Page 1

gathering the

of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of North Carolina

September/October 2018

Vol. 23 Issue 5

Serving the marginalized and vulnerable Read about Grace and Main Fellowship on page 4


the test of our faith

by Larry Hovis, CBFNC Executive Coordinator

What would you say most distinguishes us as Baptists? Believers’ baptism by immersion? Freedom of the local church? Advocating for religious liberty? All of these concepts and more are vital to our particular Baptist identity. I would add to that list an emphasis on missions. Growing up in my Baptist church, I don’t remember a lot of talk about baptism (we certainly practiced believers’ baptism, but didn’t talk about it much), local church autonomy or religious liberty. But we talked about missions all the time. At Christmas and Easter when we collected missions offerings. In RAs and other Christian education programs. At summer youth camp. In Baptist Student Union. Missions was a strong emphasis in my formation as a Baptist Christian. And while the missions we learned about certainly included sharing the Good News of God’s love and forgiveness in Jesus Christ, it was delivered (by missionaries and our own efforts) primarily through acts of mercy and compassion to vulnerable and marginalized people: children, elderly, hungry, poor, and sick. This focus, of course, is thoroughly biblical. The following verses are but a few samples of the hundreds of Scriptures that point us in the direction of serving the weakest and most needy among us: •

“For the Lord your God is God of gods and Lord of lords, the great God, mighty and awesome…  who executes justice for the orphan and the widow, and who loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing. You shall also love the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.” (Deuteronomy 10:17-19)

“Is not this the fast that I choose: to loose the bonds of injustice…to let the oppressed go free…? Is it not to share your bread with the hungry, and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked, to cover them…?” (Isaiah 58:6-7)

“Religion that is pure and undefiled before God, the Father, is this: to care for orphans and widows in their distress, and to keep oneself unstained by the world.” (James 1:27)

In my travels to partner churches I see many examples of congregations engaged in hands-on missions ministries with

Oberammergau 2020

the vulnerable and marginalized: food pantries, clothes closets, wheel chair ramp building, benevolence ministries, constructing affordable housing, visiting the sick and elderly (including but not limited to church members), and much more. But congregations are limited in the amount of direct ministry they can provide to these populations. Therefore, we join together as a fellowship to support efforts to serve God’s mission to the poor and marginalized. Here are a few examples: •

Marc and Kim Wyatt in our own state, plus CBF field personnel around the world, welcome refugees and asylum seekers to the communities in which they live, sharing the love of God in word and deed.

764 CBF endorsed chaplains and pastoral counselors (159 in NC) serve in hospitals, correctional facilities, all branches of the military, public safety circumstances (police, fire, and EMTs), business and industry settings, VA facilities, continuing care communities, and other settings.

Fellowship Southwest, CBF’s newest regional organization, has organized prayer vigils and other expressions of welcome for families and children affected by the immigration crisis on the US-Mexico border.

Anna and LaCount Anderson minister to needy persons in eastern NC as Cecelia Beck ministers to needy persons in western NC.

Mahatma Ghandi was not a Christian but many Christians saw in his life a faithful example of following the way of Jesus. Ghandi said, “The true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most vulnerable members.” Perhaps we could modify that statement to say the true measure of any church is how it treats the most vulnerable. I think Jesus would approve. After all, in describing the final judgment, he said, “Just as you did it to the least of these, you did it to me.” (Matthew 25:40) Serving the vulnerable and marginalized. Perhaps we should add that to our list of characteristics that distinguish us as Baptist Christians.

by Larry Hovis, CBFNC Executive Coordinator

Since 1634, to commemorate their escape from the bubonic plague, residents of the small village of Oberammergau, Germany, have performed a Passion Play commemorating the life, death and resurrection of Jesus every ten years. The play will be performed again in 2020. Larry and Kim Hovis will be hosting a trip to Europe, May 18-27, 2020, with the Oberammergau Passion Play as the centerpiece. Additional stops will include Budapest, Vienna, Salzburg, and Prague. If you are interested in traveling with CBFNC friends on this wonderful adventure, contact Larry Hovis (lhovis@cbfnc.org) for more information. 2 • The Gathering

September/October 2018


uncharted territory When is the last time you took a road trip? I’m not talking about a predictable journey from one place to another, both of which are already familiar to you. I’m talking about an extended journey into unfamiliar territory. Most of the traveling I do is of the former variety, mindlessly moving from place to place. But sometimes, I end up somewhere far outside what I’ve seen and experienced and those journeys can change me. Canoeing the Mountains is a book about the second kind of journey. It’s not the kind of journey you take in a car nor is it the kind of journey you make as a tourist. In this case, it’s a journey for congregations and the people who lead them. The book is written by Tod Bolsinger. Bolsinger is a former pastor and current Vice-President at Fuller Seminary. He writes well. He tells good stories, offers practical insight, and doesn’t ever come across as preachy. Bolsinger starts off by covering some familiar, if also foundational, territory. He has chapters on leadership methodologies, missional community, and congregational culture (based on the work of Pat Lencioni which is worth reading all by itself). In Bolsinger’s case, however, I found the refresher helpful because he was obviously using it to prepare the readers for new material. The new ideas in his book pre-suppose some foundational concepts that you can’t skip past if you want to be able to lead your congregation into uncharted territory. The book, however, is an attempt to describe how churches should operate “off the map.” Bolsinger uses the story of Lewis and Clark as an extended metaphor. Their journey to map a route from St. Louis to the Pacific Ocean was an example of what Bolsinger calls adaptive leadership. Using their story, Bolsinger describes some habits of heart and mind that congregations and their leaders need to operate off the map. Bolsinger then takes those habits and applies them to some of the real-world congregational challenges. This is where I think the book is at its most helpful. Bolsinger tells the story of his own congregation’s struggle to identify and respond to the challenge of dis-engagement (the growing phenomenon

by Matt Cook, Pastor, First, Wilmington

of people’s tendency to invest less time and energy into their church, even as they still perceive themselves as fully invested). Some books are long on the “what,” offering practical strategy after practical strategy. Other books are long on the “why,” offering extended analysis of all the macro factors that impact our congregations. Bolsinger, however, does a good job of building a bridge from his 25,000-foot-level insights all the way down to the nitty gritty of actual challenges. Another important benefit of Bolsinger’s analysis of his own real-world challenges is that it goes a long way toward creating hope in all of us who find ourselves with the same challenges that come with doing church “off the map.” Bolsinger is obviously smart and capable, yet he and his church couldn’t find easy answers to the problems they were encountering. In congregational ministry in the 21st century, sometimes you need to have someone to remind you that you’re not crazy. Congregational life is far more complex and challenging than it was a generation ago. At First, Wilmington, we are not terribly far removed from a season of great institutional success and yet we’ve found ourselves facing the same questions and problems that Bolsinger describes. Knowing that there are smart, faithful leaders and congregations other than ours facing these challenges, and also hearing that the way forward isn’t greater effort but a willingness to experiment, innovate, and be unafraid to fail is very life-giving. One of my favorite lines from the book is this, “The answer is not try harder but to start a new adventure.” That is both helpful and hopeful. This book is useful for both ministers and lay leaders. It’s not short, so if you’re a minister recommending it to a lay leader in your church then they better enjoy reading or you should give them a heads up first. On the other hand, there’s nothing in the book that is so technical or academic that an average adult reader can’t finish it. I recommend it to you highly! Tod Bolsinger will be the keynote speaker for the 2019 CBFNC Annual Gathering as well as the Leadership Institute, scheduled for March 28-29, 2019, at First, Greensboro.

September/October 2018

The Gathering • 3


I don’t like to be late, but nearly eight years of running force Robert into a conversation, I waited until I’d finished my on “Grace and Main time” may have had some effect on my meal to pat him on the back as I made my way to the compost punctuality. So, when I pulled my car into the street parking, I and trash. “We love you, brother,” I insisted, “and we’re glad was not only in a hurry but also anxious about it. As was often you’re here.” A few weeks later, Robert was ready to try again the case during this season in the life of the neighborhood, I at sobriety. It didn’t stick that time, either. But, just last month, was met by several kids at my car door. No longer worried about Robert celebrated two years clean and sober. We rejoiced not for tardiness, but newly worried about the flow of traffic through his speed at recovery, but for his willingness to keep trying. the neighborhood and whether or not the kids were watching it, It’s not just Robert and my daughter who need hands to hold. I grabbed my bag and made my way to the stairs while answering Living in community has meant a lot of things to me over the their myriad questions. “What are we going to have for dinner?” last several years, but perhaps the most surprising has been how “Did you bring your frisbee?” “When will the next big meal be?” uncomfortable it can be to be known so deeply and personally Those questions gave way to the most pressing and important by so many. There are parts of me that I’d like to hide away from question, “Where is your those who love me so dearly, daughter?” Satisfied by my but community makes it answer that she was coming hard to hide. My tendency with her mom in a minute, to take things too personally the kids went back to playing and grumble to myself about while I helped set up for others, my reflexive desire to a community meal on the try to make people like me, front lawn of the apartment my desire to control others complex we affectionately to ease my own anxiety, my call “Big Blue.” When my habit of trying to “figure daughter arrived, the kids people out” instead of just left their game and eagerly sitting with them, my own took turns holding her tiny selfish pride—all of these hand, walking slowly from broken parts feel like jagged one end of the lawn to the edges primed to hurt those I other. They showered her love the most. I’m pretty sure with praise for her faltering steps, I could hide these things away if it rejoicing not in her speed at walking weren’t for the fact that we’ve given but in her willingness to try and get ourselves to each other in the bonds up after falling. In fact, they were of community, in shared life, work, so fascinated with her progress that and prayers. I’m going to stumble, they had to be reminded over and I’m going to hurt others both by Joshua Hearne over again to eat. These children intentionally and unintentionally, with whom I’ve shared I’m going to want to quit numerous meals have found some days, and I’m going to a variety of ways to love me, fail. but none have been as dear But, God has surrounded to me as walking carefully me with people who will with my daughter from one hold my hand as I learn to end of the lawn to the other. walk across the lawn. They Robert was at the meal are so dedicated in their love that night, too. It was for me that they’ll need to be courageous for him since he reminded to eat. These good had relapsed just a few days people—like Robert—rejoice before the meal. He had over my faltering steps. When hoped nobody would notice I sit in the grass and refuse that he was using again but to get back up because I’m he was too near and dear for tired of trying and failing, it’s us not to notice. You can’t people like Robert who will help but notice somebody’s sit with me in silence until faltering steps when you’re holding their hand. As my daughter I’m ready to try again. It probably won’t stick this time, either. But walked back and forth across the lawn, Robert found a corner sometimes miracles happen, as Robert testifies in word and action. of the porch to eat his burger by himself. I knew he didn’t There are so many ways for us to love God, but I think I want to talk about his relapse—he’d said as much just moments know God’s favorite: holding the hands of God’s children and earlier—so I enjoyed my hot dog and potato chips a few feet walking carefully with them. Love is so much more resplendent away in silence. Not knowing what else to say and not wanting to in our faltering steps.

love found in

faltering steps

Jessica (CBF field personnel) and Joshua Hearne (Executive Director of Third Chance Ministries) serve at Grace and Main Fellowship, an intentional ecumenical Christian community in Danville, VA. Visit www.graceandmain.org for more information about their ministry. 4 • The Gathering

September/October 2018


Changes Coming to CBFNC

Budget and Mission Resource Plan by Larry Hovis, CBFNC Executive Coordinator

The CBFNC Mission Resource Plan (MRP) was developed in 2004 as a replacement for the Baptist State Convention’s Plan C, which was being eliminated. It included all of the items in Plan C (CBF Global, historic NC institutions and ministries, and national CBF partners) plus CBF of North Carolina. Churches had the freedom to use the MRP or not (if not, they designated specific amounts to CBFNC, CBF National, and other partners if desired). Through the years, about one-half of partner churches have chosen to utilize the MRP. The other half have continued to give with three primary designations: CBFNC Budget; CBF Global Budget; CBF Global Missions Offering. CBFNC MINISTRY DISCERNMENT PROCESS In early 2015, the Coordinating Council began leading CBFNC through a “Ministry Discernment Process” in an effort to develop priorities as we look to the future. This process involved gathering information from a variety of sources including church leaders and experts on the future of churches and denominations. It built upon the work of the 20th Anniversary Vision Team, whose report was adopted by the General Assembly in 2014. As a result of this discernment work, the Coordinating Council adopted four priorities for future ministry: • • • •

Equip Ministers and Churches Embrace Neighbors Through Missions Engage Students and Young Adults Enhance the Annual Gathering

BENEFITS TO PARTNERS a. Partners are different, both from each other, and from what they were in 2004. Some partners have a greater need than others for funding through CBFNC channels. b. Some partners have developed elaborate fundraising structures. They have departments devoted to fundraising. They are no longer dependent on all or a majority of their funding coming from a single denominational source. BENEFITS TO CBFNC a. CBFNC only receives funding from churches and individuals (and occasional small grants), and has a limited ability to raise funds beyond our traditional funding sources. This approach will give CBFNC more flexibility in funding the priorities that have been identified by constituents. b. The current MRP is difficult to adjust. The unified approach will allow us to be more nimble and flexible in meeting changing needs. BENEFITS TO ALL This approach will enable CBFNC and partners to more fully engage in their shared desire for “missional collaboration” (working together on common missional goals), which we have been attempting since 2009. By developing funding plans together, rather than simply reporting on expenditures, CBFNC and its partners can more effectively reflect emerging priorities.

WHY CHANGE THE MRP NOW? In addition to the four priorities, the Coordinating Council also determined to merge the MRP and the CBFNC Ministry Budget. The MRP served our fellowship (churches, partners, CBFNC-led ministries) well throughout much of this history, but circumstances and needs (of churches, CBFNC, partners, and new CBFNC ministry opportunities) have changed drastically since its inception. We are moving from a fixed percentage for some partners to a unified budget based on the unique needs of each partner. Here are the reasons for making this change, aligned with benefits for churches, partners and CBFNC as a whole:

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS Partner Conversations – Conversations with partners about changing the MRP began as early as 2015. Over the summer of 2018, partners submitted funding proposals requesting specific funding amounts, sometimes for specific ministries. These proposals will inform the development of the 2019-2020 CBFNC Ministries Budget.

BENEFITS TO CHURCHES a. The current system is confusing to churches. Partners are funded in different, sometimes multiple ways. Some partners may receive funding through their MRP allocation, the CBFNC operating budget, and the CBF Global operating budget. Many churches don’t understand how their money is currently divided between CBFNC, CBF Global and partners.

Final Approval – The final budget will be presented for approval at the 2019 Annual Gathering.

Local Church Communication – Attempts to communicate these changes with local churches have been going on throughout 2018 in a variety of ways. Special presentations were made at the 2018 Annual Gathering.

Initial Implementation – Implementation will begin with CBFNC’s new fiscal year, starting April 1, 2019. CBFNC staff will work with individual churches to “map” their current giving plan to the new approach. This will ensure that CBFNC honors all church giving plans and designations.

b. With a unified approach, churches may still designate funds to partners. For more questions, contact CBFNC Executive Coordinator, Larry Hovis (LHovis@cbfnc.org). September/October 2018

The Gathering • 5


Whatever happened to ... senior adult ministry? This is first in a series which will discuss how churches are taking a fresh look at old programs to meet today’s needs. It is dangerous to paint a generation with a broad brush, but AARP does note trends it sees in the senior generations, such as gray is in, the phrase anti-aging beauty product is out; and immediate gratification is in, bucket lists are out. How does the church change with the times? I interviewed four persons who work with older adults: Leah Brown, Minister with Senior Adults at First, Asheville; George Fuller, founder of Life Compass Living; Andrew Garnett, Minister for Serving Christ at Forest Hills, Raleigh; and Carol Layton, Director of Communications and Administration for the North Carolina Baptist Aging Ministry.

by Rick Jordan, CBFNC Church Resources Coordinator

6 • The Gathering

How has senior adult ministry changed in recent years? Carol: The old paradigm put seniors on a shelf and said, “Thanks for your service, now enjoy yourself at a monthly luncheon.” Today’s seniors want to be involved. The church is now challenged with providing intergenerational ministry opportunities to 4-5 generations. Andrew: My congregation has definitely seen a shift toward senior adults not wanting to be considered senior adults. While the average age of my congregation has increased, the number of people on our homebound member list has decreased. People are increasingly reluctant to think of themselves as homebound and do not want to be placed on the homebound list like they once did. Another big change is the increasing reliance on lay people to minister to senior adults. While a minister has some general oversight, almost all of the logistics and planning is done by lay people. Leah: Ten years ago, we had a strong group of people in their 80s-90s who were very actively engaged in programming. Today’s younger seniors, those just retired and into their 70s and even into their 80s, don’t want to identity as senior adults and don’t expect the church to fulfill social needs. They find that on their own. Many still volunteer and do mission opportunities and we still have a very active senior adult group, but numbers have dropped from 180 to 75. Those who remember how the programming used to be wonder why the new seniors don’t participate. George: Baby boomers are strapped with emotional and financial burdens they have not been prepared for. When I was a pastor, I did not understand this. How many pastors understand Medicaid versus Medicare, the four stages and who pays for them, and the yearly changes to Affordable Care? These all have a huge impact on our people. The church has always rallied around persons in a time of grief but we do not have strategies to help as they live longer and spend all their savings. How can the church be a community for these persons? How is your ministry addressing these changes? Andrew: We now keep in touch with homebound senior adults primarily through lay members. We call our homebound members the “In Crowd.” They are assigned at least one lay member who will visit or call them and one lay member who will send cards. These two people contact the In Crowd member regularly, and record all their interactions in our database. That multiplies our connections with homebound members and, by checking the database, our ministers can instantly know how much contact from the church each homebound member is receiving. Carol: NCBAM offers volunteer and mission opportunities for well-aging seniors to minister to frail-aging seniors. We do that by connecting our Call Center clients with church volunteers in their communities. The NCBAM Call Center receives hundreds of calls each month from seniors in need from all over the state. Typical needs include friendly visits, transportation assistance, and wheelchair ramp construction. Leah: The younger, pre-senior adults have many financial questions, so we have conversations about healthcare power of attorney, a living will, and how to managing finances for 30 more years of life. We are working to make stronger bonds between seniors and younger generations. We help seniors become mentors. Sunday School classes visit nursing home residents for Bible study together. We want them to know that they are not forgotten, so they do not feel isolated, alone, and depressed. We work to overcome whatever keeps them separated from us, such as transportation. We have learned to base our ministry on what that person wants, not on what we as the church want for them. We cannot assume we know what is best, so we have a conversation that starts, “Would it be helpful if we…?” We stay informed about what other agencies offer in our community. For example, every county has a Council on Aging with great resources. George: Here are some crazy dreams I have: What if the church prepared younger adults for their senior adult years? What if churches transformed their missionary homes to become licensed care homes, say, for three widows – none of whom can keep up their own place? What if churches created “mutuality groups” of 15-20 persons who were committed to help one another financially, to offer respite for caregivers, to become surrogate grandparents, to receive hospice training? What if the church taught us how to be elders – wise leaders who live to support and to bless others rather than to build bigger barns? What if we used technology to connect our homebound with a virtual caregiver who could check in with them every day? What if we used technology to connect the homebound with one another?

September/October 2018


While the largest portion of CBFNC financial support comes from local church budgets (86%), individual gifts are extremely important to our financial and missional well-being. Some individual contributors are not members of partner congregations, but most are. These folks choose to make an “over and above” gift to CBFNC beyond their church contribution. Here are a few examples of why folks make individual contributions to CBFNC. If you don’t already do so, we invite you to join their ranks!

why I

give to CBFNC

compiled by Larry Hovis, CBFNC Executive Coordinator

I value CBFNC ministries as a “second layer” beyond the work of the local church. I appreciate that CBFNC resources assist churches in addition to mine and provide outreach opportunities near and far. I give with confidence that dollars are maximized in support of worthy causes and used faithfully by CBF personnel and partners. I know that God is multiplying these gifts and resources far beyond what I can do on my own. Jason Cogdill, College Park, Winston-Salem

I give through my church as we support CBFNC. I also give individually because of the amazing contributions to NC Baptist church life such as informational gatherings and publications reflecting work around the state, theological education and student work, reference and referral, ministry and multiple other resources for church life. Mostly I give because I sense the presence of Christ in our connected fellowship and work.

I’m a Baptist. A few years back I took a serious look around at other denominations but that just confirmed what I already knew. I’m a Baptist, and a moderate Baptist at that. Is CBFNC perfect? No, but I’m reminded of a quote from one of my favorite philosophers, Michael J. Fox: “I’m careful not to confuse excellence with perfection.  Excellence, I can reach for; perfection is God’s business.”  CBFNC is reaching for excellence in the ways we encourage, empower and equip local churches to share God’s perfect love.  I always supported CBFNC through the giving plan at my church and usually made a contribution at the end of the year. Then I looked at other organizations I routinely support. My giving priorities needed some adjustment!  The automatic monthly contribution I set up through my bank is not going to make or break CBFNC, but it’s the right thing to do.  I’m a Baptist! Kathy Driver, Trinity, Raleigh

Gail Coulter, Providence, Hendersonville

I give to CBFNC because I know the impact our gifts have on North Carolina and the world.   Whether it’s providing resources to local congregations, enabling theologically responsible collegiate ministry, or supporting missionaries locally and globally, every dollar I give impacts our community in Christ’s name.

Undergirding the work of CBFNC is one of the ways I can help fulfill the Great Commission. I appreciate the faithfulness of the leaders of CBFNC and our staff, volunteers, and churches as they provide discipleship training and mission service opportunities for all who are called. Kathryn Hamrick, Boiling Springs, Boiling Springs

Seth Asbill, Duke Memorial UMC, Durham

September/October 2018

The Gathering • 7


individual contributors

January 1, 2017 - December 31, 2017

Thank you to the many generous individuals who give directly to the mission and ministry of CBFNC. While the bulk of our financial support comes from church budgets, individual gifts have become increasingly important to our organization. Your financial partnership is necessary for our ministry and that of our many ministry partners around our state. We are grateful for everyone who contributes to the mission of CBFNC. Please continue to give through your church, but also consider joining those listed below by making a contribution directly to CBFNC.

Name

City/State

Rennie & Sandy Adcock.......... Pfafftown

Don & Deborah Cherry..... Elizabeth City

Frances Armour......................Clemmons

Chipley High School Class of 1961 .............................................. Chipley, FL

Seth & Jennifer Asbill................. Durham Glenn & Cathy Baldwin........... Boonville Jan & Larry Ballard.....................Raleigh Marc Barber.....................................Apex Wayne & Anita Bare..................... Garner Jackie & Lonnie Baxley....... Thomasville Austin Beard.......................Andrews, SC Ed Beddingfield....................Buies Creek Gwen & John Bell............. Elizabeth City Warren Bishop........................ Goldsboro Albert Blackmon.............................. Cary Ken Boaz................................Yadkinville Benny Bowes.................. Winston-Salem Renee & Jim Bridges....................... Cary Tommy & Gail Bridges................Sanford Carol Brown............................ Greenville Mary Brown.................................Raleigh Martha & H.T. Bryson.............. Charlotte Grace Bullard............................Asheboro Linden & Alice Burch..... Lake Junaluska Anne & John Burdette............... Advance James Byrd........................Mount Gilead Mary Nell Byrd..................... Mount Airy Hilary & Lee Canipe................. Charlotte Patrick Cardwell..........................Edenton Tony & Susan Cartledge..................Apex Sylvia Cash..................................Raleigh

Joyce & Mitch Christmas...... Wilmington Owonna & Max Clayton.......... Matthews Jason Cogdill............................ Pfafftown Mike & Gail Cogdill.............Buies Creek Austin & Betty Connors..............Raleigh Andrew Corley.............................. Shelby Gail Coulter......................Hendersonville David Cox....................................Raleigh Jim Cross.......................................Oxford Mary Cunningham.......................Candler Barbara Dallas.................................. Eden Kathy Driver................................Raleigh Carol & Bill Duke........... Palm Coast, FL Patricia Dunn.......................... Greenville Carol Dunning....................... Mount Airy Charles & Julia Edwards ........................................ Winston-Salem Mark Elliott.................... Englewood, CO Judy & Tom Eustice................Clemmons Johnnie Evans........................ Morrisville Robert & Patsy Everhart.........Clemmons Rufus Fisher................................... Arden

Don Gordon............................Clemmons Nelson & Valerie Granade.......Statesville

Irvin Grigg........................... Kernersville Kathy Grosvenor..........................Raleigh Kathryn & Cline Hamrick............. Shelby

Tommy & Pat Hardin...... Winston-Salem

Christine & Allen Harker....... Winterville Susan Harrington.......................Fairmont David & Vanessa Hawes........ Lumberton Christopher & Amanda Hensley ................................................. Ellenboro

Dennis & Betsy Herman..............Raleigh

Marie Hill.......................Roanoke Rapids

Brenda Hipp......................... Thomasville Hilda Holder................................. Liberty

Christy Holland............................Clayton Adam & Amanda Horton ........................................ Winston-Salem

Donald & Marion Horton....... Knightdale Don & Jo Ann Horton.................Zebulon Larry & Kim Hovis......... Winston-Salem

Barbara Huggins..........................Raleigh Emily & Josh McGee...... Winston-Salem John Huneycutt.......................... Advance

Mary Foskett & Scott Hudgins ........................................ Winston-Salem

Rebecca & Mark Maynard...... Thurmond

Marie & Steven Fox..................... Benson

Jim & Jan Hylton............ Winston-Salem

Holly Ivel & Matthew Smith.......Raleigh

Joyce Fulcher............................. Madison Robert & Marsha Garrett..............Oxford

Ka’thy Gore Chappell..... Winston-Salem

Roger & Deidra Gilbert........ Mount Airy

September/October 2018

Elizabeth Gordon....................Clemmons

Jaime Fitzgerald..............................Tryon

Nichole Cella...............................Raleigh

8 • The Gathering

Lou Ann & Trey Gilliam.... Murfreesboro

Nancy & Franklin Ivey............Statesville

A. Robert & Elaine Jeffcoat........ Durham Brenda & Mike Johnson........ Hope Mills


Frances & Jont Johnson.......... Albemarle Frances Jones...............................Raleigh Linda & Joseph Jones.............Clemmons

Thomas & Robin Penninger.....Lexington

Jim Summerville....................Chapel Hill

Jason Perry..................................Whittier

Margie & Ruben Swint..... Snellville, GA

Stella & John Perrin.............. Taylorsville

Van & June Jones.........................Raleigh

Carson & Betty Pittman..........Oak Island

Sheila Jordan & Jerry Washington ............................................Sunset Beach

Clara Privott....................... Rocky Mount

Andy & Amy Jung.................. Albemarle

Bo & Gail Prosser................. Youngsville

Mike & Bobbie Queen.......... Wilmington

Michael Keffer..........................Nashville Ku Khang..............................Waynesville Bill & Jane Kibler........................Raleigh Wanda & Dan Kidd...................Mars Hill Lou Kline.....................................Raleigh Edith & Harold Knight...........Greensboro Ray & Carolyn Kohring...............Raleigh Joseph & Meade Lamb..... Elizabeth City Rhea & Bob Lamb........................ Shelby Aileen & Jay Lawrimore...........Asheville Bill & Crystal Leathers... Winston-Salem Amy Lin.......................................Raleigh Jatana Love..........................Summerfield Kathy Lovedahl............................... Sylva John Martin..................... Winston-Salem Jeff & Rebecca Mathis.................... Sylva Rick & Carolyn Matthews ........................................ Winston-Salem Gail & Larry McAlister.....Winston-Salem Fred & Sara McCall......................... Hays Judy & William McCall........Mooresville Katie Medlin............................... Durham Hal & Roberta Melton.................Raleigh Jean & Gene Millsaps...........Mooresville David Moore.........................Greensboro Tim Moore & Magay Shepherd .................................................. Charlotte

Donnie & Ann Ramsey......... Weaverville

Lynne Swaine............................ Mayodan

Donnie Tacy.................... Winston-Salem

Jennifer & Bob Talley.......... Wake Forest Neil Thaggard........................Greensboro Beth & Tommy Thompson..... Greenville

Jerry Thompson.......................Cairo, GA

Kim & Robby Ray.................... Charlotte

Carrie Tuning.................Roanoke Rapids

Mary Beth Rehm & Edwin Brown .....................................................Raleigh

Manuel Vega-Vasquez........Holly Springs

Paul & Anne Raybon...................Candler

Carolyn Ripley.......................Greensboro

Tyler & Laura Roach..............Morganton Charity Roberson..............Richmond, VA

A. Paul Rogers........................ Tabor City Greg & Leslie Rogers............. Greenville Lisa & Kenneth Rust.............. Lumberton

Katrina Salter-Wood & Patrick Wood .................................... Hawkinsville, GA

Betty Scales..................... Winston-Salem Hilda Scarborough.......... Winston-Salem

Tiffany Seaford...................... Mocksville Sara Sears...............................Greensboro

Kelly Settlemyre.................... Forest City Joann Sewell......................... Mount Airy

Shirley Shelburne..................... Lillington Alan & Jenny Sherouse..........Greensboro

Michael & Barbara Shook........... Clinton James Simmons............................... Coats

Martha Simmons....................... Charlotte John & Priscilla Singletary........Pittsboro

Dustin Tuttle................................Raleigh John Vestal........................... Wake Forest

Laura Anne Vick..........................Raleigh Don Wagner............................Burlington Ann Wall......................................Raleigh

Carey & Fern Washburn..............Kinston Mary Scott & DL Webster.......... Durham

Elaine White............................Cullowhee

Margaret & Ron White.....Black Mountain Alan & Blanche Williams........... Durham

Candy & Dick Wilson................... Shelby Creely Wilson...................... Franklin, TN David & Ann Wilson......... Maryville, TN

Bill & Kathy Wilson...............Clemmons

Nancy Wingenbach ........................... Saint Helena Island, SC Linda Winslow....................... Jamestown

Joyce Wyatt.......................... Wake Forest Kimberly & Marc Wyatt..............Raleigh

Ray & Melba Wyche............... Whiteville Richard & Betty Wynne...............Raleigh

Dina & Roger Sit...................Chapel Hill Michael Sizemore.............Fuquay Varina

Doug & Candace Murray ....................................... Black Mountain

Henry Skinner...............................Wilson

Jane & Jerry Myers................. Albemarle

Charlotte & Roy Smith... Winston-Salem

Blanche Wall & William A. Brown

Clyde & Laura Smith...................Raleigh

Hannah & Frank D. Hills

Doris Stocks............................High Point

Lynn Camp Odom

Marshall & Kay Neathery........ Rolesville Rebecca New...................... Hillsborough Alvin Newsome.............. Winston-Salem Ed & Phyllis Parkerson..........Greensboro Suzii Paynter........................ Decatur, GA Ray Pegram................................ Spindale

Amanda Smith............................ Lowgap

NC Baptist Foundation Endowment Fund

Christine Smith...........................Zebulon

Mary W. Brown

Sandy & Stephen Smith........ Wilmington

H. Manly Hocutt

Mary Lois & Chuck Strickland....Dobson

Elizabeth Simmons

Robert Stump...........................Lexington

September/October 2018

The Gathering • 9


CBFNC Honorary and Memorial Gifts Collegiate Ministry: Facebook fundraisers in honor of the birthdays of Lawrence Powers and Kevin Moore

CBFNC Financial Report June 2018 Contributions Undesignated: $82,965 Designated: $153,670 July 2018 Contributions Undesignated: $124,394 Designated: $170,839 April 2018 - March 2019 Monthly Undesignated Goal: $104,922

Check out our blog! cbfnc.wordpress.com

To contribute, e-mail acook@cbfnc.org.

Donate to CBFNC today! www.cbfnc.org/give

Ministers on the Move Our encouragement and support go to the following ministers who have recently moved:

Coordinators’ Visits June 2018 - July 2018

John Callaway to First, High Point as Minister of Students and Media

First, Elkin

Katie Callaway to First, High Point as Minister of Spiritual Formation

Nobles Chapel, Sims

Scott Hovey to St. John’s, Raleigh as Pastor

First, Rockingham

Aileen Lawrimore to Ecclesia, Asheville as Pastor

First, Greensboro

Steve Le Roux to Rose Hill Baptist as Pastor Stella Perrin to Emerald Isle Baptist as Associate Pastor for Families

First, Bladenboro First, Kannapolis Mars Hill, Mars Hill

Dan Redding to First, Taylorsville as Pastor

Mosaic, Clayton

Mark Reese to First, Elkin as Pastor

Oakmont, Greenville

Mark White to Forest Hills, Raleigh as Pastor

Providence, Charlotte

When you make a move or know of someone who has changed places of ministry, let us know by e-mailing us at cbfnc@cbfnc.org. For assistance to search committees and ministers seeking vocational discernment, visit the Career and Calling page on our website at www.cbfnc.org or call (336) 759-3456 or (888) 822-1944.

10 • The Gathering

September/October 2018

CBF Global General Assembly, Dallas CBF Student.Church Orientation CBFNC ministry coordinators are available to visit your church to speak, preach, teach, consult, lead, and minister. Contact the CBFNC office for more information.


catch and release

by Wanda Kidd, CBFNC Collegiate Engagement Coordinator

A young friend of mine has been telling me about her new passion for fly fishing. She lamented that it is complicated to get the wrist action technique accurate. It takes years of practice to appreciate all of the idiosyncrasies of the seasoned fly fisherperson. It also takes a willingness to be uncomfortable in the process. I said why do you do it, thinking that at least she would have a good fish fry for her efforts, but no, she said they “catch and release.” They just fish for fun. I thought about that phrase, catch and release, and how it relates to our mission to and with college students and young adults. It doesn’t look like fun for everyone. The students are not often interested in things that we think are really important. They want to do things we do not understand, i.e. video games and texting with people while we are sitting beside them. I am not crazy about their music, but then they are usually listening to it on their headphones and do not even respond when spoken to.  It feels like all I do with students is catch and release. They come and occasionally swim in our ponds for a little while and sometimes they allow themselves to be hooked for a moment, wiggling and uncomfortable most of the time. They do not contribute to the coffers and they seldom express a desire to want to be part of what we are doing in the church. So why do we bother?  I do not know about you, but I do it because we both need the challenge—both the student and me. We need to hear what the other has to say and to realize how we came to those understandings. Our isolation from each other causes misconceptions and assumptions that we state as truths without talking to each other. There are strongly held beliefs by young people that I do not understand, but I stay in relationship with them so I can ask sincere questions and seek answers. If I want them to see another perspective, I must stay in the conversation and so must other adults. One of the things that is missing in young adult’s lives is the opportunity to hear other people’s thoughts in relationship. They listen to a multitude of podcasts. They listen to their peers and they listen to their nuclear family (often by osmosis), but how often do they have the opportunity to hear lifeenriched perspectives from someone who just wants to talk to them? The challenge in relating to young adults is not only to be comfortable with the concept of catch and release but to allow young adults to be released from what they believe they know and caught in a pool of life where they can hear new thoughts. That is where the church can open their doors and welcome the young adult who is looking for someone to hear them and respond to them with wisdom and hope— someone who is not genetically connected to them.  Statistics show that 50-to 70-year-old women are some of the loneliest people in our culture. Their friends were dictated by the parents of their children’s friends and those they worked with. The definer of this generation is loneliness, so it seems to me that there is a great opportunity for the church to reach out to both groups and build a bridge. The older group has skills they can share and the younger group needs instruction. There is a great deal of opportunity for life conversations during that type of shared time and space. When families release their children—and that is an important part of parenting—the church has an opportunity to catch them, care for them, encourage them, and listen to them.  Why do I still do this? Because I have been downstream and those who have been released are thriving and caring and teaching others. Whether we are catching and releasing or catching those who have been released for a season, God is present in all of our stories and is calling us to share, pray, and love the lonely among us.

September/October 2018

The Gathering • 11


Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of North Carolina Bringing Baptists of North Carolina Together for Christ-Centered Ministry 2640 Reynolda Road Winston-Salem, NC 27106

888-822-1944 www.cbfnc.org

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Upcoming Events Elevating Preaching September 17, 2018 Wake Forest School of Divinity, Winston-Salem

RE (Reimagining Evangelism) November 4, 2018 Asheville, NC - Hominy Baptist Church

Mid-Winter Young Adult Retreat Feburary 15-17, 2019 Camp Thunderbird, Lake Wylie, SC

Where is Church Going From Here? September 22, 2018 Oakmont, Greenville

Growing Young Regional Workshop November 10, 2018 First, Black Mountain

Children’s Choir Festival February 23, 2019 Myers Park UMC, Charlotte

RE (Reimagining Evangelism) September 30, 2018 Raleigh, NC - Trinity Baptist Church

Children’s Mission Days November 17, 2018 Conetoe Family Life Training Center, Tarboro Providence Baptist Church, Charlotte

Youth Choir Festival March 8-10, 2019 Providence Baptist Church, Charlotte

Growing Young Regional Workshop October 20, 2018 First, Lumberton Children’s Mission Days October 27, 2018 Conetoe Family Life Training Center, Tarboro Mars Hill Baptist Church, Mars Hill 501 Foundations of Christian Coaching Day 1: November 2, 2018 Day 2: November 3, 2018

Youth Ski Retreat January 25-27, 2019 Winterplace, WV NC Growing Young Cohort Summit 1: January 31-February 1, 2019 Trinity, Raleigh Summit 2: September 5-6, 2019 Trinity, Raleigh

Profile for Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of North Carolina

The Gathering CBFNC Newsletter - Oct/Nov 2018  

September/October 2018 issue of The Gathering from the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of North Carolina

The Gathering CBFNC Newsletter - Oct/Nov 2018  

September/October 2018 issue of The Gathering from the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of North Carolina

Profile for cbfnc