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Official Publication New York Angus Association

Angus Angles MARCH 2015

INSIDE THIS ISSUE New York Angus Annual Meeting, March 21, 2015 Keynote Speaker- Bryce Schumann, CEO, American Angus Association

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Come Join Us! NY- Angus Seedstock Capitol of the World

Dr. Tom Van Dyke, Manager of Merial Veterinary Services, Duluth, GA

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Junior Program

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Business Meeting

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Awards Banquet

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Elections

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Auctions

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NY-Angus.com

Facebook

ON THE COVER: NYAA Member & 2015 Sale Host, New Penn Farm, Truxton, NY


New York Angus Association www.NY-Angus.com President Doug Giles 538 Rte. 343, Millbrook, NY 12545 845-677-6221 walbridgefarms@optonline.net Vice-President Craig Simmons 1944 St Rte 66, Ghent, NY 12075 518-858-4461 archbridgefarm@netzero.com Secretary/Treasurer Robert Groom

8974 Lyons Marengo Rd, Lyons, NY 14489

315-573-2569 Robert@angus.us Past President Mike Shanahan

P.O. Box 338, Ghent, NY 12075

518-598-8869 mike@cattlepromotions.com Directors Eric Brayman (2015) Jerry Emerich (2016) Nicole Tommell (2015) Brett Chedzoy (2017) Derrick DeBoer (2015) Allan Lawyer (2017) Roger McCracken (2016) Fred Tracy (2017) Pete Murphy (2016) Angus Angles is published five times per

year by the NY Angus Association, in an 8.5 x 11 magazine format. It is edited and produced by Mike Shanahan,with Associate Editor Nicole DeBoer. Cattle advertisements will be limited to the majority promotion of Angus genetics.

Subscription Rate NYAA Members Free Non-Members $15.00 annually Regular Issue Advertising Rates Full Page $150.00 1/2 Page $100.00 $25.00 x 5 Issues Business Card Special Issue Advertising Rates Full Page $175.00 1/2 Page $125.00 * ask about discounted contract rates, & repeat customer benefits To Place advertising and for news and editorial content contact: Mike Shanahan - 518-598-8869 mike@cattlepromotions.com

Upcoming Angus Events NYAA 2015 Dues Due Now Nominations for NY Angus Female Sale Due Now NY Farm Show February 26-28, 2015 • Syracuse, NY Trowbridge Cattleman’s Meetings throughout NYS, more details at trowbridgefarms.com March 2015 Prime Ad Auction for Angus Angles Newsletter April Special Issue, email bids to auction@cattlepromotions.com concludes with a live auction close on 3/21/15 at NYAA Annual Meeting March 15-21, 2015 NY Angus Annual Meeting & Banquet at Justin’s Tuscan Grill March 21, 2015 • East Syracuse, NY Trowbridge Annual Bull Sale at Finger Lakes Livestock May 2, 2015 • Canandaigua, NY NY Angus Female Sale, hosted by New Penn Farm May 9, 2015 • Truxton, NY *** If you have an event you would like to see listed here, please contact mike@cattlepromotions.com*** Newsletter Deadlines & Publish Dates Deadline 3/20/15, Published 4/1/15 - SPECIAL ISSUE Deadline 5/15/15, Published 6/1/15 - Regular Issue Deadline 7/10/15, Published 8/1/15 - SPECIAL ISSUE Deadline 10/15/15, Published 11/15 - Regular Issue Deadline 1/15/16, Published 2/1/16 - Regular Issue


Note From the Editor www.NY-Angus.com Mike Shanahan, 518-598-8869

New Horizons The nearly 25,000 members who comprise the American Angus Association® came off of an outstanding 2014 fiscal year (FY) this fall. Fiscal performance exceeded all expectations on nearly every front, from an increase in registrations, to record-breaking sales of Certified Angus Beef® (CAB) brand product, to the most sales revenue ever reported for Angus seedstock: $326 million. The organization is now reporting that these trends have accelerated in the first quarter of FY 2015, which began Oct. 1, 2014, and the breed is on an early pace to potentially exceed last year’s performance. Registrations submitted to the American Angus Association in December totaled 44,194, the eighth best month in history and the best December on record. Year to date, total registrations for registered Angus seedstock grew 10%; that’s an increase of 10,000 more animals in the registry. And these numbers were achieved with more people raising registered Angus genetics. Since October, memberships have grown 31%, and junior memberships have increased by more than 9%. Aside of the national stats, in New York State our membership level is at a steady increase and the talk about being a part of the most active beef breed organization in the region keeps getting louder. New York State has done it and will continue to do it. A quick compilation of registered Angus genetics that have sold within our state in 2014 (recorded via some auctions we could find) amasses a total of $2,780,000. Folks this is a big number, and it is what you have accomplished as our membership. Thanks & Congratulations to you all. Learn so much more about what is happening with our breed and hear from the main man himself, Bryce Schumann CEO of American Angus Association, at our New York Angus Association Annual Meeting on March 21, 2015 at Justin’s Tuscan Grill in East Syracuse, New York. Take care,

Mike Mike Shanahan Editor, Angus Angles Newsletter Thanks to Merial for being a sponsor of our NYAA Annual Meeting on March 21, 2015


NY ANGUS ASSOCIATION Membership Application Annual dues are $25.00 Name ____________________________________________________ Manager/Herdsman ________________________________________ Farm Name ________________________________________________ Address __________________________ City ____________________ State _________ Zip____________ County ______________________ Phone _______________________ Mobile ______________________ Fax __________________ E-Mail _____________________________ Website ________________________________________________ Location _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Year Herd Established _______________ Herd Description __________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Checks payable to: New York Angus Association 8974 Lyons Marengo Rd. Lyons, NY 14489 Don’t be left out, JOIN TODAY! *** Membership Benefits:benefits: JustSome a few of our membership • Opportunity to consign in our Annual NY Angus Sale Auction • Free subscription to NY Angus Angles newsletter, our association • eligibility for association funded sponsorships publication • •receive freefor association informational e-blasts at the Annual NYS Eligibility Association sponsored premiums • opportunity to sell in annual NY Angus Female Sale Fair Opportunities to to assume leadership roles in the Association, as • •free subscription the NY Angus Angles Newsletter well asfor attend the American Angus Association Annual Meeting in • eligible association sponsored premiums at the NYS Fair Louisville, KY as a Delegate

• discounted rate to annual state Angus business & educational meeting • opportunities to assume leadership roles, including attending the national convention, Beef Leader Institute, and others • get marketing coverage with your listing in the bi-annual membership directory and bi-annual membership map


NY Angus Association Annual Meeting Held Saturday, March 21, 2015, East Syracuse, NY A great panel of speakers is in line for the New York Angus Association Annual Meeting on Saturday, March 21, 2015, to be held at Justin’s Tuscan Grill, 6400 Yorktown Circle, East Syracuse, NY. This year’s event will include our keynote speaker Bryce Schumann, CEO of American Angus Association, from Saint Joseph, MO; Dr. Tom Van Dyke, Manager of Merial Veterinary Services, Duluth, GA. Aside of our speakers will be our annual awards banquet, business meeting, officer and board elections, newsletter special issue prime ad space auction, special Angus memorabilia auction, a tasty beef lunch, & more. You will not want to miss this event, as it promises to be the best annual meeting yet, with so much information from the industry leading companies. Our meeting is sponsored in part by Merial Animal Health - creating a healthier world for animals.

Schedule: 9am - coffee 10am - Bryce Schumann 10am - Junior Program 11am - Dr Tom Van Dyke 12pm - Awards 12:30pm - Lunch 12:45 - Auctions during lunch 1pm - Meeting

Cost $15 per person RSVP to Robert Groom by 3/16/15 robert@angus.us or 315-573-2569

Dr. Tom Van Dyke, Manager of Merial Veterinary Services

Bryce Schumann, CEO of American Angus Association


New York Angus Association Annual Female Sale 2nd Saturday in May

www.NY-ANGUS.com

Angus Hill Farm +PIO*OLMFZ7.%t $IBSMFT%J.BSJB .BOBHFSt randolphvetclinic@gmail.com

w w w.AngusHillFarm.com

8.BJO4USFFUt3BOEPMQI /:

RALLY FARMS

Jesse Bontecou 1015 Shunpike • Millbrook, NY 12545

845-677-8211 Fax: 845-677-5316 Chris Howard • Herd Manager 845-416-1056 • chrisphoward@optimum.net

STOFFELS

VTR

GLENVIEW FARM

Valley Trail Ranch H 315-688-9195 C 315-767-3290 email:LLaribee@hotmail.com

Larry M. Laribee 3220 Fuller Road Carthage, NY 13619

Registered, AI sired, gentle, curve bending Heifers and Bulls

James D. Frueh 518-436-1050 Registered Angus Bulls, Steers, Heifers, Out of quality embryos Round Baleage and Dry Round Bales Springfield, VT and Glenmont, NY

Pleasant Valley Farm Registered Angus Breeding Stock & Freezer Beef

Travis Walton

-JOXPPE3PBEt-JOXPPE /:

Frank & Joan DeBoer jdeboer@stny.rr.com 12491 St Hwy 357 Home: 607-829-3408 Franklin, NY 13775 Cell: 607-353-9520

Sarkaria Farms

Linwood Road (585)2434 703-1476 tTravisSTS9860@gmail.com Linwood, NY 14486

585-703-1476 • TravisSTS9860@gmail.com Like us on Facebook

American Angus Hall of Fame Tom Burke, Kurt Schaff, Jeremy Haag

487 Whaupaunaucau Rd Norwich, NY 13815 www.SarkariaFarms.com

816-532-0811 Fax: 816-532-0851

Sarkaria Family • 607-336-1681 angus@sarkariafarms.com

Box 660 Smithville, MO 64089

angushall@earthlink.net • AngusHall.com

Look for us on Facebook!

Mike Shanahan t$BUUMF1IPUPHSBQIZ7JEFPHSBQIZ t.BSLFUJOH"EWFSUJTJOH$POTVMUBOU t"VDUJPO1MBOOJOH3JOH4FSWJDF t(FOFSBM.BSLFUJOH$POTVMUJOH t1VSDIBTJOH"HFOU t8FCTJUF.BOBHFNFOU

(518) 598-8869

'"9   10#PY (IFOU /: NJLF!DBUUMFQSPNPUJPOTDPN

www.cattlepromotions.com

DEPENDA - BULL SERVICES

Murphy Farm Registered Black Angus

• Semen Collection, Evaluation & Freezing • Frozen Semen Storage & Shipping • Individual Pens • Centrally Located - Just off I-90 near Utica, NY (exit 33)

Route 31, Vernon, New York dependabull@ymail.com Duane and Crystal Brayman Farm - 315-829-2250 • Cell - 315-264-4894 www.DependaBullService.com

www.NY-ANGUS.com

Peter Murphy 1132 Rt. 80 Tully, NY 13159 pmurphy001@twcny.rr.com Home: 315-696-6092

Cell: 315-706-1693


New York Angus Association Annual Female Sale 2nd Saturday in May

www.NY-ANGUS.com

McCracken Vu Farms Performance Bred Angus Cattle Home of the famous McCracken Missies! cattle working in 7 states & Canada!

Scott Oeschger, Owner 32 Railroad Ave • Orleans, VT 05860 Bob Butterfield, Manager 802-673-6629 • bob.b.springhillangus@outlook.com

Jamie & Jerry Brozman Ned & Linda Hower Jennifer & Shane Boyle E-mail: Justenuffangus@enter.net 354 Townshipline Rd. Nazareth, PA 18064 Home (610)-837-3866 Cell (484)221-3455 Registered Angus Cattle Tame Show Calves

Website/Facebook – www.justenuffangus.com New Business Cards JEA Brozman.doc.pdf 1

Roger & Alice McCracken 585-243-5037 2898 Mt Pleasant Rd

Arch Bridge Farm, LLC 682 Archbridge Rd. Ext. Ghent, NY 12075

518-672-5135 Pete Kindler Craig Simmons • 518-858-4461 archbridgefarm@netzero.com

Registered Angus Cattle

EQUITY ANGUS

Registered Black Angus Jim Sheehan & Family 208 Sissonville Rd • Potsdam, NY 13676 816 O’Connor Road • Port Byron, NY 13140 Rich Brown Office: 315-265-8427 315-406-5335 Andy Weaber: 315-261-1331 rbbrown0243@gmail.com • www.EquityAngus.com windypointangus@gmail.com www.WindyPointAngus.com Cattle for the Future Today

3/6/12 10:36:46 AM

Clear Choice Angus Chris & Vanessa Jordan and Family 47 Mack Farm Rd Masontown, PA 15461 100% ALL NATURAL REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BEEF

724-984-0824 • clearchoice2@verizon.net Douglas J. Giles 538 Route 343, Millbrook, NY 12545 M 845.235.3789 / T 845.677.6221 / F 845.605.1152 walbridgefarms@optonline.net walbridgefarm.com

PUNSIT VALLEY FARM

PVF

Mark & Karolyn Shepard 518-392-3478 mshepard3478@gmail.com 365 Punsit Road Chatham, NY 12037

Registered Angus Solely using A.I. from Proven Genetics

P.O. Box 57 Lebanon Street Hamilton, NY 13346

315-824-1703 Arnold & Arlene Fisher

www.NY-ANGUS.com

Registered Breeding Stock & Show Cattle Follow us on Facebook • www.ClearChoiceAngus.com

Carousel Design Taylor Wierzbowski 716-574-9724 carouseldesign@aol.com www.newcarouseldesign.com

Graphic Design & Photo Services


New York Angus Association www.NY-ANGUS.com

Tom and Holly McKenny, Owners 207-415-2792 Rodney Cleaves, Farm Manager 207-798-0241 www.homesteadfarmangus.com

Annual Female Sale 2nd Saturday in May

Featuring calves from Trowbridge Xquisite 0216 CED +5 .42 BW +1.0. .51 WW. +44. .40 YW. +84. .36

!

RANCE LONG !

35504 S. 4415 Rd. U Big Cabin, OK 74332 918.510.3464 U rlong@rancelong.com

Full Service Sale Management • www.RanceLong.com

Dorado Angus

Heathcote Farm 15 Heathcote Lane Amenia, NY 12501

Tullyfergus Angus Herd Robert & Linda Groom

Jerry, Wanda, & Katarina Emerich 315-946-8204 1073 LaValley Road • Mooers, NY 12958 845-373-8731 Cell: 315-573-2569 518-593-0212 Dave Richmond, Mgr. rnlgroom@hotmail.com dorado@primelink1.net 845-323-9232 Forrest Hester, Herdsman heathcote@optonline.net Breeding Stock Available www.tullyfergus.com

FRONTIER GENETICS Allan Lawyer 845-891-6671 lawyera@optonline.net

Bob Butterfield 802-673-6629 bob.b.springhillangus@outlook.com

Vermont & New York

MMT

Cattle

Marc & Nicole Tommell & Family 1942 Hickory Hill Rd Fonda, NY 12068 518-573-0137 Marc • 518-369-5149 Nicole mmtcattle@gmail.com Licensed & Bonded, Buyers of Cattle

www.NY-ANGUS.com


Selling Nearly

NIVERSARY N A h 80 t

100 head!

NEW YORK STATE ANGUS ASSOCIATION

MAY 9, 2015 t 11AM

/&81&//'"3.t536950/ /: WWW.NY-ANGUS.COM

JOINT VENTURE: NY ANGUS BREEDERS & NY HEREFORD BREEDERS Teaming Up For The Best!

OFFERING

t$PX$BMG1BJST t#SFE'FNBMFT t4IPX)FJGFST t&NCSZPT.PSF

MORE INFO: Mike Shanahan 518-598-8869 / mike@cattlepromotions.com Grady Updyke 607-343-4962 / flagmarshranch@stny.rr.com Hall of Fame 816-532-0811 All cattle selling are free of testable genetic defects


Congratulations to our own Jeanetta Laudermilk, 2014 NYBPA Educator of the Year

Our lineup this year features a stylish Boyd Signature 1014 yearling heifer, produced from this impressive SAV Final Answer 0035 female, tracing back to Leachman Saugahatchee 3000C.

New Penn Farm Registered Angus

#HENINGO2Ds4RUXTON .9 #ARL(INKLE  s*EANETTA,AUDERMILK -GR   .EW0ENN&ARM GMAILCOMsWWW.EW0ENN&ARMCOM

Proud host of the NY Angus and Hereford Sales on

Find us on Facebook at ‘New Penn Farm’.


GENERATIONS of GENETICS -Bull Sale 2015

MAY 2 @ Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange CANANDAIGUA, NY

FEATURING

SCHIEFELBEIN ZEUS 3609 Selling Maternal Brothers and Sons TROWBRIDGE CRUSADER 614 Selling Sons

PHIL & ANNIE TROWBRIDGE 518.369.6584 phil@trowbridgefarms.com PJ & MIRANDA TROWBRIDGE 518.755.7467 pj@trowbridgefarms.com MIKE SHANAHAN 518.598.8869 mike@cattlepromotions.com

WWW.TROWBRIDGEFARMS.COM


THE SIRES OF OUR BULLS -Bull Sale 2015 MAY 2 @ Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange

Boyd Signature 1014

Connealy Capitalist 028

Connealy Confidence 0100

Connealy Earnan 076E

EXAR Blue Chip 1877B

EXAR Denver 2002B

GAR Prophet

JMB Traction 292

PA Power Tool 9108

SAV Brilliance 8077

SAV Final Answer 0035

Schiefelbein Zeus 3979

Thomas Powder River 9053

VAR Reserve 1111

CANANDAIGUA, NY


@“Folks are making significant investment in your

genetics, and they expect them to last,” noted Dan Moser, pointing out that proper hoof structure plays a significant role in an animal’s longevity.

Solid Footing American Angus Association to start collecting hoof scores to generate expected progeny differences. Story & photos by Shauna Rose Hermel, editor

T

he American Angus Association is now accepting hoof scores in anticipation of developing an expected progeny difference (EPD) to assist in selection decisions, Dan Moser told cattlemen gathered for the breed improvement breakout session at the Angus Means Business National Convention & Trade Show Nov. 4-6, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. “Folks are making significant investment in your genetics, and they expect them to last,” he noted, pointing out that proper hoof structure plays a significant role in an animal’s longevity. Moser encouraged those in attendance to start collecting and submitting hoof scores as he unveiled a footscoring system the Association will use to evaluate the trait in Angus cattle. “Our goal is to come up with a simple system that characterizes the cattle well enough that we can build tools to help with your decision-making in the future,” said Moser, who serves as president of Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI) and director of performance programs for the American Angus Association.

Moser said two main issues have been identified: (1) foot angle, or set to the pastern; and (2) claw set. Cattle that don’t have the proper pastern set often tend to have shallow heels, he noted. As they sit back on their heels, they don’t get as much wear on their toes, so the toes tend to grow out. This can cause lameness in especially the rear limbs, though the front limbs can be affected, too. Problems with claw set often show up as scissor or corkscrew claws in which the toes don’t stay separated and sometimes curl in, even crossing in some cases. Moser said this more often affects the front feet, but can occur with the back feet, as well. “Those are real issues that impact soundness of cattle,” Moser emphasized, noting that the Association intends to develop EPDs that will assist producers in evaluating seedstock for their ability to propagate sound hoof structure.

35 Keys to Success Seedstock & Genetic Selection

Your data needed Developing that selection tool depends first on gathering data, said Moser, adding that the Association is building the framework to collect that information for use in future evaluations. Emphasizing that doing so is strictly voluntary, he encouraged Angus breeders to submit foot scores on two traits — foot angle and claw set, scoring both on a 1-to-9 system, where 5 is the ideal. He offered diagrams used by the Australian Angus Association to illustrate the scoring system, noting that educational materials from the American Angus Association would soon be forthcoming (see Figs. 1 and 2). Looking at foot angle, Moser explained, the ideal to score a 5 would have a 45° angle to the pastern. Animals that are extremely weak in the pastern, very shallow in their heel and extremely long on their toes would score a 9. “Animals that are extremely straight in their front end and up on their toes, having no set to their pastern, would be a 1,” Moser said, noting that you don’t see very many


Fig. 1: American Angus Association scoring system to evaluate foot angle, where a 5 is ideal

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Source: American Angus Association, 2014. Illustrated by Craig Simmons.

Fig. 2: American Angus Association scoring system to evaluate claw set, where a 5 is ideal

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Source: American Angus Association, 2014. Illustrated by Craig Simmons.

modern Angus cattle at that end of the spectrum. For claw set, the ideal to score 5 would have some space between the toes, and the toes would be basically straight and symmetrical, Moser described. Toes that tend to curl in a little would score 7 or 8, while toes that curl to the point they cross over would score a 9. Toes that spread out more would score lower on the scale, with widely open and divergent toes scoring a 1. Again, few modern Angus animals would fall on the low end of the scale. For both foot angle and claw set, animals at either end of the spectrum, scoring a 1 or a 9, would be animals you would typically cull, Moser said. Working with a similar scoring system, the Australians have found reasonable heritability of both foot angle (0.13) and claw set (0.16), meaning there is opportunity to identify differences among sires.

Tips for scoring Moser offered these things to keep in mind when scoring feet: @Score animals prior to trimming hooves. @Where there is variation from front to rear, score the worst foot. @Score animals at a year of age, using the same age window and contemporary grouping as for yearling weights and ultrasound. @Submit basic ration information along with the hoof scores. @Animals may be scored as they come out of a chute or as they mill in a pen. @Data submission forms will be made available through AAA Login. Sale time provides a deadline by which breeders must score the bulls they raise, he noted. However, there may be multiple opportunities to score females as they age. “Some of these conditions become more

“Some of these conditions become more severe as animals @ get older,” Moser said. “If you have groups of 3-year-olds,

4-year-olds, 5-year-olds, and you would like to score them as a group, we would happily receive that data, as well.”

severe as animals get older,” Moser said. “If you have groups of 3-year-olds, 4-year-olds, 5-year-olds, and you would like to score them as a group, we would happily receive that data, as well.” These age groups will be maintained in their yearling contemporary groups, to allow for differences in management from one year to the next, he explained. “So your 4-year-olds as a group would be a contemporary group, but they wouldn’t necessarily be compared to your 5s.” Angus breeders soon will be able to download a spreadsheet through AAA Login for collecting foot scores that will have registration numbers, tattoos, etc. Once they input the scores, they will be able to upload the completed spreadsheet to the database. Eventually, a form that can be submitted online will also be made available through AAA Login. “As soon as we feel there’s enough data from enough members to give a reliable and useful EPD, that’s something we’ll implement,” Moser said. The end goals, he concluded, are to describe the variation that exists in the breed and to provide a tool to members that they can use to apply selection pressure for foot conformation if they choose to do so. In the meantime, he added, “it encourages people to look at the cattle’s feet a little more closely, and that may be the most powerful thing of all.” Editor’s Note: Moser spoke at the breed improvement workshop at the Angus Means Business National Convention & Trade Show. To listen to his presentation, access his PowerPoint or read summaries of other presentations at the convention, visit the newsroom at www.angusconvention.com.

This article is reprinted with permission from the February 2015 Angus Journal.


Make Walton’s Way, Your Way Travis Walton Linwood, NY 14486 • (585) 703-1476 TravisSTS9860@gmail.com TravisSTS9860@gmail.com

Always offering our genetics for sale. Stop by and visit anytime! - Walton Family

LADY Z392 • REG# 17574916

Sinclair Lady 3410-4465 - Grandam

SAV Iron Mountain 8066 x Boyd New Day 8005 x Papa Equator 2928

Our SAV Iron Mountain heifer, produced from a daughter of Sinclair Lady 3410. Tracing back to the famous DHD Traveler 6807 female, Ideal 4465 - the feed efficiency queen. She is a highlight of our coming yearling heifers.


Introducing

REMEDY

CTS REMEDY 1TO1

‘put your best foot forward’

7AN419

REMEDY 17331233 SIRE: CONNEALY THUNDER MGS: BANDO 9074

Bull Calf Ellingson Angus, ND

Heifer Calf Ellingson Angus, ND

Remedy descends from a pedigree known for making good females--but more importantly, he offers a foot and leg structure designed to get you on the road to better feet. He sires a kind you’ll like--easily-born calves with ample middle and muscle. If you’re ready to improve the feet in your cow herd, here’s your Remedy. From Ellingson Angus, ND and the 1TO1 Group: Holt Farms, Richview Farms, J O W Farms, Kristen Brown, Clarence Tays & Son, Randall Robbins Angus Farm, Jared Brown & Son, TN AAA EPDs as of 12/29/14 CED BW

EPD Acc % Rank

11 .42 10

-0.8 .51 10

Select Sire Power, Inc.

WW

47 .39

Production YW RADG YH

97 .34 30

SC

DOC

.21 .2 .11 19 .38 .37 .38 .31 30 20

HP

CEM

Milk

16.1 .20 10

14 .18 4

30 .24 10

Maternal Hd/Dt MW

0 0

35 .37

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7!4#(7).$#*2

&2/.425..%2 " Calved: 01/09/2014 Bull 17849423 Tattoo: 109B #S A V Final Answer 0035 #Sitz Traveler 8180 S A V Emulous 8145 Connealy Capitalist 028 16752262 Prides Pita of Conanga 8821 #C R A Bextor 872 5205 608 Prides Trav of Conanga 6499 Kesslers Frontman R001

#Connealy Front Page 0228 Kesslers Bell 0024 +Rito 2A63 of 2536 205 + Rally Enchantress 5057

Rally Enchantress 099 16886362

Rally Enchantress 8088 CED

I+9

BW

I+.5

WW

I+52

YW

I+89

Milk

I+31

$W

$F

+46.00 +37.89

Front Runner was bred by Watchwind Farm and Connecticut Junior Republic. He came to Rally and Heathcote as the top selling animal of the 2014 Cow Power Sale. Combining some of the breed’s most elite cow families into his pedigree, with low birth genetics, & a powerhouse, high muscle phenotype. Watch for more from Front Runner, as he is heavily use this year in these two great programs. Watch his video, scan here or visit cowpowersale.com

/WNER-ANAGER*ESSE-"ONTECOU 3HUNPIKEs-ILLBROOK .9

Farm (845) 677-8211 #HRIS(OWARD   CHRISPHOWARD OPTIMUMNET

HEATHCOTE FARM Dave Richmond, Mgr

845-323-9232

heathcote@optonline.net (EATHCOTE,ANEs!MENIA .9 Forrest Hester, Herdsman


NEW YEAR

NEW GENETICS! PURE PRIDE 011

Watch for progeny by Connealy Black Granite from this BC Eagle Eye daughter tracing back to BC Matrix’s full sister!

Madame Pride 0098

Watch for progeny by EXAR Denver from this SAV Bismarck daughter from the heart of the SAV program!

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9 eR . NIA 3- ine nl ME -32 pto s! e@o ,ANE sman t o 84a5 thc erd OTE

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BY: PAUL TROWBRIDGE The view this month from the tractor seat is looking back over shoulder at the last year here on the farm. I always try and look ahead but as we get older I think we all spend a little more time reflecting on the past. Grandpa always told me if you take your glasses off and put them on the back of your head they always see 20/20 I never knew what he meant when was young but now I realize that all of our mistakes and mystiques in life are much easier to see and understand after we have lived thru them . Having lost a sister and a brother-in-law this year has given me reason to grab the moment and seize the day remember there is no dress rehearsal to life we have to get it right the first time.

Enough of that soap box stuff the farm this last year gave our family so much joy it is hard to describe being able to bring many children onto our farm and let them be apart of mother nature and educating them to the fact that it just takes a little knowledge and understanding to be able to get closer to our food source. Our bees are one example if you watch them and how they run their society they prove that everyone and everything is important in their survival from the drones to the worker bees to the queen they all have a crucial role in storing enough honey to get them thru the winter. So as we start a new year let's all focus on what's important to us and our family's. It might not be the big mone-

tary things it just might be showing our grandchildren or children how a bee pollenates a flower or blossom and takes pollen back to the hive to make honey which by the way is a food that never goes bad they have found honey in the tombs in Egypt that this 5000 years old and still good and nutritious till next time

Thx For Readen Paul P.S. Happy New Year to everyone make this year your best ever


Is BVD in your herd?

By Lew Stickland, Univeristy of Tennessee Extension

I often have a picture of these two calves displayed in my cattle health meetings, and I ask; “Which calf is persistently infected with BVDV?” The usual response is; “the one on the right.” Most of the participants say that they answered that way because the calf on the right “looks sick.” While the calf on the right does “look sick”; it is the calf on the left that is persistently infected. Recently, The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has begun to enforce a law that requires the reporting of animals that are persistently infected with BVD to the State Veterinarian. While Tennessee has not adopted this policy, it is important that the producers of Tennessee understand what role this economically important disease can have on herd production. What is Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV)? : Part I Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a potentially serious problem for all cattle operations. It has been a cause of infertility, abortions, diarrhea, shipping fever (bovine respiratory disease), immunosuppression (weakening of the immune system which leads to other disease problems), and much more. BVDV infections are classified into three clinic al syndromes: acute (transient) infection, fetal infection, and persistent infection. Acute infections Acute (transient) infections can result in fever, depression, diarrhea, respiratory disease, reproductive problems, and much more depending on the age and immune status of the animal infected, as well as the strain of BVDV involved. Some animals will show no outward signs of illness (subclinical disease), but the immunosuppressive effect s of the virus weakens the immune system leaving them susceptible to other diseases. Most animals recover from acute infections, but some animals will die.

Fetal infections Acute BVDV infections can occur in a beef cow or heifer, but often with no outward signs of illness (subclinical). However, if she is pregnant her fetus can become infected with a variety of consequences. Fetal infections can occur anytime a fetus is exposed to BVDV, but the result varies depending on the strain of virus and the stage of gestation (pregnancy). Abortions can occur throughout gestation, but birth defects and persistent infections occur during specific time- frames: 1. Infection during the breeding season could result in infertility or early embryonic death. 2. Infection during the first half of gestation could result in abortions or the birth of persistently infected calves. 3. Infection during the second half of gestation could result in abortions, birth defects, still births, or weak calves. Persistent infections Persistently infected (PI) calves are created when a fetus is exposed to BVDV during the first half of gestation (40 – 120 days). During this time the fetal immune system is not developed enough to respond to a BVDV infection. The fetus might be aborted, but if the fetus survives it will likely develop into a PI calf. Some PI calves are “poor-doers”, while others may look healthy and grow very well, making it impossible to consistently detect PI animal s visually. Most PI animals die by two years of age, but some will survive for several years and constantly shed BVDV throughout their life. The prevalence of PI animals is relatively low (0.4 to 2 %), but their ability to shed virus to other animals is tremendous. Transmission BVDV does not usually survive in the environment very long (les s than 3 week s), so direct contact between animals is the most common route of transmission. Acutely infected animals are a temporary source of BVDV transmission, but PI animals shed millions of viral particles every day. PI animals therefore serve as a constant source of BVDV exposure in a herd because they continuously shed virus in saliva, mucous, tears, milk, feces, urine, and any other bodily secretion. Identification of PI animals and removal from the herd is key in control of transmission. BVDV control Control of BVDV currently involves a combination of biosecurity, diagnostic surveillance, and vaccination. Specific BVDV diagnostic testing protocols will differ from one operation to the next depending on herd goals, herd health history, BVDV exposure risk factors, etc. To help create an effective BVDV surveillance program, the next Animal Health column will focus on specific BVDV testing recommendations, including the different types of diagnostic tests available as well as which animals need to be tested. Consult with your veterinarian to determine the best BVDV testing strategy for your herd.


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http://www.whenwewordsearch.com/word_search/agriculture/5906/word_search.jsp


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My Beef Checkoff Farm Facts YTH: Antibiotics are overused in cattle, which results in drugs in my beef and resistant bacteria that reduces the safety of beef for human consumption.

FACTS: FALSE. In fact, antibiotics actually have helped IMPROVE beef safety, as cattle farmers and ranchers use them in cooperation with veterinarians to prevent, control and treat disease to maintain the safest beef supply possible. It’s just like proper use of antibiotics in you and your children, when bacterial infections are present. And there is no evidence that restricting or eliminating use of antimicrobials in cattle would improve human health or reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance in humans. THE BOTTOM LINE: Antibiotics and the growth hormones that have been used safely in cattle since the 1950s have shown to POSE NO RISK to animals or humans. Factory farming? How about this FACT about FARMING instead: More than 97% of U.S. beef cattle farms and ranches are family farms. Really. It's about good people working hard 365 days a year -- no furloughs or holidays off for cattlemen producers, that's for sure! -- to provide a safe, delicious and nutritious food supply for America and beyond! Did you know... ... that the average American farmer FEEDS ABOUT 155 people, compared to 19 people in 1940? ... And that experts estimate that global food production will need to increase 70% by 2050 to feed the burgeoning population? MYTH: "Participating in so-called "Meatless Mondays" is a simple step I can take to improve my own health and the health of our planet." FACTS: NOT TRUE. Meat - and beef in particular - is good for you AND good for the planet.

Word Search Answer/Hints

The words below are listed with their starting row and column ACTUATING 1:2 AERATION 2:19 AGRICULTURE 7:13 AGRISCIENCE 20:18 AUCTIONEER 7:13 BALANCE 10:22 BARROW 12:21 BLADE 5:10 BRACTS 6:12 CALYX 10:3 CARCINOGEN 14:22 CHLOROFLUROCARBONS 4:21 COACH HORSE 18:5 COMB 11:6 CONTAMINATE 12:12 COROLLA 22:16 COW 4:6

DONKEY 19:9 DUCKLING 19:9 ENDOSPERM 19:20 ENTOMOLOGY 21:2 ENTREPRENEUR 22:4 EROSION 9:12 EVAPORATION 8:21 EWE 3:19 FILAMENT 1:8 FLOCK 19:15 FOAL 6:1 FOREST LAND 17:1 FUNGICIDE 1:4 GENES 14:18 GINNING 18:19 GRADIENT 12:16 HEIFER 6:15

HEREDITY 21:21 INERT 16:3 IONS 13:8 LARVAE 1:5 LITTER 5:4 MALTOSE 22:14 MEIOSIS 3:20 NEMATODE 1:12 NOMENCLATURE 16:11 OZONE 9:4 PERLITE 21:7 PIG 9:19 PREDATION 9:3 PROPAGATED 12:22 RICKETS 11:11 ROOT CROP 15:3


By: Sherry Bunting

Kids and cattle caught in the crossfire Kids and cattle are caught in the crossfire of nutrition politics, and it may get worse. Two weeks ago we talked about the changes over the years in the federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans and their direct influence on the National School Lunch Program. This week we look at how the simple act of providing a nutritious school lunch could become even more complicated. What I have gleaned from reader comments is a high level of frustration about the current status of the National School Lunch Program limiting the caloric intake and food choices of growing children. Now, the next twist in the nutrition-noodle may not even be nutrition-based. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the deciding agency for new “Dietary Guidelines for Americans” expected to be released soon. The HHS Secretaries are deliberating the recent report from their Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, which held meetings for months. When the new Guidelines are officially published in the Federal Register, a second round of comments will open. I’ll let you know when and how to comment when the time comes. For now, let’s look at a few concerns with the committee’s preliminary report. It is worth noting that back when we had a Food Pyramid, physical exercise was visually highlighted, where today it is notably absent from the MyPlate diagram. More troubling this time around, is the fact that the committee is not just focusing on new information about healthful eating, they have incorporated so -called “sustainability” factors or environmental impacts of various foods — namely lean meats. This opens a whole can of worms that — quite frankly — have nothing to do with nutrition! Furthermore, some of the science the committee used to come up with the idea of eliminating lean meat from its so-called “healthy eating pattern” is quite controversial and involves a United Nations study that has since been refuted. That study had suggested meat production contributes more to climate change than transportation. Never mind that scientists have come forward in droves with counter-studies showing the greatly reduced carbon footprint of agriculture, particularly animal agriculture. And never mind that the United Nations study did not look at the whole lifecycle of beef and dairy cattle when doing its calculations on environmental impacts. Meanwhile, in New York City, there is a movement to declare Meatless Monday, and it has been proposed to the City Council, even though a vote has not yet been set. While the City Council downstate and the dietary gurus in Washington debate the merits of meat, let’s look at this term “sustainability” and what dairy and livestock producers actually care about and accomplish for their land, animals — and us! Regarding potential replacement of a “healthy eating pattern” in favor of a “sustainable eating pattern,” there are several concerns. 1. If lean meat is not considered a component in a healthy eating pattern, students will increasingly see this nutrient dense protein source removed from their diets and replaced with foods that are less nutrient dense. 2. Since these guidelines affect the most nutritionally at-risk children through their effects on the school lunch program, WIC and food stamps, the impact of the dietary guidelines would fall mostly on those children who are already on the hunger-side of the nutrition equation. 3. How can the committee recommend a “sustainable dietary pattern” when mothers, doctors, scientists, and all manner of experts can’t even agree on what “sustainable” actually means. Let’s stick to nutrition. Defining that is a tall-enough order. Scientist, cancer survivor and new mom Dr. Jude Capper covers this topic best. She points out that, “With the world population officially hitting 7 billion people earlier this year and projected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050, farmers and ranchers must continue to find ways to sustainably feed a growing world population using fewer natural resources.” She notes the many improvements to the way cattle are raised and fed in the United States between 1977 and 2007 that have yielded 13 percent more total beef from 30 percent fewer animals. More beef from fewer animals maximizes resources like land and water while providing essential nutrients for the human diet. U.S. cattlemen raise 20 percent of the world’s beef with 7 percent of the world’s cattle. Capper’s research in the Journal of Animal Science shows that beef’s environmental footprint is shrinking. Each pound of beef raised in 2007 (compared to 1977) used 19 percent less feed; 33 percent less land; 12 percent less water; and 9 percent less fossil fuel energy. Significant gains have been made in the seven years since the data was collected for this report. What is discouraging to cattle producers — be they beef or dairy — is the lack of understanding for how cattle are raised and fed.


They utilize feedstuffs we humans cannot digest and turn that into meat and milk, which are nutrient-dense sources of proteins, minerals and vitamins. Some of their lifecycle is spent on grass or eating a mostly grass / hay diet and some of their lifecycle is spent eating a more concentrated diet at certain stages. Feedlot beef cattle start out as calves on grass. Even in the feedlot, today’s rations — especially in the east and near food processing centers — utilize bakery waste, over cooked potato chips, wilted produce and the like that would otherwise end up in a landfill. Incorporated into cattle diets along with traditional feedstuffs, these foods provide protein and energy for the animals without sole reliance on corn. In addition, when corn is fed, the whole plant is used. Farmers are thrifty. They don’t like to waste a thing. They understand the balance of working with nature because it is not just the vocation, but also the very life they have chosen working with their animals and the land. I can’t think of any other reason why someone would work this hard and put their entire livelihood and all of their capital at risk to the swings of the marketplace other than they are passionate about producing food and using science and ingenuity to work with Mother Nature in preserving a sustainable balance for all of God’s creatures — the 2 -legged and the 4-legged. Look for part three in this series when the official new guidelines are posted in the Federal Register for public comment. This article first appeared on February 8, 2015 in the Columbia-Green Media Register-Star, where Sherry Bunting writes a biweekly column called "Growing the Land." She has been covering agriculture for various dairy and beef trade publications over 30 years, is a member of the North American Agriculture Journalists, and can be contacted at agrite@ptd.net.

Honoring the life of Charles was born on February 21, 1925 and passed away on Monday, January 5, 2015. Charles is the father of NYAA Member Steve Packard, of Masontown, PA; and the grandfather of NYAA Member Tommy Packard or Macedon, NY. Charles was a resident of Macedon, New York. Charlie was a dairyman through and through, but enjoyed talking Angus cattle and watching his family raise Angus. He always appreciated Angus breeders approaching him at the Finger Lakes auctions and ag events as well as stopping by the farm to talk. He will be missed dearly.


2015 Spring Bull and Female Sale Saturday •

APRIL 25, 2015 • 5 p.m. • Ewing, VA sire: BC Emblazon 854E 8023 dam: Coleman Donna 386 BW I+2.0; WW I+53; YW I+92; MILK I+29 CW I+11; MARB I+.10; RE I+.60; FAT I+.023 $W +54.51; $F +42.01; $G +18.73; $B +44.79

Angus Alliance Donna 975

Headlining the foundation Lawson Donna family, a heifer pregnancy and a daughter of Donna 975 sired by the Lawson sire, Boyd Cartwright 3303 and Ace Cross Point 278. Donna 975, the dam of these sale features is a direct daughter of the longtime anchor of the Angus Alliance International program, Donna 386, the dam of the $290,000 valued Coleman and ZWT Ranch donor, Donna 714. A special highlight from the Donna family, the top family ever developed in the Coleman Angus program.

sire: Ace Cross Point 278 dam: Angus Alliance Donna 975 sire: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 dam: Sitz Henrietta Pride 643T BW +5.3; WW +50; YW +97; MILK +33 CW +59; MARB +.41; RE +1.20; FAT +.016 $W +33.92; $F +47.86; $G +32.27; $B +120.57

EXAR Henrietta Pride 2881

Selling a flush to the bull of the buyers choice from the cornerstone Henrietta Pride in the Lawson program, Henrietta Pride 2881, the daughter of the $380,000 valued full sister to the growth and CW leader, Upward 307R by the REA sire, Complete 1P55. Henrietta Pride 3881 was selected to anchor the herd sire producing Henrietta Pride family and her maternal brothers include the 2014 Express Ranches top-sellers of their spring bull sale, Resistol 3710B and Stetson 3704B. Offering a unique opportunity to select the mating on one of the greatest females to ever work in the Lawson donor arsenal.

SALE 131 Robin Ct. MANAGED Howell, MI 48855 BY: 517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

http://www.LiveAuctions.tv

Chris and Amanda Lawson Office: 276-445-5411 1691 Chadwell Station RD Cell: 423-526-8576 Ewing, VA 24248 Fax: 276-445-5348 Email: lawsonfamilyfarms@hotmail.com

WWW.LAWSONFAMILYFARMS.COM

Rock Solid Genetics


IT’S BREEDING SEASON Who will you use?

Sarkaria Farms Registered Angus Seedstock, Proven Genetics

Bobcat Black Diamond A75 Calved 03/22/13 • AAA 17568869 Connealy Consensus 7229 [AMF-CAF-XF] Connealy Black Granite # Eura Elga of Conanga 9109

Connealy Consensus [DDF] Blue Lilly of Conanga 16 [CAF] #+ S A V Bismarck 5682 [AMF-CAF-XF] Eura Cal of Conanga 56B [AMF-NHF]

# Baldridge Nebraska 901 [AMF-CAF-XF] Bobcat Erica 870 Vermilion Erica 0418

# S A F Focus of E R [AMF-CAF-XF] Baldridge Flossie 367 #+ Leachman Right Time [D2F-M1F] R A Emblems Erica 245

The most talked about bull in the yards of the National Western Stock Show in 2014. He returned to be on display in 2015 and had a big following with many inquiries. A unique pedigree and great EPD profile. His full sister recently sold for $18,500. CED +10

BW +1.2

WW +59

YW +108

Doc +29

MILK +29

MARB +.49

RE +.68

$W +57.59

$F +63.51

$G +35.01

$B +98.83

487 Whaupaunaucau Rd Norwich, NY 13815

Sarkaria Family 607-336-1681 • angus@sarkariafarms.com

www.SarkariaFarms.com


WHEN IT COMES TO DEWORMING, SPEED MATTERS.

A herd that isn’t protected with TrichGuard® is no better off.

Cydectin® Injectable

Ivomec®

Dectomax® In the cattle business, time is money. You don’t want to waste it waiting for your dewormer to take action. So choose Cydectin® Injectable. It reaches peak blood levels in just 27 hours compared to 96 hours for Ivomec® and 144 hours for Time to Peak Plasma Concentrations 1,2 27HOURS ! CYDECTIN INJECTABLE Dectomax®. Get CYDECTIN Injectable and get your cattle back to work. Visit 96 HOURS ! IVOMEC INJECTION bi-vetmedica.com/CydectinInjectable 144 HOURS ! DECTOMAX INJECTABLE to learn more. 1,2

®

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PREVENTION WORKS.

Safety Information: Do not treat cattle within 21 days of slaughter. Do not use in female dairy cattle of breeding age, veal calves or calves less than 8 weeks of age. 1 Data on file, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. 2 Lanusse C, Lifschitz A, Virkel G, et al. Comparative plasma disposition kinetics of ivermectin, moxidectin and doramectin in cattle. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 1997;20(2):91–99. Cydectin is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Ivomec is a registered trademark of Merial Limited. Dectomax is a registered trademark of Zoetis. ©2014 Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. BIVI 3841-10


Joint Production Sale Date

September 26, 2015 (Always 4th Saturday in September)

New Location!

Time

Tullyfergus Angus 8974 Lyons Marengo Rd. Lyons, NY 14489

1:00 PM

Sale Participants Tullyfergus Angus, Lyons • 315-573-2569 Fleur de Lis Farms, Seneca Falls • 315-549-8407 McCracken Vu Angus, Piffard • 585-746-3002 Kelley's Stock Farm, Camden • 315-225-0827 Walbridge Farms, Millbrook • 845-235-3789 Gibson Family Farms, Valley Falls • 518-369-5895

Registered Angus top quality heifer calves & bred heifers from the heart of our herds, productive brood cows, Commercial Angus based feeder steers and replacement quality heifer calves.

For more Information: Robert Groom 315-573-2569 robert@angus.us


Dr. Temple Grandin receives prestigious Farm Bureau award by Sally  Colby At  the  American  Farm  Bureau’s  96th  Annual  Conven on,  Dr.  Temple  Grandin  was   presented  with  the  Dis nguished  Service  Award.  Grandin,  professor  of  animal  sci-­‐ ence  at  Colorado  State  University,  addressed  some  of  today’s  most  pressing  issues  in   animal  ag.  She  believes  that  one  of  the  most  important  things  that  ag  needs  to  do  is   have  farmers  directly  communica ng  with  people. Grandin  finds  it  frustra ng  that  a  lot  of  young  people  don’t  know  about  the  good   things  that  have  been  done  in  agriculture.  She  cited  a  Purdue  study  that  revealed   that  31  percent  of  young  people  have  never  been  on  a  farm,  and  50  percent  of   people  in  the  UK  couldn’t  connect  pigs  with  bacon.  She  talked  about  her  visit  to  The   Pig  Adventure  at  Fair  Oaks  Farm  —  a  modern,  open-­‐door  pig  farm  where  visitors  can   see  every  aspect  of  produc on.  Grandin  asked  employees  at  Fair  Oaks  what  kinds  of   strange  ques ons  they’ve  go en  from  visitors  viewing  the  pigs.  The  ques on  Gran-­‐ din  couldn’t  believe  people  asked  was  “are  those  actually  pigs?” din   Despite  the  posi ve  changes  in  ag,  there  are  s ll  prac ces  that  should  be  changed.   “There  are  some  people  in  the  ag  industry  who  aren’t  happy  with  me  because  I   won’t  defend  everything  that  ag  does,”  said  Grandin.  “What  we  have  to  do  is  com-­‐ municate  with  the  public.”  She  took  out  her  iPhone  for  emphasis  as  she  reminded   people  that  “everyone  has  one  of  these”  and  farmers  cannot  get  away  from  video   cameras. One  of  Grandin’s  biggest  concerns  in  animal  ag  is  biological  system  overload.  “We’re   pushing  a  dairy  cow  to  the  point  where  she’s  having  a  lot  of  problems,”  she  said.   “Lameness  has  go en  worse.  Some  of  the  problems  I’m  seeing  at  the  packing  plant  have  to  be  fixed  at  the  farm.  There  are  dairies  that  do  an  ex-­‐ tremely  good  job  and  keep  lameness  down  to  around  five  percent,  which  is  where  it  should  be.”  Grandin  noted  that  management  of  freestalls  is   an  important  aspect  of  good  welfare.  On  farms  where  bedding  is  worked  several  a  week,  there  are  significantly  fewer  swollen  hocks.  “But  there   are  gene c  issues  too,”  she  noted.  “The  fat  pads  on  dairy  cows’  feet  have  go en  less  and  less.” One  issue  that’s  on  the  public  radar  is  sows  in  gesta on  and/or  farrowing  crates.  “The  science  on  sow  stalls  shows  that  sows  produce  just  fine  in   those  stalls,”  said  Grandin,  “but  you  aren’t  going  to  sell  it  to  consumers.  It’s  that  simple.”  Grandin  noted  some  gene c  lines  simply  cannot  live  to-­‐ gether,  and  talked  about  the  gene c  changes  that  will  have  to  occur  in  order  for  sows  to  live  in  group  housing. Grandin  talked  about  how  pig  fa gue  and  how  pigs  behave  when  they’re  moved  out  for  shipping  “One  of  the  things  that  contributes  to  fa gued   pigs  is  a  simple  thing  to  fix,”  she  said.  “Get  people  to  walk  through  the  pigs  at  the  farm  and  train  the  pigs  to  quietly  get  up  and  move  away.  If   nobody  has  moved  the  pigs  before  the  day  they’re  loaded  out,  they’re  going  to  go  berserk,  piling  up  and  squealing.  The  pigs  view  the  man  in  the   pen  and  the  man  in  the  alley  as  two  different  things.” In  the  beef  industry,  Grandin  says  she’s  seen  some  posi ve  changes.  “Handling  has  improved,  and  that’s  a  bright  spot.  There  are  a  lot  of  people   In  the  be working  on  low-­‐stress  handling,  and  beef  quality  assurance  puts  a  lot  of  emphasis  on  it.”  However,  Grandin  says  she’s  seeing  leg  conforma on   issues  in  ca le  at  the  slaughter  plant.    “EPDs  and  genomics  are  really  good  things  but  you  have  to  be  careful  with  those  power  tools,”  she  said.  “There’s  s ll  a  need  for  visual  appraisal    “EPDs  and   of  ca le.  If  a  bull  is  going  to  go  out  and  work,  he  can’t  be  post-­‐legged  or  splay-­‐footed.”  One  of  Grandin’s  students  looked  at  bull  summaries  from   four  major  semen  companies  and  found  that  in  many  of  the  photos,  the  feet  were  not  completely  visible  or  legs  were  obviously  photoshopped  —   what  conforma on  faults  are  being  hidden? Farmers  and  ranchers  can’t  get  away  from  public  scru ny,  whether  it’s  via  video  cameras,  the  evening  news  or  false  informa on  being  spread   online. “Consumers  don’t  like  surprises,”  said  Grandin.  “Look  at  the  pink  slime  debacle.  If  it  had  been  labeled,  it  probably  wouldn’t  have  been  such  a   “Consume problem.”  Grandin  looked  into  the  controversy  surrounding  finely  textured  meat  and  found  that  elimina ng  it  from  the  food  chain  would  be  the   equivalent  of  taking  an  en re  truckload  of  ca le  from  a  large  packing  plant  and  disposing  of  them  at  a  dump.  “You’d  be  was ng  that  much  beef   protein,  and  that’s  sinful.” Grandin  talked  about  the  recent  incident  of  alleged  abuse  at  a  Petaluma,  CA  poultry  farm  that  supplies  eggs  to  Whole  Foods.  An  animal  ac vist   group  gained  access  to  the  cage-­‐free  farm  and  shot  video  of  sick  birds.  “They  (the  ac vists)  had  been  on  the  farm  10   mes,”  said  Grandin  as  she   discussed  the  video.  “There  were  no  wide-­‐angle  shots,  no  way  to  judge  whether  the  farm  was  good  or  bad.”  Grandin  contacted  Whole  Foods  and   suggested  they  hold  an  open  house  at  the  farm  to  help  dispel  rumors  about  abuse.  “I  think  we  have  to  look  at  everything  we  do  and  ask  ‘how   would  this  play  on  YouTube?’” So  where  should  animal  ag  put  its  efforts?  Grandin  says  consumers  have  three  main  concerns:  they  don’t  like  animals  in   ny  boxes,  they  don’t  like   So  whe it  when  bits  and  pieces  are  cut  from  animals  without  pain  relief,  and  they  want  animals  to  be  killed  nicely.   “Ag  has  to  open  up  the  door  and  show  what  we’re  doing,”  said  Grandin.  “We  have  a  genera on  of  young  people  today  who  have  no  idea  what’s   going  on.”


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New York Junior Beef Producer’s: Hard Work Leads to Success

The New York Junior Beef Producer’s Association (NYJBPA) should have a great year in 2015! From semen sales, scholarship auctions, shows, and other educational events, they have many learning experiences. In January, the Juniors held their most successful semen sale yet, helping many breeders within the state and the mid-atlantic area get unique and popular semen for their breeding season inventories. This year the sale was managed by NYJBPA member, Jayne Bannister of Kent, NY. “It was a great lineup, from so many gracious donors”, said Jayne. The bidder of the top semen Lot was Stoffel’s Glenview Farm, of Glenmont, NY. “What a great opportunity for the Juniors to be involved in the marketing aspects of agriculture and see what it takes to merchandise their products,” said Mike Shanahan, CoAdvisor for the NYJBPA. The sale grossed $9100, and those proceeds go towards the NYJBPA events. Their meeting at the New York Beef Producer’s Conference was very well attended by statewide Juniors. Many families are involved in this group, and that number keeps growing. The kids are looking forward to keeping track of all events that they participate in this year, which count toward the NYJBPA Achievement Program. This helps them want to be involved, keep good records, and they are recognized in front of the NYBPA each January. Gearing up for spring shows and volunteer events, the group remains one of the largest and most active youth groups of its kind, in the northeast. Keep watching for information on the Juniors on their website, www.nyjuniorbeef.org

Submitted by: Cattle Promotions LLC


by Baxter Black, DVM This is one of those stories that sound so unbelievable that you’ll know I didn’t make it up! Mike studied the bloodlines. He checked performance records. He knew his herd like the top two layers of his tool box! He was a good young cattleman. When he decided on the course of action to improve his herd’s genetics he called the breed association rep. They discussed his needs. Plans were made for the fieldman to attend a bull sale in Texas with the express instructions to buy exactly the right bull. The call from Texas delighted Mike. The fieldman had bought the perfect yearlin’ bull that would carry Mike’s cows into the 21st century for $10,000...half interest. He agreed that the co-owner, a purebred breeder from Oklahoma, could use the bull that fall. Then he would ship him to Pine Ridge country of northwestern Nebraska in time for Mike’s spring breeding. In February arrangements were made to put the bull on the back of a load going as far as Sterling, Colorado. The trucker would call Mike on arrival. Mike waited anxiously. Several days passed and nobody called. He called his partner only to find they’d left Oklahoma territory a week before! Feeling uneasy, Mike called the Sterling sale barn. “No? No,” they didn’t remember any bull. “Let us check.” They suggested possibly the bull Mike was lookin’ for had been bought by a trader! “What’d he pay?” asked Mike. “Fifty-six cents a pound.” In a panic he tracked down the trader. He’d run the bull through the Brush sale. The trader said he broke even. Packerland had bought him as a baloney bull! Mike drove all night to Packerland in a desperate effort to save his bull! “No,” they said, “he was too thin to kill so they’d sent him to a feedlot in Rocky Ford! Mike smelled like burnin’ rubber and was chewin’ the upholstery when he boiled into the feedlot in a cloud of dust! The foreman was surprised but led him over to the receiving pens. There stood Mike’s future; road weary, coughin’ and covered with sale barn tags! Mike’s knees were shakin’! “Nice bull,” said the foreman, “But ya cut’er close, sonny. Tomorrow evenin’ he’da looked a lot different without his horns and cajones!” www.baxterblack.com


Cattleman Honor  the  life  of  Paul  Saenger:

A Wish  for  St.  Jude’s  Children’s  Hospital Paul  Saenger  and  his  wife  Rene  owned  and  operated  Cream  Hill  Farm  in  Shoreham,  Vermont.    Purchased  in   1988  at  755  acres,  Cream  Hill  grew  to  more  than  1600  acres.    Their  specialty  was  selling  quality  finished  beef   to  the  white  tablecloth  restaurant  market. Known  for  his  educational  internet  postings,  willingness  to  always  help  the  youth  and  agricultural  newcomers,   Paul  always  had  time  for  everyone.    To  convey  his  passion  about  agriculture  and  to  educate  the  public,  Paul   was  part  of  an  audio  interview  with  Middlebury  College  which  captured  advice  and  stories  from  his  experienc-­ es.    Paul  once  wrote  to  then  Governor-­elect  Jim  Douglas,  “Vermont  is  a  unique  place  in  that  our  society  has   said  open  space  and  agriculture  is  so  important  to  us  that  we  are  willing  to  put  our  money  on  the  line  to   achieve  those  qualities…the  financial  benefits  derived  from  the  growth  of  our  farm  have  greatly  exceeded  any   land  appreciation  that  would  have  occurred  otherwise.” Paul  made  sure  that  the  cattle  he  purchased  were  of  utmost  quality,  by  genetically  superior  sires,  and  precon-­ ditioned.    He  always  used  his  patience  when  buying,  ensuring  the  best  animals  came  to  his  farm.    His  trust  in   Finger  Lakes  Livestock  Exchange  and  what  cattle  came  through  their  sales  made  them  the  primary  market-­ place  for  his  purchases.    It’s  safe  to  say  that  Paul  was  such  a  loyal  person,  friend,  and  advisor  to  many  of  us. On  December  6,  the  Trowbridge  Customer  Preconditioned  Feeder  Calf  Sale  was  held  in  conjunction  with  the   regular  Finger  Lakes  Feeder  Calf  Sale.    A  total  of  1266  head  of  feeder  cattle  sold  that  day,  in  Canandaigua.     In  honor  of  Paul’s  dedication  to  quality  and  to  the  good  of  agriculture,  a  collection  was  taken  in  his  name  to   benefit  St.  Jude’s  Children’s  Hospital  of  Memphis,  Tennessee. The  Parker  family  of  Finger  Lakes  Livestock, The  Parker  family  of  Finger  Lakes  Livestock,  Trowbridge  family  of  Trowbridge  Farms,  and  the  Shanahan   family,  together  donated  $1  for  every  feeder  calf  sold.    With  that  donation,  there  was  also  a  bucket  passed   around  the  crowd  for  donations.    Additionally,  two  buyers  at  the  sale  -­  Mike  Rodgers  and  Gary  Burly,  donated   $1  for  every  animal  they  purchased  that  day.    There  were  many  regulars  at  Finger  Lakes  that  donated  $100   or  more,  with  too  many  names  to  keep  track  of.    At  the  end  of  the  day,  nearly  $4500  was  collected  for  St.   Jude’s  under  the  memory  of  our  dear  friend  Paul.    His  memory  and  friendship  will  live  on  forever.


NEW YORK BEEF PRODUCERS’ ASSOCIATION 290 FOUR ROD ROAD, ALDEN, NEW YORK 14004 716-902-4305 716-870-2777 Email: nybeefproducers@aol.com website: www.nybpa.org UPCOMING EVENTS March 7th- NYBPA Council Meeting, Double Tree Hotel, Syracuse, NY 10:00AM March 12th - Western Region Annual Meeting, Red Osier, Stafford, NY 6:00PM March 28th-Eastern Region Annual Meeting, Orange Co. CCE, Middletown, NY 10:30AM April 24- All Breed Sale, Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, Canandaigua, NY 6:30 PM Check out our web site www.nybpa.org for additions.

New York Beef Producer’s Association Annual 2014 Awards and Junior Beef Producer Awards

After our conference sessions, which were extremely well presented by all of our Speakers on the topics of "Exploring the Stocker/Backgrounding Business" and, "Identifying Loss Opportunities" The NYBPA held their Annual Awards Banquet on Saturday evening, January 17th, at the Double Tree Hotel, East Syracuse. Newly elected President Randy Librock and Vice President John Kriese welcomed all members and guests. Our 2014 Awards were presented to: President’s Award- New York Beef Council-Westmoreland, NY, for their countless events to Promote Beef in New York. Friend of the Industry Award- Scott Grigor, who runs New York Farm Show and his continued support of the NYBPA. Beef Promoter of the Year- Jake Martin and Family- Tamberlane Farm, Canandaigua, NY. Cattlemen of the Year- Phil Keppler, Medina, NY. Educator of the Year- Jeanetta Laudermilk, Penn Yan, NY. Special Service Award- Scott Kelley- Kelley’s Agway, Cobleskill, NY. Extension Educator- Dr. Jerry Bertoldo, Attica, NY. Volunteer Recognition- Kathi Wagner, Catskill, NY. BQA Award- Lynn Bliven, Franklinville, NY, Value Discovery Award- New York Angus Association, Nicole Tommell, to accept for her continued work on the Supreme Reception at NY State Fair after our Supreme Female Show. The Junior Beef Producers, who are the next generation of Beef Producer’s were presented awards from their Advisors, Kathy Librock and Mike Shanahan. The 2014 Junior Scholarship Award- Jake Ledoux, Croghan, NY The Youth Award was presented to Megan Andersen, Long Eddy, NY. Juniors receiving awards for their Achievement Points for the 2014 year: GOLDAnna King, Katie Hopkins, Katharine Wesche, Jala Murphy, Megan Andersen, Katie Kriese, Sara Fessner, Jayne Bannister SILVERChase Gerhardt, Patrick Coombe, Matthew Kelley, Evie Groom, Nathan Hay, Brianna Bentley, Aubrey Gerhardt, Witt Bates, Brian Bentley, Dalton Gerhardt, Troy Brayman, Anthony Adams, Olivia Adams, Kelsey Librock, Courtney Charlesworth, Emily Cranwell, Amanda Cranwell, Megan Cranwell, Haley Cranwell, James Hicks, Kris Hicks, Sam Birdsall BRONZE- Morgan Wagner, Tucker Giles, Paige Schrems, Gunner Giles, Luke Brayman, Makayla Youngman, Rebecca Coombe, Rylee Phillips, Chris Dermody, Carlee Thompsom, Brooke Gerhardt, Mackenzie Brayman HONORABLE MENTION- Schyler Phillips *****************************************************************************************

Join the New York Beef Producers Today For only $30.00 a Year! Membership Applications available for download on our web site www.nybpa.org


SPRING IS COMING - TIME TO PLAN A VACATION. Robin Tassinari, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Medicine, Albany Medical College

S

o the holidays are over and we have been facing a bit of a cold, snowy winter. As is well known, the effects of our northern latitude on mood and the occurrence at times of Seasonal Affective Disorder or ‘winter blues’ thought to be from diminished sunshine, can be a bit of a downer. Studies show that bright light therapy is helpful, but there might be an even better ‘treatment’ for this condition and for our mental health in general. A Spring Vacation! You see, its fairly well known that, while the importance of vacations to our physical and emotional well being is very well known, most of us do not take advantage of our allotted days to ‘rest.’ In a story from Marketplace, most of us left about 9 days of vacation days unused in 2012, despite the fact that 87 % of us would LIKE to vacation more if we could. It seems most Americans fear repercussions from management or fear the boss will think that they’re lazy. But in actuality (according to a Forbes Magazine article last July) “the cost of stress-related health care is estimated at $344 billion per year”, and thus, both management and labor would benefit from some ‘time off.’ At USAA, a major insurance company, Jeff Weiss, senior VP of benefits, said, ‘we think time off is actually critical to productivity. When people take their time off to refresh and renew, we believe they service the members more effectively.’ And its very true that the stress of everyday living, whether at home or at work, finances, deadlines, you name it, can affect one’s health in so many ways. Studies show that resistance to infection can be altered, and mood and anxiety issues may arise, as well as changes in memory and even the increased risk of having accidents. In a May 2013 article in Psychology Today, Dr. Cynthia Thaik spoke of the preventive and rejuvenative aspects of vacations. She cited the well-known Framingham Heart Study that began in 1948 and followed adults at risk of heart disease. Interestingly over a 9-year period, they found a close correlation between the frequency of vacations and longevity. And she reported that ‘men who skipped vacation for several years were 30 percent more likely to suffer heart attacks than those who took a vacation at least one week a year. Based on these findings, the study reported that skipping even one year’s vacation time can be associated with increased risk of heart disease. ‘ Choice of time or place for vacations varies, but certainly the winter and early spring is a great time to get away or if not feasible, to start now to plan for a vacation in the summer; the planning alone can be a bit therapeutic (and of course necessary for a successful vacation). Susan Whitbourne, PhD, also in Psychology Today, recently said that ‘vacations have the potential to break into the stress cycle. We emerge from a successful vacation feeling ready to take on the world again. We gain perspective on our problems, get to relax with our families and friends, and get a break from our usual routines.’ She suggests several things when in the vacation planning stage. She feels that many folks feel guilty when they go on a vacation. Wrong! The very reason we vacation is to leave things like guilt behind. And that includes feeling guilty if you occasionally check your email while on vacation…. as many of us know, its lousy to come home to a bunch of messages and its OK to make sure, for a limited time of the day while away, that all’s fine at home or even at work. She also suggests vacationers plan the trip in such a way that it's a true adventure. In that regard, I found it interesting to read about developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik’s research at University of California at Berkeley. She studies the differences between babies’ brains and adult brains. She feels that adults learn as they get older to focus on one thing while babies and youngsters become ‘captivated by multiple stimuli, spreading their attention all over the place.’ To gain that wonderful openness children have, we should all try to put ourselves in positions that are very new: "All adults have the potential to continue to experience the world in some of the ways that children do," Gopnik told Charlie Rose in a recent interview. "I think a nice example is like when we go to a foreign city. When we go to Beijing for the first time, and suddenly we're all like babies. We're in a world that's new and rich and everything around us is unexpected...we go to the new place, we have to learn something new and suddenly we experience everything in a new way." She feels that those completely new stimuli can tap into one’s creativity, help folks to relax and have fun like a child who is curious, and therefore help the vacationer ‘sort through the challenges at work or in life.’ Now I’m not suggesting we all go to China, or even out of the country or state. Vacations can be close to home, or even ‘staycations’ a word coined by Judith Fein a travel journalist who refers to folks who enjoy just staying home and turning off the phone and computer for a while, or reading a book you’ve wanted to read for example (maybe ABOUT China). In Life is a Trip, she says the ‘where’ is less important than the ‘how’ and she refers to the ‘how’ as real relaxation: “whatever sings to your soul is the melody of vacation. It doesn’t have to be expensive, luxurious or even exotic. But it has to be the thing most people long for: prolonged down time, where renewal and regeneration can take place.’ So I guess I’m saying that after all the shopping, planning, socializing, and fun of the holidays, albeit a bit stressful, maybe now it’s time to let down, consider some ‘winter fun,’ as the cold and snowy months plod on; consider time away from work, responsibilities, and everyday worries. Plan a vacation! And then, take it.


EQUITY’S ELITE 2015 BULL LINEUP Cattle for the Future, Today!

Equity 72 Exemplar Pioneer Equity 87 Treasure NCC1 x Pioneer 7301 Reg#: AAA 17237941 • DOB: 04/02/2012 Production & Maternal CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk -3 +3.5 +59 +102 +.63 +4 +28 Marb +.52

Carcass & $Values RE Fat $Beef +.65 +.008 +99.47

Stout. Deep. Eye appealing. Will add muscle and feed efficiency. Proven pedigree and proven champion in the showring.

Equity 221 EZ Going Rally Forever Lady 181B x CC&7 Reg#: AAA 17086992 • DOB: 06/13/2011 Owned with Thunder View and TP Farms

Moderate framed. Low birth weight bull. Calves grow with vigor. Will add milk and udder quality to any herd. Curve bender in every sense. Production & Maternal CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk -1 +2.5 +44 +78 +.36 +18 +27

Carcass & $Values Marb RE Fat $Beef +.60 +.45 -.044 +96.16

Equity 343 Northern Star Equity 87 Treasure NCC1 x Northern Improvement 4480 Reg#: AAA 17569176 • DOB: 06/06/2013 Maternal sibling to Exemplar. Bull with a bright future. Will add balance, eye appeal, and hair in a stout, functional package.

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$Beef +94.78


MARCH 3-Mar 3-Mar 5-Mar 5-Mar 6-Mar (N) 7-Mar 7-Mar 7-Mar 10-Mar 12-Mar 14-Mar 14-Mar 14-Mar (N) 15-Mar 16-Mar 16-Mar (N) 17-Mar 17-Mar 18-Mar 19-Mar 20-Mar (N) 21-Mar 21-Mar 21-Mar 21-Mar 21-Mar 22-Mar 22-Mar 23-Mar 23-Mar 23-Mar 24-Mar 25-Mar 26-Mar 26-Mar 27-Mar 27-Mar (N) 28-Mar 28-Mar 28-Mar 28-Mar 29-Mar 29-Mar 30-Mar (N) 30-Mar 31-Mar

DHT Angus Online Embryo Auction, hosted by Angus Live (Ava, MO) Jindra Angus 15th Annual Production Sale, Clarkson, NE, sale at Creighton, NE Boss Premier Cattle Angus Sale, Chappell, NE Pasture View Angus Bull Sale, Dunlap, IL, sale at Valentine Livestock, Valentine, NE Maymont Angus Bull & Female Sale, Rockingham County Fairgrounds, Harrisonburg, VA Buford Ranches 7th Annual Spring Angus Bull Sale, Welch, OK Double R Bar Ranch Angus Bull Sale, Plymouth, IN Wood Angus Farm Production Sale, Willow Spring, NC Nebraska Angus Breeders Online Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Kearney, NE) McCurry Angus Ranch Bull Sale, Burrton, KS Sunnyhill Angus 25th Annual Production Sale, Fairview, IL Tennessee Agribition Angus Sale, Lebanon, TN SF Farms 14th Annual Performance-Tested Angus Bull Sale, Garnett, KS April Valley Farm Performance-Tested Angus Bull & Female Sale, Leavenworth, KS, sale at St. Joseph, MO Lindell Angus Production Sale, Leonardville, KS TLC Vetsch Angus Ranch Sale, Linton, ND Quirk Land and Cattle Sale, Hastings, NE Siebring Angus Online Embryo Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Gilman, IL) Minnesota Angus Breeders' Sale, at Olmsted County Fairgrounds, Rochester, MN DBL/Pinehurst Angus Bull & Female Sale, at Bullodge, Fullerton, NE TL Ranch Angus Sale, Monticello, MO 44th Annual Carolina Angus Breeders Futurity, at Garrison Livestock Sale Arena, Clemson University, Clemson, SC East Tennessee Angus Association 97th Annual Sale, at University of TN, Knoxville, TN Molitor Angus Farm 36th Anniversary Sale, Zenda, KS Musgrave Angus 20th Annual Sale, Griggsville, IL Smith Angus & Hereford Annual Production Sale, Wadley, GA LC Land and Cattle Online Bull Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Noble, OK) York Farms Annual Angus Sale, Palestine, IL Conley Cattle Co. & Penner Ranch Performance Angus Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Sulphur, OK Iron Mountain Performance-Tested Angus Bull Sale, Belle Fourche, SD MM Cattle Company Online Show Heifer Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Bowdon, GA) Double Diamond Angus Online Production Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Chrisman, IL) Wildcat Creek Ranch Online Angus and Red Angus Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Peabody, KS) Glasoe Angus Production Sale, Wildrose, ND, sale at Sitting Bull Livestock Auction, Williston, ND Hurlbut Cattle Co. Angus Bull & Female Sale, held at Glacial Lakes Livestock, Watertown, SD Pennsylvania’s Finest Female Sale Volume XXII, at Livestock Evaluation Center, Furnace, PA Miller’s Prairie View Angus Production Sale, Gridley, IL Kramer Farms Performance-Tested Angus Bull & Female Sale, Farina, IL Sauk Valley Angus Bull Sale, Rock Falls, IL White Farm Angus Production Sale, Lexington, KY Whitestone Pasture Performance-Tested Angus Bull & Female Sale, Aldie, VA Hardy Angus Ranch Cattleman’s Kind Annual Bull & Female Sale, Woodward, OK Leary Brothers Angus Sale, Caledonia, MN Maifeld/O’Neill Angus Bull Sale, Centerville, IA Womack Cattle Enterprises Online Female Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Pembroke, KY) Dameron Angus Online Show Heifer Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Lexington, IL)

APRIL 1-Apr Top Line Farms Online Show Heifer Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Tremont, IL) 2-Apr Springlake Angus & Guests Angus Sale, Creighton, NE 4-Apr Earl MarshallAngus Opportunity 26th Anniversary Sale, at Buckner & Jeffries Angus Farm, Canmer, KY 4-Apr Grassy Valley Performance-Tested Angus Bull & Female Sale, Greeneville, TN 6-Apr (N) Brockmere Farms 21st Annual Angus Bull & Female Sale, Brookfield, MO, sale at New Cambria, MO 7-Apr DHT Angus Online Embryo Auction, hosted by Angus Live (Ava, MO) 7-Apr (N) Joe Hammell’s Freeburg Ridge Angus Performance-Tested Bull Sale, Caledonia, MN 10-Apr Christensen Angus Production Sale, Okarche, OK 11-Apr Blubaugh Angus Ranch Pride of the Pasture Sale, Tonakawa, OK 12-Apr Champion Hill Angus Production Sale, Bidwell, OH Ballot of Belladrum 12-Apr Northern Indiana Angus Breeders Sale, Logansport, IN 13-Apr (N) Platinum Alliance Angus Sale, James E. Ward Agricultural Center, Lebanon, TN 14-Apr Mark Davis Family Online Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Shelbyville, TN) 15-Apr Ponca Creek Cattle Angus Sale, Bonesteel, SD 15-Apr Wilson Cattle Company Online Heifer Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Cloverdale, IN) 16-Apr Katie Colin Farm Online Production Sale, hosted by Angus Live (Cartersville, GA) 18-Apr Genetics Annual Production Sale, hosted by Britt Angus, Hartwell, GA Bandoliermere GVGeorgia 13S 18-Apr (N) Wisconsin Angus Breeders' Futurity Sale, at Jackson County Fairgrounds, Black River Falls, WI 21-Apr (N) Diamond J Angus Sale, Mandan, ND 24-Apr McKean Brothers Performance-Tested Angus Bull & Female Sale, Mercer, PA 25-Apr Wild Wind Angus Sale, Fisherville, VA, sale at Harrisonburg, VA

SAV Final Answer 0035

Blackbird of Corskie 2d

RR Rito 707

Pride Belle Valleymere 18M

Blacklock McHenry 13Y

Clarice of Wye

PS Power Play

Pine Drive Big Sky

Angus L egends Special Edition Set QAS Traveler 23-4

hall of fame aj 3-15.indd 10

N Bar Emulation EXT

N Bar Primrose 2424

Sitz Everelda Entense 1137

The Largest and Most Complete Compilation of Albern Duchess 5 73 Angus Bulls, Cows and History Ever! Leachman Lass 1004 Available For Immediate Shipment! — Order Yours Now!

GAR Scotch Cap 867

Ideal 4465 of 6807 4286

LT Forever Lady 395 GDAR

2/16/15 11:09 AM


Vacinek genetics like these are always available

V A C I N E K

OCC Blackbird 696P- same family as our junior herd sire O C C Zone 770Z

Ideal 4465 of 6807 4286 - our herd features descendants of this historic feed efficiency female

Vacinek Farm

Sinclair Lady 1C8 4465 - dam of our senior herd sire Sinclair Rocket Man 0R105

N Bar Kinochtry Beauty F4439 - features in our herd trace back to this famous N Bar cow

12280 Rte 39 Sardinia, NY 14134 716-982-2788 vacinekfarm@gmail.com Vacinek Family Russel, Darliene, Lauren & Lexi

Stop in anytime!

NY Angus Angles Newsletter March 2015 - online issue  

Official Publication of the NY Angus Association. This newsletter is a service to our members and beyond, about industry news and our assoc...

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