated project team in charge of the renovation has weekly meetings, workshops, and critiqued presentations from Cal Poly’s CAED department. The deliverables that will be provided to the client will consist of the proposed building and site development for the renovation. Architectural concepts, seismic retrofit, cost analysis, construction sequencing, and code specifics will also be provided.

SECTION 2.0

1.3 PROJECT PARTICIPANTS INTEGRATED FIRM

Servizi Supremo Inc. Ian McMurtrey, Architect Christina B. Hackett, Architect Hayle Lipp, Structural Engineer Kelly Keefe, Construction Manager Reid Etcheverry, Construction Manager Mike Mansfield, Landscape Architect

2.1 MISSION STATEMENT

SSI, an integrated disciplinary firm , is dedicated to collaborative projects that demonstrate good communication between designer, engineers, and construction managers for overall hollistic designs.

2.2 PROJECT GOALS

CLIENTS

California Polytechnic State University President: Jeffrey D. Armstrong CAED Dean: R. Thomas Jones CAED Associate Dean: K. Richard Zweifel

design problem

The CAED seeks a conceptual design proposal that creates a new hub for digital fabrication within the Crandall Gym and Natatorium site and provides optimum linkages between buildings and outdoor spaces within its current campus footprint (from Building 05 to the Power House, Engineering West, and new Construction Innovations Center). The complex in its design, engineering, and construction should illustrate principles of historic preservation, adaptive reuse, sustainability, innovative technology, flexibility, and interactivity. The proposal must demonstrate improved access: building and site circulation for pedestrians, bikes, and vehicles along all major and minor axes connected to the site. It must also address universal design features throughout. It should provide new design concepts for intersecting or terminus nodes as places of visual and practical importance (aesthetic and orienting, respectively). The new design should enhance indoor-outdoor connections between the buildings and the site in ways that create opportunities for new modes of interactive learning and foster a universitywide conversation between departments and colleges on the art, science, and technology of “making”.

client needs

1. Build a Digital Fabrication Lab with interdisciplinary classrooms, faculty offices, and appropriate storage spaces for equipment supplies 2. Undergo construction in a way that won’t disrupt Cal Poly activities, classes, and the overall circulation of cars, bikes and pedestrians 3. Create a cohesive site that connects the different parts of campus 4. Seismic retrofit of Crandall Gym 5. Improve interdiciplinary communication. 6. Keeping the architectural character of the Crandall Gym as a vital part of Cal Poly’s history.

design intentions

1. Design a flexible space that will accommodate future changes and/or modernization of equipment with the d[fab] facilitity. 2. Provide and accommodate phasing and staging for current occupants during construction. 3. Create a directional flow through the building by connecting to the proposed CAED spine 4. Add adequate lateral system to Crandall Gym 5. Create a meeting place for CAED college _Reuse of the historical gym as an auditorium for a large CAED meeting space _Incorporation of an exterior plaza that will allow for an outdoor public meeting space _ Keep the dFab lab separate from the classroom and meeting spaces due to noise and circulation separation _Interdisciplinary classrooms 6. Preserve the historical characteristics of Crandall Gym _Take out the dance studio to place in more appropriate location _Restoring the gym back to its historical state

3


3.1 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The stakeholders Jim Doerfler, who is the head of Cal Poly’s Digital Fabrication Facility, and Dick Zwifel, who is the department head of Cal Poly’s Landscape Architecture program, formulated the program for the reuse of Crandall Gym and the Old Natatorium as a Digital Fabrication Lab. The program designed by SSI Inc. reflects the stakeholder’s needs and desires by transforming the abandoned Crandall Gym and Natatorium into a centrally located hub that serves as the gateway and entrance to the College of Architecture and Environmental Design. It also reflects their desire for having a facility that has an open design that will easily accommodate any future changes. The program has three primary functional areas: classrooms, a small prototype area and a large prototype area. Along with the main functional areas, there are also numerous support spaces such as a library, gallery space, and an auditorium. The following Program Summary Table groups the related required program spaces together and shows the required square footage for each component compared to the actual square footage of the designed spaces. The adjacency diagram shows the relative scale of each space, which is designated a color that correlates to the program floor plans. Through these diagrams, the incorporation of the clients’ needs and project goals into the design of the facility are prevalent. The floor plans and the proposed master plan graphically explain the organization and relationship of the spaces and how they relate to the site and the surrounding context. They also address how the issues of a drastic change in grade on the site are resolved in a design that provides easy and indiscriminatory access into all parts of the building.

3.2 PROGRAM SUMMARY TABLE Space

Area

Quantity

SECTION 3.0

3.3 ADJACENCY DIAGRAMS

Total

d[fab] lab Small Prototpe Area Large Prototype Area Post Processor Area Support Lab

1160 SF 1264 SF 2655 SF 758 SF

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Subtotal:

1160 SF 1264 SF 2655 SF 758 SF 2827 SF 185 SF 576 SF 9425 SF

761 SF 24 SF 120 SF

1 1 1 Subtotal:

761 SF 24 SF 120 SF 905 SF

1007 SF

2 Subtotal:

2014 2015 SF

1358 SF 2173 SF

1 1 Subtotal:

1358 SF 2173 SF 3531 SF

235 SF [each]

2 Subtotal:

470 SF 470 SF

7848 SF 575 SF

1 1 Subtotal:

7848 SF 575 SF 8423 SF

Outdoor Assembly Area d[fab] O ce Material Storage

185 SF

plaza

outdoor assembly area

Library Library Space Storage Library O ce

storage

indoor gallery space

Classroom Classroom [ exible]

office

Galleries Permanent Indoor Flexible Indoor/Outdoor

auditorium entrance

auditorium

d[fab] lab

flexible gallery space

Restroom Men/Women

storage

Auditorium Auditorium Space Storage

Total NSF Net to Gross Area

24,796 SF 549 SF

Total GSF

25,384 SF

storage

rest room

library classrooms

4


3.4 ROOM/EQUIPMENT DATA SHEETS Room Name

d[fab] lab Small Prototype Area Large Prototype Area Post Processor Area Support Lab Indoor Assembly Lab Outdoor Assembly lab Material Storage

Indoor/Outside

[Indoor] Indoor Indoor Indoor Indoor Indoor Outdoor Outdoor

Size

109'3" x 55'2"

SF

Max. Occupancy

6033 SF

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

Environmental

Lighting: Temperature: Humidity: Noise:

Fluorescent Indirect/Direct Natural/Mechanical Ventilation Standard Acoustical Dampening to absorb noise by equipment

Fire Rating

Sprinklers

Yes

Yes Finishes

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Stained Concrete None Painted Concrete Exposed Structure, Acoustical Clouds Furniture

Work tables, stools, shelves, and cabinets.

Misc. Equipment

Laser cutters, CNC machines, rapid prototype machines, robots, digital arm

Adjacencies

O ce, Storage, Flexible Gallery Space, Plaza Functions

Workshop and construction space Options/Remarks

Designed with high vertical clearance and clear site lines. Also Designed with a very open plan to allow for any future changes

LEGENDLEGEND RAPID PROTOTYPE RAPID PROTOTYPE MACHINESMACHINES LASER CUTTERS LASER CUTTERS CNC MACHINE/WATER CNC MACHINE/WATER JET CUTTER JET CUTTER ROBOTIC ARM ROBOTIC TRACK ARM TRACK

[FIRST] LEVEL

[SECOND] LEVEL

5


Room Name

Library Space

Indoor/Outside

Indoor

Size

44'1" x 7'3"

SF

Room Name

Max.Occupancy

Auditorium

761 SF

Lighting: Temperature: Humidity: Noise:

Over head Flourescent Direct/Indirect and task lighting Natural and Mechanical None Sound insulation and damping

Fire Rating

Furniture

Misc. Equipment

Size

16'11" x 15'3"

Environmental

Overhead ourescent Natural/mechanical Standard None

Fire Rating

Room Name

Max.Occupancy

Sta O ce [2] O ce [1] O ce [2]Functions

Yes

Lighting: Temperature: Humdity: Noise:

Misc. Equipment

Furniture

Adjacencies

Restrooms, Flexible gallery space, auditorium entrance Options/Remarks

Two moveable partition walls to create smaller spaces when needed. Located near plaza.

Options/Remarks

Spare Conduits

Indoor/Outside

Size

SF

Max.Occupancy

Room Name

Classroom [2] Indoor Indoor

13'8" x 13'8" 9'3" x 12'9"

Ove head ourescent and task lighting Natural and mechanical Standard Sound insulation in walls

185 SF 120 SF

5 3

Flexible gallery space, permanent indoor gallery space

Dimensions

36'9" x 27'5"

SF

1007 SF

Max. Occupancy

25

Over head fluorescent and task lighting Natural and mechanical Standard Sound insulation in walls

Fire Rating

Sprinklers

Yes

Yes

Sprinklers

Finishes

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Carpet over concrete Painted MDF Painted GBD Acoustical Tiles Furniture

Indoor/Outside

Indoor

Environmental

Lighting: Temperature: Humidity: Noise:

Carpet over concrete Painted MDF Painted GBD Acoustical Tiles Furniture

Desks, chairs, tables Adjacencies

Misc. Equipment

Nana walls, to allow for adjustable space

Finishes

Misc. Equipment

Carpet over conrete Painted MDF Painted GBD Accoustical Tile

Small tables and chairs

Yes

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Sprinklers

Yes

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Functions

Yes

Tile Tile Tile Accoustical Tiles

Max.Occupancy

Finishes

Stained concrete Painted MDF Painted GBD

Adjacencies

Fire Rating

Finishes

SF

1358 SF

Overhead Direct/Indirect ourescents and spot lamps Natural/Mechanical Standard Accoustical Tiles

Yes

Restrooms, Flexible gallery space, auditorium entrance

Environmental

Sprinklers

Yes

SF

235 SF

Size

14'4" x 94'9"

Fire Rating

Sprinklers

Flexible seating to allow for multi-use functions

Indoor/Outside

Indoor

Indoor/Outside

Indoor

Environmental

Lighting: Temperature: Humdity: Noise:

Overheard fluorescent Direct/Indirect, spot lighting Natural ventilation Standard Acoustical Tiles

Furniture

Options/Remarks

Located away from d[fab]for silence

Indoor Gallery Space

Projector

Hold large meetings

Options/Remarks

Room Name

Max. Occupancy

Finishes

Functions

Design reasearch

SF

2173 SF

Yes

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Auditorium entrance, library, o ce, storage

Functions

Size

71'8" x 30'4"

Fire Rating

Adjacencies

O ce, Storage

Indoor/Outside

Indoor/Outdoor

Yes

Stained Concrete Painted MDF Painted GBD and acoustical tiles and clouds Acoustical tiles and clouds

Chairs

Copy machine, computers

Adjacencies

Furniture

Sprinklers

Furniture

Misc. Equipment

Tables, shelves, chairs, co e tables, o ce desk

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Lighting: Temperature: Humidity: Noise:

Finishes

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Carpet Painted MDF Painted GBD Accoustical Tile

Lighting: Temperature: Humdity: Noise:

Room Name

Flexible Gallery Space

Yes

Finishes

Room Name

Max. Occupancy

Environmental

Yes

Yes

Restroom [2]

SF

7848 SF

Controllable lighting Natural/Mechanical Standard Acoustical tiles and clouds

Fire Rating

Sprinklers

Yes

Floor: Base: Walls: Ceiling:

Size

82'10" x 94'9"

Environmental

Environmental

Lighting: Temperature: Humdity: Noise:

Indoor/Outside

Indoor

Misc. Equipment

Projector, projector screen, white board, computers

Misc. Equipment

O ce desk, chair, lamp

Adjacencies

Adjacencies

O ce [1]: d[fab] lab, storage, exible gallery space O ce [2]: Library Functions

Spare Conduits

Space for administration to run workshop and library Options/Remarks

Views into workshop space for convenient monitoring of machinery and students.

Functions

Classes, computer room Options/Remarks

Adjustable partition wall to create larger classroom space

6


SECTION 4.0 4.1 DEMOLITION PLAN CRANDALL GYM

7


NATATORIUM

8


4.2 FLOOR PLANS [FIRST] LEVEL

LEGEND d[fab] LAB OFFICE

N

FLEXIBLE GALLERY SPACE INDOOR GALLERY SPACE RESTROOMS

9


4.2 FLOOR PLANS [SECOND] LEVEL

ESTCODE

LEGEND CLASSROOMS FLEXIBLE AUDITORIUM

N

AUDITORIUM ENTRANCE STORAGE

10


4.2 FLOOR PLANS [THIRD] LEVEL 0600C20000

LEGEND OFFICE STORAGE

N

LIBRARY

11


4.3 FRAMING PLANS [FIRST FLOOR] CRANDALL GYM

1

2 16' - 0"

3 16' - 0"

4

5

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

6 16' - 0"

7 16' - 0"

8 18' - 6" 13' - 5 1/2"

8' - 0"

4 - 2" x 10"

5 - 2" x 10"

4" slab

2x10 JOIST @ 16" o.c

5 - 2" x 10"

30' - 4"

BRACE FRAME

Concrete Piers Typ

BRACE FRAME

BRACE FRAME

BRACE FRAME

59' - 10"

3' - 6"

8 x 8 Timber Posts Typ

4 - 2" x 10"

8 x 8 Timber Posts Typ

F

11' - 1 1/2" 11' - 1 1/2"

8' - 0"

3.5" Slab

16' - 0"

W18x55 COLUMNS TYP

B

H

Drop Slab 4.5"

BRACE FRAME

BRACE FRAME

A

BRACE FRAME

3 - 2x10's

24' - 4"

4 - 2x10's

2 x 10's @ 2' o.c

2x10

4 - 2x10's

G

1

Level1 1/16" = 1'-0"

12


[SECOND FLOOR] CRANDALL GYM

2

1

COLLECTOR

BRACE FRAME

MOMENT FRAME

COLLECTOR

BRACE FRAME

OPEN TO GYM

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

BRACE FRAME

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR COLLECTOR

BRACE FRAME

COLLECTOR

MOMENT FRAME

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

W18 x 55 COLUMN TYP

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

W18x55 BEAM TYP

24' - 4"

G

8 18' - 6"

11 6x10 rafters @ 8" o.c

BRACE FRAME

29' - 6" 30' - 4"

F

COLLECTOR

16' - 0"

REMOVE EXISTING SHEATHING ADD 3/4" PLYWOOD

BRACE FRAME

H

16' - 0"

7

COLLECTOR

B

6

16' - 0"

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

16' - 0"

BRACE FRAME

16' - 0"

5

COLLECTOR

A

16' - 0"

4

Wood Shear Wall

16' - 0"

3

8 x 8 @ 2'3" o.c

1

COLLECTOR

LEVEL 2/ CEILING 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

13


[ROOF] CRANDALL GYM

1

16' - 0"

2

3

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

4

16' - 0"

5

16' - 0"

6

16' - 0"

7

8

18' - 6"

13' - 7 3/4"

BRACE FRAME

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

BRACE FRAME

BRACE FRAME

24' - 4"

1

COLLECTOR

BRACE FRAME COLLECTOR

59' - 10"

MOMENT FRAME

F

G

REMOVING EXISTING SHEATHING ADDING 3/4" PLYWOOD SHEATHING

W18 x 55 BEAM TYP W18 x 55 COLUMN TYP

COLLECTOR COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

BRACE FRAME

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

WOOD SHEAR WALL

BRACE FRAME

BRACE FRAME

B

3' - 6"

16' - 0"

A

COLLECTOR

CEILING 1/16" = 1'-0"

14


15


16


[FIRST FLOOR] NATATORIUM

1

2 18' - 9"

3 13' - 6 1/4"

4 14' - 10 1/2"

6

5 14' - 10 1/2"

14' - 10 1/2"

7 13' - 6 1/4"

8 14' - 2 3/8"

9 19' - 3"

10 19' - 3"

11 19' - 3"

12 19' - 3"

13 19' - 3"

F E D

B A

6' - 0"

14' - 4"

C

8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

CURTAIN WALL

REINFORCED 5" SLAB

CRANDALL GYM 1'x1' WOOD COLUMN TYP

2' x 2' WOOD COLUMN TYP

8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

NATATORIUM

BREEZE WAY

CURTAIN WALL

EXISTING SLAB REMOVED ADD NEW 5" REINFORCED SLAB SLAB LOWERED TO HEIGHT OF BREEZEWAY'S SLAB BRACE FRAME

Existing Opening 4'-2"

G

BRACE FRAME

New Opening 5'-0"

H

8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

New Opening 4'-6"

I

6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 7' - 1"

New Opening 9'-0"

8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

1

LEVEL 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

17


[SECOND FLOOR] NATATORIUM

E D

B A

19' - 3"

10 19' - 3"

CRANDALL GYM

1' x 1' WOOD COLUMN TYP

2" x 8" WOOD JOISTS @ 3'8" O.C

10" x10" WOOD GIRDER TYP

8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

19' - 3"

12 19' - 3"

13 19' - 3"

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

BRACED FRAME

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

COLLECTOR

SECOND FLOOR ADDITION

COLLECTOR

BRACED FRAME

COLLECTOR

0' - 10"

11

New opening 7'-0"

COLLECTOR

2' x 2' WOOD COLUMN TYP 8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

2' x 2' WOOD BEAMS TYP

1

14' - 2 3/8"

6' - 0"

14' - 4"

C

13' - 6 1/4"

9

OPEN TO NATATORIUM BELOW

0' - 10"

F

14' - 10 1/2"

8

COLLECTOR MOMENT FRAME COLLECTOR

G

14' - 10 1/2"

7

8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

H

14' - 10 1/2"

6

5

0' - 10" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 7' - 1"

I

13' - 6 1/4"

4

MOMENT FRAME

18' - 9"

3

COLLECTOR

2

COLLECTOR

1

8" WOOD SHEAR WALL

LEVEL 2 1/16" = 1'-0"

18


[ROOF] NATATORIUM

8

9 19' - 3"

10

11

19' - 3"

19' - 3"

12 19' - 3"

13 19' - 3"

1

I H G F E D

4" ROUGH CONCRETE SLAB 1/2" RODS @ 6" o.c

4" ROUGH CONCRETE SLAB 1/2" RODS @ 6" o.c

4" ROUGH CONCRETE SLAB 1/" RODS @ 8" o.c

14' - 4"

C

6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 6' - 11" 7' - 1"

S.4

B A

1

TOP OF BEAM 1/16" = 1'-0"

19


I [SECTION] NATATORIUM

2' - 8 3/8"

TOP OF PARAPET 313' - 0" TOP OF BEAM 310' - 3 5/8"

REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAM

12' - 8 1/8"

CONCRETE MOMENT FRAME

5" REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB

LEVEL 2 297' - 7 1/2" W12x30 BEAM

11' - 11 7/8"

W12 x 40 COLUMN

5" REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB

5' - 4 1/2"

LEVEL 1 285' - 7 1/2"

Pool Height 280' - 3"

NEW INFILL

EXISTING FOUNDATION NEW CONCRETE GRADE BEAM

1

NATATORIUM SECTION 1/4" = 1'-0"

20


21


22


1

2 30' - 0"

STORAGE SHED

3 10' - 0" REINFORCE CONCRETE GRADE BEAMS

5" Reinforced Concrete Slab

4'-0" TYP

15' - 0"

C

REINFORCED CMU CONCRETE BLOCKS

1

2 30' - 0"

3 10' - 0"

3' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

7' - 0"

10' - 0"

12' - 0"

B A

4' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

1

2 30' - 0"

3 10' - 0"

15' - 0"

C

3" LIGHT WEIGHT CONCRETE ON 2" STEEL DECK

10' - 0"

B

A

23


4.4 SITE SECTIONS

24


4.5 CROSS SECTIONS

25


4.7 PERSPECTIVES OF RENOVATION

26


27


28


SECTION 5.0

5.1 SITE/CLIMATE CONDITIONS Average Temperature: (Max, Mean, Min)

Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high (0.20 to 0.57 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Soils Map: (Not to scale)

Topography: The topography of the Crandall Gym and Natatorium site has a rather steep incline on starting from the southern part of the site and plateauing in the northern part. The site in addition sits on a southern aspect of the slope.

120° 40' 1''

120° 39' 43''

Soil Map—San Luis Obispo County, California, Coastal Part (Crandall Gym)

712160

712200

712240

712280

712320

712360

712400

712440

712480

712520

712560 35° 18' 3''

35° 18' 3''

Pepper Ln

3908840

3908840

3908880

3908880

Average Precipitation: (Average in inches)

3908800

Cuesta

3908800

163 Ave

View

Dr

3908760

3908760

Poly

Pepper

197 7

Ln 3908720

3908720

e Ave ge Colleg

Califo

ter Perime

Rd

rnia 3908680

Cue

3908680

Blv d

sta Ave

35° 17' 55''

35° 17' 54'' 712200

712240

712280

712320

712360

712400

712440

712480

712520

712560 120° 39' 43''

120° 40' 1''

712160

Map Scale: 1:1,260 if printed on B size (11" x 17") sheet.

0 0

20 50

Natural Resources Conservation Service

40 100

80 200

Feet 300

Meters 120

Web Soil Survey National Cooperative Soil Survey

2/9/2011 Page 1 of 3

NORTH

Topography Map: (Topography lines in 2’ increments) (Not to scale) Geology and Soil: The geology of this site fits the requirements of seismic design category D. Category D states that earthquakes can occur here at a rather high frequency. The soil of the site consists two types: Salinas silty clay loam and Los Osos-Diablo complex. 163—Los Osos-Diablo complex, 9 to 15 percent slopes Elevation: 200 to 1,500 feet Mean annual precipitation: 15 to 25 inches Mean annual air temperature: 59 degrees F Frost-free period: 275 to 350 days Los Osos and similar soils: 35 percent Diablo and similar soils: 30 percent Minor components: 35 percent Slope: 9 to 15 percent Depth to restrictive feature: 20 to 40 inches to paralithic bedrock Drainage class: Well drained Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Very low (0.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches 197—Salinas silty clay loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes Elevation: 0 to 40 feet Mean annual precipitation: 14 to 22 inches Mean annual air temperature: 57 degrees F Frost-free period: 275 to 365 days Map Unit Composition Salinas and similar soils: 85 percent Slope: 0 to 2 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Drainage class: Well drained

Vegetation: The existing vegetation consists of a majority of those that are from Mediterranean climate. Some examples are pittosporum spp., Lavandula spp., Magnolia spp., and Ceanothus spp. Existing Vegetation Map: (Not to scale) LEGEND

Vegetation (15’ - up) Vegetation (5’-15’) Vegetation (Lawn-5’)

NORTH

Climate: The Crandall Gym and Natatorium site has a Mediterranean climate. It typically has warm, dry summers and cool, wet winters. The charts below show the average temperature and precipitation for the San Luis Obispo area.

29


5.2 CONTEXT ANALYSIS DIAGRAM

Context Analysis Analysis Map Context Map Highway 1

Bishop’s Peak

Highway 1

Cal PolySan Luis Obispo Cal PolySan Luis Obispo

Bishop’s Peak

LEGEND

LEGEND GENERAL PLAN USE

Highland Ave

Highland Ave

Crandall Gym Site

Crandall Gym Site Foothill Avenue

US-101 Grand Avenue

Foothill Avenue

US-101

California BlvdAvenue Grand

California Blvd

Downtown San Luis Obispo

Cerro San Luis

Downtown San Luis Obispo Higuera Street

Cerro San Luis

Higuera Street

Los Osos Valley Road

Cal Poly Campus Blow-Up

Cal Poly Campus Blow-Up Robert E. Kennedy Bus Stop

<allPLAN other USE values> GENERAL <all other values> LANDUSE Agriculture LANDUSE Business Park Agriculture Com Coml Business Park General Retail Com Coml High Density Residential General Inter OpenRetail Space High DensityResidential Residential Low Density Medium Density Inter Open SpaceResidential Medium-High Density Residential Low Density Residential Neighborhood Commercial Medium Density Residential Office Medium-High Density Residential Park Neighborhood Commercial Public Office Recreational Park Residential Neighborhood Public Rural Residential Recreational Service Man Residential Neighborhood Suburban Residential TouristResidential Rural Class 1 Bicycle Service Man Lane Class 2 Bicycle Lane Suburban Residential Class 3 Bicycle Lane Tourist Walk Zone Class 1 Bicycle Lane Bus Stop Class 2 Bicycle Lane Crandall Gym and Natatorium Site Class 3 Bicycle Lane Walk Zone Bus Stop

Crandall Gym and Natatorium Site

Perimeter Road

Robert E. Kennedy Bus Stop Perimeter RoadGrand Ave

Los Osos Valley Road

Bus Stop

Madonna Road

Madonna Road

Via Carta

Grand Ave Bus Stop

Via Carta

Crandall Gym Site California Blvd

Crandall Gym Site

NORTH

30


5.3 SITE ANALYSIS DIAGRAM UTILITIES: There are a set of different utility structures around the site. As a result some of the design ideas will be impeded due to these different structures.

WIND DIRECTION: The seasonal wind patterns on our site come from a West to Northwest direction. Wind provides the opportunity to create some white noise on our site. With implementation of elements that will greater increase white noise on the site, users will have an interactive experience showcasing sound.

BUILT FEATURES: Some of the existing built features on site are outdated and need some modifications. By renovating some features such as Crandall Gym and the Natatorium, the historical context of this site can be achieved while making them structurally sound. Some other features should be demolished to provide space for new and innovative structures that will greatly enhance the integrity of the site.

LEGEND Noise Views Wind Direction Drainage Multi-use circulation Pedestrian circulation Vegetation (15’ - up) Vegetation (5’-15’) Vegetation (Lawn-5’) Utilities Built Features

5.4 SITE OPPORTUNITES/CONSTRAINTS The Crandall Gym and Natatorium site offers a lot of opportunities to greatly enrich the design with a few constraints. Throughout the site there is a significant grade change that impedes handicap access from the southern portion of the site to the northern portion. This provides the opportunity to create an integrated ADA (American Disabilities Act) ramp access and stair system that will allow handicap access throughout the entire site. The grade change also offers the opportunity to create an integrated rainwater catchment system that can collect water to be used elsewhere on the site helping with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) qualification for this project. The climate of the site is typical of a Mediterranean climate. This unique climate provides both an opportunities and constraints. Since this climate is so unique, it provides the chance to use many unique plant species that are only found in these types of climates around the world. Some of those plant species have some sort of drought tolerance that can be beneficial for the design. It also can cause a constraint with some years over others fluctuating in rainfall. With that, plants that can typically handle drought in a normal rainfall year will require more watering during the years with longer droughts. The existing vegetation on site consists of plants that are found in a Mediterranean climate. Since these plants are adapted to the climate, they will require less water, also helping with LEED requirements for the site. However, the vegetation is rather patchy and has no overall uniformity. By keeping some of the existing plants while implementing new species, the overall planting palette will be greatly enhanced. The views that overlook O’Neil Green and Alex G. Spanos stadium provide an excellent opportunity to incorporate viewpoints on the western portion of the site. By implementing these viewpoints in the design it will greatly enhance the overall aesthetics of the site. A large asphalt road that both pedestrians and vehicles use on a daily basis surrounds the site. This creates quite the conflict with vehicular and pedestrian interaction with the possibly of a pedestrian being struck by a vehicle. By limiting vehicular access to just emergency and service vehicles, the likelihood of a pedestrian being struck by a vehicle will be greatly decreased. One of the largest constraints on the site are the existing utilities around the site. Since these structures cannot be removed without a large amount of money being spent, the design of the site will have to accommodate them in the design.

CONSTRAINTS

NOISE: Noises that are surrounding the site may become distracting to the learning process. By implementing a buffer system at these areas, the sound can be minimized to be less distracting.

MULTI-USE CIRCULATION PATTERN: The multi-use circulation pattern indicates vehicular and pedestrian access. This can cause conflict with pedestrians being struck by vehicles. By limiting vehicular access to just emergency and service vehicles, the likelihood of a pedestrian being struck by a vehicle will be greatly decreased.

VEGETATION: The existing vegetation on site consists of plants that are found in a Mediterranean climate. Since these plants are adapted to the climate, they will require less water. The vegetation is rather patchy and has no overall uniformity. By keeping some of the existing plants while implementing know species, the overall planting palette will be greatly enhanced.

DRAINAGE: The existing drainage on the site drains into different storm gutter systems. By changing the drainage process to where water can be collected through a series of retention zones or swale systems, water can be kept on site to be used in different processes such as irrigation.

VIEWS: The views that overlook O’Neil Green and Alex G. Spanos stadium provide an excellent viewpoint for the site. By implementing these viewpoints in the design it will greatly enhance the overall aesthetics of the site.

31


5.5 SITE DEVELOPMENT MASTER PLAN

SITE PLAN Seating Area

LEGEND Seat Walls

Proposed Coffee shop

Crandall Gym Entrance

Integrated Stair/Handicap Ramp System Crandall Gym Entrance

Adaptable Breezeway

Seat Walls

CAED Coutyard Plaza

dFab Lab Entrance Seating Area

Roundabout Plaza

dFab Lab Loft Stair/Lift Entrance Outdoor Assembly Area

Power House Plaza

CAED Entrance Sign

32


5.6 1:5 PLAN

33


5.7 PLANTING PLAN A

PLANTING PLAN

S

LEGEND

S P

B

A

M C

A

T

S

Salvia leucantha

Mexican sage brush

P

Pennisetum setaceum

Purple fountain grass

T

Tagetes lemmonii

Copper Canyon daisy

C

Ceanothus ‘Dark Star’

‘Dark Star’ ceanothus

O

Cercis occidentalis

Western redbud

A

Arbutus menziesii

Madrone

B

Prunus cerasifera ‘Atropurprea’

Purple leaf plum

M

Magnolia grandiflora

Southern magnolia

I

Phoenix canarensis

Canary Island date palm

E

Eschscholzia californica

California poppy

D

Carex praegracilis

Dune sedge

K

Artemisia pycnocephala ‘David’s Choice’

Sandhill sagebrush

C

P

PLANTING CONCEPT: B

T

SSI’s planting palette consists of both California natives and plants that are adapted to the Mediterranean climate of San Luis Obispo, CA. The plants selected consist of preserved species that were located on the Crandall Gym and Natatorium site at the beginning stages. Most of the existing species required a sufficient irrigation system to be maintained, which drastically affects the water usage on the site. SSI collaborated and decided that some species existing on the site tie to the overall context of the existing area and were important. The newly proposed species require minimal maintenance practices and are found around the Cal Poly campus. Plants that have valuable meaning, such as California’s state flower (California poppy) were included into the planting palette. Overall, SSI’s planting design showcases a unique color palette of Mediterranean climate species and California natives that has minimal impact to the existing environment.

I S O D O

A

40

E

K

0

40

80

34


5.7 LIGHTING PLAN

35


6.1 SITE DESIGN A well written description of the partnershipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall design identity or theme as related to their project design activities. Further, a well written discussion is to be presented that outlines how this theme or identity is to be universally applied in their Gym- Natatorium complex design, plus their designs for the extended corridors to the CAED office and the CM building complex. This narrative must provide evidence that the partnershipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s submission is thematically driven. Preserving the Past While Showcasing the Future The design intention of SSI is to create an identity that maintains the historic character of the Old Crandall Gym and Natatorium, while incorporating a series of modernist aspects. The modernist site design surrounds the two historic buildings, creating a meaningful core. The technology of the world as it is today can be interpreted as a series of adaptations throughout history. People have learned from past experiences, and have been able to adapt to it. With this concept, the Old Crandall Gym and Natatorium represent the historical core of what technological advances have led us to the future. Technology can never be set in stone; it is always changing. With that idea, SSI incorporated a series of adaptable spaces throughout the site, envisioning that they will someday serve a different function. Examples of these spaces would be seating areas with moveable seating, retractable walls in the gallery spaces, and large open spaces in the Digital Fabrication Lab. Since the surrounding areas of the Crandall Gym site are contradicting to one another, a cohesive connection was a challenge. To address this issue, SSI included a site design that showcases different elements of angles, shapes (circular, triangular, and rectangular), and organic forms. The intention behind the different features of the site was that there are always different interpretations to certain technologies. These shapes and angles were incorporated in the connection corridors with the idea that the CAED offices and the CM building complex represented different areas of technology. The Crandall Gym and Natatorium complex represents the nucleus of the CAED college. Technology is the driving force behind the progress of the professions within the CAED. By incorporating these historic buildings into the CAED as gateways, it can represent how much has changed throughout the history of the design world.

6.2 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

SECTION 6.0 6.3 CONSTRUCTION

Link the old and the new buildings in the project to the surrounding area, using digital fabrication in the building, site, and surrounding areas Create a cohesive building design that surrounds and incorporates the plaza for indoor and outdoor functions. Adaptively re-use the buildings as a new digital fabrication and educational hub for the CAED and Cal Poly. Use digitally fabricated pieces and other components to improve the energy performance of the buildings by shading large windows to reduce heat gain. Optimize new spaces inside of the buildings to take advantage of the natural light and views that are available. Create flexible spaces and designs, indoors and outside, to encourage the modification and updating of the buildings as technology and tastes change.

In order for construction to take place at the Crandall Gym and Natatorium site there are a few things which need to be planned for and executed. There must be a site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP), a site specific security plan, a site safety plan, and a site layout. Most important to our partnership are the Site Security and Site Safety Plans. This job is being conducted on a busy and active college campus. We need to make sure we clearly map and show the paths for pedestrians and vehicles into and around our construction site. We will provide information posted on signs regarding when and where areas will be closed or off-limits. Also, securing our site is of utmost importance. Construction sites are just as dangerous, if not more, when they are closed for the evening or weekend. We will completely fence our site with chain link fence with silt screen. We also plan to have a webcam hooked up for both security and also public viewing. San Luis Obispo is a very sensitive area and the Cal Poly campus is concerned with environmental protection. In order to prevent silt and debris from making it into the storm water system we will design and implement a SWPPP plan. This plan will need to be put in place as needed and as soon as possible. It will consist mainly of straw waddles and sandbags to collect and filter silt and debris. This plan will be in accordance with any and all governing requirements. Crucial to the success of our project is our site layout. This plan will determine where our jobsite trailer, material laydown, haul road and parking will occur. In order to make the site modular we will have to make sure our plan is thought through to the end of the job. In order for all of our plans to work we need to create a construction phase plan as well. Phase 1 will consist of site layout, security, SWPPP if needed. Phase 2 will consist of Site demolition and grading for haul and construction. Phase 3 will consist of Demolition of the interiors of all buildings preparing for structural renovation. Phase 4 will be structural renovation. Phase 5 will be finishes and completion. Some phases have very detailed procedures involved and some are as simple as the phase name. These phases require some modifications to the site each time.

36


6.4 STRUCTURAL DESIGN GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Codes and Standards: International Building Code, 2009 Edition ASCE/SEI 7-05, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and other Structures ASCE/SE 31-03, American Society of Civil Engineers, Seismic Evaluation of Existing Buildings ACI 318-08, Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete American Institute of Steel Construction, Thirteenth Edition Steel Construction Manual National Design Specification for Wood Construction, 2005 Edition 2006 Design of Reinforced Masonry Structures, Concrete Masonry Association of California and Nevada Building Code Requirements and Specification for Masonry Structures, Masonry Standards Joint Committee Design Loads: CRANDALL GYM Seismic: Ss= .474 S1 = 1.26 Sds = .84 Sd1 = .505 Occupancy Category 3 Importance Factor = 1.25 R = 6 for special steel concentric braced frames R = 8 for special steel moment frames Site Class D Live Load: Roof = 20psf [ASCE 7-05 Table 4-1] Auditorium Floor = 100psf [ASCE 7-05 Table 4-1] Library Floor = 150psf Dead Load: Roof = 30.5psf [Refer to Unit take off in Appendix] Walls = 10psf NATATORIUM: Seismic: Ss = .474 S1 = 1.26 Sd1 = .7584 Sds = .84 Occupancy Category 3 Importance Factor = 1.25 R = 6 for special steel concentric braced frames R = 8 for special steel moment frame Site Class D

Live Load: Roof = 20psf [ASCE 7-05 Table 4-1] Classroom Floor = 40psf D-Fab Lab Floor = Dead Load: Roof = 118psf [Refer to Unit Take off in Appendix)] Walls = 258psf

Crandall Gym Gravity: Truss: Forces are then taken from the columns down to the foundatioLateral Force Resisting System: Let-ins on interior N-S wall

inforce concrete slab will be placed at the same level as the breezeway. Two holes will be made in the Old Natatorium less than 5% the total length of the structure’s exterior walls. A new second story will be also be added. The floor will be a concrete slab on steel decking. The lateral system will be composed of braced and moment frames supported by concrete grade beams at the foundation. The second floor will not be connected to the exterior walls of the Natatorium. Locker Rooms: This structure is going to be completely demolished and a new wood breeze way structure will be built in its place. The new breeze way will have 2” x 10” wood joists and 8” x 8” wood girder. The outside timber columns will be 2’ x 2’. The lateral force resisting system will be composed of wood shear walls in the East-West and North-South direction. The breezeway will not be connected to Crandall Gym or the Natatorium but act as a separate structure.

General Existing Building Description: Crandall Gym: The building is a two story wood framed structure with concrete retaining walls and piers as the foundation. Primary Structure: The roof framing is made out of plywood sheathing and ¾” diameter rods that span between 6”x 12” wood purlins. The purlins and plywood are supported by wood trusses composed of 6”x 8” and 8”x 8” wood members and 7/8” diameter steel rods. The floor framing is composed of 2” x 10” wood joists and 5-2”x 10” as wood girders. There are 8” x 8” wood posts supporting the gravity load at each end of the wood trusses. The lateral forced resisting system is made up of wood let-ins, tong and groove and stucco. Foundation The foundation is composed of concrete piers that are in a variety of sizes that range from 2’4” by 2’4”sq base to 3’9” by 3’9” base. All wood posts are supported by concrete footings. There is a partial basement on the South side of the building surrounded by concrete retaining walls. Natatorium The building is a one story concrete shear wall structure with concrete moment frames and a stiff diaphragm. The foundation is made up of concrete footings and concrete retaining walls. Primary Structure The roof framing is made out of a 4” reinforced concrete slab, (1’8” x 10”) and (1’8” x 8”) reinforced concrete beams, and (2’ x 10”) reinforced concrete girders. The floor is composed of a concrete slab and beams. The walls are composed of 10” reinforced concrete. The lateral force resisting system is 10” reinforced concrete shear walls and four reinforced concrete moment frames that span the E-W direction of the Natatorium. Foundation The foundation is composed of reinforced concrete footings and bearing walls. The bearing walls and footings surround the entire Old Natatorium pool and exterior walls of the structure. Existing Load Path:

Natatorium Gravity System:

Dance Studio: This structure is going to be completely demolished and a new plaza will be built in its place. Exterior Stair and Elevator Balcony to the Natatorium: This structure will have a lateral force resisting system of reinforce concrete shear walls. One shear wall will be in the East-West direction and another will be in the North-South direction. Concrete grade beams will be the foundation. This structure is separate from the Old Natatorium.

Gravity loads will travel from the slab to the beams and then to the girders. Loads from the girders will travel to the shear walls and down to the foundation.

Storage Structure: A new reinforced CMU concrete structure with a brick veneer is going to be built on the South-East end of the site. The roof will be a concrete slab with steel decking. The foundation will be reinforced concrete footings.

Lateral System: Earthquake load will travel from the diaphragm to the shear walls on all four sides. As well, four moment frames will provide lateral support in the East-West direction. The overturning moment will be transferred to the foundation walls and footings. Demo/New Construction: Crandall Gym: Crandall Gym will undergo a seismic retrofit by adding a new lateral force resisting system which will consist of steel moment frames, steel braced frames, steel collectors, and one wood shear wall. New reinforced concrete grade beams will be placed under the new lateral force resisting members at the foundation. The existing bleachers will be taken out and a new partition wall will be built where the bottom bleachers start to create a separate space between the first floor and the basement. The cracked wood truss members will be replaced as well as the corroded exterior imitation purlins. Positive connections between existing beamto-column members will be added. A few walls in the entrance to the Natatorium will be knocked out. The gravity loads that were transferred to the existing walls will then be taken over to the new steel beams and columns. Old Natatorium: The existing floor of the Natatorium will be demolished and a new re-

37


SECTION 7.0

7.1 PRECONSTRUCTION SEQUENCING DIAGRAM PRECONSTRUCTION NARRATIVE

The main goal of preconstruction is to reduce time and reduce cost of the overall project. It is always cheaper to change a design or plan before it has begun. Some common goals of preconstruction are finalizing of a Design, Value Engineering, Feasibility Reviews, creating a Schedule, creating Site, Demolition, SWPPP and Safety plans, Subcontractor Buyout(Bids) and Material Procurement. The two most important goals of preconstruction are Specification Development and completing a set of Working Drawings. Each one of these goals plays its own role in creating a faster more cost effective job. Preconstruction generally involves finalizing of a design. This is mostly done by feasibility reviews and value engineering. The Renovation of Crandall Gym and the Natatorium provides a wide range of possibilities. Before any construction begins, the ideas and designs presented must be studied for feasibility. Can the proposed design be accomplished in the budget? Can the design proposed be constructed at all? What constraints are there on the project? These are all questions one would ask during a feasibility review. Once a design has been agreed upon the processes for specification building and working drawings begins. This is the most crucial step in Precon because it governs everything to follow. Once a set of Plans and Specs have been finalized, value engineering could begin. For the Crandall Gym some value engineering questions are: What can we keep and reuse from the building? What materials can we use for the renovation? How can we save money during construction? Once a set of plans and specs are complete and thoroughly reviewed the planning for construction can begin. There are many plans to create before any construction can begin. One of the most important is the Site Layout. This plan incorporates some assumptions about the project. For our site Layout we have to assume the amount of space we are getting to designate as our construction site. Also, how and where will material storage be? Will we have an offsite location for lay-down or parking? For these we must make assumptions and continue the preconstruction phase. At the same time the project schedule creation should begin. The schedule will most likely change as information about materials, site conditions and subcontractors change.

Program, RFP

Site exploration

Feasability review

Value Engineering

Owner Goals

Funding

Final Design/Con Docs Complete

Schedule

Site Plan

Demolition Plan

The last step in project pre-construction involves material procurement and subcontractor buyout. This is the process where all the materials for the project are analyzed and long lead time items are ordered for delivery. Also, the project is broken out into packages that can be â&#x20AC;&#x153;bought outâ&#x20AC;? by competing subcontractors. These work packages take some time to build and when being build must be very specific and wholly inclusive. If all the Preconstruction steps are taking, a project can begin successfully and hopefully continue to a successful end.

SWPPP Plan

Student Safety Plan

Subcontractor Buyout

Materials Procurement

Approval to Proceed

Preconstruction Sequence

38


7.2 CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY SCHEDULE ID

Task Name

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 28 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

DESIGN RFP RFP Issued Site Exploration Design Charette Conceptual Design Conceptual Estimate Conceptual Schedule Submit Proposal Award Project AWARD DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Finalize Design Finalize Estimate Project Schedule Project Budget Demolition Plan SWPP Plan Safety Plan CONSTRUCTION Notice to Proceed Preconstruction Site Improvements Sitework Complete Crandall Gym Crandall Demolition Crandall Demo Complete Crandall Foundation New Structural System Roof Sheathing & Tiles New MEP Finishes Crandall Closeout Crandall Complete Natatorium Demolition Natatoruim Demo Complete Interior Fondation New Slab Second Floor Structural System New MEP Finishes Closeout Natatorium Complete Testing and Commissioning HVAC Test & Balance Equipment Testing Crandall Commissioning Natatorium Commissioning Substantial Completion POST CONSTRUCTION Demobilization Building Occupancy

Duration , '11 F 56 days 0 days 1 day 1 day 1 day 40 days 10 days 5 days 1 day 1 day 0 days 18 days 15 days 8 days 5 days 5 days 5 days 5 days 5 days 240 days 0 days 24 days 216 days 0 days 150 days 15 days 0 days 25 days 35 days 10 days 30 days 40 days 10 days 0 days 135 days 15 days 0 days 15 days 5 days 20 days 35 days 35 days 10 days 0 days 24 days 15 days 5 days 2 days 2 days 0 days 10 days 10 days 0 days

T

Feb 20, '11 S

7.3 PROJECT MILESTONE SCHEDULE W

Apr 3, '11 S

T

May 15, '11 M F

T

Jun 26, '11 S

W

Aug 7, '11 S T

Sep 18, '11 M F

T

Oct 30, '11 S

W

Dec 11, '11 S T

Jan 22, '12 M F

T

Mar 4, '12 S

W

Apr 15, '12 S T

2/25

May 2 M

ACTIVITY

Request for Proposal Issued

5/13

5/23

WEEK COMPLETE

1

Project Award

12

Notice to Proceed

14

Crandall Demo Complete

24

Natatorium Demo Complete

28

Crandall Complete

55

Natatorium Complete

56

Substancial Completion

61

Sitework Complete

65

Building Occupancy

66

4/20

8/5

2/10

9/2

2/17

3/22

5/4

PROJECT SCHEDULE

39


NATATORIUM IMPROVEMENTS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL COSTS

$2,320,000 $634,000

$8,245,000

SECTION 8.0

8.1 FUNCTIONAL PLANNING BUDGET

PLANNING BUDGET SITE DEMOLITION

$338,000

SITE DEMOLITION

SITE IMPROVEMENTS

$639,000

SITE IMPROVEMENTS

UTILITIES

$222,000

UTILITIES

CRANDALL GYM IMPROVEMENTS

$4,092,000

NATATORIUM IMPROVEMENTS

$2,320,000

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

TOTAL COSTS

$634,000

CRANDALL GYM IMPROVEMENTS NATATORIUM IMPROVEMENTS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

$8,245,000

40


50 13 14 20 21 10 22 10 30 40

CRANDALL GYM AND NATATORIUM COST BREAKDOWN ESTIMATE CSI DIVISIONS 01 30 50 02 20 40 50 60 03 10 20 30 80 04 05 10 70 06 10 07 10 40 50 70 08 10 50 70 09 20 50 60 70 90 10 11 12 30 50 13 14 20 21 10 22 10 30 40 23 20 30 40 25

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS TEMPORARY FACILITIES AND CONTROLS EXISTING CONDITIONS ASSESSMENT DEMOLITION/STRUCTURE MOVING SITE REMEDIATION CONTAMINATED SITE MATERIAL REMOVAL CONCRETE FORMING AND ACCESSORIES REINFORCING CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE CUTTING AND BORING MASONRY METALS STRUCTURAL METAL FRAMING DECORATIVE METAL WOODS, PLASTICS, COMPOSITES ROUGH FRAMING THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION DAMPPROOFING AND WEATHERPROOFING ROOFING MEMBRANE ROOFING ROOFING ACCESSORIES OPENINGS DOORS AND FRAMES WINDOWS HARDWARE FINISHES PLASTER AND GYPSUM BOARD CEILINGS FLOORINGS WALL FINISHES PAINTING AND COATING SPECIALTIES EQUIPMENT FURNISHINGS CASEWORK FURNITURE SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION CONVEYING EQUIPMENT ELEVATORS FIRE SUPPRESSION WATER-BASED FIRE-SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS PLUMBING PLUMBING PIPING AND PUMPS PLUMBING EQUIPMENT PLUMBING FIXTURES HEATING, VENTILATING, AND AC HVAC PIPING AND PUMPS HVAC AIR DISTRIBUTION HVAC AIR CLEANING DEVICES INTEGRATED AUTOMATION

APPROX. ESTIMATING QUANTITY UNIT 12 MONTHS 12 MONTHS 1 84000 84000 1

EA SF SF EA

EXTENDED UNIT PRICE COST $25,083.33 $4,916.67

$301,000 $59,000

$3,000.00 $1.93 $0.14 $15,000.00

$3,000 $162,000 $12,000 $15,000

$3.33 $1,488.89 $200.00 $1.41

$3,000 $67,000 $133,000 $12,000

23 20 30 40 25 26 10 20 40 50 27

900 45 665 8500

LF TONS CY LF

20 28 31 20 32

17620 SF 22200 SF

$95.00 $0.41

$1,674,000 $9,000

4600 SF

$140.00

$644,000

SF SF SF SF

$0.40 $1.26 $1.90 $4.08

$9,000 $21,000 $32,000 $68,000

22200 SF 4600 SF 22200 EA

$1.06 $3.23 $0.57

$24,000 $15,000 $13,000

7600 22200 22200 22200 22200

$8.16 $4.74 $5.27 $2.58 $0.73

$62,000 $105,000 $117,000 $57,000 $16,000

30 80 90 33

22200 16600 16600 16600

SF SF SF SF SURFACE SF

FURNITURE SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION CONVEYING EQUIPMENT ELEVATORS FIRE SUPPRESSION WATER-BASED FIRE-SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS PLUMBING PLUMBING PIPING AND PUMPS PLUMBING EQUIPMENT PLUMBING FIXTURES HEATING, VENTILATING, AND AC HVAC PIPING AND PUMPS HVAC AIR DISTRIBUTION HVAC AIR CLEANING DEVICES INTEGRATED AUTOMATION ELECTRICAL MEDIUM-VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION LOW-VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION ELECTRICAL AND CATHODIC PROTECTION LIGHTING COMMUNICATIONS DATA COMMUNICATIONS ELECTRONIC SAFETY AND SECURITY EARTHWORK EARTH MOVING EXTERIOR IMPROVEMENTS SITE IMPROVEMENTS IRRIGATION PLANTING UTILITIES WATER UTILITIES SANITARY SEWERAGE UTILITIES ELECTRICAL UTILITIES COMMUNICATIONS UTILITIES

22200 SF

$2.03

$45,000

2 EA

$85,300.00

$171,000

22200 SF

$2.27

$50,000

22200 SF 22200 SF 85 EA

$1.30 $0.70 $17.80

$16,000 $2,000

22200 SF 22200 SF 1 EA

$0.90 $3.85 $8,000.00

$20,000 $85,000 $8,000

SF SF EA SF

$1.88 $0.20 $10,000.00 $9.51

$42,000 $4,000 $10,000 $211,000

22200 SF

$2.80

$62,000

300 CY

$7.67

$2,000

84000 SF 20000 SF 20000 SF

$0.95 $0.82 $2.50

$80,000 $16,000 $50,000

22200 22200 1 22200

EA EA EA EA

$1.04 $2.03

$23,000 $45,000

2 EA

$85,300.00

$171,000

22200 SF

$2.27

$50,000

22200 SF 22200 SF 85 EA

$1.30 $0.70 $17.80

$29,000 $16,000 $2,000

22200 SF 22200 SF 1 EA

$0.90 $3.85 $8,000.00

$20,000 $85,000 $8,000

$10,000 $45,000 $60,000 $11,000

$4,685,000 ADDITIONAL FEES ARCHITECTS FEE CONTRACTORS FEE SITE INVESTIGATION PROJECT FINANCING INSURANCE CONTINGENCY

0.07 0.2 0.008 0.01 0.007 0.35 0.645

% % % % % %

$328,000 $937,000 $37,000 $47,000 $33,000 $1,640,000

$7,707,000

ADJUSTMENTS CITY INDEX

$539,000

0.07

GRAND 22200 SF 22200 SF

$29,000 8.2 COST BREAKDOWN

TOTAL

$8,246,000

41


8.3 DESCRIPTION/VALIDATION OF COST MODEL The cost estimate for Servizi Supremo Inc. was compiled using RS Means Cost Works, Square Foot Costs, and Assemblies Cost Data books. We were able to do a quantity take-off for the site demolition and exterior improvements based on our latest site plan. The Crandall Gym and Natatorium cost estimates were created using RS Means square foot costs based on a college laboratory example. These square foot costs were multiplied by the total area of our designed structures. In our estimate we included additional costs such as the contractors and architects fees to make the price as accurate as possible. Also, we applied an adjustment to our final dollar amount to account for constructing our building in San Luis Obispo, CA. Since our design is has yet to be finalized, we included an additional 3.5 percent contingency to mitigate any upcoming design changes. After performing a quantity take-off and applying our known per square foot costs we end up with a lower estimate compared to our initial conceptual estimate. This allows us to continue to improve our design without having to worry about removing items.

CONCRETE ITEM CONCRETE FORMS - SIDEWALK STAIRS REBAR SIDWALK CONCRETE AND FINISH FOOTINGS - 24"X12" REINFORCED 6" PAVEMENT 6" PAVEMENT FINISH 6" PAVEMENT FORMS SAWCUTTING

QUANTITY 233 980 45 3130 30 570 30770 675 8500

UNIT SFCA LF NOSE TON SF CY CY SF SFCA LF

UNIT RATE $3.36 $19.12 $1,490.00 $2.09 $219.01 $153.27 $0.45 $3.36 $1.41

TOTAL COST $783 $18,738 $67,000 $6,542 $6,570 $87,364 $13,847 $2,268 $12,000

EXISTING CONDITIONS ITEM DEMOLITION BLOCK BUILDINGS BUILDING SLAB CRANDALL GYM GUTTING NATATORIUM GUTTING ROADWAY CURB & GUTTER SIDEWALK NATATORIUM LOCKER ROOM NATATORIUM FOOTINGS

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS QUANTITY 66360 4900 11880 8108 2650 1400 900 33600 210

UNIT CF SF SF SF SY LF SY CF LF

4" SIDEWALK AREA 9 10

UNIT RATE $0.23 $4.17 $4.26 $4.26 $5.63 $2.97 $9.28 $0.31 $16.22 TOTAL

TOTAL COST $15,263 $20,433 $50,609 $34,540 $14,920 $4,158 $8,352 $10,416 $3,406 $162,000

ITEM FIELD PERSONNEL PROJECT MANAGER SUPERINTENDENT OFFICE MANAGER CONSTRUCTION FACILITIES OFFICE TRAILER OFFICE SUPPLIES OUTHOUSES TEMPORARY BARRIERS RENTAL FENCE TEMPORARY SCAFFOLDING SCAFFOLD EQUIPMENT RENTALS REACH LIFT MISC

QUANTITY

UNIT

UNIT RATE

TOTAL COST

66 WK 66 WK 66 WK

$1,850 $1,700 $1,005

14 MO 14 MO 66 WK

$150 $95 $55

$2,100 $1,330 $3,630

$3

$3,300

135.55 CSF

$114

$15,453

66 WK 66 WK

$200 $300

$13,200 $19,800

1100 LF

$122,100 $112,200 $66,330 $301,000

$59,000

42


SECTION 9.0 9.1/9.2/9.3

Design Criteria

1.Design a flexible space that will accommodate future changes and/or modernization of equipment with the d[fab] facility. 2. Create a directional flow through the building by connecting to the proposed CAED spine  3. Create a meeting place for CAED College. 4. Preserve the historical characteristics of Crandall Gym 5. Add adequate lateral system to Crandall Gym

Functional Requirements

Design a flexible space that will accommodate future changes and/or modernization of equipment with the d[fab] facility. Create an open space in Natatorium with modular building systems. Create electrical system that promotes future change. Create anchoring grid so that equipment can be moved or replaced at will in different configurations. Create a directional flow through the building by connecting to the proposed CAED spine  Create a gallery that draws people to the building from the outside. Create a site plan that will showcase digital fabrication Create an open space that “flows” through the building into the other parts of the CAED Create a meeting place for CAED College. Design a plaza area where students can relax and take a break from school Design a modular auditorium to hold interdisciplinary classes and forums Create a DFab lab that will utilize equipment that all disciplines can use. Preserve the historical characteristics of Crandall Gym Keep and re-use as much material from Crandall Gym as possible Keep but enhance the look of Crandall Gym Showcase the history of Crandall Gym with informational plaques Add adequate lateral system to Crandall Gym Create a structural System that will allow for future modifications to Crandall Gym without structural change Create a structural system that showcases the abilities of the CAED students

Value Scheme

By designing a flexible space, these buildings will be able to adapt to the changing needs of its occupants and the CAED. With larger open spaces, and well lit designs this structure allows for uses as labs, offices, and classrooms without causing long term closure to redesign the structure. As an addition to the CAED spine, this structure ensures that the growing CAED program will have a space that changes with the needs of its students. By creating a functional, changeable space today, this building will help in providing work space and learning space for students while assisting in establishing a “CAED wing” on campus. The integrated plaza adds long term value for the students, faculty, and visitors of the campus by ensuring an open space on a campus that continues to become more dense. The auditorium and lab located in this design are valuable

SECTION 10.0

working space that will continually be used in Cal Poly’s “Learn by doing” educational approach. As working spaces become more scarce, valuable, and difficult to reserve this building will ultimately bring long term value to CAED. It is important to remember and preserve the historical value of Cal Poly. This design that being used was chosen to reflect how CAED has changed over the years and the potential it has for years to come. This structure retains Crandall Gym’s history while promoting CAED’s growth and future. By taking this opportunity to renovate and update Crandall Gym’s structural system we are ensuring that the building will stand for years to come. The structural System design leaves many open bays for future changes to the floor plan and use of Crandall Gym.

10.1 REGULATORY AGENCY REVIEW

Here is a list of the current planning and building agencies involved in the review, permitting, and inspection of the site development and program description. San Luis Obispo County Planning Commission: This Commission ensures that proposed developments will meet the County’s technical, environmental and aesthetic standards. The commission meets the second and fourth meeting of each month at the County Government Center.

San Luis Obispo Planning and Building Department:

San Luis Obispo County Air Pollution Control District:

Bureau of Land Management (BLM):

Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB):

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

San Luis Obispo Long Range Planning Agency: Meet and discuss long term effect of buildings and sites in San Luis Obispo. San Luis Obispo Current Planning Agency: Meet and discuss effect of building and site development in San Luis Obispo. Geo-Technical Report (Soil Conditions): Not yet received.

10.2 BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS 1) ASCE/SEI 31-08 Standard 2) The California Building Code -- Title 24 -Part 1, Building Standards Administrative Code -Part 2, California Building Code -Part 3, California Electrical Code -Part 4, California Mechanical Code -Part 5, California Plumbing Code -Part 6, California Energy Code -Part 7, California Elevator Safety Construction Code -Part 8, California Historical Building Code -Part 9, California Fire Code -Part 12, California Reference Standards Code 3) The California Occupational Safety and Health Act 4)Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Title II, ADAAG: - All entrances should be handy cap accessible. All floors should provide an elevator or ramp that allows access to every floor to the handicapped. There should be braille on all bathroom signs. 5) ASHRAE indoor air quality standard 62-1989. 6) The California Administrative Code, Title 19 (Industrial Relations, Public Safety) 7) The California Environmental Quality Act, latest edition 8) Requirements of the Regional Water Quality Board 9) Public Contract Code, Sections 10700 et seq. (California State Contract Law) 10) Air Quality Management District regulations 11) California Coastal Commission Regulations 12) Local Public Agency standards. 13) University Design Standards CSU Seismic Safety Standards Energy & Utility Systems Requirements CSU Telecommunications Infrastructure Planning Guidelines CSU Computer Aided Design Standards 14)California Building Code/International Building Code Non-structural Provisions – Building Code Analysis Determine the occupancy types for each space in your building(s). Look up maximum allowable floor area per occupant for each occupancy type (called the “occupant load factor”). Occupant Load Factors: Max allowable floor space per occupant Crandall Gym: Assembly without fixed seats(concentrate w/ unfixed chairs) = 7 sf/person Gallery/exhibit = 15 sf/person Library reading room = 50 sf/person (net) Natatorium: Educational Classroom = 20 sf/person Educational Shop = 50 sf/person Breezeway: Gallery/Exhibit = 15 sf/person C.Calculate the maximum number of occupants per room and per floor allowed by code. Verify the minimum width of exit doors, corridors and stairs. Determine the minimum number of exits for (a) each room, and (b) each floor. F.Verify the maximum allowable distance for paths of travel to exits is not exceeded (including no “dead end” corridors). G.Verify the minimum allowable separation distance between exits for rooms and floors with >= 2 exits is met.

43


D=47’ d’= 97’

D=45’

CRANDALL GYM FINAL REPORT:

d’= 61’ 0600C20000

D=47’ d’= 97’

D=45’ D=70’

d’= 61’ 0600C20000

D=47’

d’= 97’

D=45’

d’=31’

[GROUND LEVEL] CRANDALL GYM

[UPPER LEVEL] CRANDALL GYM

ESTCODE

OCCUPANCY TYPE: Assembly 3 TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION: V STORIES AND ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: STORIES AND ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: 9204 SF Actual and 1900 SF Allowable

STORIES AND ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: 1045 SF Actual and 1800 SF Allowable

D=75’

d’=54’

D=70’

D=70’

d’=31’

d’=31’

d’=73’

[GROUND LEVEL] NATATORIUM

OCCUPANCY TYPE: B TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION: III STORIES AND ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: 5254 SF Actual and 1800 SF Allowable

[UPPER LEVEL] NATATORIUM

STORIES AND ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: 2847 SF Actual and 1800 SF Allowable

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

D=75’

d’=54’

D=75’

d’=54’

44


10.3 PLUMBING CODE ANALYSIS

10.4 LEED CHECKLIST For summary of LEED checklist see appendix A Y

17 3 1

Y

N

Sustainable Sites

Materials and Resources, Continued

21 Y

?

Y

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

1 0 0

Site Selection

5 0 0

N

?

-Table 4-1 Footnotes for college universities. Water Closets (fixtures per person): Male Female 1 per 40 1 per 30 Urinals (fixtures per person): Male 1 per 35 Lavatories ( fixtures per person): Male Female 1 per 40 1 per 40 Drinking Fountains (fixtures per person): 1 per 150 Table A: Occupant Load Factor -Educational Facilities other than group E -Occupant load factor = 50

Credit 1.1

1 to 19

1 0 0

Credit 1.2

10 0 0

Optimize Energy Performance

0 0 1

On-Site Renewable Energy

1 0 0

Enhanced Commissioning

p. 38

1 to 7

1 0 0

Credit 1.3

2

1 0 0

Credit 1.4

1

0

1 0 0

Credit 1.2

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

p.85

1

1 to 3

1 0 0

Credit 1.3

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

p.85

1

1 0 0

Credit 1.4

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

p.85

1

Green Power

2

5

1 0 0

Credit 6

Rapidly Renewable Materials

p. 54

1

0 1 0

Brownfield Redevelopment

1

1 0 0

Credit 7

Certified Wood

p. 55

1

1 0 0

Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access

1

14 0 0

Materials and Resources

Storage and Collection of Recyclables

3 0 0

Building Reuse—Maintain Existing Walls, Floors, and Roof

1 1 to 2

2 0 0

Alternative Transportation—Parking Capacity

2

Y

Prereq 1

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance

0

1 0 0

1 0 0

Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat

1

Y

Prereq 2

Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

0

2 0 0

Construction Waste Management

0 1 0

Site Development—Maximize Open Space

1

1 0 0

Credit 1

Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring

1

2 0 0

Materials Reuse

1 0 0

Stormwater Design—Quantity Control

1

1 0 0

Credit 2

Increased Ventilation

1

0 0 1

Stormwater Design—Quality Control

1

1 0 0

Credit 3.1

Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction

1

Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy

1

1 0 0

1 0 0

Heat Island Effect—Roof

p.17 1

1 0 0

Credit 4.1

Low-Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants

1

0 1 0

Light Pollution Reduction

1

1 0 0

Credit 4.2

Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings

1

Credit 4.3

Low-Emitting Materials—Flooring Systems

1

Credit 4.4

Low-Emitting Materials— Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products

1

1 0 0

Credit 5

Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control

1

1 0 0

Credit 6.1

Controllability of Systems—Lighting

1

1 0 0

Credit 6.2

Controllability of Systems— Thermal Comfort

1

2

1 0 0

Credit 7.1

Thermal Comfort—Design

1

2 to 4

1 0 0

Credit 7.2

Thermal Comfort— Verification

1

1 0 0

Credit 8.1

Daylight and Views—Daylight

0 1 0

Credit 8.2

Daylight and Views—Views

5 1 0

Innovation and Design Process

5 5 0

Water Efficiency

Y

Water Use Reduction—20% Reduction

2 2 0

Water Efficient Landscaping

0 2 0

Innovative Wastewater Technologies

3 1 0

Water Use Reduction

14 0 1

Y

Y

Energy and Atmosphere

10

p. 23

p. 26

2 to 4

35

Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems Minimum Energy Performance

1 0 0

p. 77

LEED Accredited Professional

Possible 4 Points:

14

Y

Building Reuse—Maintain 50% of Interior Non-Structural Elements

p.16 1

1

p. 85

1 0 0

Development Density and Community Connectivity

Heat Island Effect—Non-roof

p. 84

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

p. 53 1 to 2

1 0 0

1

Credit 1.1

Regional Materials

Credit 3.2

p. 83

1 0 0

Credit 5

3

1

Regional Priority Credits

2 0 0

Alternative Transportation—LowEmitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles

p. 83

4 0 0

1

3 0 0

1

Credit 2

3

14 1 0

p. 83

1 0 0

Measurement and Verification

p. 7 1

1

0 1 0

1 0 0

1 0 0

p. 83

2

p. 52 1 to 2

Possible 15 Points:

1

Enhanced Refrigerant Management

Recycled Content

Alternative Transportation— Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms

p. 83

1 0 0 Credit 4

Indoor Environmental Quality

Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title

Credit 1.5

2 0 0

1 0 0

2007 California Plumbing Code

1 0 0

Fundamental Refrigerant Management

p. 51

1 to 2

73 10 2

Total

Possible 110 Points:

1

1

Possible 6 Points:

0

45


10.5 ASCE 31 Summary CRANDALL GYM FINAL REPORT:

Scope and Intent: The purpose of going through the ASCE 31 Standard basic structural checklist for wood frame buildings was to evaluate how structurally sound Crandall Gym is. The gravity and lateral system was examined as well as deterioration or cracking of building members. A calculation of the capacity of the current lateral system was checked against the building demand using Tier 2 procedure. List of Tiers Followed: Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.1.1, Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.3.1, Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.3.2, Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.1.1, Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.1, Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.2, Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.3, Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.4, Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.5, Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.3.3 , Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.3.4, Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.4.1, Tier 2: Sec 4.4.2.7.9, Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.1.1, Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.1.3, Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.2.1, Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.2.2, Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.2.3, Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.3.9 Site and Building Data: General Building Description: Crandall Gym is a historic building on Cal Poly’s campus that was built in 1927. The structure is made out of wood beams, joists, columns, and walls. The foundation consists of concrete bearing walls and piers. Crandall Gym is a two story, 12,600 square foot structure with a small basement around 1440 square feet. The first floor is a rectangular shape of 119’8” wide and 100’ long. The second story is also rectangular in shape with a dimension of 18’6” wide and 60’8” long. Lastly the basement follows the same rectangular pattern with dimension of 100’ long and 15’ wide. Structural Description: The first floor framing is made up of wood joists that span to wood girders. The wood girders are supported by concrete piers. The second floor has wood joists that span to wood walls. The exterior and interior walls of Crandall Gym are made up of dimensional lumber, tong and groove, let-ins, and stucco. The diaphragm is made up of wood trusses that span from column to column with wood sheathing on top that span from truss to truss. The trusses are supported by concrete piers at the foundation. Crandall Gym does not have an adequate load path for the walls to be considered a shear wall lateral system. Nonstructural System Description: Heavy weight ceramic tiles are used for Crandall Gym’s roof. The walls have exterior stucco and interior plaster. There are glass windows on all four sides of the building. Building Type: Crandall Gym is a wood framed structure. Performance Level: Life Safety Level of Seismicity: Seismic Design Category D Soil Scope: Soil Classification D

List of Assumptions: Determinate Structure Findings: A Prioritized List of Deficiencies: Crandall Gym has an inadequate lateral system due to their being no continuous load path from the diaphragm down to the foundation, no hold downs at each end of the shear walls, and a demand higher than the capacity for each wall. Crandall Gym has truss members with cracks, exterior wood member that are rotting, protruding fasteners, and inadequate connections between structural members. Site and Building Data: Building Occupancy: Occupancy Category III Use: Auditorium and Library Historical Significance: Historic Cal Poly Gymnasium ASCE 31 checklist in Appendix A

OLD NATATORIUM FINAL REPORT: Scope and Intent: The purpose of going through the ASCE 31 basic structural checklist for concrete shear wall building with a stiff diaphragm was to evaluate how structurally sound the Old Natatorium is. The gravity and lateral system was examined as well as the cracking of the building members. A calculation on the shear wall and moment frame capacity of the current structure was checked against the building demand. As well, a torsional analysis was calculated.

No cladding and glass windows Building Type: The Natatorium is a concrete shear wall structure with a stiff diaphragm. Performance Level: Life Safety Level of Seismicity: Seismic Design Category D Soil Scope: Soil Classification D List of Assumptions: Indeterminate Structure Findings: A Prioritized List of Deficiencies: The Old Natatorium has cracks larger than 1/8” on portions of the interior wall. Site and Building Data: Building Occupancy: Occupancy Category III Use: Lab and Classrooms Historical Significance: Historic Cal Poly Indoor Pool ASCE 31 checklist in Appendix A

List of Tiers Followed: Tier 2: Sec 4.3.1.1, Tier 2: Sec 4.3.2.4 Tier 2: Sec 4.3.2.6, Tier 2: Sec 4.3.3.4 Tier 2: Sec 4. 3.3.9, Tier 2: Sec 4.4.1.6.1, Tier 2: Sec 4.4.2.1.1, Tier 2: Sec 4.4.2.2.1, Tier 2: Sec 4.4.2.2.2, Tier 2: Sec 4.6.2.1, Tier 2: Sec 4.6.3.5, Tier 2: Sec 4.4.1.6.3, Tier 2: Sec 4.5.1.1, Tier 2: Sec 4.5.1.4, Tier 2: Sec Site and Building Data: General Building Description: The Old Natatorium used to be an indoor pool for Cal Poly students. The swimming pool is still there along with life guard signs in the inside of the building. The Natatorium is a reinforced concrete structure. It has concrete shear walls and moment frames as its lateral force resisting system. It is a one story structure that is about 5,400 square feet. The building is 96’ feet long and 56’ feet wide. Structural Description: The first floor framing consists of a reinforced concrete slab that spans to reinforced concrete beams and girders. The roof is made up of reinforced concrete slab that spans to reinforced concrete beams and girders. The foundation is made up of concrete footings and concrete foundation bearing walls. The lateral force resisting system is reinforced concrete shear walls and reinforced concrete moment frames.

Nonstructural System Description:

46


SECTION 11.0 11.1 CASE STUDY BUILDINGS

Case Study  #1 Architectural  Hall  University  of  Washington Cost:  25  Million  dollars Price  /  SF~ Similari=es:

Size: 47,500  SF

$530/SF

Seismic Renova=on  of  a  Historical  Building Construc=on  on  an  ac=ve  college  campus Studios,  Classrooms  and  Offices Auditorium

Case Study  #2 College  of  Marin  -­‐  Math,  Science,  Central  Plant  complex Cost:  35  Million  Dollars Price  /  SF  ~ Similari=es:

Size: 70,000  SF

$500/SF

Built on  an  ac=ve  college  campus Delivery  of  materials  was  carefully  scheduled  and  coordinated   due  to  a  =ght  site Designed  to  house  large  technical  and  innova=ve  Equipment

Case Study  #3 Edward  M.  Crough  Center  for  Architectural  Studies Catholic  University  of  America,  Washington  D.C. Cost:  4  Million  dollars Price  /  SF  ~ Similari=es:

Size: Approximately  5,000  SF

$571/SF

Historic structure  build  in  the  early  1900's Used  to  be  gym  w/  pool  and  running  track  that  was  turned into  a  d-­‐Fab  lab

Architecture Hall University of Washington

We feel this project is a good example of design criteria and structural renovation of a historic building. Similar to what needs to be done to the Crandall Gym and the Natatorium, there was a complete redesign and upgrade of the major building systems including a complete electrical renovation. The interior also received a historic renovation of its own. Inside the Architecture Hall are studios, classrooms and offices. We feel this also represents similarities to our project based on the program we were given. Another similarity we took into account for our design was the improved natural light. Currently, Crandall Gym receives a lot of natural light and we want to keep it that way. See attached for complete Case Study (Created by Proxima Design Group).

Edward M Crough Center for Architectural Studies

This case study shared the idea of using a gymnasium space for something other than a gym. The spaces were turned into offices and labs similar to the plan for Crandall Gym. The basement of the gym was turned in a digital fabrication lab utilizing much of the equipment set forth in the program for Crandall gym and the Natatorium. We felt this was a good representation of our project due to its renovation of an existing gym and open space.

College of Marin – Math, Science, and Central Plant Complex

This project was on an active college campus and faced many of the logistics of construction that our project will face. This project was also creating a gateway into the college which is a design aspect we are using for the Crandall Gym and Natatorium. This case study can give us good ideas for site logistic plans, safety plans, and construction phasing plans. This case study is more useful for the construction phase than the design phase.

New roof  structure Complete  rebuild  of  electrical  and  mechanical Renova=on  included  enhancing  the  entrance  and  plaza. Average  /SF  cost  -­‐  $534/SF

47


11.2 [a] LEED SUMMARY Materials and Resources

MR Prerequisite 1: Storage and Collection of Recyclables The design of the facility must incorporate a recycling program for the occupants of the building in order to reduce the amount of waste that is generated by occupants that is transported to landfills. This credit can be fulfilled by providing an appropriately sized designated area[s] for occupants to collect and store recyclable materials. At a minimum, recycling must be available for paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics and metals. Local waste handlers and buyers for the collected recyclable materials should be identified and located, along with instructing the occupants on the procedures for recycling. MR Credit 1.1: Building Reuse – Maintain Existing Walls, Floors and Roof [1-3 Points] The intent of this goal is to extend the life and preserve the embodied energy of the building by maintaining the existing building structure and envelope. There are a total of 3 points that can be earned for this credit, which are determined by the percentage of building reuse in the project. The minimum percentage of building reuse is 55%. However, if the project includes an addition more than 2 times the current square footage of the existing building, then the credit is no longer applicable. This is a possible credit to earn points for our project, for one of our goals is to preserve and maintain as much of the building as possible. We are keeping all existing exterior walls and are trying to reuse as much material as possible, for example the Spanish roof tiles. Some complications might be found in the structural floor and roof decking, which are both in need of modifications and in need of being retrofitted to be seismically sound. MR Credit 1.2: Building Reuse – Maintain Interior Nonstructural Elements [1 Point] This credit is intended to preserve the interior nonstructural elements of the existing project, such as interior walls, doors, floor coverings and ceiling systems. The minimum amount of reused interior nonstructural elements is 50%. Again, if the project includes an addition more than 2 times the current square footage of the existing building, then the credit is no longer applicable. This credit will be one of the more challenging points to earn. The current building has many interior walls that create small, inconvenient, and uncomfortable spaces that are not suitable to be reused for the building’s proposed new use and would be difficult to quantify the extent of the building reuse. MR Credit 2: Construction Waste Management [1-2 Points] The intent of this credit is to minimize the amount of material that is disposed of in landfills during the demolition and construction process. To achieve points for this credit, recyclable or salvageable materials must be redirected back to the manufacturing process or to appropriate sites for reuse. A construction waste management plan that identifies the materials to be recycled should be developed, as well as implemented. Soil and land-clearing debris are not applicable for this credit. All calculations can be done either by weight or volume and must be consistent. The minimum percentage of debris that is to be recycled or salvaged is 50%. Materials that can be recycled for this credit are: cardboard, metal, brick, mineral fiber panel, concrete, plastic, clean wood, glass, gypsum wallboard, carpet, and

insulation. A designated specific area for the collection of recycled or salvaged material on the construction site is necessary. To receive points for this credit, it is also possible to donate the recycled material to charitable organizations

harvested and transported within 500 feet of the project site, to ensure that environmental value of transportation does not outweigh the value of the rapidly renewable materials.

MR Credit 3: Materials Reuse [1-2 Points] This credit is intended for the incorporation of salvaged, refurbished or reused materials as permanent materials installed in the projects. The minimum percentage to qualify for points is 5% of reused materials, which is based on cost of the total value of materials on the project. While mechanical, electrical, and plumbing cannot be included in the calculation, furniture may be included as long as it is included consistently.

MR Credit 7: Certified Wood [1 Point] The intent of this credit is to encourage environmentally responsible forest management. The requirements for the points is to use a minimum of 50% of wood based materials and products that are certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council’s principles and criteria, for wood building components. The components must include structural framing, and general dimensional framing, flooring, sub flooring, wood doors and finishes. This credit should be fairly easy to earn points for, our team will need to look up the cost of the wood and ensure that it is an affordable alternative, as it is a very sustainable component for the construction of the project.

To receive points for this credit, our team will need to look into the possibility of tying salvaged material into the design and do research to find potential material suppliers within 500 miles of the project site. One example to help in the design of using refurbished material, will be finding precedents of other projects that successfully tied in salvaged material cohesively into their design. MR Credit 4: Recycled Content [1-2 Points] The goal of this credit is to incorporate recycled materials into the construction of the building. This will then reduce the impacts resulting from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Our team can look into the incorporation of some type of recycled material for the flooring and the furniture. In order to receive points for this section, the minimum amount of recycled content is 20%. The percentage is determined by the sum of postconsumer recycled content plus ½ of the preconsumer content. To receive points for this portion of the project, out team will need to consider a range of environmental, economic and performance attributes to ensure tat the recycled material will be an asset to the project. Again, our team will need to look up precedents to find ideas in the creative incorporation of recyclable material into the project that can also contribute to a learning environment for occupants. MR Credit 5: Regional Materials [1-2 Points] This credit is to ensure that the material used in the project is located within the region of at least 500 miles, reducing environmental impacts from the cost of transportation. To earn points for this credit, building materials must be extracted, harvested, or recovered within the 500 miles of the project site. Also, the minimum percentage of regional materials used in the project is 10%, which is derived based on cost of the total materials value. For this project, our team will need to decide on the materials used in the projects and ensure that the material can be purchased and transported and harvested within 500 miles of our site. MR Credit 6: Rapidly Renewable Materials [1 Point] This credit ensures that there is a reduction in the use and depletion of finite raw materials, by replacing them with the use of rapidly renewable materials. To achieve points, the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, which is based on cost, contributes to at least 2. 5% of the project. Our team can look at different ways to incorporate materials that are typically harvested within a 10 year or shorter cycle such as bamboo, wool, cotton insulation, agrifiber, linoleum, wheatboard, and strawboard cork. However, our team will also nee to ensure that the rapidly renewable materials are grown and

SUSTAINABLE SITES

The section of the LEED rating system titled “Sustainable Sites” deals with storm water runoff and its reduction or elimination, erosion control, proximity to services, ability to reduce pollution by cars by proximity and available parking, construction activity pollution prevention and design or protection of open space. Some of the points for this section are based solely on the location of the building site. Since we are renovating an existing building we have no control over these points. The points that are achievable for this reason are:

SS1: Site Selection (1 point) SS2: Development Density and Community Connectivity (5 points) SS4.1: Alternative Transportation-Public Transportation Access (6 points) SS4.1: Alternative Transportation-Parking Capacity (2 points) Some of the points in the Sustainable Sites section are obtainable and not limited but achieved only from design. SS4.2: Alternative Transportation-Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms (1 pt) SS4.3: Alternative Transportation-Low-emission/Fuel-efficient vehicles (3 pts) SS5.1: Site Development-Protect or restore Habitat (1 pt) SS6.1: Stormwater Design-Quantity Control (1 pt) SS7.1: Heat Island Effect-Non-Roof (1 pt) SS7.1: Heat Island Effect-Roof (1 pt) There are a couple of items which are un-obtainable. Unlike a new construction project, we do not have many choices about the land we are building on. Also, the site we are working on has a fairly large slope on areas which must be civil and cannot be turned into green landscape or permeable materials. The following items cannot be achieved on our site: SS 3: Brownfield Redevelopment (1 pt) SS 5.2: Site Development-Maximize Open Space (1pt) SS 6.2: Stormwater Design-Quality Control (1 pt) SS 8: Light Pollution Reduction (1 pt) -Note: we can obtain this point but based on the University and safety at night we probably won’t want to

WATER EFFICIENCY

WE Prerequisite 1: Water Use Reduction

The Water Use Reduction prerequisite requires the team to factor in a reduction of water usage in the design. The basic requirements are to implement strategies that use 20% less water than the baseline that will be calculated for the Crandall Gym and Natatorium. This category does not include the water usage for irrigation. It is strictly for the buildings. Most of the requirements will be factored in at the detail level: faucets, toilets, urinals, showers, kitchen sinks, etc. Some fixtures are outside the scopes of this requirement: Steam Cookers, Commercial Dish- washers. I believe that these requirements can be attained by our group. All this prerequisite requires is that we reduce our water usage by 20%, which I believe is a reachable goal. By just updating the faucets, toilets, and urinals in both the Crandall Gym and Natatorium, this prerequisite will be achieved. We can also implement techniques of rainwater catchment and gray water for non potable uses such as toilet flushing and custodial uses. WE Credit 1: Water Efficient Landscaping The Water Efficient Landscaping credit requirement requires the team to limit or eliminate the use of potable water or any on-site or nearby water resources for landscape uses. There are two options for this section; one being worth two points, and the other being worth four points. Option 1 requires potable water usage for irrigation to be reduced by 50%. There are a few considerations that must be met for this requirement which include plant species, irrigation efficiency, rainwater catchment usage, recycled water usage, and water treated and conveyed by a public agency specifically for non-potable uses. Option 2 requires that we meet the requirements of Option 1 with the addition of not using any potable water for landscape uses. It states that the irrigation design should only use rain- water captured, recycled gray water, or water treated and conveyed by a public agency that is to be used specifically for nonpotable uses. Another aspect of Option 2 is that the irrigation system should not be permanent. However a temporary system can be installed for plant establishment for up to 1 year. I believe our team can definitely reach the requirements of Option 1 for this section. In our design we can factor in a rainwater catchment system that can be installed at the south end of our site. We can also use recycled gray water from the Crandall Gym and Natatorium buildings as well as any additional buildings we propose in our design. WE Credit 2: Innovative Wastewater Technologies: The Innovative Wastewater Technologies section requires reduction in wastewater production and potable water demand while increasing the local aquifer system. There are two options that the design team can follow. Option 1 requires a 50% reduction of potable water for sewage conveyance in the buildings by techniques of water-efficient fixtures such as urinals and faucets. Another technique can be the use of rainwater collection, recycled gray water, or treated wastewater. Option 2 requires that 50% of wastewater shall be treated to tertiary standards. The treated water is then to be used on site or infiltrated. I believe that this section of Water Efficiency standards will be hard to achieve.

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Our site is just one small aspect on the entire Cal Poly campus. However, I still believe that we can implement these strategies into our design to use for irrigation and other nonpotable uses. WE Credit 3: Water Use Reduction: The Water Use Reduction section requires the design team to further increase the water efficiency within buildings to release the burden on local water supply and wastewater treatment systems. This section follows the same requirements that are included in the prerequisite for the Water Efficiency section. By calculating the baseline level water usage of the Crandall Gym and Natatorium we can then calculate the minimum water savings percentage into three categories: 30% water savings for 2 points, 35% water savings for 3 points, and 40% water savings for 4 points. I believe our group can reach the requirements of 30% water savings up to 35% water savings for our design. With the requirements of the prerequisite already being at 20% water reduction savings from the baseline, another 10 to 15% is a reachable goal.

Indoor Environmental Quality

The following is a summary of the USGBC requirements for LEED certification in Indoor Environmental Quality and how we can achieve the available points for the Crandall Gym and Natatorium renovation

PREREQUISITE 1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Requirements Must meet sections 4 through 7 of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 Mechanical Ventilation systems must be designed using the ventilation rate procedure or the applicable local code, whichever is more stringent Naturally ventilated buildings must comply with ASHRAE Standards 62.1-2007, Paragraph 5.1 PREREQUISITE 2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control Requirements Must prohibit smoking in the building The building site can only allow smoking in designated outdoor areas CREDIT 1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring (1 Point) Install CO2 and airflow measuring equipment which sends information to the HVAC system or building automation system to trigger correction action We can achieve this point by notifying the owner of this point and convincing them to install the necessary equipment by explaining its cost and environmental savings CREDIT 2: Increased Ventilation (1 Point) In mechanically ventilated spaces, use heat recovery to minimize the additional energy consumption used for higher ventilation rates ** CREDIT 3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan (1 Point) Adopt and Indoor Air Quality Management Plan to protect HVAC elements during construction and sequence installation to avoid contamination of materials Do not use permanently installed HVAC system during construction for heating or cooling This point can be achieved by strictly writing the specifications for the HVAC system to ensure the contractor protects the elements of the system during construction CREDIT 3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan Before Occupancy (1 Point) Perform and building “flush-out” and test the air contaminant levels This point can be achieved by mandating a period of time for flushing-out the building between construction completion and occupancy. The construction documents need to include a clause about including the flush-out in the construction schedule

CREDIT 4.1: Low-Emitting Materials – Adhesives and Sealants (1 Point) Adhesives, Sealants and Sealant Primers must comply with South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168. Volatile organic compound (VOC) limits listed in the table below correspond to an effective date of July 1, 2005 and rule amendment date of January 7, 2005 We can specify low VOC materials in the contract documents and ensure that the VOC limits are clearly stated in the specifications CREDIT 4.2: Low-Emitting Materials – Paints and Coatings (1 Point) Architectural paints and coatings applied to interior walls and ceilings must not exceed the volatile organic compound (VOC) content limits established in Green Seal Standard GS-11, Paints, 1st Edition, May 20, 1993 Anti-corrosive and anti-rust paints applied to interior ferrous metal substrates must not exceed the VOC content limit of 250 g/L established in Green Seal Standard GC-03, Anti-Corrosive Paints, 2nd Edition, January 7, 1997 Clear wood finishes, floor coatings, stains, primers, sealers, and shellacs applied to interior elements must not exceed the VOC content limits established in South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1113, Architectural Coatings, rules in effect on January 1, 2004 We will be able to achieve this point by using low VOC paints and coatings in the design of the building finishes CREDIT 4.3: Low-Emitting Materials – Flooring Systems (1 Point) All flooring elements installed in the building interior must meet the testing and product requirements of the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions This LEED point will be achieved by utilizing flooring systems that meet the requirements for low-emitting materials CREDIT 4.4: Low-Emitting Materials – Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products (1 Point) Composite wood and agrifiber products used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside the weatherproofing system) must contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins. Laminating adhesives used to fabricate on-site and shop-applied composite wood and agrifiber assemblies must not contain added ureaformaldehyde resins Composite wood and agrifiber products are defined as particleboard, medium density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, wheatboard, strawboard, panel substrates and door cores. Materials considered fixtures, furniture and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are not included We can achieve this point through design by specifying composite materials that meet these requirements CREDIT 5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control (1 Point) Design to minimize and control the entry of pollutants into buildings and later cross-contamination of regularly occupied areas This point can be achieved by the following: Designing the facility cleaning system and maintenance areas with isolated exhaust systems for contaminants Installing permanent architectural entryway systems such as grilles or grates to prevent occupant borne contaminants from entering the building Specify and install high-level filtration systems CREDIT 6.1: Controllability of Systems – Lighting (1 Point) Provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the building occupants to enable adjustments to suit individual task needs and preferences Achieving this point can be accomplished by designing the building with occupant controlled lighting

CREDIT 6.2: Controllability of Systems – Thermal Comfort (1 Point) Provide individual comfort controls for 50% (minimum) of the building occupants to enable adjustments to meet individual needs and preferences. Operable windows may be used in lieu of controls for occupants located 20 feet inside and 10 feet to either side of the operable part of a window. The areas of operable window must meet the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 paragraph 5.1 Natural Ventilation We will be able achieve this point by meeting the AHREAE Standard through design CREDIT 7.1: Thermal Comfort – Design Design heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and the building envelope to meet the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 55-2004, Thermal Comfort Conditions for Human Occupancy We can get this LEED point by designing the building envelope and systems with the capability of meeting the stated requirements CREDIT 7.2: Thermal Comfort – Verification Agree to conduct a thermal comfort survey of building occupants within 6 to 18 months after occupancy. This survey should collect anonymous responses about thermal comfort in the building, including an assessment of overall satisfaction with thermal performance and identification of thermal comfort-related problems Achieving this point is done by requiring the thermal comfort survey in the contract documents Credit 8.1: Daylight and Views – Daylight (1 Point) Provide building occupants with a connection between indoor spaces and the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building We will be able to achieve this point by designing the building with things like high-performance glazing, PV panels, permanent shading devices, and ceiling reflectance CREDIT 8.2: Daylight and Views – Views (1 Point) Achieve a direct line of sight to the outdoor environment via vision glazing between 30 inches and 90 inches above the finish floor for building occupants in 90% of all regularly occupied areas This point may be difficult to achieve since the windows and building openings are already existing but we may be able to add windows to increase the line of sights to the outdoors

INNOVATION AND DESIGN PROCESS ID Credit 1: Innovation in Design The purpose of this particular section is to express the importance of continually pursuing sustainable design and performance. There are two paths to achieving credit in this category. Path 1 (1-5 points) is create a measurable improvement in environmental performance. Environmental improvement categories include energy performance and water efficiency. Path 2 (3 -5 points) is to achieve performance similar to an existing LEED 2009 building or one that is similar to what is specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 Edition.   This requirement is completely achievable and should be an important goal for all clients with adequate resources. All designer should be searching and thinking of new ways to improve energy efficiency in a building. Due to California being in a budget crisis, this expectation maybe a little far fetched for this project. It is still important to get ideas from previous projects and do what can

be done to keep sustainable design going strong.

REGIONAL PRIORITY CREDITS

RP Credit 1: Regional Priority (1-4 points) This section is important in providing an incentive to pursue environmental improvements that deal with the specific geography of the area. These specific requirements are from the USGBC regional council. Depending on the specifics of a certain region, different environment improvements of buildings should be pursued.  This requirement is achievable for this particular renovation project. Depending on Cal Poly’s particular geographic region certain requirements, such as, optimizing sunlight for a particular side of the building or achieving a specific R-value depending on the climate is in range of what our original project goals were. The RPC are specific to other credits and determined by zip code.

ASCE 31 CHECKLIST

11.3 ARCE APPENDIX

Crandall Gym: 3.7.2 : Basic Structural Checklist For Building Type W2: Wood Frames, Commercial And Industrial This Basic Structural Checklist shall be completed when required by Table 3-2. Each of the evaluation statements on this checklist shall be marked compliant (C), non-compliant (NC), or not applicable (N/A) for a Tier 1 Evaluation. Compliant statements identify issues that are acceptable according to the criteria of this Handbook, while non-compliant statements identify issues that require further investigation. Certain statements may not apply to the buildings being evaluated. For non-compliant evaluation statements, the design professional may choose to conduct further investigation using the corresponding Tier 2 evaluation procedure; the section numbers in parentheses following each evaluation statement correspond to Tier 2 evaluation procedures. Commentary: These buildings are commercial or industrial buildings with a floor area of 5,000 square feet or more. Building loads are heavier than light frame construction, and framing spans are long. There are few, if any, interior walls. The floor and roof framing consists of wood or steel trusses, glulam or steel beams, and wood posts or steel columns. Lateral forces are resisted by wood diaphragms and exterior stud walls sheathed with plywood, stucco, plaster, straight or diagonal wood sheathing, or braced with rod bracing. Large openings for storefronts and garages, when present, are framed by post-and-beam framing. Lateral force resistance around openings is provided by steel rigid frames or diagonal bracing.

Building System C NC N/A

LOAD PATH: The structure shall contain one complete load path for Life Safety and Immediate Occupancy for seismic force effects from any horizontal direction that serves to transfer the inertial forces from the mass to the foundation. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.1.1) For Life Safety there exist no adequate load path for the seismic forces from any horizontal direction to transfer the inertial forces from the mass to the foundation. Plaster shear walls, tong and grove shear walls, and let-ins provide some later support but don’t have an adequate shear capacity for the building to be considered life safe after an earthquake.

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Since the shear wall capacity is based off of tung and grove, letins, and stucco shear walls the “All other condition of 100plf” was used. Using Section 3.5.3.3 shear stress in the N-S direction was calculated as 449plf which is great than the allowable 100 plf. Therefor the shear walls are non-compliant. Calculations for this procedure are stapled to the back.

damage, or sagging in any of the wood members and none of the metal accessories shall be deteriorated, broken, or loose. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.3.1) A) Decay at end of false Girders

C NC N/A

ex: let-ins provide minimal shear support in N-S direction C NC N/A

C NC N/A

MEZZANINES: Interior mezzanine levels shall be braced independently from the main structure, or shall be anchored to the lateral-force-resisting elements of the main structure. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.1.3)

B) exterior beams splitting

There are no interior mezzanine levels. C NC N/A

C NC N/A

WEAK STORY: The strength of the lateral-force-resisting system in any story shall not be less than 80% of the strength in an adjacent story above or below for Life-Safety and Immediate Occupancy. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.2.1)

SOFT STORY: The stiffness of the lateral-force-resisting system in any story shall not be less than 70% of the stiffness in an adjacent story above or below or less than 80% of the average stiffness of the three stories above or below for Life-Safety and Immediate Occupancy. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.2.2)

GEOMETRY: There shall be no changes in horizontal dimension of the lateral-forceresisting system of more than 30% in a story relative to adjacent stories for Life Safety and Immediate Occupancy, excluding one-story penthouses. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.2.3) There isn’t an adequate lateral-force-resisting system. Also, there is only one story.

C NC N/A

C NC N/A

C NC N/A

MASS: There shall be no change in effective mass more than 50% from one story to the next for Life Safety and Immediate Occupancy. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.2.5)

There is only one story and a basement. C NC N/A DETERIORATION OF WOOD: There shall be no signs of decay, shrinkage, splitting, fire

The structural engineers relied on the stucco as a portion of the lateral-force-resisting system for the 20 foot building.

PICTURE OF CONNECTIONS

GYPSUM WALLBOARD OR PLASTER SHEAR WALLS: Interior plaster or gypsum wallboard shall not be used as shear walls on buildings over one story in height. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.3)

NARROW WOOD SHEAR WALLS: Narrow wood shear walls with an aspect ratio greater than 2 to 1 for Life Safety and 1.5 to 1 for Immediate Occupancy shall not be used to resist lateral forces developed in the building. ( Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.4)

C) crack in truss bottom chord

WALLS CONNECTED THROUGH FLOORS: Shear walls shall have interconnection between stories to transfer overturning and shear forces through the floor. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.5)

OVERDRIVEN FASTENERS: There shall be no evidence of overdriven fasteners in the shear walls. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.3.2)

There exist no straight path for the shear load to flow straight through the floor.

Too hard to look at shear wall fasteners from the inside due to the building being retagged.

PICTURE Showing Load Path C NC N/A

Lateral Force Resisting System C NC N/A

VERTICAL DISCONTINUITIES: All vertical elements in the lateral-force-resisting system shall be continuous to the foundation. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.3.2.4) There isn’t an adequate lateral-force resisting system.

There exist connection from all wood posts to the foundation. The gravity system is working due to the building still standing up.

PICTURE showing aspect ration C NC N/A

REDUNDANCY: The number of lines of shear walls in each principal direction shall be greater than or equal to 2 for Life Safety and Immediate Occupancy. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.1.1) There are no adequate shear walls in the transverse and longitudinal direction.

C NC N/A

C NC N/A

SHEAR STRESS CHECK: The shear stress in the shear walls, calculated using the Quick Check procedure of Section 3.5.3.3, shall be less than the following values for Life Safety and Immediate Occupancy (Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.1): Structural panel sheathing: 1000 plf Diagonal sheathing: 700 plf Straight sheathing: 80 plf All other conditions: 100 plf

HILLSIDE SITE: For a sloping site greater than one-half story, all shear walls on the downhill slope shall have an aspect ratio less than 1 to 1 for Life-Safety and 1 to 2 for Immediate Occupancy. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.6)

CRIPPLE WALLS: All cripple walls below first floor level shear walls shall be braced to the foundation with shear elements. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.7)

PICTURE OF SILL BOLTS TO FOUNDATION C NC N/A

OPENINGS: Walls with garage doors or other large openings shall be braced with plywood shear walls or shall be supported by adjacent construction through substantial positive ties. This statement shall apply to the Immediate Occupancy Performance Level only. (Tier 2: Sec 4.4.2.7.8) We are designing for life safety not Immediate Occupancy Performance Level.

GIRDER/COLUMN CONNECTION: There shall be a positive connection between the girder and the column support. ( Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.4.1) There are connections from the girders to the columns. The gravity system is working due to it still standing and occupiable.

Lateral Force Resisting System C NC N/A

HOLD-DOWN ANCHORS: All walls shall have properly constructed hold-down anchors. This statement shall apply to the Immediate Occupancy Performance Level only. (Tier 2: Sec 4.4.2.7.9) There are no hold downs in this building. Hold downs didn’t exist in 1927.

Diaphragms C NC N/A

DIAPHRAGM CONTINUITY: The diaphragms shall not be composed of split-level floors. In wood buildings, the diaphragms shall not have expansion joints. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.1.1) There are no split-level floors. There is a first floor and a basement.

C NC N/A

There are no cripple walls C NC N/A

WOOD SILLS: All wood sill s shall be bolted to the foundation. ( Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.3.4) The structural drawings show bolt connections for the sill to the foundation.

CHECK DIM for slope C NC N/A

WOOD POSTS: There shall be a positive connection of wood posts to the foundation. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.3.3)

STUCCO (EXTERIOR PLASTER) SHEAR WALLS: Multistory buildings shall not rely on exterior stucco walls as the primary lateral-force-resisting system. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.4.2.7.2)

For Life Safety the structural engineers used 2 by 8’s (narrow wood) with aspect rations greater than 2 to 1. DIM (#######)

There exist only one story and a basement. C NC N/A

C NC N/A

The structural engineers relied on the plaster as a portion of the lateral-force-resisting system for the 20 foot building.

There is only one story and a basement. The basement is made of retaining walls and is underground, therefor weak story analysis isn’t applicable to this building. C NC N/A

Connections

ROOF CHORD CONTINUITY: All chord elements shall be continuous, regardless of changes in roof elevation. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.1.3) There are no continuous cords in the diaphragm.

C NC N/A

PLAN IRREGULARITIES: There shall be tensile capacity to develop the strength of the diaphragm at re-entrant corners or other locations of plan irregularities. This statement shall apply to the Immediate Occupancy Performance Level only. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.1.7) The floor plan is rectangular.

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C NC N/A

DIAPHRAGM REINFORCEMENT AT OPENINGS: There shall be reinforcing around all diaphragms openings larger than 50% of the building width in either major plan dimension. This statement shall apply to the Immediate Occupancy Performance Level only. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.1.8)

OVERTURNING: - N/A Using Life Safety not immediate occupancy CONFINEMENT REINFORCING: -N/A Using Life Safety not immediate occupancy

There are no diaphragm openings. C NC N/A

REINFORCING AT OPENINGS: -N/A

STRAIGHT SHEATHING: All straight sheathed diaphragms shall have aspect ratios less than 2 to 1 for Life Safety and 1 to 1 for Immediate Occupancy in the direction being considered. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.2.1)

Using Life Safety not immediate occupancy WALL THICKNESS: -N/A

The diaphragm has straight sheathing with an aspect ratio of 2:1 which just hits the max code value. C NC N/A

SPANS: All wood diaphragms with spans greater than 24 ft. for Life Safety and 12 ft. for Immediate Occupancy shall consist of wood structural panels or diagonal sheathing. Wood commercial and industrial buildings may have rod-braced systems. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.2.2) There are wood spans larger than 24ft for Life Safety. Wood panels with a combination of diagonal rods were used.

C NC N/A

UNBLOCKED DIAPHRAGMS: All unblocked wood structural panel diaphragms shall have horizontal spans less than 40 ft. for Life Safety and 25 ft. for Immediate Occupancy and shall have aspect ratios less than or equal to 4 to 1 for Life Safety and 3 to 1 for Immediate Occupancy. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.2.3) The diaphragm is unblocked. The trusses are spaced at 10 in o.c. which is less than 40ft span limit for Life Safety. The aspect ration for the diaphragm is 2:1 which is less than the limit of 4:1 for Life Safety.

C NC N/A

OTHER DIAPHRAGMS: The diaphragm shall not consist of a system other than those described in Section 4.5. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.5.7.1)

Connections C NC N/A

WOOD SILL BOLTS: Sill bolts shall be spaced at 6 ft. or less for Life Safety and 4 ft. or less for Immediate Occupancy, with proper edge distance provided for wood and concrete. (Tier 2: Sec. 4.6.3.9) Architectural Drawings show bolts at sills but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t specify if all sills have bolts at 6 ft o.c or less for life safety.

ASCE 31 CHECKLIST

NATATORIUM: Cal Poly Natatorium ASCE-31 Checklist Response TIER 1 (3.7.9) Checklist:

Building System

LOAD PATH: -Compliant For Life Safety there exist two shear walls in the North-South direction and four moment frames/two shear walls in the South-East direction that transfer the inertial forces from the diaphragm to the foundation. The adequacy of the lateral force resisting system will be checked.

Using Life Safety not immediate occupancy

photos of cracked concrete Photo of the East-West moment Frames MEZZANINES: - N/A There are no interior mezzanine levels. WEAK STORY: - N/A The Natatorium only has one story. SOFT STORY: - N/A The Natatorium only has one story. GEOMETRY: - N/A The Natatorium only has one story. VERTICAL DISCONTINUITIES: - Compliant The Natatorium has no discontinuities in the shear walls. An adequate load path exists in all shear walls and moment frames. MASS: - N/A The Natatorium only has one story. TORSION: -Compliant The center of mass is the center of rigidity due to the shear walls of the Natatorium being symmetrical in both directions and the building being rectangular. More Details on attached page. DETERIORATION OF CONCRETE: - Compliant There is no visible deterioration of concrete or rebar on the Natatorium. POST-TENSIONING ANCHORS: - N/A There is no post-tensioning or coil-anchors in the Natatorium. CONCRETE WALL CRACKS:- non-compliant There are a few 3ft long longitudinal cracks on the inside of the South Wall near the large window opening. (Shear Cracks)

Lateral-Force Resisting System

Diaphragms

DIAPHRAGM CONTINUITY: - non-compliant

COMPLETE-FRAMES: - non-compliant

The Natatorium does not have a split level roof diaphragm but does a split level floor. The floor diaphragm may act as a three sided diaphragm or cantilever causing torsional affections not designed for in the slab. There are expansion joints in the Natatorium.

There are no columns adjacent to the walls. The roof beams/girders are supported by moment frames. (ok there) REDUNDANCY: -compliant For Life Safety there are two shear walls in each direction of the Natatorium. SHEAR STRESS CHECK: - non-compliant Refer to attached sheet with shear calculations for the Natatorium. REINFORCING STEEL: - non-compliant Check steel reinforcing calculations on attached sheet. Moment frames have adequate steel to concrete ratios while shear walls do not. Slab and shear wall reinforcing spacing is larger than 18in.

CONNECTIONS

OPENINGS AT SHEAR WALLS: -compliant There are no diaphragm openings greater than 25% of the adjacent shear wall length for Life Safety. PLAN IRREGULARITIES: -N/A This is for immediate occupancy. DIAPHRAGM REINFORCEMENT AT OPENINGS: -N/A This is for immediate occupancy. UPLIFT AT PILE CAPS: -N/A There are no pile caps

TRANSFER TO SHEAR WALLS: - compliant The diaphragm connects to the shear walls on all four sides of the Natatorium therefor no chords are needed and this requirement is met.

FOUNDATION DOWELS: -compliant The sections show dowels but they may not have the proper development lengths. TIER 1 (3.7.9.s) Checklist:

Lateral-Force Resisting System

DEFLECTION COMPATIBILITY: - N/A There are no internal columns (secondary system other than main laterforce resisting system) in the Natatorium. FLAT SLABS: - Non-compliant The Natatorium roof diaphragm slab that pass through the moment frames do not have continuous bottom steel. The bottom floor slab has continuous reinforcement of the bottom steel. COUPLING BEAMS: -N/A No coupling beams in the Natatorium.

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UNIT LOAD TAKE OFF FOR CALCULATING PSEUDO LATERAL BASE SHEAR CRANDALL GYM

ROOF: Hardwood approx. = 50 pcf Ceramic Tile Roof = 12 psf Trusses Total = 6 psf 6 (6x8) = [(6 total)*(50pcf)*(6*8/144)*(12’)]/ (10’*76’) = 1.6psf 8x8 top & bottom cord = [(50pcf)*(8*8/144)*(60’8” *2)] / (10’*76’) = 3.5 psf Bolts/connections = 1psf Purlins (8x12) = 7 *(50pcf)*(8” x 12”/144)* 116.5’/ [(76)*(116.5)] = 3 psf Other Framing [(2x6)(2x8)(6x8)(6x10)ect.]= 3psf Flashing = .5psf Sheathing = 2.5psf Tension Rods = 3psf

Total Roof = 30.5 psf WALLS: E-W Walls (structural) 2x8 @ 2”o.c= [(2 walls)*(1.5psf)* (114.5’ long)* (24.5’ tall)] /[114.5’*99’] = .75psf LETINS (2 x 8 diagonals) = .5psf Plaster Shear Walls = 1 psf N-S Walls (structural) 2x8 at 2”o.c = [(2 walls)*(1.5psf)* (99’ long)* (24.5’ tall)] / [114.5’*99’] = .65psf LETINS (2x8 diagonals) = 1psf Plaster shear walls = 2 psf Tung & grove sheathing = [(2 walls)*2.5psf *(99‘long)*(24.5’ tall)] / [114.5*99] = 1.1psf Non-structural walls = 3psf

OLD NATATORIUM

ROOF: Slab: (150pcf)(4/12 ft thick slab) = 50 psf Concrete Beams: (150pcf)(10” width)(1’4” Thickness minus slab)(19’3”long)*(20 beams)/ (56’ *96’3”) = 12 psf Concrete Girders: (150pcf)*(10” wide)*(1’8” thick minus slab)*(56’ long)*(4 girders)/(56’*96’3”) = 9 psf Moment Frame Roof part: (150pcf)*(5‘ wide)*(18’’ thick)*(56’ long)*(4 total)/ (56’*96’3”) = 47 psf

NATATORIUM SECOND FLOOR FLOOR:

Total: 129 psf MEP: 10psf MISC: 5psf

ROOF: 2” x 8” Wood Joist @ 3’ 8” o.c = [(50pcf)*(2/12)*(8/12)*17.5’]/[17.5’*3’8”] = 1.5psf 2’ x 2’ Beams & Girder = [3*(50pcf)*(2’)*(2’)*(86’)]/[41’*86’] = 14.6psf 1/2” Wood Sheathing = 1psf

5” Concrete Slab w/ Steel Decking = 3psf Beams = [30plf*48’*(3 rows) + 30plf*49’*(2 rows)]/[50’*51’] = 2.85 psf

Total: 118 psf 1/2 WALLS: Moment Frames Wall part: (150psf)*(5’ wide)*(2’ mid-width)*(14’ half the story height)*(8 total)/(56’ x 96’3”) = 32 psf Shear Walls: (150pcf)*(10” thick)*(296’ perimeter)*( 14’ half story height)/(56’ x 96’3”) = 97 psf

BREEZEWAY

Total = 5.85 psf

Total Roof = 17.1psf

WALLS

Columns = [(40plf)*(14’)*(16 columns)]/[50*51] = 3.5 psf

Brace Frames= 2psf Non-Structural Walls = 10psf

1/2 Total Wall Weight = 7.75 psf MISC = 5psf MEP = 5psf

TOTAL WEIGHT = (23.6 psf)

WALLS:

16” Wood Shear Walls = 5psf

Non-structural Walls = 5psf Columns = 5psf 1/2 Total Walls = 7.5psf

MEP= 10psf MIS = 3psf

TOTAL WEIGHT= (17.1 + 7.5 + 13)psf = 37.6psf

TOTAL WEIGHT = (118 + 129 + 10 + 5)*(56’*96’) = 1,409 kips

Total (1/2 Wall weight to the roof) = 10 = 5psf

Columns = 1psf Mechanical = 5psf Electrical = 5psf MISC = 5psf TOTAL WEIGHT FOR CALCULATING PSEUDO LATERAL FORCE:

TOTAL WEIGHT= [30.5psf + 5psf + 1psf + 5psf + 5psf + 5psf] * (115’*99’) = 581 kips

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11.4 LA APPENDIX sustainability data sheet

sustainability data sheet

Alcott

Austin™ November 2009

January 2011

sustainability data sheet

sustainability data sheet

Charlie™

Collect™ Litter Receptacle

October 2010

February 2011

With our roots in the landscape and a stated purpose to “Enrich Outdoor Spaces,” Landscape Forms has a special relationship to the natural environment. We have always been mindful that as we design and manufacture products that are acted upon by the environment, we act upon it in turn. Environmental sustainability is completely consistent with our purpose, our goals, our values and our principles. We make stewardship of the environment a vital part of our business.

With our roots in the landscape and a stated purpose to “Enrich Outdoor Spaces,” Landscape Forms has a special relationship to the natural environment. We have always been mindful that as we design and manufacture products that are acted upon by the environment, we act upon it in turn. Environmental sustainability is completely consistent with our purpose, our goals, our values and our principles. We make stewardship of the environment a vital part of our business.

With our roots in the landscape and a stated purpose to “Enrich Outdoor Spaces,” Landscape Forms has a special relationship to the natural environment. We have always been mindful that as we design and manufacture products that are acted upon by the environment, we act upon it in turn. Environmental sustainability is completely consistent with our purpose, our goals, our values and our principles. We make stewardship of the environment a vital part of our business.

To learn more about our sustainability initiatives, refer to our Environmental Statement.

To learn more about our sustainability initiatives, refer to our Environmental Statement.

To learn more about our sustainability initiatives, refer to our Environmental Statement.

alcott is manufactured using the following materials:

austin is manufactured using the following materials:

charlie is manufactured using the following materials:

Material cast aluminum various, see guide specs

Material iron aluminum wood

Parts Recyclable base plate/pole, luminaire, cabinet 100% LED lighting componentry

Finishing All metal is finished with Pangard II ® polyester powdercoat, which is lead-free, hazardous air pollutants-(HAPS) free, does not generate hazardous waste, and contains less than 1% VOCs. Once processed, these trace VOCs are fully inert therefore the finish does not release airborne contaminants. Packaging Materials plastic recycled skid cardboard with 35% recycled content

Parts product bagged to protect finish

Recyclable 100% 100% 100%

To find local recyclers visit: for steel: www.recycle-steel.org; for cardboard: www.corrugated.org.

leed® This product may help achieve the following points under the LEED 2009 Rating System. For specifics regarding rules for the

Parts supports end caps, back straps, optional armrests, seat/back slats seat/back slats

Recyclable 100% 100% 100%

Finishing All metal is finished with Pangard II ® polyester powdercoat, which is lead-free, hazardous air pollutants-(HAPS) free, does not generate hazardous waste, and contains less than 1% VOCs. Once processed, these trace VOCs are fully inert therefore the finish does not release airborne contaminants. Landscape Forms wood furniture for outdoor use is manufactured from wood species that weather naturally in outdoor settings to a beautiful pewter gray. We do not apply paints or finishes to these products and do not recommend the use of finishes which would require ongoing maintenance programs as the wood weathers. Our wood furniture for indoor use is finished with LF 80, a clear, catalyzed low-VOC acrylic finish. Packaging Materials Parts plastic product bagged to protect finish recycled skid cardboard with 35% recycled content

Recyclable 100% 100% 100%

To find local recyclers visit: for steel: www.recycle-steel.org; for cardboard: www.corrugated.org.

inclusion of furniture, please consult the rating system and reference guide that applies to your project.

Material steel aluminum

Parts tabletop/seat insert, legs, mounting plate tabletop/seat frame

Recyclable 100% 100%

Finishing All metal is finished with Pangard II ® polyester powdercoat, which is lead-free, hazardous air pollutants-(HAPS) free, does not generate hazardous waste, and contains less than 1% VOCs. Once processed, these trace VOCs are fully inert therefore the finish does not release airborne contaminants. Packaging Materials Parts plastic product bagged to protect finish recycled skid cardboard with 35% recycled content

Recyclable 100% 100% 100%

To find local recyclers visit: for steel: www.recycle-steel.org; for cardboard: www.corrugated.org.

With our roots in the landscape and a stated purpose to “Enrich Outdoor Spaces,” Landscape Forms has a special relationship to the natural environment. We have always been mindful that as we design and manufacture products that are acted upon by the environment, we act upon it in turn. Environmental sustainability is completely consistent with our purpose, our goals, our values and our principles. We make stewardship of the environment a vital part of our business. To learn more about our sustainability initiatives, refer to our Environmental Statement. collect litter receptacle is manufactured using the following materials: Material iron steel aluminum rotationally molded linear low density polyethylene

Parts freestanding base diverter/ash pan frame, surface mount base bin

Recyclable 100% 100% 100% 100%

Finishing All metal is finished with Pangard II ® polyester powdercoat, which is lead-free, hazardous air pollutants-(HAPS) free, does not generate hazardous waste, and contains less than 1% VOCs. Once processed, these trace VOCs are fully inert therefore the finish does not release airborne contaminants. Packaging Materials plastic recycled skid cardboard with 35% recycled content

Parts product bagged to protect finish

Recyclable 100% 100% 100%

To find local recyclers visit: for steel: www.recycle-steel.org; for cardboard: www.corrugated.org.

leed® This product may help achieve the following points under the LEED 2009 Rating System. For specifics regarding rules for the inclusion of furniture, please consult the rating system and reference guide that applies to your project.

EA Credit 2: Optimize Energy Performance

leed®

Intent To achieve increasing levels of energy performance beyond the prerequisite standard to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

This product may help achieve the following points under the LEED 2009 Rating System. For specifics regarding rules for the

This product utilizes LED technology. LED’s, are extremely energy efficient. Today’s high-performance LED’s produce @90 lumens per watt (90 lm/W) in comparison to @15 lm/W for conventional 60-100 watt incandescent bulbs. Using LED technology can help reduce excessive energy use to assist in obtaining this credit.

IEQ Prerequisite 2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

inclusion of furniture, please consult the rating system and reference guide that applies to your project.

Intent To prevent or minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces and ventilation air distribution systems to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS).

IEQ Prerequisite 2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Intent To prevent or minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces and ventilation air distribution systems to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Benches, tables, chairs and ash urns help create a designated smoking area 25 feet or more from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows to support the intent of this prerequisite. Charlie table is ADA Compliant.

Benches, tables, chairs and ash urns help create a designated smoking area 25 feet or more from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows to support the intent of this prerequisite.

leed® This product may help achieve the following points under the LEED 2009 Rating System. For specifics regarding rules for the inclusion of furniture (CSI Division 12), please consult the rating system and reference guide that applies to your project. IEQ Prerequisite 2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Intent To prevent or minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces and ventilation air distribution systems to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Benches, tables, chairs and ash urns help create a designated smoking area 25 feet or more from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows to support the intent of this prerequisite.

800.430.6209

800.430.6209

800.430.6209

800.430.6209

53


54


Lighting Materials and Specifications

Lighting type: FL-18 from ALLSCAPE Product Order Guide: Series: FL-18 Mounting Type: K Max Watts: 32 FL Lamp Type: T81 Min Start Temperature: 0째F Voltage: 120 Finish: BK Black Options: JBC3 Junction box cylindrical Quantity Desired: 1 Intended use: Sign accent/Landscape lighting. Will be used to illuminate CAED sign at the entrance of the Crandall Gym and Natatorium site.

Photometric Data: FL-18-32FL 2950 Initial Lumens 1.0 ft. Mounting Height, 3 ft. back, 20째 tilt 2.0 ft. grid, Value in foot-candles

Luminare Dimensions: A (FL-18):9.0 inches A (JBC mount): 5.75 inches B (FL-18): 55.5 inches B (JBC mount): 3.00 inches C: 6.00 inches D: 7.00 inches Weight (FL-18): 25 lbs Weight (JBC): 1 lbs.

55


Materials and Paving Specifications Product Name: Austin Backless Bench from Landscape Forms Quantity Desired: 4 Intention of Use: To be used at entrances to Crandall Gym and also in areas around the CAED Courtyard Plaza.

Product Name: Parc-Center Table and Chairs from Landscape Forms Quantity Desired: 24 (Tables) 96 (Chairs) Intention of Use: To be used in seating areas around the Crandall Gym and Natatorium site.

56


Planting Materials and Specifications

Scientific Name: Salvia Leucantha Common Name: Mexican Bush Sage Characteristics: Drought tolerant herbaceous perennial that grows up to 4 feet high. Leaves are soft grayish-green with purple inflorescences. Plant in full to partial sun. Quantity Desired: 164 Size (GAL): 1 Gallon

Scientific Name: Tagetes lemmonii Common Name: Copper Canyon Daisy Characteristics: Drought tolerant evergreen shrub growing to 4 feet high. Leaves are highly fragrant if rubbed against. Orange-yellow flowers blooming in the winter. Plant in full sun to partial shade. Quantity Desired: 154 Size (GAL): 1 Gallon

57


11.5 CM APPENDIX RISK MANAGEMENT Risk College Campus / Property or Personal injury

Nature of Risk

Risk Allocation

Monetary / Insurable

General Contractor

Demolition / Hazardous materials Time / Monetary

General Contractor/Owner

Loss of time due to Weather

Time / Monetary

General Contractor/Owner

Construction Documents

Time / Monetary / Liability Owner/Designer

Contract Risks

Monetary / Liability

All Parties

Project Funding

Political / Monetary

All Parties

Mitigation / Remediation Create a Surrounding Site plan including signs and information boards to prevent injury or damage to surrounding public. Identify and take appropriate actions to dispose of hazardous materials. Create and implement an IIPP and Hazardous materials plan. Extension of time must be written into DB contract for unforeseen weather issues like a ten year rain. Feasability and constructability reviews should take place in order to nd and x any errors or additions in the plans and speci cations needed for construction. The design-Build contract should be well thought out and provide a model for all parties to succeed in their respective abilities and not be held liable for work done by others. Make sure the funding for the project is secure and the structure for payment to all parties and sub-parties is equal and fair.

JOBSITE MANAGEMENT Our project jobsite is located near the southwest corner of the California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo. The site is surrounded by active university buildings as well as a roadway that completely encircles the site. The close proximity of the existing buildings and roadway make the jobsite very tight. There is very little room for onsite material storage. The jobsite itself has three existing structures and two portable trailers. One existing building will be demolished and the portable trailers will be removed. The jobsite is on land with a slope between 8% - 10%. The footprint of our jobsite is approximately 80,000 square feet or 1.8 acres. Jobsite Management Issues in order of importance:

Public Safety

Job fence, tra c control, posted detour maps, clean surrounding area

Employee Safety

Meet OSHA requirements, proper training, toolbox talks, clean jobsite

Existing Building Preservation

Quality and thorough demo plan, support existing structures, cautious construction

Meeting Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Budget

Job expense tracking, monthly cost reports, work cost projections

Quality Seismic Retro ts

Dedicated quality manager, installation planning, quali ed tradesmen

Work Production

Weekly crew schedules, production rates known by superintendent

Tracking and Managing Jobsite Costs

Organize material and subcontractor bills, record actual crew productions

Project Schedule

Weekly progress meetings, subcontractor management, timely material orders

Reusing Onsite Materials

Communication with work crews, material storage areas, cautious construction

Progress Payment Billing

Organized accounting system, weekly construction reports

Coordination of Material Deliveries

E ective communication with suppliers

Achieving Available LEED Points

Separate recycled materials, follow LEED guidelines

58


11.6 ARCH APPENDIX

MARCH 9 AM

JUNE 9 AM

DECEMBER 9 AM

MARCH NOON

JUNE NOON

DECEMBER NOON

MARCH 3 PM

JUNE 3 PM

DECEMBER 3 PM

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Crandall Gym Retrofication  

Winter quarter 2011 integrated project.

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