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one day One future One Region

the inception of your vision presented by:

in partnership with: Old Dominion University and the E.V. Williams Center for Real Estate and Economic Development (CREED) Hampton Roads Planning District Commission Hampton Roads Partnership


“

We are at the beginning of a new era in America that will reshape

�

our lives and our communities. Communities that plan for the future will prosper; those that cling to the past will falter.

-Ed McMahon, ULI Senior Resident Fellow


ta b l e o f c o n t e n t s introduction ......................................................1 acknowledgements Steering Committee . . ....................................... 2 Investors ........................................................4 Endorsing Organizations . . ...................................5 preface – Reality Check Hampton Roads. . .................6 Executive Summary ............................................ 8 Section 1 – The Hampton Roads Region . . ............... 12 Section 2 – Game Day ........................................ 16 Section 3 – Guiding Land Use Principles ............... 24 Section 4 – Mapping .......................................... 30 Section 5 – Land Use Patterns . . ........................... 42 Section 6 – Transportation . . ................................. 50 Section 7 – Environment . . ................................... 56 Section 8 – Next Steps . . ..................................... 59 Participants . . ................................................... 61 Facilitators .................................................. 66 Scribes / Data Input ....................................... 67


introduction Reality Check Hampton Roads is the product of a group of stakeholders who recognize the need for regional land use visioning and have access to a proven program to get there. It is led by the Urban Land Institute Hampton Roads District Council, in collaboration with its Partners: Old Dominion University, the Hampton Roads Partnership, and the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission. Reality Check is a process conceived by the Urban Land Institute, and implemented around the country in regions that face similar circumstances to Hampton Roads and are competitive on a global scale. For Hampton Roads to thrive in this environment, the region must actively pursue land use strategies that will take advantage of unique, natural resources and provide the highest quality of life for its residents. Reality Check is the vehicle to create just those strategies. The event on May 17, 2012 required tremendous work from a very diverse group of stakeholders. Beginning in 2010, the ULI District Council management committee had the courage to commit significant resources to a program that had been proven elsewhere in the country, but required justification to regional leaders. Upon initial acceptance by some regional stakeholders, the Partners all contributed enormous amounts of time and financial resources to make the event a success. The enthusiasm, energy, and genuine engagement of the 300 Game Day participants was a testament to the hard work contributed by the individuals listed on the following page. For their efforts, the region can be grateful. This is just the first step in a perpetual process of creating and refining the vision for land use in Hampton Roads. With the support of all stakeholders, Reality Check will continue to shape the future of the region. The Urban Land

Burrell Saunders

John H. Peterson, III

Chair, ULI Hampton Roads

Vice Chair, Mission Advancement, ULI Hampton Roads introduction

Institute, along with its Partners, appreciates the opportunity to help lead this effort.

1


Acknowledgements The Reality Check Hampton Roads project would not be possible without the generous contributions of time, knowledge, resources, and personal energy on the part of many individuals. The presenters of Reality Check Hampton Roads would like to extend a special thanks to the following people:

Advisory Chairs & Committee Members: C. Grigsby Scifres, Co-Chair, Reality Check Vaughn Rinner, PLA, ASLA, Landscape Architect Deborah Blythe Bauman, Assistant Dean, College of Health Sciences, Old Dominion University

John Lombard, Executive Director, E.V. Williams Center for Real Estate & Economic Development, Old Dominion University

Kyllie Brinkley, Program Manager, E.V. Williams Center for Real Estate and Economic Development (CREED), Old Dominion University

George M. McLeod, GIS Coordinator, High Performance Computing-OCCS, Old Dominion University

John Carlock, Deputy Executive Director, Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Stephanie McMorris, Intern Landscape Architect, H&A Architects & Engineers

Julie Clifford, Project Development Executive Assistant, H&A Architects & Engineers

Donna Morris, Executive Vice President, Hampton Roads Partnership

Christopher Contreras, Senior GIS Technician, Old Dominion University

Jamie Richardson, District Council Coordinator, ULI Hampton Roads

Dana Dickens, President and CEO, Hampton Roads Partnership

Joel Rubin, Media Relations and Participant Coordinator, Reality Check Hampton Roads, Rubin Communications Group

Dwight Farmer, Executive Director / Secretary of the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission and the Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Organization

steering committee

2

Sara Kidd, Senior Regional Planner, Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Heidi Sweetnam, Vice President, District Councils, Urban Land Institute

Bob Fenning, Vice President for Administration and Finance, Old Dominion University

Rusty Waterfield, Assistant Vice President for Computing Services (OCCS), Old Dominion University

Tom Herbert P.E., Vice President, Director of Private Sector Programs, H&A Architects & Engineers

Sabrina Zimring, Project Manager, Reality Check Hampton Roads, Rubin Communications Group

Thank you to all the community leaders who volunteered on each of these committees. Your contributions are greatly appreciated in the preparation for this program.


Keynote Speakers: Ed McMahon, Senior Resident Fellow / Charles E. Fraser Chair for Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy, Urban Land Institute Mitchell J. Silver, Chief Planning & Development Officer and Director, Department of City Planning, City of Raleigh James B. Oliver, Jr., Emeritus Chairman for the Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement

Special Thanks to Our Facilitators Representing: Lead Hampton Roads

Christopher Newport University

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

Kellam High School

TowneBank

Old Dominion University

Woodside High School

The College of William & Mary

steering committee

Special Thanks to Our Data Input Facilitators & Scribes Representing:

3


investors

Gold GoldLevel LevelInvestor Investor Goldgold Levellevel InvestorGold Level Investor Gold Level Investor

Gold Level Investor

Gold Level Investor Silver Level Investors Silver Level Investors Silver Level Investors Silver Level Investors

Silver Level Investors Silver Level Investors

silver level

Silver Level Investors

Reidy Family

Reidy Family Reidy Family

Reidy Family

Reidy Family Reidy Family

Reidy Family Emerald Level Investors Emerald Level Investors

emerald level Emerald Level Investors Emerald Level InvestorsEmerald Level Investors Emerald Level Investors

Emerald Level Investors

Bronze Level Investors Bronze Level Investors

Bronze Level Investors

bronze Bronze LevelLevel Investors Bronze Investors

level

Bronze Level Investors Bronze Level Investors KOTARIDES KOTARIDES DEVELOPERS DEVELOPERS KOTARIDES

KOTARIDES DEVELOPERS DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPERS DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT

John Fain

DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT

PARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT

DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT

6

DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT 6

6

investors

4

6 6

KOTARIDES DEVELOPERS KOTARIDES 6 DEVELOPERS 6 John Fain

John Fain

DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT

KOTARIDES DEVELOPERS

John Fain John Fain

John Fain John Fain


E n d o r s i n g O r g a n i z at i o n s American Institute of Architects – Hampton Roads

Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Organization

Center for Real Estate and Economic Development

Leadership Hampton Roads

(CREED) Central Business District Association (CBDA) Christopher Newport University Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Cultural Alliance of Greater Hampton Roads Elizabeth River Project Environmental Council of Hampton Roads Fort Monroe Authority Future of Hampton Roads

Light Rail Now, Inc. Lynnhaven River NOW Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority Old Dominion University One Economy Corporation Portsmouth Partnership The College of William & Mary The Planning Council The Port of Virginia The Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Higher

Greater Peninsula NOW

Education

Hampton Roads Association for Commercial Real

Tidewater Builders Association

Estate (HRACRE) Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce Hampton Roads Committee of 200+ Men, Inc. Hampton Roads Green Building Council Hampton Roads Military and Federal Facilities Alliance Hampton Roads Partnership

Tidewater Community College Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center Virginia Arts Festival Virginia Beach Vision, Inc. Virginia Peninsula Association of REALTORS® Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce Wetlands Watch

Hampton Roads Public Transportation Alliance Hampton Roads REALTORS® Association (HRRA) Hampton Roads Sanitation District (HRSD)

Supporting Through Participation Department of the Navy, Navy Region, Mid-Atlantic

endorsing organizations

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

5


preface

Realit y Check Hampton Roads

preface: reality check hampton roads

6

What is Reality Check?

Reality Check Goals

Reality Check starts out as a one-day participatory visioning exercise, kicking off a long-range groundwork process designed to help leaders envision alternative growth scenarios. Neither a traditional conference nor a theoretical exercise, Reality Check is a planning technique rooted in real world economic, demographic, and geographic data and trends analysis. Participants representing diverse constituencies and points of view meet and work together during the course of a morning to allocate the region’s projected population and job growth and to develop Guiding Land Use Principles for implementation of desired patterns of growth.

The overall goal of the Reality Check initiative is ongoing: it is to provide information and support to help people and communities throughout Hampton Roads work together in order for the region as a whole to grow in a way that adds value to our economy and our communities while also preserving the unique character and quality of the environment. Useful outcomes of Reality Check will be reflected in future policies and practices.

Hampton Roads Game Day

• R  ecognize the legitimate points of view of different stakeholders;

On May 17, 2012, Reality Check Hampton Roads brought together 300 leaders from the political, business, environmental, real estate, and civic realms to envision the future land use of our region. The participants represented diverse age and ethnic groups from throughout Hampton Roads and hail from the 17 cities, counties, and towns that make up our region. Together, they discussed and explored how to accommodate the ongoing growth in our region while sustaining and improving our quality of life.

The May 17, 2012 Game Day exercise was designed to primarily accomplish the following four tasks: • P  romote a region-wide awareness of ongoing and future growth;

• E  nvision how projected housing and employment growth should be allocated in the region, based on consensus values and principles; and • L  ay the foundation for the next steps to take in order to assure that high-quality growth takes place during the decades to come.


Evaluate and Interpret Reality Check Hampton Roads Game Day generated a wealth of information about how and where growth should take place in Hampton Roads. It also put forward a clear message that the jurisdictions, people and communities in Hampton Roads need to work together as a region to maintain and enhance a future high quality living and working environment. This document provides a brief summary of the outcomes of Reality Check Hampton Roads Game Day along with links to detailed mapping and data generated on Game Day. It is a gateway to information and support for ongoing growth and land use decision-making.


executive summary Reality Check is an active, ongoing process focused on its singular purpose of land use. Effective organizations already exist in Hampton Roads to evaluate and promote economic development strategies, military relationships, tourism, and/or port-related business. Reality Check concentrates on the placemaking elements of the region, defined as the identification of a region through the built environment in coordination with natural land features. The premise of Reality Check does not pre-suppose

executive summary

8

any specific development pattern, nor is there any assumption that current development patterns in Hampton Roads are negative or unsustainable. These types of conclusions will come from the continuous study and analysis by Reality Check participants. The only assumption made by this process is the basic foundation realized during Reality Check Game Day: regionallyfocused land use visioning will make Hampton Roads competitive and universally desirable in comparison to other global regions.


GUIDING LAND USE PRINCIPLES Regionalism Work together as a region: Celebrate our unique identity while accommodating growth throughout the area.

Quality of Life Promote a high quality of life and a healthy community: Encourage diversity and provide choices of lifestyle – places to live, work and play.

Business and Economics Build a resilient future by diversifying economic engines and leveraging existing assets: Include military installations and the port – grow existing businesses and attract new ones.

Land Use Patterns Maximize redevelopment and new mixed-use development along transportation corridors: Incorporate a network of green areas with a variety of housing types to serve a diverse population.

Transportation Develop a regional interconnected system of multi-modal transportation corridors coordinated with land use and density.

Environment

executive summary

Preserve and protect natural resources, historic areas, and prime farmland while providing a green network with public access.

9


consensus transporation improvements for all reality check participants

executive summary

10


emergent pattern of development vs. preservation

section 1: the hampton roads region

emergent pattern of development vs. preservation

11


Section 1

THE HAMPTON ROADS REGION Hampton Roads is a unique region with a wealth of natural waterways, protected habitat, varied recreation, and treasured historic sites. These features provide both a high-quality living environment and a rich economy based on its maritime location. Bounded by the Atlantic Ocean on the east and the Chesapeake Bay on the north, it contains one of the world’s largest natural harbors, with major port facilities and the largest naval base in the world. Navigable rivers provide deep water access and beautiful beaches attract tourists. It’s no wonder people want to move to the Hampton Roads area. Our economy is among

the strongest in the nation. We have high-quality jobs and a growing knowledge-based sector. The region is international and our communities are diverse. Hampton Roads has great neighborhoods and culture, excellent healthcare institutions and universities, and treasured natural and historic resources. Robust job creation is fueling the regional economy and, in turn, the demand for housing, schools, commercial buildings, and infrastructure. Experts tell us that by 2035 the region will have generated 175,000 new jobs and have 350,000 new residents, requiring an additional 140,000 housing units.

“Hampton Roads has tremendous historical as well as contemporary significance. There is enormous potential in the region, as we have more advantages than almost anywhere. With our geography and section 1: the hampton roads region

12

resources, natural and otherwise, we are poised to be a jewel and



a model for the nation. The way to realize this potential is through

coordinated, visionary effort. Reality Check is just that.

– Ross Brockwell, Streets and Bridges Administrator, City of Chesapeake


The Hampton Roads region demonstrates many trends that need to be addressed and studied:

• Challenges in locating housing in close proximity to employment centers; • Constraints on creation of affordable housing choices;

• Regional air and water quality; • Sustainability and preservation of forests and farmland; • Competition among the region’s jurisdictions for finite resources.

section 1: the hampton roads region

• Demonstrable increase in traffic congestion;

13


HAMPTON ROADS factsheet

HAMPTON ROADS PLANNING DISTRICT COMMISSION

Gloucester County

Hampton Roads, Virginia

James City County

Member Localities Yo rk Ri ve r

723 Woodlake Drive Chesapeake, VA 23320 www.hrpdcva.gov 757-420-8300

Williamsburg

ke B pea esa Ch

York County Surry County

Jam es Riv er

Poquoson

ay

Newport News

Hampton Roads Planning District Commision 723 Woodlake Drive Chesapeake, VA 23320 757-420-8300

Hampton

Isle of Wight County Norfolk Portsmouth Virginia Beach

Southampton County

Suffolk

Franklin

Chesapeake

Last Updated: January 2012

2012 Population 10-Year Population Growth1,2,3 Land Area (Square Miles)3,2 Population Density (Per Sq Mile)3 2011 Gross Product4 5-Year Growth in Gross Product4 2011 Per Capita Gross Product (2005$s)4 2011 Total Employment4 10-Year Employment Growth4 2012 Labor Force5 2012 Unemployment Rate5 2011 Median Age2 2011 Housing Units2 2011 Owner Occupied Rate2 2011 Average Family Size2 2011 Average Household Size2 2011 Median Household Income2 2011 Median Family Income2 2011 Per Capita Income4 1,2

Hampton Roads

Virginia

U.S.

1,697,962

8,185,867

313,914,040

6.7%

12.3%

9.1%

2,907

39,490

3,531,905

584

207

89

$80.7B

$428.9B

$15.0T

11.0%

14.5%

12.7%

$41,714

$46,408

$42,070

993,289

4,800,825

175,834,700

4.3%

8.9%

6.2%

826,071

4,209,532

154,975,000

6.6%

5.9%

8.1%

35.4

37.3

37.6

689,061

3,387,801

132,316,248

64.1%

67.3%

64.6%

3.18

3.18

3.25

2.64

2.63

2.64

$57,356

$61,882

$50,502

$67,905

$74,500

$61,455

$41,976

$46,107

$41,560

Sources: Weldon Cooper Center; U.S. Census Bureau; HRPDC; Bureau of Economic Analysis; Bureau of Labor Statistics 1

2

3

4

5


Who’s done a Reality Check? Here are some communities across the country that have gone through the same process we are.

The natural assets of the Hampton Roads Region also provide challenges to connectivity and cooperation among the 17 jurisdictions that make up the region. The Chesapeake Bay access from the “roads,” the natural harbor that results from the confluence of the James, Elizabeth, and Nansemond Rivers, has long driven the region’s prosperity. It also creates the region’s major barrier, separating the jurisdictions that make up the Peninsula from the Southside. In addition, the Hampton Roads region is affected by rising sea level and tides, an issue that is coming to the forefront of planning.

Jurisdictions in Hampton Roads The Reality Check Hampton Roads region incorporates 17 jurisdictions in Hampton Roads as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission.

Cities

Counties

Norfolk

Isle of Wight

Chesapeake

Southampton

Virginia Beach

Surry

Portsmouth

James City

Hampton

Gloucester

Newport News

York

Williamsburg Towns Franklin Smithfield Poquoson

section 1: the hampton roads region

Suffolk

15


Section 2

GAME DAY The Challenge: Where will 350,000 new residents and 175,000 new jobs go? How do we accommodate growth while preserving the environment and adding value to our region’s communities?

More than 300 Hampton Roads leaders from 17 cities, counties and towns met at Old Dominion University to explore and visualize how the region will look in 2035 with the addition of 350,000 more people and 175,000 jobs. Reality Check is a process of visualizing patterns of growth rather than actual projected numbers. The growth projections were established as a reasonable starting point for the Game Day exercise, but are not assumed to be fact. Actual growth projections are and will continue to be subject of ongoing study.

section 2: game day

16

Each table placed LEGOÂŽ blocks to represent new jobs, new standard housing, and new workforce housing (assumed to be 20% of the housing stock). The population growth was converted to housing assuming that an average of 2.5 residents live in each house or apartment. Each table was also allowed a given amount of string to represent improved or new transportation facilities, whether roads, rail, or ferries.

Participants worked in groups of ten at 30 tables, led by facilitators and supported by scribes, to accomplish two things. One, each table developed Guiding Land Use Principles for future growth. Two, utilizing a regional map without jurisdictional boundaries, each table diagrammed the locations for future population and job growth, the general locations where green area should be preserved, and the transportation improvements needed to support the growth. ULI members, GIS specialists from Old Dominion University, and HRPDC staff worked to compile the data and report back the results.


section 2: game day

Game Day was exciting and successful in establishing important principles about how the residents, businesses, schools and governments can work together across the region. The vision that emerged includes maintaining the unique character and diversity of Hampton Roads while cooperating to provide the infrastructure necessary to maintain economic vitality. The importance of protecting the high quality of life and unique environment that make Hampton Roads a great place to live and work was an essential part of the discussion.

17


Vision Process Rules Participants were assigned to one of 30 tables. Each table had a game board which was a large map of the entire region that purposely did not include jurisdictional boundaries. It did include general information showing existing land use; i.e., residential densities, employment densities, military facilities, protected / managed lands, agriculture, wetlands, and undeveloped land. The was overlaid with a grid, with each grid cell equaling 3/4 square mile calibrated to be the same size as a LEGO® block. Each table was given 280 yellow LEGO® blocks, representing 350,000 people, and 175 blue LEGO® blocks, representing 175,000 jobs. The blocks represented only the new growth that will be added to existing population and jobs by 2035. The population and job numbers were based on the growth estimates projected by HRPD. Participants had to place all the LEGO® blocks, and could place them anywhere but in the water or outside the region. • Everyone has an equal voice. This is an exercise in collective decision making. Acknowledge that every participant has a valid perspective from which you can learn. No one should dominate the discussion. • Think big. Remember that this is a regional exercise with a tight timeline. Visioning is intended to be broad. Keep it at “10,000 feet” and avoid getting bogged down in too much specificity at a local level. • Keep an open mind. Don’t discount any ideas without discussing and evaluating them. Build upon each other’s ideas in a positive way. • Be bold. Don’t try to avoid controversy; welcome it. Regional planning processes that avoid controversial issues and decisions produce little. • Examine alternatives. One good way of resolving opposing ideas is to develop alternatives to them and then evaluate the results. • Compromise. Accept that making decisions often means making tradeoffs.


“Isuggest today we begin the journey to look inside ourselves, inside

our region and share with each other what we see and think. It will take uncommon talent and commitment for us to have one region and one future… If we combine what each of you bring to this room today with good process and good information we will see the new beginnings of order and

understanding for our shared future.

-Jim Oliver, Hampton Roads Center for Public Engagement


section 2: game day

20


21

section 2: game day


section 2: game day

22




“ Focusing on what you have is known as Asset-Based Economic

Development. A successful plan for economic development and job creation begins by identifying your existing assets—economic, those assets.

– Ed McMahon, ULI Senior Resident Fellow

section 2: game day



educational, human, natural, cultural—then building plans around

23


Section 3

GUIDING LAND USE PRINCIPLES Each table started out by developing a set of Guiding Land Use Principles relative to future growth. After discussion, each table was directed to number their top five or ten principles in order of importance. After each table worked on their maps, they were asked to return to their guiding principles and review them relative to their maps, making any changes they wanted based on what they had shown on the maps and further discussed during the mapping process. The top ten and the top five Guiding Land Use Principles from each table were tabulated by both subject and intent after the exercise was complete. A composite set of six Guiding Land Use Principles was prepared based on the major

section 3: guiding land use principles

24

ideas included in the lists from each table. While the Guiding Land Use Principles are not exact quotes from any single table, they utilize language generated by the participants to put forward the most common principles identified during Reality Check Hampton Roads. There was an extreme level of consistency among the independent tables, both in the major guiding principles and in the associated mapping. This consistency provides validity that there is broad support for utilizing these Guiding Land Use Principles as guidance in making regional land use decisions.



egional cooperation has emerged as a key to success in “ Rcompeting on the world stage.”

– Mitchell Silver, President, APA


GUIDING LAND USE PRINCIPLES Regionalism Work together as a region: Celebrate our unique identity while accommodating growth throughout the area.

Quality of Life Promote a high quality of life and a healthy community: Encourage diversity and provide choices of lifestyle – places to live, work and play.

Business and Economics Build a resilient future by diversifying economic engines and leveraging existing assets: Include military installations and the port – grow existing businesses and attract new ones.

Land Use Patterns Maximize redevelopment and new mixed-use development along transportation corridors: Incorporate a network of green areas with a variety of housing types to serve a diverse population.

Transportation Develop a regional interconnected system of multi-modal transportation corridors coordinated with land use and density.

Environment Preserve and protect natural resources, historic areas, and prime farmland while providing a green



“ Community character matters – the image of a community is fundamentally important to economic vitality and quality of life.”

- Ed McMahon, ULI Senior Resident Fellow

section 3: guiding land use principles

network with public access.

25


Summary of Major Guiding Principles

Of 30 tables, how many focused on each issue: Subject

# of Tables % of Tables

Transportation • Mass Transit Support Regionalism • Unique Sense of Place, Regional Identity, and Branding • Maintain and Enhance Local Character

30 100% 27

90%

21 70% 13

43%

9

30%

Land Use Patterns • Mixed Use Communities

21

70%

• Waterway Access and Use, including Ports

18

60%

• Infill and Redevelopment Priority

17

56%

• Development along Transportation Corridors

16

53%

Quality of Life, Health and Appearance 16 53% • Diversity and Choices • Mixed Use aligned with Quality of Life • Education Environment

15

50%

9

30%

13

43%

• Protect Natural Resources and Expand Greenspace

27

90%

• Protect Historic and Cultural Resources

12

40%

11

36%

• Sea Level Rise, Hazard Mitigation, and Flood Plain Concerns

Economy section 3: guiding land use principles

26

• Military Economy

15 50%


HAMPTON ROADS – ONE REGION, ONE FUTURE

Regional cooperation is challenged in Virginia by a state code that limits the extent of regional planning and collaboration. In spite of this complication, a momentum towards regional cooperation is already underway through the efforts of such organizations as the Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Organization, the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission, and the Hampton Roads Partnership. Regionalism and a high quality of life are themes that resonated in various ways at nearly all of the tables. While there is a commonly expressed desire to recognize the Hampton Roads region as a unified community, there was also a clear desire to maintain and further enrich the region’s diversity, celebrating the unique characteristics and history of the many special places within the region. A Pride of Place exists in Hampton Roads, built on the unique coastal and riverine environment, and a shared history and culture beginning with the earliest English settlement in the United States. Transportation and related land use patterns are by far the most important specific issues that need to be addressed on a regional level. The land use development patterns are closely

aligned with transportation, with a consensus that growth should primarily occur along the transportation corridors. There was an extremely high level of agreement that future growth should occur in nodes that include places to live, work and play, connected to other areas by a linking transportation system. It was recognized that retaining unique places that provide a choice of lifestyle goes hand in hand with maintaining a high quality of life. High-quality education was also considered an important element to maintaining a high-quality lifestyle. The relationship of higher education centers to research, job growth, and the larger community was also included in the guiding principles.



n indispensable asset in a “ Aknowledge-based economy is smart well-educated people.” 

– Ed McMahon, ULI Senior Resident Fellow

From an environmental perspective, there is a desire to preserve and protect both agricultural lands and sensitive environmental areas. Many tables also listed access to green areas and the incorporation of greenways and recreational spaces within the fabric of the community as important principles. Some of the Guiding Land Use Principles, particularly those relative to the importance of

working together as a region and maintaining a high quality of life, are underpinnings for the mapping but are not directly evident in the land use patterns. The Guiding Principles relative to land use patterns, transportation routes, and environmental protection were apparent in the mapping prepared by each table. These are consequently discussed in separate sections of this document as demonstrated by the mapping results.

section 3: guiding land use principles

Regionalism is the overriding theme of the Guiding Land Use Principles, consistently embraced by the participants at the independent tables. Participants delivered a clear message that Hampton Roads communities need to work together in order to support sustained economic growth and a prosperous community. A strong economy depends on the development of an interconnected, efficient transportation network within the region as well as external connections by water, rail and roadways. It also requires continued support of the regional military personnel and institutions, as well as protection of the bases from incompatible land use. The port is also a regional asset, and continued growth of port activity is recognized as a great opportunity for the economy of the region as a whole.

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The word cloud graphic was generated by Dr. John Lombard from Old Dominion University using the textual software program NVivo 9. The program analyzed the frequency of words occurring in text on game day. In the graphics the importance or relative frequency of each concept or term is depicted by font size (and reinforced by the contrasting color) to provide a quick synopsis most frequently occurring terms found in the participants verbatim responses.

Word frequency top 50 access agriculture alternative assets attractive centers choices commercial

community connectivity

cultural density

corridors

create crossing

development

diversity economic education

employment encourage

enhance environment existing expand growth historic

housing identity improve income increase infrastructure maintaining maximize military multiple natural options population

preserve

regional sustainable transit section 3: guiding land use principles

28

protect

quality redevelopment

residential

resources

transportation


Word frequency top 50 using synonyms access agriculture assets attractive centers commercial

communities connecting corridors create crossing cultural density design

development

diversity economic education employment encourage enhance entertainment environment existing expand growth historic housing identity improve income increase industry

infrastructure invest maximize

military multiple natural options population protect

quality redevelopment

resources sustainable

preserve

regional

residential

section 3: guiding land use principles

transportation

29


Section 4

mapping Following the mapping exercise on Reality Check Day, the data collected from each cell on the map was entered into computers and assembled in a GIS database for mapping analysis. Data included the quantity of additional housing, workforce housing, or jobs. In addition to entering the data in a GIS database, record photos were taken of each of the maps on the individual tables. Preliminary composite analysis maps were generated during lunchtime presentations so that the overall development patterns could be presented to the participants on Reality Check Day. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and techniques were critical to the success of Reality Check Hampton Roads. GIS was employed during three distinct phases in order to produce the game map, 120+ results maps, and to provide related information critical to planning the future of the Hampton Roads Region. The 5’ x 5’ Reality Check HR game map was created during the first phase (pre-game) by Sara Kidd, Senior Regional Planner at the HRPDC, using GIS to portray current land use and density of development. It also indicated where protected lands, wetlands, and military facilities are located. section 4: mapping

30

During the second (game day) phase, George McLeod, Lead GIS Engineer and Adjunct Faculty

at ODU, and Sara Kidd (HRPDC) developed a method for translating the participants’ game map placements into digital geospatial data. Table-specific spreadsheets were created for Reality Check staff to record participant map data. These data were merged into a master spreadsheet and “averaged” to create 2- and 3-dimensional representations of changes expected for the Hampton Roads region, with the intent to provide near-immediate feedback regarding the overall vision of Reality Check participants. The provision of “real-time” results to participants was the first of its kind in the history the Reality Check exercise. The third (post-game) phase was performed by the ODU GIS team under the direction of George McLeod, according to three main tasks: 1) preparation of digital game maps for each table, 2) careful aggregation of game data and preparation of final participant consensus maps, 3) advanced spatial analysis of game data. Ninety unique table-specific data sets and maps resulted from the Reality Check exercise. These data were aggregated to produce 14 final consensus data sets and maps detailing the collective vision of all participants regarding changes in population, employment, transportation, and preservation areas.


Since the Reality Check HR event, Sara Kidd (HRPDC) and George McLeod (ODU) have given presentations regarding Reality Check map creation and GIS techniques to a number of audiences throughout the region, state, and country. The Reality Check game map, along with a poster explaining the GIS methodology, was entered into the 2012 ESRI International Users Conference Map Gallery competition during the week of July 23 – 27 in San Diego, California and received second place in the “Best Data Integration” category. Following Reality Check Day, 90 GIS maps were prepared, three for each of the 30 tables, as a record of what was placed on the maps at each table. These 90 GIS maps separated out the following for each table: • Improved and additional transportation networks • locations and density of job and population growth • p  atterns and locations of green space preservation

For purposes of analysis, a number of composite maps were also developed to demonstrate and evaluate the similarities and differences between the tables and to portray the consensus of the majority of tables. The composite maps include: • t ransportation, including new roads, road improvements, new rail, and rail stops • preservation areas • allocated new population • percent change in population • allocated jobs • percent change in jobs The maps showing the consensus locations of population and jobs also show the transportation improvements in order to portray the relationships between the transportation networks and the growth of population and jobs. All of the mapping data is available for future analysis and use. The following three sections of this document provide maps analysis relative to three of the Guiding Land Use Principles that were most directly evident from the maps: land use patterns, transportation patterns and improvements, and environmental protection.

section 4: mapping

The final data were analyzed to answer several key questions and to determine which of the following four emergent patterns of development each table most closely resembled: Corridor, Urban Compact, Multiple Growth Center, and Dispersed.

31


investors

32


table 3 –3 new jobs TABLE - New Jobs name: first Name: Firstregion...connected! Region... Connected!

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Jobs

2000 4000 6000 8000 10000


table 3 –3new standard population TABLE - New Standard Population name: first region...connected! Name: First Region... Connected!

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Standard Population

(number of persons)

1250 2500 3750 5000 6250 7500 8750 10000


table 7 –7 new jobsJobs TABLE - New name: growing pains! Name: Growing Pains!

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Jobs

2000 4000 6000 8000 10000


table standard population TABLE7 –7new - New Standard Population name: growing pains! Name: Growing Pains!

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Standard Population

(number of persons)

1250 2500 3750 5000 6250 7500 8750 10000


table 1717 – new standard population TABLE - New Standard Population name: none Name: None

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Standard Population

(number of persons)

1250 2500 3750 5000 6250 7500 8750 10000


table 1717 – new jobsJobs TABLE - New name: none Name: None

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Jobs

2000 4000 6000 8000 10000


table 1515 – new jobsJobs TABLE - New name: Just it hr Name: JustdoDo It HR

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Jobs

2000 4000 6000 8000 10000


table 1515 – new standard population TABLE - New Standard Population name: Just it hr Name: JustdoDo It HR

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Standard Population

(number of persons)

1250 2500 3750 5000 6250 7500 8750 10000


table 1510 – new jobsJobs TABLE - New name: balanced development Name: Balanced Development

Proposed Mass Transit Proposed Road Improvement Proposed New Roadway Proposed Ferry Current Highways Proposed Protected Areas Non-military Federal Facilities Military Federal Parks, Conservation, and other Open Space

New Jobs

2000 4000 6000 8000 10000


Section 5

LAND USE PATTERNS The Reality Check mapping was unusually consistent compared to the results of the Reality Check process in other regions. While there were variations in intensity and location, a pattern of nodes of development along a regional, interconnected transportation network emerged in all of the maps. The nodes of development included new population and jobs along both new and existing transportation corridors. The degree of projected density and the relationship to existing development areas varied from table to table.

Within this general pattern, there were two variations. Some tables showed the clusters close together and primarily in areas that currently have a higher density of development, with a focus on density increase. Others included increased density in current higher density development areas, but also dispersed clusters more widely and added additional new development centers. A mixed-use pattern of development was widely preferred, locating housing near jobs to reduce travel and creating places where people can live, work and play. The guiding principles also linked this multi-use pattern to a high quality of life.



section 5: land use patterns

42

“ A community’s appearance is about placemaking and placemaking drives economic prosperity.� 

- Ed McMahon, ULI Senior Resident Fellow


60000

New Population

50000

New Jobs

40000 30000 20000 10000

Municipality Chesapeake

Franklin

Gloucester

Hampton

Isle of Wight James City

Newport News

The consensus distribution of jobs and population was analyzed in two ways as shown on the Allocation Maps. One was to look at the location of population and job increases, and the other was to look at the percentage change in the population and jobs relative to existing development. While most of the jobs and population were located at or near currently highly developed areas, growth was allocated to other locations, particularly Suffolk, Franklin, Smithfield, and Isle of Wight County. Growth was also allocated to the I-64 corridor between Newport News and Williamsburg as well as in Gloucester County.

Norfolk

Poquoson

Portsmouth Southampton

Suffolk

Surry

VA Beach

Williamsburg

York

The larger quantity of growth is in developed areas. The change in character of these areas will primarily result from an increased diversity of land use as well as redevelopment of vacant or non-performing strip shopping centers, old light industrial and warehouse areas, and large areas of surface parking. However, areas with more limited existing development and a higher percentage of growth will present a much more noticeable change in character than will be evident in existing highly developed areas.



“ The younger generation will demand an urban lifestyle, housing choices and transportation choices.” 

– Mitchell Silver, President, APA

section 5: land use patterns

0

43


allocated new jobs 2010 to 2035

section 5: land use patterns

44


section 5: land use patterns

allocated population (# of people) 2010-2035

45


percent change in employment (jobs) 2010-2035

section 5: land use patterns

46


section 5: land use patterns

percent change in population 2010-2035

47


3d model

jobs only

Average allocation of 175,000 new jobs by all participants. Darker colors and higher bars indicate greater increase in employment.

preface: reality check hampton roads

48


3d model

population only

Average allocation of 350,000 person increase in population by all participants. Darker colors and

section 5: land use patterns

higher bars indicate greater increase in population.

49


Section 6

t r a n s p o r tat i o n Transportation is the number one issue that needs to be addressed in order for Hampton Roads to function as a region. It was the major regional issue to be addressed, included in the top five guiding principles at 93% of the tables. The need for multiple forms of transportation to interconnect the region was specifically included in the top five guiding principles at 80% of the tables. The Guiding Land Use Principles and the mapping that resulted from Game Day attest to the vision of an interconnected system of roads and transit with increased jobs and population clustered primarily along these transportation corridors. Improved roadways and additional roadway corridors were included on all of the maps. In addition, all of the tables included light rail as the major transit expansion. Consensus rail improvements included connections to Suffolk, the oceanfront, Virginia Beach, and from the Southside up the Peninsula. Ferries were also included on the mapping at many of the tables.

section 6: transportation

50

The Consensus Transportation Improvements map shows existing major roadways, the consensus road improvements and new roadways, as well as the consensus light rail stop locations. In addition, road improvements,

new rail locations, and rail stops that were shown on several of the tables are indicated on the map as potential. Improvements to the Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel and I-64 appeared on the majority of the maps, and a third water crossing with both road and rail was an important consensus improvement. Roadway and light rail improvements shown on the mapping include: • 7  8.78 miles of new light rail construction (recommended by consensus) • 3  4.6 miles of additional light rail constructions (recommended by large minority) • 6  0,458 (17%) new population allocated within 1/4 mile (walking distance) of new light rail • 3  9,667 (23%) new jobs allocated within 1/4 mile (walking distance) on new light rail • 9  .38 miles of new highway/bridge/tunnel construction (recommended by consensus) • 4  7.85 miles of highway improvements (recommended by consensus) • 4  1.32 miles of additional highway improvement (recommended by near majority)


section 6: transportation

consensus transporation improvements for all reality check participants

51


all recommended roadway construction options

Roadways

section 6: transportation

52

The All Recommended Roadway Construction map shows the locations of the new road construction and improvements to existing roadways. Ninety percent of the tables showed a third crossing between the Peninsula and Southside, and the “Patriot Crossing� was the location choice at 73% of the tables. Eighty percent of the tables indicated expansion of I-64 on the Peninsula, and 43% of the tables showed an expansion of US 460.


all recommended new commuter rail options

Commuter Light Rail

• 100% to Naval Station Norfolk • 8  7% across the Monitor-Merrimac Bridge Tunnel

• 83% to Portsmouth • 83% to the Norfolk International Airport • 80% to ODU • 8  0% to Christopher Newport University and Oyster Point • 63% to Suffolk • 50% to Hampton University • 50% parallel to I-64 on the Southside

preface: reality check hampton roads

Commuter light rail expansion was included on the maps at all of the tables, although the locations for expansion varied. A composite of the light rail expansion is shown on the Recommended New Commuter Rail Options Map. Major destinations for rail expansion from the existing Tide route, and the percentage of tables where each was included are:

53


all recommended ferry system options

Ferries section 6: transportation

54

New ferry lines were shown on maps at 37% of the tables, although there was no consensus on where the ferry routes might be located. The Recommended Ferry System Options map shows all of the locations indicated at the various tables. While the result does not suggest actual locations, it is important to note the level of interest in making better use of the waterways as a regular means of travel in the region.




“The event opened my eyes to the diversity of the Hampton Roads Region and how we are relatively still unknown. Having served on regional

committees for several decades the emphasis has been a united region speaking with one voice. Even with all of the work and progress we have made as a region we still have hurdles to cross to get our name recognized nationally and globally. Reality Check pointed us in that direction with a clear vision. It is now up to us to make that vision a reality. 

– Phillip A Bradshaw, CFO, Isle Of Wight County Schools.


Section 7

environment Maintaining farmland and agriculture where it exists in the region was an important value included at many of the tables, as was the protection of natural resources. Protection of the rich historic resources in this region was specifically listed in the Guiding Land Use Principles at several tables. In varying words, many tables advocated for a network of green areas through the region, and many also wanted the network to include public access to the green space network for recreational use. White areas on the base map indicated agricultural and forested area. Identified wetlands, environmentally sensitive areas, parks

section 7: environment

56

and other protected areas were shown in green on the base map. In order to indicate specific additional protected green area, participants at the tables needed to mark areas and/or make notes on the maps. Only about half of the tables outlined additional greenspace on the maps, but the avoidance of development in agricultural land and environmentally sensitive areas on most of the others speaks to the perceived value of protecting both of these resources. The Preservation Green Space Averages map shows all of the areas marked for preservation on the table maps. The darkest colors represent areas marked on the largest number of table maps and the lightest by the fewest tables.

“Community character matters – the image of a community is fundamentally important to economic vitality and quality of life.� 

- Ed McMahon, ULI Senior Resident Fellow


section 7: environment

all recommended preservation areas

57


consensus areas of preservation among reality check participants

section 7: environment

58


Section 8

next steps

Reality Check Hampton Roads participants identified that collaboration as a region will provide the most effective and sustainable solutions to accommodate and promote future population growth. Leaders from the public, private and non-profit sectors indicated their support for regional collaboration to develop sustainable land use strategies and a preferred vision to guide future growth. The desire for collaboration and regional strategies, and the priorities established by the Guiding Land Use Principles, will serve as the mandate for future

action. To this end, a collaborative approach to better understand and examine growth scenarios for our region’s future development is necessary to carry forward the land use principles and scenarios presented during Reality Check. Using an initiative-based strategy and relying upon best practices established in other regions of the country, the Urban Land Institute will lead and facilitate a collaboration of regional partners to visualize the future of Hampton Roads and create tools for implementation of that vision. This collaborative will maintain an open exchange of ideas, information and experience among industry leaders and policy makers dedicated to creating a better region. The regional partners in this collaboration will initially include Old Dominion University, the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission and the Hampton Roads Partnership, but there will be opportunities for collaboration with all organizations that share a regional focus. The Guiding Principles identified during the Reality Check Game Day will serve as a starting point and these Principles will be studied and refined, with input from all citizens of this region. section 8: next steps

In May 2012, a conversation began. Three hundred stakeholders in the Hampton Roads region participated in an unprecedented study of current land use patterns, and options to accommodate future growth. But, more importantly, this large diverse group of individuals, representing all facets of land users from the Southside and Peninsula, came together face-to-face to vet their different opinions, listen to the viewpoints of others, and begin to understand the power and potential of evaluating land use as a region, instead of unrelated counties and cities. This exercise was just the beginning of a long process of creating the community we all want.

59


The lessons learned from the Reality Check Game Day planning process demonstrate that there are many organizations working in parallel toward the same regionally-focused goals. The intent of the ongoing Reality Check collaboration will be to unite those organizations who contribute to the land use discussion. This discussion may include environmental advocates, agricultural interests, municipal planning departments, military liaisons, modeling, simulation, and GIS technicians, and economic development professionals, among others. However, the goal of this collaboration is not to circumvent or duplicate any of the efforts of other worthy regionally-focused organizations. Instead, the work of the Reality Check collaboration will be provided to all regional stakeholders as quality, citizen-generated visions for how Hampton Roads will look in the future. An immediate and tangible example of Reality Check’s impact on our region will be the input provided to the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission’s Regional Stategic Plan. This Plan is required by Virginia State code and the elected leaders comprising the Board of the Planning District Commission need the tools to create this Plan. The willingness of regional stakeholders to collaborate, as demonstrated by Reality Check, will be a critical impetus to beginning this planning process. The Guiding Principles established during Reality Check Game Day will be considered during the creation of the Regional Strategic Plan.

section 8: next steps

60

Additional work products of Reality Check will include “tool kits” for development industry participants, research reports about land use factors, and further land use visioning exercises focused on smaller micro-regions within Hampton Roads. The tool kits will be educational resources designed to assist municipalities, land owners, and development professionals in the use of their land for redevelopment, conservation, transportation projects, and others. The creation

of these tool kits will come from a collaboration of industry experts, citizens and municipal leadership. There are inherent limitations to the Reality Check process, which will serve to focus the collaboration on its singular purpose of land use. Effective organizations already exist in Hampton Roads to evaluate and promote economic development strategies, military relationships, tourism, and/or port-related business. Reality Check will only focus on the placemaking elements of the region, defined as the identification of a region through the built environment in coordination with natural land features. The premise of Reality Check does not pre-suppose any specific development pattern, nor is there any assumption that current development patterns in Hampton Roads are negative or unsustainable. These types of conclusions will come from the continuous study and analysis by Reality Check participants. The only assumption made by this process is the basic foundation of Reality Check: a lack of regionallyfocused land use visioning will make Hampton Roads non-competitive and undesirable in comparison to other global regions. The Reality Check exercise in May 2012 proved the willingness of regional stakeholders to collaborate for the betterment of Hampton Roads’ future. The goal of the Urban Land Institute, and its partners, is to ensure that effort is perpetuated and embellished. As long as this region is competing in a global economy, regional cooperation will be required. The Hampton Roads region has some of the most unique and valuable natural and historical assets in the United States, and beyond. With the symbiotic goals of maintaining the character of the region, preserving natural assets, involving citizens in shaping their region’s future, and providing expertise to critical decision-makers, Reality Check will serve as a perpetual conversation about the future of Hampton Roads.


pa r t i c i pa n t s TABLE # Chad

Adkins, AICP

AECOM

Urban Planner

26

Ray

Alley

Newport News Shipbuilding/Huntington Ingalls

Director, Plant Engineering

7

Tammi

Amick

South Norfolk Civic League

President

20

George

Anas

VB Harbour Group

Principal

8

Laurent

Andre

Young Leaders

15

Doug

Aronson

Larry

Atkinson

Old Dominion University

Professor of Oceanography

14

Nicolas

Balce

RRMM Architects

Senior Designer

1

Bob

Baldwin

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic

Regional Community Plans and Liaison Officer

10

Brian

Ballard

Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek Fort Story

Community Plans & Liaison Officer

4

Mike

Barrett

Virginia Beach Vision

Immediate Past President

25

Evan

Bell

CSX

Director of Network Modeling

23

Nicola

Beltz

Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Higher Education

Director of Programs and Administration

25

Paulette

Benson

Hampton Roads Liaison for International Transportation

Joanne

Berkley

Citizens for a Fort Monroe National Park

Board Member

8

Jay

Bernas

Hampton Roads Sanitation District

Virginia Beach Planning Commission, Chairman

9

Clay

Bernick

City of Virginia Beach

Administrator, Environment and Sustainability Office

16

Shernita

Bethea

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Housing and Human Services Coordinator

22

Dave

Bickford

Divaris

Young Leaders

24

Wendy

Billue

City of Portsmouth

City of Portsmouth Parks & Rec (Ret.)

17

Barry

Bishop

Greater Norfolk Corporation

Executive Vice President

3

Angela

Blackwell Carter

LEAD Hampton Roads

Vice President, Leadership Programs

Daniel

Blevins

Kotarides Builders

Development Manager

Deborah

Blythe Bauman

Old Dominion University

Assistant Dean, College of Health Sciences

Chris

Bonney

Bonney & Company

Founder

4

Tuck

Bowie

The Terry Peterson Companies

Residential Builder and Developer

5

Hank

Boyd

BB&T

SVP CRE Group

20

Phillip

Bradshaw

Isle of Wight County Schools

CFO

8

Dru

Branche

Newport News Shipbuilding/Huntington Ingalls

Director, Environment, Health & Safety

16

Kyllie

Brinkley

CREED, Old Dominion University

Program Manager, CREED

Ross

Brockwell

City of Chesapeake

Streets and Bridges Administrator, Dept. of Public Works

John

Broderick

Old Dominion University

Judith

Brown

Transportation Alliance

Joan

Bryan

TowneBank

Senior Vice President, Private Banking, First Colonial

24

Nancy

Buchanan

William and Mary Real Estate Foundation

Executive Director

20

Dave

Burden

Virginia Eastern Shorekeeper

Shorekeeper

1

Marilyn

Burstein

The Art Institute of Virginia Beach

President

7

Scott

Butler

Citizens for a Fort Monroe National Park

Treasurer

25

Carol

Butler

Cultural Alliance of Greater Hampton Roads

Cultural Alliance Board Member

21

Jimmy

Capps

Virginia Beach Vision

President

29

John

Carlock

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Deputy Executive Director

Mike

Carpenter

Peninsula Chamber Leadership Group

Long & Foster Realtor

1

Carolyn

Caywood

League of Women Voters - South Hampton Roads

Newsletter Editor

10

Kenneth

Chandler

City of Portsmouth

City Manager

16

Lisa

Chandler

Greater Norfolk Corporation

President

9

Scott

Chase

City of Havelock

Director of Planning & Inspections

26

Brian

Chenault

Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Org

Community Outreach Planner

8

Flora

Chioros

City of Newport News

Landscape Architect/Planner, Dept. of Planning

10

Will

Christopher

Will Christopher Consulting

Principal

19

Ron

Clark

Hampton Roads Service

Director of Sales

11

Josh

Clark

Clark Communications & Hampton Roads Public Transportation Alliance (HRPTA)

Lynn

Clements

Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center

Executive Director

29

Rob

Clendenin

Wheelabrator Portsmouth

Senior Manager Business Development

20

Julie

Clifford

H&A Architects & Engineers

Project Development Executive Assistant

Cathy

Coleman

Downtown Norfolk Council

President & CEO

Jennifer

Collins

Old Dominion University

Assistant Vice President, Marketing and Communications

Larry

Colorito

Axial Advisory Group

Carol

Considine

Craig

Cope

Liberty Property Trust

Ryan

Correia

PlanIt EAST

2

13

3

21 6

10

Principal

13

Associate Professor, Civil Engineering Technology

16

Vice President & City Manager

29 18

participants

12

61


Erin

Corrie

Virginia Port Authority

Economic Development Manager

30

Grant

Cothran

Norfolk Southern

Economic Developer, Transporation Marketing

14

Claudia

Cotton

Tidewater Builders Association

Staff Vice President

28

Jim

Councill

Franklin Mayor

Cindy

Creede

Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia

Director of Transit and Wellness

23

Ann

Crenshaw

Kaufman & Canoles

Partner

22

Darrell

Crittendon

City of Norfolk Department of Recreation, Parks and Open Space

Director

27

John

Crouse

H&A

Paul

Darden

Darden Publishing

Publisher

16

Bill

Davenport

Landscape Architect

Landscape Architect

17

Tim

Davey

Timmons Group

Carron

Day AICP, CEP, CNU-A

PlanIt EAST

Project Manager

Brian

Devlin

Liberty Property Trust

Director of Leasing and Development

16

Dana

Dickens

Hampton Roads Partnership

President and CEO

15

Elizabeth

Dietzmann

Attorney

1

Alex

Divaris

Divaris

Young Leaders

22

Joe

Donnelly

Portsmouth Partnership

Past President of the Portsmouth Partnership, Chairman of 10 the Transportation Committee

Larry

Dotolo

Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Higher Education

President

22

Kevin

DuBois

City of Norfolk

Enviornmental Enineer

7

Tom

Duckett

Hampton Roads Realtors Association

Associate Broker

5

William

Dufault

Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads

Community Plans & Liaison Officer

3

Barbara

Duke

Virginia Beach Parks & Recreation

Senior Open Space Planner, Planning Design and Development Division

4

Bob

Dyer

City of Virginia Beach

Council Member

1

Christine

Early

CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women)

Past President

16

Kim

Edwards

Studio G squared

Landscape Architect

8

Greg

Edwards

Virginia Port Authority

Director of External Affairs

5

Catherine

Eichel

Brown and Caldwell, Environmental Engineer

David

Ermini

H&A Architects & Engineers

Architect

21

Jeanne

Evans-Cox

Central Business District Association

Exec. Director

14

George

Faatz

Virginia Natural Gas

Young Leaders

26

Bob

Fallon

Newport News Shipbuilding/Huntington Ingalls

Director of Facilities and Waterfront Support

13

Dwight

Farmer

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission/ Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Organization

Executive Director/Secretary of the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission and the Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Organization

Bob

Fenning

Old Dominion University

Vice President for Administration and Finance

Jim

Ferber

Monarch Bank

President of the Real Estate Group

14

Andrew

Fine

The Runnymede Corporation

President

22

Nate

Fine

Virginia Tech, Student

Zach

Fine

Hampden-Sydney College, Student

Bill

Fleming

Lynnhaven River NOW

Public Policy Committee

1

Caroline

Forehand

S.L. Nusbaum Realty Company

Vice President Multifamily Marketing

23

Karen

Forget

Lynnhaven River NOW

Executive Director

18

Scott

Foster

City of Williamsburg

Council Member

19

Joan

Fowler

City of Chesapeake

Development Services Coordinator, Dept. of Economic Development

20

Dave

France

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc

Joe

Frank

David, Kamp, & Frank

Barry

Frankenfield

City of Virginia Beach

Landscape Architect

23

Chris

Freeman

Kellam High School

AP Environmental Science Teacher

13

Greg

French

LEAD Hampton Roads

Immediate Past Chair

23

Gloria

Freye

McGuireWoods, LLC

Elizabeth

Friel

Williamsburg Land Conservancy

Jaime

Garcia

RRMM Architects

Laura Lee

Garrett

Hirschler Fleischer

Susan

Gaston

Robbyn

Gayer

Jeff

Geiger

Hirschler Fleischer

Saul

Gleiser

Michael

Glover

Claudia

25

2

13 25

3 Director of Design, Principal

9

The Gaston Group

Principal

28

UBS

Young Leaders

18

City of Newport News

Senior Planner/Urban Designer

20

Monarch Bank

Commercial Loan Officer

30

Gooch

The Planning Council

VP

7

Robert

Goodman

Kaufman & Canoles

Partner

15

participants

Carlyle

Gravely

Boys & Girls Club of the Virginia Peninsula

Bill

Griggs

Young Audiences of Virginia

Executive Director

26

Greg

Grootendorst

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Chief Economist

19

62

Tory

Gussman

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Dir. Property Planning & Mgt

24

Louis

Guy

Citizens for a Fort Monroe National Park

Board Member

15

12


Betty Jo

Gwaltney

Portsmouth Partnership

Executive Director

9

Cami

Hahn

CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women)

Past President

17

Scott

Hall

Virginia Beach Economic Development

Wendy

Halman

Hampton Roads Realtors Association

Carlton

Hardy

Dave

Hare

TowneBank

Director of Private Banking, Harbour View Financial Center 5

Wayne

Harris

Albemarle Economic Development Commission

Chairman

18

Chavis

Harris

Newport News Shipbuilding/Huntington Ingalls

Director, EEO, Diversity & Corporate Citizenship

12

Jonathan

Hartley

Planning Administrator Portsmouth

Planning Administrator

4

Chris

Harvey

Armada Hoffler Development Company

Executive Vice-President

27

Eric

Hauser

Williams Mullen

Andrew

Heatwole

Ripley - Heatwole Company, Inc.

Principle

3

Daniel

Heatwole

Ripley - Heatwole Company, Inc.

Associate

4

Andy

Hecker

Moffatt & Nichol

Director

12

Mary

Heinricht

Environmental Council of Hampton Roads

Director

11

John

Hendrickson

Parsons Brinckerhoff

Sr. Supervising Transportation Planner

24

Ted

Henifin

Hampton Roads Sanitation District

General Manager

6

Barbara

Henley

City of Virginia Beach

Council Member

25

Graham

Herbert

BB&T

Assistant Vice President

4

Steve

Herbert

City of Virginia Beach

Deputy City Manager

24

Tom

Herbert

H&A Architects & Engineers

Vice President, Director of Private Sector Programs

Susan

Hirschbiel

Kurt

Hofelich

Sentara Norfolk General

18

Dale

Holt

City of Virginia Beach

17

Deanna

Holt

City of Suffolk Eco. Develoment

Angela

Hopkins

City of Newport News

Senior Planner

7

Jack

Hornbeck

Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce

President and CEO

16

Doug

Hornsby

Christopher Newport University

CNU Real Estate Foundation

24

Oneiceia

Howard

City of Norfolk

Neighborhood Development Specialist

3

Joe

Howell

Naval Station Norfolk

Community Plans & Liaison Officer

7

Jason

Howell

RRMM Architects

Designer

2

Mike

Howlett

Cherry, Bekaert & Holland

19

Bill

Hudgins

Harvey Lindsay

30

Mike

Hull

Monarch Bank

Kim

Humphrey

Future of Hampton Roads

Secretary

19

Carl

Jackson

VDOT

Transporation Planner

15

Andrew

Jackson

Thomas

Johnson

S.L. Nusbaum Realty Co.

Senior Vice President, Commercial Development

Mark

Johnson

SunTrust

Shana

Jones

Center for Progressive Reform

Environmental Policy Consultant

9

Claire

Jones

City of Suffolk

Principal Planner

5

Amy

Jordan

City of Hampton

Redevelopment Manager, Dept. of Economic Development

4

Rodney

Jordan

Hampton Roads Committee of 200+ Men, Inc. & One Economy Corporation

V.P. Economic Justice

2

Mallory

Kahler

City of Portsmouth

Economic Development Admin Coordinator

7

Kevin

Kattwinkel

H&A Architects & Engineers

Architect

6

Andy

Keeney

Kaufman & Canoles

Partner

Aaron

Kelley

LEAD Hampton Roads

TowneBank

8

Jim

Kelly

Newport News Shipbuilding/Huntington Ingalls

Manager, Plant Engineering

14

Sara

Kidd

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Senior Regional Planner

Florence

Kingston

City of Newport News

Director, Department of Development

9

Bill

Kiniry

Kiniry and Company, Inc.

President

25

Corey

Kiprakis

UPA

Young Leaders

5

David

Klemt

Klemt & Associates, P.C.

Architect

12

Doug

Knack

Mark Kronenthal

Kronenthal

McCandlish Holton

Mike

Kuhns

Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce

President and CEO

28

Heidi

Kulberg

City of Chesapeake

Deputy Health Director, Chesapeake Health Department

14

Chip

Land

Kaufman & Canoles

Partner

1

Cameron

Langille

Kaufman & Canoles

Courier

6

Leisha

LaRiviere

ULI Richmond Management Committee

Karen

Lasley

City of Virginia Beach

Planning and Zoning Administrator for Va. Bch

2

John

Lauterbach

Naval Air Station Oceana/Dam Neck

Community Plans & Liaison Officer

6

Jim

LaVier

Virginia Arts Festival

Board member

28

Steve

Lawson

The Lawson Companies

President

21

Aubrey

Layne

Great Atlantic Management

President, Principle Broker

10

29 New Homes Council Chair, HRRA Board of Directors, Rose & Womble Realty

30

Consultant

27

20

Community Volunteer

4

6

29

2 7 30

participants

28

63


participants

64

Brad

Lazernick

Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia

Social Work Supervisor

14

Joy

Learn

Fulton Bank

VP Relationship Manager

25

Beth

Lewis

Southampton County

Community Development Director

6

Christina

Lipuma

Old Dominion University

David

Lohmeier

DaLoh Designs, LLC

Architect, Owner

11

John

Lombard Ph.D

CREED, Old Dominion University

Assistant Director for Community Engagement

Diana

LoVecchio

Riverside Health System

VP Construction Management & Shared Services

Steve

Lucas

Strategic Commercial Development, Inc.

Randy

Lyall

Lyall Design Architects

President

5

Catherine

Magill

Great Bridge International, LLC

President

3

Randy

Martin

City of Franklin

City Manager

10

Ashley

Martin

Rubin Communications Group

Leslie

Mason

Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Higher Education

Project Coordinator

20

Marjorie

Mayfield Jackson

Elizabeth River Project

Executive Director

8

Jai

McBride

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Principal Regional Planner

9

Tim

McCarthy

Light Rail Now

President

17

Steve

McCurdy

Norfolk Southern

Benjamin

McFarlane

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Mary Katherine

McGetrick

Williams Mullen

Greg

McLemore

Franklin City Council

George

McLeod

Old Dominion University

GIS Coordinator, High Performance Computing-OCCS

Shannon

McLeod

Parsons Brinckerhoff

Senior Port & Intermodal Planner

Ed McMahon

McMahon

Urban Land Institute

Senior Resident Fellow/Charles E. Fraser Chair for Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy

Stephanie

McMorris

H&A Architects & Engineers

Intern Landscape Architect

Carolyn

McPherson

Light Rail Now

Executive Director

Karen

Meier

Old Dominion University

Assistant Vice President for Community Engagement

Capt. Charles "Chuck"

Melcher

US Navy

Commanding Officer NSA Hampton Roads (Ret.)

11

John

Merenda

Young Leaders

20

Mary

Miller

Downtown Norfolk Council

Dawn

Miller

HRRA Board of Directors

Scott

Mills

City of Suffolk

Jay

Mitchell

William E. Wood

Mike

Molzahn

HBA Architecture & Interior Design

Brandi

Monsma

Mike

Monteith

Shurl

26 27

18 Regional Planner

4 27 29

24

10 City Planner

9 13

Architect

14

Young Leaders

6

Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement

Board Member

16

Montgomery

Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority

CEO

22

Jerry

Moore

Fort Monroe Authority

Director of Real Estate

14

Chris

Moore

Chesapeake Bay Foundation

Steve

Morales

Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority

Housing Reinvention Project Director

12

Chris

Morello

City of Newport News

Administrator of Development Projects

22

Morlock

Regional Visioning/ ULI

R Entertainment Company

Walter

Morlock

Regional Visioning/ULI/R Entertainment Company

Chad

Morris

City of Norfolk Department of Recreation, Parks and Open Space

Division Head of Open Space Planning & Development

10

Christine

Morris

Hampton Roads Community Foundation

Vice President, Initiatives

15

Donna

Morris

Hampton Roads Partnership

Executive Vice President

29

Susan

Murphy

Hampton Roads Realtors Association

Resale Council Chair, HRRA Board of Directors, William E. Wood & Associates

1

Lisa

Murphy

LeClair Ryan

Partner

12

Brent

Nielson

City of Chesapeake

Planning Director for the City of Chesapeake, he is representing City Manager of Chesapeake Amar Dwarkanath at Reality Check

17

Jessica

Nightingale

Sauer Incorporated

Business Development Coordinator

17

Sheila

Noll

York County Board of Supervisors

Vice Chairman

13

Bill

Nusbaum

Williams Mullen

RJ

Nutter

Troutman Sanders

Managing Partner/VB & Norfolk

18

Thomas

O'Grady

Clancy & Theys Construction

Director of Business Development

1

Megan

O'Reilly

HRP

Young Leaders

9

Brendan

O’Hallarn

Old Dominion University

Marketing/PR Specialist

6

Renee

Olander

Old Dominion University

Assistant Vice President

11

W.F.

Oliver

EV Williams, Inc.

Business Development

7

Jim

Oliver

Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement

Board Chairman

11

Keith

Oliver

Hampton Roads Green Building Council

Vice Chair

19

Jim

Owens

Harvey Lindsay

Anthony

Paige

First Baptist Church Lambert's Point

Minister

19

Vivian

Paige

Vivian J. Paige, CPA, PC

President

21

Chris

Parker

Timmons Group

Engineering Manager

21

2

13

27


Sara

Parker

Norfolk Economic Development

Keith

Parnell

JASE Group & Hampton Roads Public Transportation Alliance

CEO

3

Russell

Parrish

Lyall Design Architects

Senior Project Architect

23

Amy

Paulson

EVMS

Dir. Consortium for Infant & Child Health

22

Benito

Perez

Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Org

Transportation Engineer

25

Mark

Perreault

Citizens for a Fort Monroe National Park

President

17

Lisa

Perry

Isle of Wight County Economic Development

Director of Eco. Dev.

3

Grey

Persons

Pilot Media

Young Leaders

18

John

Peterson III

Urban Land Institute Hampton Roads

Chair

John

Peterson, Jr.

The Terry Peterson Companies

Chairman

19

Dave

Pezza

Old Dominion University

Civil Engineer Graduate Student

21

Jeryl Rose

Phillips

City of Virginia Beach

Comprehensive Planning Coordinator

8

Marina

Phillips

Kaufman & Canoles

Partner

30

Victor

Pickett

Grandbridge Real Estate Capital, LLC

Senior Vice President/Regional Manager

9

Phil

Poling

Williamsburg Investment Group

Mel

Price

Work Program Architects

Young Leaders

30

Suzanne

Puryear

The Planning Council

President

28

Craig

Quigley

Hampton Roads Military and Fed Facilities Alliance

Ex. Dir.

26

Patrick

Reynolds

Ashby Development

President of Ashby Development

1

Rodney

Rhodes

City of Williamsburg

Zoning Administrator

18

Joan

Rhodes-Copeland

Cultural Alliance of Greater Hampton Roads

Exec. Director

4

Jamie

Richardson

ULI Hampton Roads

District Council Coordinator

Chuck

Rigney

Norfolk Department of Development

Mark

Rinaldi

Bush Construction Corp.

Planner/Developer

28

Amy

Ring

Isle of Wight County Economic Development

Business Development Manager

27

Vaughn

Rinner

Vaughn Rinner Landscape Architect, PLC

PLA, ASLA

Tu

Ritter

Peninsula Chamber Leadership Group

Mortgage Sales Associate - SunTrust Mortgage

8

Season

Roberts

Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia

Director of Volunteers

15

Drew

Robins

Naval Weapons Station Yorktown

Community Plans & Liaison Officer

18

Darren

Robinson

Hampton Roads Committee of 200+ Men, Inc.

Ken

Rodman

VHB

Steven

Rowe

Bowman Consulting

Project Manager

Joel

Rubin

Rubin Communications Group

Media Relations and Participant Coordinator, Reality Check Hampton Roads

Sara Jo

Rubin

Rubin Communications Group

Edward

Russell

Kaufman & Canoles

Partner

8

Henry

Ryto

Hampton Roads Transit

Data Collector

26

Chris

Sanders

Robinson Development Group, Inc

Brad

Sanford

Dominion Realty Advisors Inc.

Principal

10

Stephanie

Sanker

CREED

Vice President of S.L. Nusbaum Realty Co.

27

Tara

Saunders

Old Dominion University Real Estate Foundation

Executive Director

William

Saunders

Town of Smithfield

Town Planner & GIS Coordinator

Burrell

Saunders

Urban Land Institute Hampton Roads

Mission Advancement Chair

Mark

Schnaufer

City of Virginia Beach

Transporation Planning Coordinator

24

Caren

Schumacher

Williamsburg Land Conservancy

757-565-0343

24

Grig

Scrifes

Williams Mullen

Dr. Michael

Seiler

Old Dominion University

Founder and Director, Institute for Behavioral and Experimental Real Estate (IBERE)

Karen

Shaffer

City of Chesapeake

Assistant Planning Director, Dept. of Planning

25

Jaleh

Shea

City of Chesapeake

Program Manager, Bureau of Community Programs

27

Jonathan

Siegel

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic

Regional Community Plans & Liaison Officer

22

Mitchell

Silver

Department of City Planning, City of Raleigh

Chief Planning & Development Officer and Director

Fay

Silverman

Tidewater Mortgage Services

Loan Officer

2

Andrew

Sinclair

Hampton Roads Realtors Association

Government Affairs Director

21

John

Skirven

Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia

CEO

30

Leonard

Sledge

The College of William & Mary

Director Office of Economic Development

19

Doug

Smith

Kaufman & Canoles Consulting

President

23

Linda

Smith

Synergy Inc.

Todd

Solomon

Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement

Interim Exec. Director

15

Josh

Son

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic

Regional Community Plans and Liaison Officer

23

Jim

Spore

City of Virginia Beach

City Manager

21

Frances

Stanley

Virginia LISC

Skip

Stiles

Wetlands Watch

Executive Director

3

Candice Streett

Streett

Virginia LISC

Jen

Stringer

Ivy Architecture Innovations

Architecture Project manager

16

Caroline

Sullivan

Urban Land Institute

Dr. Michael

Summers

Tidewater Community College

Provost, Virginia Beach Campus

28

participants

2

Paul

Sutton

U. S. Coast Guard, LANT Command Center

Maritime Safety & Law Enforcement Specialist

12

65

26

28 15 22

5

30

11


Heidi

Sweetnam

Urban Land Institute

Vice President, District Councils

Cynthia

Taylor

City of Suffolk

Assistant Director of Planning, Dept. of Planning and Community Development

11

Adm. Ray

Taylor (Ret.)

Future of Hampton Roads

Chairman

17

Hoagie

Thorn

Newport News Shipbuilding/Huntington Ingalls

Manager, Environmental Engineering

17

Hugh

Tierney

Empire Real Estate

President

8

Julie

Timm

Advancing Women in Transportation

President

20

Paul

Trapp

Timmons Group

Managing Principal, Infrastructure Division

29

Stacey

Vellines

Old Dominion University Real Estate Foundation

Real Estate Manager

Jason

Vickers-Smith

WVS Companies

Beverly

Walkup

Isle of Wight

Director of Planning and Zoning

Rusty

Waterfield

Old Dominion University

Assistant Vice President for Computing Services (OCCS)

Dr. Nancy

Welch

City of Chesapeake

Health Director, Chesapeake Health Dept.

25

Rick

West

City Chesapeake

Council Member

26

John

Westbrooke

Lynnhaven Mall

General Manager (Ret.)

11

Randy

Wheeler

City of Poquoson

City Manager

23

Ben

White

City of Chesapeake

Assistant Director Eco. Dev.

5

Stephen

White

City of Virginia Beach

Planning Evaluation Coordinator

23

Thom

White

Work Program Architects

Young Leaders

28

Steve

White

Dollar Tree, Inc.

Chief Logistics Officer

29

Jack

Whitney

City of Virginia Beach

Planning Director

27

Gregory

Wilhelm-Wenzel

Faithful+Gould Inc.

Development Manager

12

Liz

Williams

Riverside Health System

VP Strategy, Marketing & Development

29

Ned

Williams

Vector Real Estate Advisors, LLC

Principal

26

Nancy

Williams

City Planner (Ret.)/ CPDS Specialist

13

Bob

Williams

Tri-City Developers, LLC

Brittney

Willis

Burgess & Niple, Inc.

Civil Engineer

14

Toi

Wilson

City of Portsmouth

Economic Development Analyst

6

Matthan

Wilson

Newport News Public Schools

Social Studies Teacher

21

Tiffani

Wilson

Norfolk State University

Graduate Student

15

Charlie

Wornom

Greater Peninsula NOW

Randy

Wright

Hampton Roads Public Transportation Alliance

President

Chas

Wright

Monarch Bank

Senior Vice President

Dubby

Wynne

Landmark Communications, Inc.

Retired President and CEO

Gil

Yochum

Old Dominion University

Dean, College of Business and Public Administration

Emily

Zak

Central Business District Association

Programs Administrator

Sabrina

Zimring

Rubin Communications Group

Project Manager, Reality Check Hampton Roads

Abbie

Zwicke

ULI Richmond

19

2

30

fa c i l i tat o r s

facilitators

66

12

7 11 13

TABLE #

Jeff

Ainslie

Ainslie Group

President

22

Jenifer

Alonzo

Old Dominion University

Assistant Professor, Communication and Theatre Arts

8

Beth

Armistead

Lynnhaven River NOW

Wetlands Committee Member

9

Gary

Baum

Wall, Einhorn & Chernitzer, P.C.

Business Valuation and Litigation Support Services

4

Alonzo

Bell

Randolph Real Estate Services Co.

Principal Broker

2

Douglas

Burdett

Artillery

Owner/Principal

6

Matt

Burton

Matthew G Burton Architect LLC

Colonel J.J.

Frazier

Retired

U.S. Army

17

Theresa

Garber

Wilbanks Smith & Thomas Asset Management LLC

Vice President of Operations

29

Jimmy

Gray

City of Hampton

Assistant City Manager

27

Nicole

Harrell

Kaufman & Canoles

Partner

16

Julia

Hillegass

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

Public Information & Community Affairs Administrator

10

Tracy

Keller

Girl Scout Council of Colonial Coast

Chief Executive Officer

15

Lance

Landeche

Booz | Allen | Hamilton

Peter

Lobred

Amerigroup

Vice President, Communications

20

Ray

Mattes

Retail Alliance

President / CEO

28

Kathy

Nelson

Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Norfolk

Director

12

Mike

Padden

Clark Nexsen

Ray

Pentecost

Clark Nexsen

7

26

30 Vice President, Director of Healthcare Architecture, Design Principal

3


Thom

Prevette

Bon Secours Health System Hampton Roads

Mary

Redd-Clary

Navy Voluntary Education Program

Director

1 21

Stephen

Romine

LeClairRyan

Attorney

11

Stephanie

Roper-Burton

Joint War Fighting Center

DOD Joint Staff

18

Peter

Shaw

TCC - Norfolk Campus

Professor of Business Management & Administration

19

Debbie

Sivertson

Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce

Coordinator, Curriculum, Leadership Programs

13

Elizabeth

Taraski

Nansemond River Preservation Alliance

Shepelle

Watkins-White

ShepelleWatkinsWhite Consulting & Law, PLLC

Rich

Werber

Great Atlantic Pool Spa Patio

Tom

Winborne

Clark Nexsen

Heather

Wood

Virginia Port Authority

25 President

14 24 5

Director, Environmental Affairs

Leslie

Allen

TowneBank

Benefits Coordinator, Human Resources

Ethan

Armistead

Cape Henry Collegiate School

Student

Christina

Bustos

Christopher Newport University

Student

Rachel

Carter

Christopher Newport University

Student

Dylan

Coolbaugh

Old Dominion University

Student

James

Day

Christopher Newport University

Student

Hind

Elhakour

Old Dominion University

Student

Jacob

Fish

Christopher Newport University

Student

Dana

Gilbert

The College of William and Mary

Master of Public Policy Candidate

Sara Ann

Harding

Old Dominion University

Student

Mark

Horton

Towne Insurance Agency

Commercial Producer (Sales)

Adam

Jefferson

Old Dominion University

Student

Brian

McLellon

TowneBank

Paige

Schwartz

Christopher Newport University

Student

Kinte

Smith

TowneBank

Business Banking Officer

David

Snyder

Christopher Newport University

Student

David

Culler

Kellam High School

Student

Bridgette

DeBolt

Kellam High School

Student

Delaney

Downs

Kellam High School

Student

Megan

Frazier

Kellam High School

Student

Katelyn

Hadder

Kellam High School

Student

Victoria

Houston

Kellam High School

Student

Jay

Lichty

Kellam High School

Student

Sam

Popejoy

Kellam High School

Student

Sarah

Seifert

Kellam High School

Student

Steven

Sims

Kellam High School

Student

Mallory

Sobol

Kellam High School

Student

Dylan

Thiemen

Kellam High School

Student

Josh

Underdown

Kellam High School

Student

Molly

Wright

Kellam High School

Student

Alexia

Jones

Woodside High School

Student

Jennifer

Jones

Woodside High School

Student

Aaron

Manning

Woodside High School

Student

Zhane’

Rodgers

Woodside High School

Student

Dominique

Vaughan

Woodside High School

Student

Maria

Wright

Woodside High School

Student

Joe

Burns

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

Instructor, Modeling & Simulation Support Specialist and GIS

Michael

Carr

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

M&S I

Sean

Derby

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

M&S I

Pannill

Hedgecock

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

Student Services Liason

Jeremy

Hight

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

M&S I

Antonio

Newby

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

M&S I

Tyler

Schmeckenbecher

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

GIS

Robbie

Stevens

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

M&S I

Melvin

Wilson

The Pruden Center for Industry & Technology

M&S I

scribes / data input

s c r i b e s / d ata i n p u t

67



Hampton Roads - Reality Check 2013