Page 1

Programme C C1 Improving Access within NNRs C2 Improving Access to Features and Attractions C3 Travelling Through Time: Historic Routes and Links to Historic Features C4 Understanding the Landscape

C


Improving Access within NNRs

C1

The Clyde and Avon Valley contains a number of important nature reserves, including the Clyde Valley Woodlands National Nature Reserve, which encompasses six semi natural valley woodlands. Access routes around these areas are in need of improvement – both to improve safety and to improve the visitor experience. The aims of this workstream are to enhance, improve and repair access features across the NNRs, including path works, interpretation and signage. New paths or path links are to be created.

Projects in this work stream include: C1.1 Falls of Clyde: Wildlife Reserve Access C1.2 Garrion Gill: Wildlife Reserve Access C1.3 Lower Nethan Gorge: Wildlife Reserve Access C1.4 Nethan Gorge: Wildlife Reserve Access C1.5 Cartland Craigs and Cleghorn Glen: paths and signs C1.5.1 C1.5.2 C1.5.3

Access Infrastructure Access Link Path Resilience

C1.6 Mauldslie Access C1.7 Baron’s Haugh Access C1.8 New Lanark Access


C1.1

FALLS OF CLYDE: WILDLIFE RESERVE ACCESS

Context The Falls of Clyde Wildlife Reserve is part of the Clyde Valley Woodlands National Nature Reserve and situated next to the New Lanark World Heritage Site. It is a popular visitor attraction with approximately 70,000 people annually coming to walk through the woodlands and view the spectacular waterfall, Corra Linn. This project will improve the access facilities and interpretation on the reserve for visitors. The Proposals 

Fell and prune dangerous trees

Install interpretation signs

Produce Trail leaflets

Footpath upgrade/construction

Renew the Clyde Walkway Boardwalk

Strim footpaths

Post and wire fencing

Safety fencing

Benefits and Justification To create a safe environment for the general public when visiting the reserve. To provide opportunities for the visitor to learn about the woodland management and cultural significance of the site. To improve and maintain a high quality visitor experience through the replacement of the boardwalk and footpath upgrade. Risks The degradation of the access infrastructure of the reserve and missing the opportunity to inform visitors about the natural and cultural heritage.


Audience: Reserve visitors Outputs: 2.4km of footpath upgraded; 3 interpretation panels installed; trail leaflets provided replacement of 330m of boardwalk; strimming and vegetation clearance on 7km of footpath; removal and replacement of 600m of post and wire fence; removal and replacement of 75m of safety fence. Media outputs: Funder’s logo’s on interpretation panels. Press releases regarding the access improvements to local and national press. Training and education: Training in practical conservation and access works for the trainees on the SWT Conservation Training Team. Partners: SWT is the lead and delivery will be through the SWT Reserve Project Group for the dangerous tree work and the footpath maintenance and upgrades. Specialist contractors will be required for the boardwalk, fencing and interpretation panels. Private land involvement: The reserve is managed and part owned by SWT, who have a lease and management agreement with the Corehouse Estate for part of the site. SWT and Scottish Power are currently renewing the management agreement for the parts of the reserve owned by Scottish Power.


C1.2

GARRION GILL: WILDLIFE RESERVE ACCESS

Context Garrion Gill Wildlife Reserve is a small woodland reserve on the southern slopes of the gill situated between Law village and Overtown. The site is designated as a SSSI and SAC and supports a broad diversity of flora and fauna. A footpath through the reserve forms part of a link between the two communities and a small area of species rich grassland is found on the edge of the wood. The Proposals 

Strim footpath

Install threshold signs

Benefits and Justification To maintain and enhance the access network in the local area. Risks A degradation of the local access network.

Audience: reserve visitors and local communities Outputs: 350m of path strimmed annually; 2 threshold signs installed Media outputs: Funder’s logo’s on the threshold signs Training and education: Training in practical conservation and access works for the trainees on the SWT Conservation Team. Partners: SWT is the lead and delivery will be through the SWT Conservation Training Team for the practical conservation work. Specialist contractors will be required for the sign production. Private land involvement: N/A


C1.3

LOWER NETHAN GORGE WILDLIFE RESERVE: ACCESS PROJECT

Context Lower Nethan Gorge Wildlife Reserve is also part of the Clyde Valley National Nature Reserve. A fantastically diverse woodland, it clings to the sheer sides of the Nethan Gorge between the village of Crossford and the historic Craignethan Castle. A long history of sustainable woodland management through coppicing was replaced by coal mining in the 19th Century, which has since disappeared. Some evidence remains, but nature has reclaimed the gorge and it is now home to raven, woodpecker, otter and a rich assemblage of dead wood invertebrates. The Proposals 

Strimming the footpath

Footpath upgrade and additional signage

Interpretive Viewpoint

Benefits and Justification Maintaining a high quality visitor experience when walking on the reserve and providing an new opportunity to view and learn about the natural and cultural history of the gorge. This footpath forms part of the access link from Crossford to Lesmahagow via Craignethan Castle and is an important branch from the Clyde Walkway Risks Degradation of the local access network.


Audience: Reserve visitors and the local community of Crossford Outputs: Maintenance of 1.1km of footpath. Replacement of poor quality wooden steps. Creation of a viewpoint overlooking the gorge incorporating interpretation Media outputs: Funder’s logo’s on the interpretive viewpoint. Training and education: Training in practical conservation and access works for the trainees on the SWT Conservation Team. Partners: SWT is the lead and delivery will be through the SWT Reserve Project Groups or contractors, depending on the task. Private land involvement: N/A


C1.4

UPPER NETHAN GORGE: WILDLIFE RESERVE ACCESS

Context Upper Nethan Gorge Wildlife Reserve is a SSSI and SAC woodland that clings to the steep slopes above the River Nethan. The main footpath follows the route of an old railway line and forms part of the local community footpath network, joining Lesmahagow with Crossford. The Proposals 

Strim path

Install Threshold signs

Install interpretation panel

Benefits and Justification This project will help to maintain a high quality visitor experience when walking on the reserve along with an increased visitor awareness and knowledge of the natural environment.

Risks Degradation of the access resource in the Blackwood/Kirkmuirhill area.

Audience: Reserve visitors Outputs: 900m of footpath strimmed 3 times per year, 3 threshold signs and one interpretation panel will be installed. Media outputs: Funder’s logo’s displayed on the interpretation panel. Training and education: This will contribute to the practical conservation training of the SWT Reserve Project Group volunteers. Partners: SWT will lead this project with the strimming and installation of the signs undertaken by the SWT Reserve Project Group and the production of the signs undertaken by specialist contractors. Private land involvement: none


C1.5

CARTLAND CRAIGS AND CLEGHORN GLEN: WILDLIFE RESERVE ACCESS

Context Access routes through Cartland Craigs and Cleghorn Glen are in need of improvement and repair works, including path works, and threshold and interpretation signage, as well as monitoring visitor usage. In addition there are opportunities for links to be made between existing paths. The Project Proposals

C1.5.1

Cartland Craigs and Cleghorn Glen: Access Infrastructure

C1.5.2

Cartland Craigs and Cleghorn Glen: Access Links

C1.5.3

Path Resilience

Benefits and Justification Measuring visitor usage of the paths through Cartland Craigs and Cleghorn Glen. Improving safe access. Creation of additional path links Risks There is a current lack of engagement between local people and the landscape, and there is a risk of further disengagement if access provisions are not improved.


C1.5.1

CLEGHORN GLEN AND CARTLAND CRAIGS: ACCESS INFRASTRUCTURE

Context Over the past three years both Cleghorn Glen and Cartland Craigs have benefitted from improvements to their path networks, but we need to further enhance the quality of the visitors’ experience and importantly to then understand and monitor how people use this National Nature Reserve (NNR). Consequently, this access infrastructure project is to install people counters, perches / benches and leaflet dispensers at key locations around the Reserve. The Proposals 

To source and install people counters, perches/ benches and leaflet dispensers on the NNR.

Consultancy to undertake feasibility study to improve access infrastructure, assess proposed routes and parking provision

Benefits and Justification The leaflets will provide visitors with natural heritage and orientation information about the Reserve (including the forthcoming new Reserve leaflet). The perches/benches will allow visitors to rest, particularly at the steeper sections on Cartland Craigs, thereby extending the appeal of the Reserve to the less mobile. The people counters will enable SNH to monitor visitor use of the site and this will assist our management of the Reserve. Risks None

Audience: Reserve visitors Outputs: Installation of people counters, perches/benches and leaflet dispensers. Feasibility report Media outputs: N/A Training and education: N/A Partners: SNH CSFT Private land involvement: N/A


C1.5.2

CLEGHORN GLEN AND CARTLAND CRAIGS: ACCESS LINKS

Context This project and 1.5.3 is to complete the installation of a high quality access path network at Cleghorn Glen and Cartland Craigs. This will entail two new sections of path and some essential improvements to the existing path. This will provide a high quality link between the neighbouring woodlands of Cleghorn and Cartland and a further link with the nearby Clyde Walkway, adding great value and interest to these important ‘landscape’ routes. Furthermore, this project will augment the robustness and sustainability of these paths in the face of increased use by visitors. The Proposals 

To provide a clear walking route that links Cleghorn Glen and Cartland Craigs.

Benefits and Justification Currently the gorge topography and the river and road ‘barriers’ of this landscape make it difficult to create a linked cohesive path network (many paths being short and linear); this project would link the Clyde Walkway with an additional and spectacular excursion into a nearby 4km long National Nature Reserve that occupies the valley of the Mouse water ; a ‘hanging’ tributary of the Clyde. Risks Some of the land across which the path links will need to be created is in private ownership, so landowner permission or agreements may need to be sought. However, other sections (also in private ownership) have paths which are part of the Core Path Network, but which require improvement and signage. The remainder of the ground is owned or controlled by SNH.

Audience: Local communities, walkers and tourists Outputs: Linking signage Media outputs: Training and education: Partners: SNH and South Lanarkshire Council through the Core Path Network. Private land involvement:.


C1.5.3

CLEGHORN GLEN AND CARTLAND CRAIGS: PATH RESILIENCE UPGRADE

Context Cleghorn Glen and Cartland Craigs are two of the protected gorge woodlands that comprise the composite Clyde Valley Woodlands National Nature Reserve (NNR). Following considerable damage to the path network and an audit to identify how best to repair the path, this project is phase 1a of the physical works to produce a more robust, sustainable path, that is more resilient to adverse weather and recreational impacts. It is hoped that phases 1b and 2 will take place in 2015/16 and 2016/17, subject to funding. It is anticipated that SNH will be approaching the CAVLP for match funding for these phases of the project.

The Proposals 

This project will entail physical improvements to approximately 1.5 km of path within the National Nature Reserve. Considerable lengths of this path have been damaged by poor weather and increased recreational usage. As a consequence SNH now wishes to undertake improvements to produce a more resilient and durable path that will improve the quality of the experience for visitors. We will however, ensure that the improved path retains its natural and aesthetically attractive appearance. The work will include such operations as drainage, improvements to camber and some surfacing with locally appropriate materials.

Benefits and Justification This work will greatly enhance the quality and enjoyment of visits to the NNR by our visitors. At present, during wet weather or during the winter, visitors are being deterred from visiting the NNR by the deteriorating condition of the path network. In addition, the improvements will enhance opportunities for more organised visits to the NNR by school groups, etc. Risks Should this work not go ahead, then the worsening condition of the paths will continue to deter visitors from using the site, meaning that the NNR is failing to meet its full potential in terms of re-engaging the public with the countryside and the natural heritage. There would also be an associated reputational risk to SNH if the NNR was considered to be in poor condition.


Audience: Reserve visitors. Outputs: Upgraded path – approximately 1.5km. Increased opportunity for usage by visitors and local schools/groups. Media outputs: A press release will be prepared explaining the intended works to the public, as well as on completion of the works. This can be used by CAVLP team to inform people through website, Facebook, newsletter etc. HLF / CAVLP temporary signage will be put up during works. Photos of the project works will be provided to CAVLP in progress and completion. Training and education: A guided walk (or similar) will be programmed linked to celebrate the path works and bring people into the reserve. Partners: SNH Private land involvement:


C1.6

MAULDSLIE WOODS: ACCESS IMPROVEMENTS

Context Mauldslie Woods includes some 32ha of woodland in the Clyde Valley between Rosebank and Garrion Bridge. The area is separated into two units (Mauldslie Wood and West Brownlee Wood). These units previously formed part of the larger Mauldslie Estate, but are now owned by South Lanarkshire Council and form part of the Clyde Valley Woodlands NNR.

The Proposals 

Upgrade 1km of footpath along Clyde walkway.

Benefits and Justification This project will re-establish access to Mauldslie Woods on sections of degraded footpath. The existing Clyde Walkway route through Mauldslie is a Core Path and provides access to a variety of user groups to the reserve itself and also as a through route for pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders from Glasgow through to New Lanark. It is a crucial part of the path network both within the reserve and beyond and the work is necessary in order to maintain this link. Risks Should this work not go ahead, then the worsening condition of the paths could deter visitors from using the site, meaning that the NNR is failing to meet its full potential in terms of reengaging the public with the countryside and the natural heritage. There would also be an associated reputational risk to SLC if the NNR was considered to be in poor condition.

Audience: Reserve visitors. Outputs: Upgraded path – approximately 1km Media outputs: A press release will be prepared explaining the intended works to the public, as well as on completion of the works. This can be used by CAVLP team to inform people through website, facebook, newsletter etc. HLF / CAVLP temporary signage will be put up during works. Photos of the project works will be provided to CAVLP in progress and completion. Training and education: A guided walk or similar event will be programmed linked to the CAVLP events programme to celebrate the path works and bring people into the reserve. Opportunity for volunteer involvement via partnership working with Phoenix Futures and Lanarkshire Association for Mental Health. Partners: Private land involvement:


C1.7

RSPB BARON’S HAUGH RESERVE: THE CLYDE WALKWAY

Context The existing Clyde Walkway route through Baron’s Haugh RSPB Reserve is a Core Path and provides access to a variety of user groups and types to both the reserve itself and also as a through route for pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders from Glasgow through to New Lanark. It is a crucial part of the path network both within the reserve and beyond. In recent times it has suffered from bank erosion due to the more frequent flooding from the River Clyde and this process has accelerated over the last three years in particular. The effect of this is that sections of the path have become irrecoverably damaged. Temporary re-routing has been implemented at the worst affected sections but these are not adequate to ensure the ongoing use of the Path as the erosion is gathering pace and causing sever damage in certain sections. The solution is to move the worst affected section to another location away from the river bank but this is a major operation. By undertaking the fundamental re-location of these sections the Core Path will be maintained allowing the 20,000 or so users per annum to continue to benefit from facilities within the reserve and beyond. The Proposals 

Relocation of the Clyde Walkway route

Volunteer activities on path improvement

Benefits and Justification The Clyde Walkway is a major walkway route but is irrecoverably damaged due to flooding. This could dramatically affect access from the Glasgow into the Clyde valley reducing local visitors from the built up areas around Glasgow and tourism. Risks Solution does not happen and path is cut off.


Audience: Local communities, RSPB members, school groups, wildlife enthusiasts Outputs: sections of pathway re-located, long-term sustainability of the route, Provision of volunteering opportunities (see below) Media outputs: In line with all RSPB/CAVLP projects. Press releases will be issued at regular intervals but in particular at commencement and completion. All PRs include relevant acknowledgement of CAVLP/HLF funding Training and education: It is likely that whilst some work will require the use of specialist contractors there will be opportunities for volunteers to assist with much of the work. Baron’s Haugh reserve already utilises a regular volunteer force who assist with a variety of duties both practical and administrative. The type of work which this project presents is likely to provide opportunity to expand this volunteer workforce thereby providing publicity for CAVLP/HLF and RSPB. Such activities also present opportunity for provision of training to volunteers on path building skills and possibly use of mechanical equipment. Partners: As the Clyde Walkway runs through a number of locations within the CAVLP catchment there are other sections of the path that require restoration outwith the RSPB reserve Private land involvement: RSPB owns the majority of land which forms the reserve. Small area (car park only) is leased from North Lanarkshire Council but will not be affected by the project proposals. RSPB owns all of the land over which the Clyde Walkway runs within the reserve


C1.8

NEW LANARK: ACCESS

Context The access improvements for New Lanark will be achieved through the Arts Sculpture Trail, outlined in B3.1.3, which will  

Encourage locals to access New Lanark via Lanark and Castlebank Park Provide a new and innovative way for visitors to access the site, both physically and intellectually.

This will be a highlight of the CAVLP programme, celebrating themes that are pivotal to the Partnership and area. Audience: Visitors, locals Outputs: sames as B3.1.3 Media outputs: same as B3.1.3 Training and education: Partners: Impact Arts, Lanark Trust, Lanark Community Development Trust, Scottish Wildlife Trust, South Lanarkshire Council Private land involvement: A small section of the proposed route of the Clyde Walkway runs on the land, if this is an issue we will not place any artworks on this section.


Improving Access to Features and Attractions

C2

Both North and South Lanarkshire have produced Core Path Plans for their respective Council areas which provide a framework for improving access from communities to the wider countryside. However, this could be augmented by adding historic and other features of interest to the number of destinations and creating walks with a purpose. Communities have indicated that there are a number of popular and well-used walks within CAVLP, but these could benefit from clearer signage, particularly if users are not familiar with the area within which they are walking. This suggests that although some additional paths would be welcomed, improving the quality of what exists already would add considerably to the use and value of access routes and encourage higher usage. The key strategic route is the Clyde Walkway, which runs along the Clyde and forms the spine of the Clyde Valley section of CAVLP. Well-developed paths run through the National Nature Reserve sites, but linkages to them from communities and the Clyde Walkway could be significantly improved. With access freely available to some of the most important habitats and natural heritage resource, it is not necessary to provide pathways through some of the more sensitive sites, which, in any event, offer challenges in terms of topography and thus ensuring public safety, particularly those with difficulty walking. At least some of the paths within publicly-owned sites are suitable for people with a range of abilities. The aims of this workstream are to create links with the existing path network, through additional path links. Projects in this Workstream include:

C2.1 Walkway Links: Chatelherault to Larkhall Millheugh

C2.2 Community Links: Clyde Walkway Community Link Routes

C2.3 Monitoring Access


C2.1

WALKWAY LINKS: MILLHEUGH TO CHATELHERAULT

Context There are also opportunities for links to be made between these existing paths, to create better connectivity with the communities that enjoy them, and to create a more varied path network. The footpath from Mary Hoses ford to Millheugh, Larkhall follows a route traditionally used by miners walking from Larkhall to the pits at Quarter. The path is part of the Avon Walkway and provides a link between Chatelherault Country Park and the town of Larkhall. A landslip has prevented safe use of the path by all but the most able for nearly a decade. The Proposals To restore safe access between Chatelherault and Millheugh by 

stabilising the landslip,

repairing the footpath and

installing safety fencing.

Benefits and Justification Safe access links for local communities and walkers. Risks If this work is not carried out, this link will remain unusable. Health and Safety risks.


Audience: Local walkers and communities Outputs: works to footpath over approx. 1.5km Media outputs: Training and education: land based skills Partners: Private land involvement:


C2.2

CLYDE WALKWAY COMMUNITY LINK ROUTES

Context Consultation work during the CAVLP development year highlighted that local people and visitors want to learn more about the rich natural, built, industrial and cultural heritage of the area. They want to access, explore and experience their landscape but many are unsure of where to go beyond key destination sites such as New Lanark, Falls of Clyde, Dalzell and Chatelherault Country Park. Using local knowledge, research studies, core path plans and ground-truthing of existing and potential path routes, this project aims to raise awareness of the diverse network of pathways in the Valleys. The Clyde Walkway is identified as one of ‘Scotland’s Great Trails’. Creating and strengthening recreational and functional access links with communities along the route is a key action in ensuring that the route functions effectively for both residents and visitors alike. Within the CAVLP area there are a number of communities which would benefit from improved access to the Walkway. The aim of this programme is to identify priority areas where infrastructure improvements works could be undertaken.

The Proposals 

Identify communities and carry out feasibility and assessment work for specific route improvement programmes. Potential candidate communities include Law, Carluke, Rosebank, Dalserf, Crossford, Lanark, Larkhall, Netherburn, Blackwood, Kirkmuirhill, Nemphlar and Ashgill.

Implement phased programme of works. Where appropriate, these works will allow volunteer and community involvement.

Benefits and Justification Strengthening and enhancing the physical access network links between the communities immediately out with the CAVLP area and the Clyde Walkway will provide a range of benefits including; accessing historical routes and features in the landscape, contributing towards health and active living, supporting rural regeneration and tourism agendas.

Risks Potentially unable to secure private landowner agreement for route improvement works.


Audience: Local communities and visitors Outputs: Routes upgraded within key Clyde Valley communities. Communities engaged with landscape via access improvements. Opportunities to learn about local cultural and natural heritage through use of routes. Increased opportunity for physical activity and associated mental and physical health benefits. Volunteering and community involvement through practical tasks. Links to established health improvement, volunteering and walking initiatives- Get Walking Lanarkshire, SLC Path Warden Scheme, Healthy Valleys, South Lanarkshire Older Walkers, VIVA Walkers and Strollers Group, Lanarkshire Association for Mental Health (LAMH), Phoenix Futures (local addictions charity). Routes/ heritage trails input on website. Media outputs: A press release at start/, completion of the works- public information through website, Facebook newsletter etc. Training and education: opportunities for participation by community services teams and volunteers/voluntary organisations to carry out improvement works. Use of the routes will improve user awareness of local history, cultural and natural heritage and thereby, the significance of the Clyde Valley Landscape Partners: SLC, relevant local community groups. Private land involvement: Routes may include passing over private land, agreement of landowner may be required in certain circumstances although LA has powers available under provisions of LR(S) Act.


C2.2 C2.3

MONITORING USE OF THE NETWORK

Context A programme to monitor the use of the access network at various locations throughout the partnership area. The Proposals  

Set up a network of 6 initial access monitoring equipment locations around the partnership area. Carry out monitoring of existing locations and install 3 new counters.

Benefits and Justification The ability to monitor use of the network, building on existing monitoring data within the project area. Data will provide evidence for areas where future access investment should be made. Risks That data is lost during the download process or that data is not used to attract investment in the future.

Audience: Project partners Outputs: Annual reporting and better understanding of use of the network Media outputs: Training and education: staff / volunteer training in data retrieval from the monitoring software Partners: SLC / NLC / SWT / SNH Private land involvement:


Travelling Through Time: Historic Routes and Links to Historic Features

C3

The Clyde and Avon Valleys have rich and varied history. The Landscape Partnership aims to make this history more accessible by creating a series of themed trails, using existing and new paths, to tell stories about our surrounding landscape. The aims of this work stream are to develop a series of trails through the Partnership area, and to provide interpretation, through signage, leaflets or guided walks. Projects in this work stream include:

C3.1 Historic Trails C3.1.1 Jacob’s Ladder C3.1.2 Trail: Local Landscape Heroes C3.1.3 Trail: Shaping our Landscape


C2.2 C3.1

HISTORIC TRAILS

C10 Context The Clyde and Avon Valleys have rich and varied history. There are opportunities to make this history more accessible by creating a series of themed trails, using existing and new paths, to tell stories about our surrounding landscape. The Project Proposals

C3.1.1

Access: Jacob’s Ladder

C3.1.2

Trail: Local Landscape Heroes

C3.1.3

Trail: Shaping our Landscape

Benefits and Justification Improving safe access, and providing intellectual access to the history and natural history of the Landscape Partnership area. Risks There is a current lack of engagement between local people and the landscape, and there is a risk of further disengagement.


C3.1.1

ACCESS: JACOB’S LADDER RESTORATION

IMPORTANT NOTE: This project was for full implementation but CAVLP is asking HLF’s permission to remove as not feasible within CAVLP programme. However, we funded feasibility report to inform this decision so that is included here. Context Jacob’s Ladder is a historic route that was used by local miners to go between their homes in Overtown and their workplace at Law Colliery on the opposite side of the Garrion Burn. Since 1999 the route has been deteriorating and in 2003 a flash flood resulted in the route having to be closed to the public. The Proposals 

Carry out a feasibility study to establish the extent of the works required to be able to reopen the route.

Benefits and Justification Jacobs Ladder is of historical and cultural interest to several of the local communities in the Partnership area and this route has community backing to be upgraded and re-opened. Risks Risks to the project include the possibility that the feasibility study will uncover more issues than the project is currently thought to cover, which may make the project larger than anticipated.

Audience: Local communities and visitors to the partnership area. Outputs: Feasibility report Media outputs: Local newspapers can follow developments – potential for competitions for interpretation panels. Training and education: Possibility of training being delivered for conservation / maintenance tasks of the Ladder in the future. Partners: To be led by North Lanarkshire Council, with input from training partners as there is potential for learning outcomes to be achieved. Private land involvement: Private land to be used for access to sites. Area is thought to be in the ownership of the Houldsworth Estate.


C3.1.2

TRAIL: LOCAL LANDSCAPE HEROES

Context A trail following the lives of local famous people, or those who have impacted on the partnership area. The aim of the project would be to allow communities to undertake research and decide who they think has significantly contributed to Clyde Valley, this could be people who we may not think of as “famous” but to local communities they are or perhaps through project research we discover new heroes. In addition it will highlight Clyde Valleys connections with famous people that will also highlight different aspects of what the valley has to offer e.g. nature, art, industry etc. People will be connected to places to encourage visitors and locals to explore the landscape in new ways through a themed trail across the valleys. This will not create a physical walk but rather a themed trail, that may connect to individual walks and places across the Clyde and Avon valleys.

The Proposals 

Carry out research on local people; make contact with local interest groups with knowledge of this theme.

Encourage communities to decide through research who are the landscape heroes for the area.

The creation of a digital trail that highlights the places that connect to these people and encourage visitors and locals to explore the valley in a new way.

If required liaison with landowners and development of route implementation plan.

Small-scale conservation works, signage, and interpretation to allow access to the area, and identify the trail as a unique brand across the valleys.

Depending on costs for this trail, a second themed trail is suggested to come out of the content of Flow of Time, encouraging visitors to explore the landscape from prehistory to modern day.

Benefits and Justification Local people will be given the opportunity to decide on what makes a local landscape hero and learn more about their local history. This will provide a new way for people, both local and visitors, to explore their landscape by providing engaging content through people’s stories that will help us connect to places in the landscape. Risks That there are insufficient famous people to create a trail within this theme.


Audience: Local communities and visitors to the partnership area. Outputs: Landscape Heroes/research training workshops, research and report produced with recommendations on trail route and related works needed, digital heritage trail, leaflet for trail, small conservation works, signage and interpretation at places on the trail, events celebrating local heroes, content for memory bank/virtual museum Media outputs: Local newspapers, website Training and education: Training on research and interpretation Partners: Northlight Heritage, both north and south Lanarkshire councils Private land involvement: Private land to be used for access to sites. ownership.


C3.1.3

TRAIL: SHAPING OUR LANDSCAPE

Context A trail of discovery through the millions of years of geology, geography and meteorology that have shaped this area of Scotland. The Proposals 

Carry out research on the geology of the area; make contact with local interest groups with knowledge of this theme.

The creation of a digital trail that highlights the places that connect to these people and encourage visitors and locals to explore the valley in a new way.

If required liaison with landowners and development of route implementation plan.

Small-scale conservation works, signage, and interpretation to allow access to the area, and identify the trail as a unique brand across the valleys.

Benefits and Justification Local people and visitors alike will be given the opportunity to better understand where the landscape in which they live, work and play came from by getting out and about along a geology trail. Risks That there are insufficient routes available to create a trail within this geology theme.

Audience: Local communities and visitors to the partnership area. Outputs: Report outlining recommendations for trail and costs, physical works and signage to brand trail, digital and physical guides outlining the trail Media outputs: Local newspapers can follow developments – potential for community input into interpretation panels. Training and education: Possibility of training being delivered for conservation / maintenance tasks of the routes in the future. Possibility of ‘healthy walks’ co-ordinators being incorporated into this theme also. Partners: To be led by North Lanarkshire Council, with input from training partners as there is potential for learning outcomes to be achieved. Private land involvement: Private land to be used for access to sites. Paths are within unknown land ownership.


Understanding the Landscape

C4

There are opportunities for access to information and learning about our surrounding landscape. These can take the form of working with schools and the formal education system – encouraging outdoor teaching and increasing the use of the local area in the school curriculum. They can also take the form of community based projects, with events, activities, and publications. The aims of this work stream are to increase access to information about the landscape of the Partnership area. Projects in this Work stream include:

C4.1 Working with schools C4.1.1 C4.1.2

Learning Support for Formal Education Outdoor Learning

C4.2 Working with communities

C4.2.1 C4.2.2

Reviving the Orchards: Access and Learning Third Party Grant Scheme


C4.1

WORKING WITH SCHOOLS

Context There are many formal education establishments across the Landscape Partnership Area, and there are aspects of the formal education curriculum that benefit from access to outdoor learning and visits to the environment outside the classroom. There are opportunities to provide access for school groups in the environment. The Project Proposals

C4.1.1 Learning Support for Formal Education C4.1.2 Outdoor Learning Benefits and Justification Expanding the knowledge of our children and adults through use of the outdoor environment as a source of teaching material Risks There is a current lack of engagement between local people and the landscape, and there is a risk of further disengagement.


C4.1.1

LEARNING SUPPORT FOR FORMAL EDUCATION

Context The community engagement plan research demonstrates a local desire to increase opportunities for young people to take part in activities in the Clyde and Avon valleys. The formal education sector is therefore a key target audience. The aims of this project are to increase educational use of this area in the by developing the use of on-line curriculumbased teaching resources and promoting places to learn outdoors within the valleys.

The Proposals      

Creation of curriculum- based education resources for arts, natural and built heritage. Promote ‘education’ centres within the CAVLP area, linked to teaching materials. Identify opportunities to deliver arts, cultural/built heritage and natural history themed projects. Identify and promote safe walking routes. Establish an education fund to support site visits. Establish national GLOW site (Intranet for Scottish Education).

Benefits and Justification These include:     

Promotion of CAVLP area as a resource for Outdoor Learning. Increasing “sense of place” through a variety of curriculum topics. Local teaching staff developing local teaching resources and opportunities. Contributing teaching staff will be ambassadors for the project. Increasing school engagement with the wider community.


Audience: Formal education sector. Outputs: CAVLP education resources- free, on-line. National GLOW site. Trained education staff as CAVLP area ambassadors. Series of school visits to CAVLP area. Increased opportunities for outdoor learning. Increased awareness of natural, cultural and historical heritage of Clyde and Avon Valleys Media outputs: News stories associated with individual school projects. Promotion of working model e.g. to other Education authorities and landscape partnerships. Training and education: Potential for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for teaching staff. Partners: This is a partnership between South Lanarkshire Council and North Lanarkshire Council education departments. Private land involvement: It is anticipated the project will use existing public sites and access routes.


C4.1.2

OUTDOOR LEARNING

Context This project will build on and expand existing capacity to deliver Outdoor Learning opportunities using sites within the CAVLP area The Proposals 

Deliver natural play taster sessions/programmes with interested parties.

Support ‘community champions’ to take forward natural play and outdoor learning within schools and/or community settings. This could be through formal Outdoor Learning or Forest School Training or via tailored on-site support.

Benefits and Justification Fits well with emphasis on using the outdoors to deliver Curriculum for Excellence for schools. Links to Scottish Government, Play Strategy for Scotland Directly addresses many of the barriers that prevent schools and other organisations from using local woodlands. Develops real & deep relationship with woodlands on own doorstep- a ‘sense of place’ Results in family groups visiting and playing in woodlands more. Can act as lead onto Environmental Volunteering.

Risks Insufficient interest in longer term projects. Lack of landowner agreement may restrict project sites


Audience: Educational establishments, Home School partnership, community groups/organisations, charities working with disaffected children, communities, families Outputs:, numerous visits to woodland sites by same people over a long time period. Increased understanding of /respect for the area. “Leave no trace” methodology will be employed. Self-led “natural play” groups. Media outputs: Internal SLC/NLC promotion, local newspaper opportunities, possible national article. Education and early years publications. Training and education: Open College Network Forest School certificates, Grounds For Learning training Partners: Clydesdale Community Initiatives, Forest Education Initiative Lanarkshire, SLC Countryside & Greenspace, SLC Education Resources and NLC Education department, local educational establishments and community groups/organisations. Private land involvement: Extent unknown at present (dependent on where sites are). Ideally sites will be in the heart of communities, close to educational establishments, community projects and housing- however, there may be restrictions due to private land ownership.


C4.2

WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES

Context There are many opportunities for involving communities in all elements of our Programme, however this section is dedicated to community learning and involvement through being involved or leading their own projects.

The Project Proposals C4.2.1 Reviving the Clyde Valley Orchards: Access and Learning C4.2.2 Third Party Grant Scheme

Benefits and Justification Raising awareness of the work of the community through the Landscape Partnership Scheme, and involving the community in events and activities. Allowing communities to run their own projects that fit CAVLP agenda, showing an understanding of our aims and offering opportunities for communities to take the lead.

Risks There is a current lack of engagement between local people and the landscape, and there is a risk of further disengagement.


C4.2.1

REVIVING THE CLYDE VALLEY ORCHARDS: ACCESS AND LEARNING

Context It is important that both the local valley community and visitors from further afield have an appreciation and understanding of the area’s history and produce. An annual fruit fair in the autumn will be the main cultural as well as selling event. It is the main chance to celebrate orchards. Sales of fruit and orchard products should be important parts of the fair, but there is an opportunity to include wider cultural events such as music, theatre and evening activities that have an orchard connection. The inclusion of wider cultural events should broaden the appeal, thus raising awareness to a wider audience. It also represents an opening for orchards to be linked with other established cultural activities. There is also an opportunity create events during the blossom season. These events engage local people and raise awareness. If part of a calendar of events, and with appropriate publicity, they can also serve bring in others from further afield and boost the tourist image of the Valley. A further consequence of the project is that a conversation about access is begun, and trust is built with orchard keepers. The Proposals 

Young People Education programme: Engaging with schools & youth group in formal and informal activities, including visits to orchards. Memories of the Valley, cultural recording the oral history of growers and orchard keepers in the Clyde Valley, and by encapsulating the vibrancy of the former fruit culture, help to inspire a reestablished orchard culture. £24,500

Fruit Events Project: Blossom event: celebrate growing season : Fruit day: larger annual celebratory event including selling local juice £ 32,500

Benefits and Justification Reaching out to the wider community and engaging thoroughly is an important element of the LCAP. The engagement and awareness raising work should continue. The key elements are 

Education & liaison with young people

Training & advice for enthusiasts

Support to local groups

Publicity to raise awareness

Fruit days and other events

Website


Further new activities can act in different ways and reach out to folk that have yet to be engaged. Risks Engagement and buy-in from orchard owners is needed alongside interest from the wider community. Education also need to be delivered in partnership with schools and the local education authority in order that it links to the curriculum and is appropriate activity. Audience: Valley Communities, schools adjacent to CAVLP area, general orchard interest groups and individuals Outputs: web site, cultural recording, programme of blossom events, Fruit day event x4, establish European links. Media outputs: web site Training and education: Partners: To be led by RDT, CVOG and Project manager Link to Ground for Learning Orchards project Private land involvement: Private land to be used for access to sites.


C4.2.2

CAVLP THIRD PARTY GRANTS SCHEME Context

This project establishes a grants scheme for local community groups to access small scale funding to : •

help community groups deliver on the aims of the LCAP, with projects that conserve, enhance and celebrate the natural and cultural heritage of the area.

build capacity within groups to assess, develop and manage sustainable projects, reach out to their local communities, engage a wider membership and work in partnership with others.

encourage projects that will help establish independent and sustainable income streams.

ensure that delivery of the LCAP benefits individuals and groups who are often excluded due to barriers such as age, gender, disability, education, employment, financial or health status.

The Proposals The Scheme will operate as part of the Developing Local Communities Fund. The aims and objectives of this are very similar to the CAVLP requirements and would cover small scale natural and cultural heritage projects, building capacity within groups, projects that will help establish independent and sustainable income streams and social inclusion. An on line application process exists and a management and administration system is in place as a partnership between RDT and South Lanarkshire Council. The grant element is supported by renewable energy community benefit monies and LEADER makes a contribution to project development and animation and scheme administration. Applicant groups must have a constitution and bank account in the name of the applicant group. Grants can be for capital costs or costs of a one-off non-recurring nature, revenue costs, related to achieving the objectives of the Landscape Conservation Action Plan, physical projects and feasibility, design or development work. Examples of projects that could be funded include: Community orchard development, oral history recording, film making, training, archaeology digs, publications on local heritage, community events celebrating heritage and traditional skills, training on community growing, species recording, researching old maps, creative writing, purchase of equipment.


Grants: ÂŁ85,000

Scheme Management and administration: ÂŁ15,000

Benefits and Justification See above. Risks It is essential that CAVLP community organisations have the capacity and capability to deliver and sustain projects. Engagement and buy-in from community groups is needed both to the objectives or the LCAP and to the Scheme principles. Hands on assistance through the DLCF Development Officer will help establish this. Audience: Valley community groups. Outputs: Media outputs: Press opportunities at launch of scheme and grant approvals Training and education: Increased capacity of community groups. Partners: To be led by RDT Private land involvement: Landowner agreement required for any projects on private land

CAVLP Programme C project sheets  
CAVLP Programme C project sheets  
Advertisement