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AngusAngles

August/September 2013 Official Publication New York Angus Association

Come Join Us! www.NY-Angus.com

Angus Angles P.O. Box 338 Ghent, NY 12075

NY - Angus seedstock capitol of the world

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New York Angus Association www.NY-Angus.com President Mike Shanahan P.O. Box 338, Ghent, NY 12075

518-598-8869 mike@cattlepromotions.com Vice-President Doug Giles 538 Rte. 343, Millbrook, NY 12545 845-677-6221 Secretary/Treasurer Robert Groom 8974 Lyons Marengo Rd, Lyons, NY 14489

315-573-2569 Robert@angus.us Past President Mike Kelley 9757 Dutch Rd, Camden, NY 13316 315-225-0827 Directors Eric Brayman Randy Librock Jerry Emerich Roger McCracken Derrick DeBoer Pete Murphy Brett Chedzoy Craig Simmons Nicole Tommell

Upcoming Angus Events NYS Fair

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NYS Fair - BEEF DAY

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National Angus Conference & Tour "VHVTUt"MCBOZ"SFB /:

Annual Female Sale at Trowbridge Farms %VSJOHUIF/BUJPOBM"OHVT5PVS "VHVTUt1.t(IFOU /:

Garret Farms Sale

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Cow Power XLI Angus Sale BU8BMCSJEHF'BSN 4FQUFNCFSt.JMCSPPL /:

Final Call Show Calf Sale at WBB Farms 4FQUFNCFSt"MEFO /:

Angus Angles

year by the NY Angus Association, in an 8.5 x 11 magazine format. It is edited and produced by Mike Shanahan Cattle advertisements will be limited to the majority promotion of Angus genetics Subscription Rate NYAA Members Free Non-Members $15.00 annually Regular Issue Advertising Rates Full Page $115.00 1/2 Page $75.00 1/4 Page $45.00 Business Card $25.00 Contract Rates Available To Place advertising and for news and editorial content contact: Mike Shanahan - 518-598-8869 mike@cattlepromotions.com

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Coby Classic Calf Sale & Fall Festival

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Cornell Replacement Heifer Sale 0DUPCFSt53$FOUFSt%SZEFO /:

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Newsletter Deadlines & Publish Dates: %FBEMJOF 1VCMJTI%BUF


Message from the President A path traveled by many? Over the past year nearly $2.8 million in registered Angus sales in NY

NY has long been known as the “Angus seedstock capitol of the world.” After reading a few of the ‘excerpts of history’ in this issue, it will give you some of the reasons why. So much Angus history throughout the country has started right here in NY and the northeast; multiple world-records have been broken in the Angus business, within NYS. In reviewing the advertisements within this issue, you will come to understand how our current breeders here, are continuing the rapid pace of Angus growth, and NY Angus Association is at the forefront. Bull sales, female sales, and general talk about Angus cattle is at a high. Over the past year, NY Angus breeders have marketed registered Angus cattle, approaching the $2.8 million figure. Our Juniors participate in so many activities. Not only is it fun to visit our county fairs to see these youth compete and learn, but you see them working with each other, helping each other - something that makes any onlooker proud. This spring our Juniors were able to meet with Richard Beaven, who was able to help them understand how to “Tell their story” and how they have so much at their fingertips. The feedback from our Juniors was amazing. They went on to have Team Building workshops later that day at the renowned ‘Wonderworks’. Whether you are a visitor to this part of the country, or if you live here in the northeast, we are certainly glad to be here with you. Search our Membership Directory to see if there are any members near you that you can visit (by visiting www.NY-Angus.com); or just give us a call here at NYAA and we will schedule a visit with one of our team members for you. Take care, Thanks for reading,

Mike

Mike Shanahan President, NYAA 518-598-8869 mike@cattlepromotions.com

www.NY-Angus.com

NY Angus Association, Inc. The objective of this association is to promote in all ways the interests of the Angus cattle breeders of New York State. To increase the number of breeders; to advertise and promote New York as an Angus breeding center; to assist in furnishing outlets by promoting public sales and otherwise for the sales of surplus breeding and feeder stock of members; to seek to improve the general merit and extend the favorable reputation of New York Angus; and to do any and all proper things necessary to advance the prosperity of the breed and its breeders herein. NYAA is run by our board of directors under supervision of our membership. These people dedicate much time to the efforts of Angus promotion. www.NY-Angus.com


PACKARD CATTLE Registered Angus Cattle

PACKARD CATTLE 438 Macedon Center Road Macedon, NY 14502

Steve Packard Consultant 585-738-9404

Famous lines include: Forever Lady 181C, Peg 013, Lucy 178E, Zulu, & more

Tom Packard 585-329-4216

Kevin Quigley Herdsman 585-255-0453 sj.packard@hotmail.com


HEADED TO THE TROWBRIDGE SALE during the National Angus Tour "VHVTU t(IFOU /:

McCracken Vu Farms

Performance Bred Angus Cattle Home of the famous McCracken Missies!

2898 Mt Pleasant Rd

cattle working in 7 states & Canada! Roger & Alice McCracken 585-243-5037

Also offering her 3/4/2013 heifer calf by BC Eagle Eye 110-7


A VIEW FROM THE TRACTOR SEAT THE VIEW THIS MONTH IS NOT FROM A TRACTOR SEAT OR MY PICK UP TRUCK BUT FROM THE READING ROOM OF OUR HOUSE ----- YOU ALL KNOW THE SACRED ROOM. I WOULD LIKE TO PASS THIS ON TO EVERYONE. I GOT A LOT OF MEANING FROM THIS AND I AM SURE MOST OF YOU WILL TOO. INSTEAD OF YOU MIGHT BE A RED NECK IF------IT GOES--- YOU MIGHT BE A BEEF FARMER IF---YOUR BACK YARD ENDS AT A ELECTRIC FENCE YOUR IDEA OF OVERNIGHT DELIVERY IS PULLING A CALF AT 3:00 IN THE MORNING FIXING FENCE IS SECOND NATURE YOU CAN FIX ANYTHING WITH BALER WIRE- WD-40 -DUCT TAPE -- BALER TWINE AND A METRIC VISE GRIPS. MANURE IS A DINNER TOPIC YOU’VE RECEIVED AN AWARD FOR POUNDS OF GAIN [AND YOUR PROUD OF IT] YOUR IDEA OF NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH IS SOME ONE CALLING TO TELL YOU YOUR HEIFERS ARE OUT THE MEDICINE CABINET IN THE HOUSE HAS BAG BALM IN IT TO YOU MASS TRANSIT IS MOVING YOUR COWS TO THE WORKING CHUTE, HOLDING PEN OR PASTURE YOU HAVE THE SAME NUMBER PICTURES OF YOUR COWS AS PICTURES OF YOUR CHILDREN I HOPE YOU ENJOY THIS AS MUCH AS I DID THANKS FOR READING PAUL P.S. GRANDPA ALWAYS SAID ABOUT THE WEATHER DRY WEATHER ALWAYS FOLLOWS WET AND COLD WEATHER ALWAYS FOLLOWS HOT


HEADED TO THE TROWBRIDGE SALE during the National Angus Tour "VHVTU t(IFOU /:

SAV Pioneer 7301 x TA Lucy BFMV 063 x CA Future Direction 5321

A fancy fall yearling replacementsired by the proven low birth and high growth Genex sire SAV Pioneer 7301 from the famous Lucy family. She was the Grand Champion Angus Female at the 2013 Walton Regional Show. Zoetis 50K results will be available by sale day, or at www.AtEaseAcres.com She posted WR-113 and her dam by the $75,000 Trowbridge Crusader 614 traces to the $410,000 Basin Lucy 178E. Also watch for our spring bred SAV 8180 Traveler 004 daughter, At Ease Miss E01, due to Connealy Confidence 0100. Her February heifer calf also sells, by Boyd New Day 8005 At Ease Acres

Farm: 184 Freeman Hill Rd.

ateaseacres@gmail.com

The DeBoer Family

Berne, NY 12023

www.AtEaseAcres.com

Office: 518-872-0460

Mailing: 253 Line Rd.

Follow us

Derrick's Cell: 607-280-8111

Berne, NY 12023

on Facebook!


New York Angus Association Annual Female Sale 2nd Saturday in May

www.NY-ANGUS.com

Angus Hill Farm

VTR

Valley Trail Ranch

+PIO*OLMFZ7.%t $IBSMFT%J.BSJB .BOBHFSt randolphvetclinic@gmail.com

w w w.AngusHillFarm.com

8.BJO4USFFUt3BOEPMQI /: The Foundation of your Future Greenane Angus Genetics greenanefarms.com 5637 Turnpike Road Delhi, NY 13753 PATRICK & THANYA RIDER patrick@greenanefarms.com 607-746-8878

Sarkaria Farms

H 315-688-9195 C 315-767-3290 email:LLaribee@hotmail.com

Larry M. Laribee 3220 Fuller Road Carthage, NY 13619

Registered, AI sired, gentle, curve bending Heifers and Bulls

Registered Angus Breeding Stock & Freezer Beef Frank & Joan DeBoer jdeboer@stny.rr.com 12491 St Hwy 357 Home: 607-829-3408 Franklin, NY 13775 Cell: 607-353-9520

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(518) 598-8869

James D. Frueh 518-436-1050 Registered Angus Bulls, Steers, Heifers, Out of quality embryos Round Baleage and Dry Round Bales Glenmont, NY

Travis Walton 2434 Linwood Road Linwood, NY 14486 585-703-1476 TravisSTS9860@gmail.com -JOXPPE3PBEt-JOXPPE /:

(585) 703-1476tTravisSTS9860@gmail.com

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Dr. MB Rad 518-369-6624 drrad@verizon.net Steve Packard, Herdsman 585-738-9404

2035 State Route 31 Chittenango, NY 13037

Mike Shanahan

GLENVIEW FARM

Pleasant Valley Farm

487 Whaupaunaucau Rd Norwich, NY 13815 www.SarkariaFarms.com

Look for us on Facebook!

STOFFELS

(315)527-5037 welytokmark@aol.com

"Welytok Angus- Breeding For The Next Generation"

DEPENDA - BULL SERVICES

506 Queen Anne Road Amsterdam, NY 12010 www.HiddenAcresAngus.com

Murphy Farm Registered Black Angus Peter Murphy 1132 Rt. 80 Tully, NY 13159 pmurphy001@twcny.rr.com

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www.cattlepromotions.com

Home: 315-696-6092

www.NY-ANGUS.com

Cell: 315-706-1693


New York Angus Association Annual Female Sale 2nd Saturday in May

www.NY-ANGUS.com

McCracken Vu Farms Performance Bred Angus Cattle Home of the famous McCracken Missies! cattle working in 7 states & Canada!

Scott Oeschger, Owner Bob Butterfield, Manager

Jamie & Jerry Brozman Ned & Linda Hower Jennifer & Shane Boyle E-mail: Justenuffangus@enter.net 354 Townshipline Rd. Nazareth, PA 18064 Home (610)-837-3866 Cell (484)221-3455 Registered Angus Cattle Tame Show Calves

Roger & Alice McCracken 585-243-5037 2898 Mt Pleasant Rd

Registered Angus Cattle Jim Sheehan & Family Office: 315-265-8427 Andy Weaber: 315-261-1331

Website/Facebook – www.justenuffangus.com New Business Cards JEA Brozman.doc.pdf 1

3/6/12 10:36:46 AM

JLL Angus Acres Jerry & Jeanette Loss

6791 West Main Road Lima, NY 14485 585-624-9593 jeanetteloss@hotmail.com

Great cow families, great carcass traits Registered Breeding Stock

PUNSIT VALLEY FARM

PVF

Mark & Karolyn Shepard 518-392-3478 mark3478@hotmail.com 365 Punsit Road Chatham, NY 12037

Registered Angus Solely using A.I. from Proven Genetics

Attention Angus Breeders Space Available Advertise Your Farm Here! Contact Mike Shanahan 518-598-8869 mike@cattlepromotions.com P.O. Box 57 Lebanon Street Hamilton, NY 13346

315-824-1703 Arnold & Arlene Fisher

www.NY-ANGUS.com

Shale Ridge Farm The Duncan Family 102 Duncan Lane Farm - 319 Lobdell Road Otego, NY 13825 www.shaleridgefarm.com

MWM ANGUS Mark Mangano 13245 Ottenbecker Road Lawtons, NY 14091 mwmangus45@gmail.com 716-560-1293

Clear Choice Angus Chris & Vanessa Jordan and Family P.O. Box 143 Lemont Furnace, PA 15456 Steve Schmuck, Herdsman 814-289-1617

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Registered Breeding Stock & Show Cattle Follow us on Facebook

Carousel Design Taylor Wierzbowski 716-574-9724 carouseldesign@aol.com www.newcarouseldesign.com

Graphic Design & Photo Services


www.cattlepromotions.com Mike Shanahan (518) 598-8869

mike@cattlepromotions.com

It’s almost Auction time, Contact Me


Welcome to New York! Where are you headed? Canada Vermont

Massachusetts

Connecticut

Pennsylvania

New Jersey

NY Agriculture Facts Top Agriculture Products 1. Dairy products 2. Greenhouse/nursery 3. Corn 4. Apples 5. Cattle and calves Number of Farms 36,300

Land in Farms 7.2 million acres Average Farm Size 197 acres


Scott Oeschger, Owner 32 Railroad Ave Orleans, VT 05860 Bob Butterfield, Manager 802-673-6629 hph@bartonvt.net

FFR Annie 471 Reg# AAA17105147 *Watch for other consignments from our team, we're offering the top of our program!*

This Hoover Dam 2 year old is due to calve September 3rd, 2013 to SAV Brilliance. This heifer is one of Spring Hill Angus' top heifers. She is a long sided, big ribbed cow that will be a great addition to any herd. Spring Hill is reserving the right to flush this cow. Igenity numbers will be available at sale time.

Spring Hill Chloe 942 Reg# AAA+17479663

This is a fantastic Cole Creek Black Cedar September calf that has started her show career with a ball of fire. She was Reserve Grand Champion at the Fryeburg Youth Show in Fryeburg, ME in April 2013 and Calf Champion at the Big East show in West Springfield, Ma in May 2013. This calf is an ET calf out of a Special Design cow that has produced some of the top show cows in New England. Maternal sister EHB Chloe 269 ranks in the top 1% B dollars and in the top percentage of many other categories. Igenity has been done on this heifer.

Cow Power Sale 9/21/13 held at Walbridge Farm, Millbrook, NY www.CowPowerSale.com


Power Up

Your Breeding Program

Selling in the Trowbridge Farms “Family Affair” Annual Female Production

Dorado 454 Blackbird E125 of a lovely uddered, top performing powerful dams that trace back to Blackbird of R R 1204

Dorado Blackbird E021

Toebben Blackbird 112F

Blackbird E125’s impressive carcass EPD profile is powered by ranking her in the top 1% Marbling, and top 3% for Ribeye.

Dorado Angus

Jerry, Wanda & Katarina Emerich 1073 LaValley Road dorado@primelink1.net


New York & the northeast on the map.... ============================================== Thomas Angus Ranch At a time when Angus enthusiasm, excitement and breed leaders were being bred and developed in the state of New York, Bob and Gloria Thomas moved from their Iowa home ground to join forces with Myron Fuerst in the Empire State. Next, Bob and Gloria would find themselves moving to Long Island, New York, where they worked on the C. V. Whitney Estate. Working with these two legendary Angus scholars proved to be one of the most valuable working experiences that Bob could have ever happened upon. The time spent with these two great programs enabled Bob to develop an eye for quality, a passion for breeding superior performance genetics and the dedication to breed cattle that fit with his customers’ needs. This is an excerpt taken from the “History” at thomasangusranch.com =============================================================================

Leachman Born on a small livestock farm near Adamsville, Muskingum County, Ohio, the two brothers were the first of the family to attend college. Both worked their way through Ohio State University living and working in the beef cattle or draft horse barns; both were on the University Livestock Judging teams; both were inducted into the Ohio State University Animal Science Hall of Fame and both graduated . . . Lee-1939 . . . Les-1946. Both were called to judge the Perth Show in Scotland. They joined forces at Ankony Angus. The list of achievements written in the world’s Angus record book by Ankony Farm of Rhinebeck, New York challenges even the most optimistic Angus enthusiast. Both men were inducted into the Angus Heritage Foundation by the American Angus Association in 1989 for their improvement and promotion of the Angus breed. In 2006, Lester’s portrait was hung in the famous Saddle and Sirloin Club Gallery, Louisville, Kentucky.


In October 1947, Lee and his wife Mildred, an Ohio State graduate and prominent leader of Ag campus activities as a student whom he married in 1941, rented a farm near Rhinebeck, New York, owned by Allan Ryan. The young family included son James, daughters Joyce and Carolyn (Lynn). Daughter Gay was born at Ankony. Things were set to go big time. With the move to Rhinebeck, Lee was ready to bring his small herd being cared for by Mildred’s family in Ohio, to the new farm. Most of the animals were payment-in-kind for his work on previous farms. Allan A. Ryan, chairman of the board of Royal Typewriter Co., was the owner of Ankony Farm, Rhinebeck, New York. The historic landmark overlooking the scenic Hudson River Valley was named after an Esopus Indian named Ankony who signed a treaty in 1686 transferring 2000 acres of land to US buyers for stuff. After the ’53 show, Les offered a one-third interest in O. Bardoliermere to Whitney Farms for $25,000. When they refused, Les, Ruth, two sons, Bill and Jay, and a small group of cows they owned, moved to a leased farm near Claverack, New York and Les started building a cow herd. In 1958, Les and Ruth bought 300 acres of the leased farm and remodeled the 1775 built Merryfield home. The cattle operation later became a part of Ankony Angus. Excerpts are taken from leachman.com Other internal Acknowledgements: Background material for this Leachman family story has been taken from No Better Bull, by Les Leachman, 2003; The History of Red Angus, by Dr. Bob Hough; The Last Round-up, by James H. Leachman, BEEF, 2003; and The International Herd, from the 1966 Ankony Dispersal Catalog. Dale F. Runnion

=============================================================================

Rishel Rishel Angus began with the purchase of one registered Angus female, PS Primrose 299, from the late Herman Purdy at Pennsylvania State University in 1966 while Bill was a student in Animal Science. PS Primrose 299 still has descendants in the herd today. Following graduation and completion of a master's degree in animal breeding, Bill, Barb, and oldest daughter Jill moved to Phelps, NY, to co-manage with Bill’s brother Ed at Sayre Farms. During their stay at Sayre Farms, Bill was involved with the purchase of Ankonian Dynamo who went on to be named both the International and National Western Grand Champion Bull, and Georgina of Valleymere 44 who was declared International Grand Champion Female. In 1972, Bill and Barb, along with their two daughters Jill and Joy, moved to Hillsdale, NY, to manage Topp Hill Farm. While at Topp Hill, Bill went to Alberta, Canada and purchased the bull Bandolier Eston Durness 42B who he nicknamed "Pacesetter" and was recognized 20 years later for siring the


very popular Paramont Ambush. While at Topp Hill, Bill also bred two National Champion Females, Topp Hill Annie 4106 and Hedgerows Jestress. Excerpts taken from “History” at rishelangus.com =============================================================================

Trowbridge Trowbridge Angus began in Corfu, NY in 1957 when Paul Trowbridge, Sr. bought their first Angus cow from Wendland Angus in Millgrove, NY. The cow was a daughter of Prince Sunbeam of Shadoe Isle 78. With the goal of getting his eldest son, Paul, Jr., into 4-H and for his other eight children to follow, little did Paul, Sr. know, that the impact Angus cattle would have on the lives of his kids would stay forever. All were involved in the day to day care and showing of their Angus cattle as they were growing up, though, a few of the children went on with their interest even further. Paul, Jr., "PJ", worked at Bippert's Farms for many years, as well as Elm Place Angus Farm, both in Western NY, and now has cattle on their home farm in Corfu, NY, as well as being the author of "A View from the Tractor Seat" column that many read in agricultural publications every month. Paul's son, Aaron, went on in the Angus business as well, and managed Highfield Angus Farm in Clinton Corners, NY for some years. Patrick Trowbridge, the youngest son of all of the Trowbridge family, made a name for himself managing Fairfield Farms in CT for years, and then went on to Cobble Pond Farm in NY for some time. Today, Patrick and his wife, Mary, run a successful Arabian horse business in Connecticut. The middle son of the Trowbridge Family, Phil, after growing up on the family farm, went on to Alfred State College and earned his degree in 1976, where he majored in Animal Science. The day after graduation he reported to work as a herdsman at Gallagher’s Angus Farm in Ghent — a fledging business owned by restaurateur and entrepreneur Jerome “Jerry” Brody. Now, more than 30 years later, Phil, his wife Annie, and their two children, P.J. and Amy own and operate their own family Angus operation in Ghent, NY, on the eastern part of NY state, where the Trowbridge Angus legacy is getting stronger and stronger every day. Phil currently serves as the President of the American Angus Association. Excerpt taken from the “About Us” page at TrowbridgeFarms.com =============================================================================


Production Sale

Friday • August 30, 2013 • 6 p.m. (EST) Selling 64 Lots (120 Head) • Donors, Pairs, Bred Cows & Bred Heifers Sale will take place at the end of the National Angus Tour

(EPDs as of 6/17/13)

Lot 1 - Garret Lass 3236 BW +1.0 • YW +100 • $W +44.18

Lot 1B - Garret’s Lass 326V EXT’s Best

Lot 2C- Garret’s First Lady 651F RE I+.71 • I+38 CW

Lot 3 - DB Lucy 162 CW +56 • 178E Daughter

Lot 3A - Garret’s Lucy 162I CW I+44 • EXT Daughter

Lot 11 - Garret Forever Lady 800Y RE +.75 • Sister to 004

Lot 18 - Callaway Blackcap 1130 2536 Granddaughter

Lot 33 - Garret Forever Lady 80G $B +92.26 • Sister to 004

Lot 34 - Garret’s Forever Lady 864 Marb I+.86 • $B +88.35

Garret Matteo, Owner/Manager 289 Hunt Rd., Hillsdale, NY 12529 (518) 325-4540 • Cell (518) 755-5021 Fax (518) 325-1301

For sale books

254-413-2420

parkerfriedrich@earthlink.net

Remember the Trowbridge Sale on August 29


HD 50K

TO UNLOCK HIS FUTURE POTENTIAL, NOTHING IS MORE DEPENDABLE.

To watch the video, visit www.unlockfuturepotential.com or use your smartphone QR code reader to scan this code.

For more details, visit learncattlegenetics.com, zoetisUS.com/genetics, cabpartners.com/genemax/ or contact: Rodney Schoenbine, Cattle Genetics Specialist at 330.464.9793 or rodney.k.schoenbine@zoetis.com All trademarks are the property of Zoetis Inc., its affiliates and/or its licensors. Š2013 Zoetis Inc. All rights reserved. PAG13023


The kind you can use... Connealy Consensus 7229 x Summitcrest High Prime 0H29 x B/R New Design 036 BW 2.3 WW 53 YW 87 Milk 19 Marb .83 RE .53 $G 42.75 $B 82.62

Watch for other of our sale features, contact us for a sale book

OCC Prototype 847P x WCC Special Design L309 x Rito 054 GDAR BW 1.9 WW 42 YW 68 Milk 18 Marb .37 RE .35 $B 49.17 Bred to Connealy Sandhills 122, due 3/8/14

held at Walbridge Farm, Millbrook, NY

www.CowPowerSale.com

OCC Prototype 847P x Mytty In Focus x Rito 2V1 of 2536 1407 BW -.1 WW 48 YW 79 Milk 19 Marb .45 RE .49 $B 53.34 Bred to GDAR Game Day 449, due 1/18/14

Heathcote Farm Dave Richmond, Manager


Add Some Cow Power! RALLY FARMS Jesse M. Bontecou, Owner-Manager chrisphoward@optimum.net

Watch for more features from Rally, contact us for a sale book!

Cow Power Sale 9/21/13

held at Walbridge Farm Millbrook, NY

www.CowPowerSale.com Connealy Confidence 0100 x Conealy Final Product x SydGen Contac


C Cow Power P O WER in the Pastures W 9/21/13 at Walbridge Farm, Millbrook, NY

www.CowPowerSale.com

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River Bend Farm

CornĂŠ Vogelaar, manager "RANCH2Ds&AR(ILLS .*   s  #ORNĂ?CELL %MAIL#ORNE 2"&!NGUSCOM

www.RBFangus.com


Welcome to Angus Hill Farm! We have made it our ultimate goal to find and breed cattle with superior EPDs based upon ultrasound values, while being committed to producing cattle that are sound, functional, highly maternal, and still very superior in carcass merit, with much emphasis on the $B index. However, due to recent advancements in DNA technology, the influence and impact of Genomic profiling cannot be ignored. To improve the accuracy of our EPDs we have Igenity or Zoetis tested our complete herd. One of our greatest accomplishments in the past few years was the purchase of Stevens Bros. Slaughterhouse. This in turn allowed us to acquire a contract and supply Wegmans Supermarkets with premium Angus beef. To date, Angus Hill Farm is the sole producer for ten Wegmans stores throughout the state of New York. We have also developed an overwhelming local meat market after building a retail store on the farm. We are very excited about this ever growing beef market and what it will mean to both our purebred and commercial customers.

Inkley Family

John Inkley V.M.D 716-358-6817 Charles DiMaria, Manager 716-307-1851 randolphvetclinic@gmail.com 12400 W. Main Street Randolph, NY 14772

www.AngusHillFarm.com


DRMCTR 1I1 Rita 6108

BW 4.1 WW 88 YW 142 Doc 21 Milk 23 CW 65 Marb .74 RE 1.23 $W 42.59 $F 81.23 $G 47.61 $B 116.03

Rito 1I1 of 2536 Rito 6I6 x DRMCTR 2908s Design 2B02 x New Design 1407 SELLING A HEIFER CALF BY EXAR UPSHOT from this featured Angus Hill Female. A rare opportunity to select breed-impacting carcass genetics from the $108,000 valued Rita 6108, a female who ranks 2nd among all Angus dams for $Beef Values as well as 2nd for WW EPD, 4th for YW EPD and 4th for $Feedlot Values. This elite donor has already amassed more than $600,000 in progeny sales to date as well as has earned a progeny record of BR 2@97, WR 2@119, YR 2@111 and UREA 28@103. This powerful matron is also the dam of GAR 5050 Data Manager 0536, a top new sire prospect plus the $110,000 Spruce Mountain and Vintage Angus donor, BoBo Rita 1132. Zoetis 50k info will be done by sale day to this featured calf. Owned with Hillhouse Angus, TX

John Inkley V.M.D 716-358-6817 Charles DiMaria, Manager 716-307-1851 randolphvetclinic@gmail.com 12400 W. Main Street Randolph, NY 14772 www.AngusHillFarm.com

Trowbridge Angus & Friends Sale "Angus Along the Hudson" held during the National Angus Conference & Tour Ghent, NY, Thursday, 6pm

August 29, 2013


-JOXPPE3PBEt-JOXPPE /: (585) 703-1476tTravisSTS9860@gmail.com

ACOMB ACRES

Bryan Acomb 585-217-7711 9944 St Rte 36 South Dansville, NY 1443

McCracken Vu Lookout 275 Reg# 16670970

Future Semen Available. Give us a call!

BC Lookout 7024 x McCracken Vu Missie 178 x B/R New Frontier 095 STYLE, MUSCLE, GROWTH! CED 4 BW 3.2 WW 49 YW 86 Milk 22 Marb .56 RE .66 $B 83.47 REAL DATA: 275 has had an average progeny birth weight of 83# and weaning weight of 857# on 52 calves


True reform needed on farmland assessments High property taxes are pretty much a fact of life here in New York. But as we report this week, a group particularly important to our collective wellbeing feel singled out when it comes to the tax man. The New York Farm Bureau is calling for a cap on the year-to-year hike in agricultural land assessments, saying runaway values have hit farmers hard in recent years. This is a poignant topic as we enter the summer season and families look to add fresh, inseason and local food to their diets. The concept of “eating local” has gained considerable traction among mainstream Americans, and the proliferation of farmers markets all over the area suggests it has staying power. For this reason alone, we should be cognizant of what it takes to run a farm here in New York. According to the Farm Bureau, farmers here pay $38.41 per acre in property taxes, which amounts to about 15 percent of a farm’s net income. New York’s tax rate is second only to California (we bet this comes as no huge surprise). Lowering the current assessment cap from 10 percent to 2 percent would not affect the rate at which farmers are taxed, but instead prevent the value of their land from being hiked so high year after year, which in turn results in a larger tax bill. It’s an idea that would provide relief to New York’s farmers, who have to compete with products grown hundreds and thousands of miles away under much more favorable business conditions. But it’s a stop-gap measure. What is needed is an examination of the assessment system itself. Farmland is assessed under a complicated formula that in theory sets an assessment based on the quality of the soil (there are 20 different soil groups). Using a number of data points provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the state Department of Taxation and Finance sets a base agricultural assessment value, which is defined as “the average capitalized value of production per acre for the eight-year period ending in the second year preceding the year for which the agricultural assessment values are certified.” The value also takes into account things like the real estate value of structures on farms, production expenses, value of production and so on and so forth. Once set, the base assessment value is then adjusted downwards for poorer soil quality, which makes what the government thinks of your dirt pretty important to farmers. The idea is to assign fair worth to what is by any conventional measure empty space by evaluating its potential. It’s hardly a bad idea in theory, but in practice the assessment values per acre here in New York have spiked dramatically in recent years. The base assessment value was $513 per acre in 2006. By 2011, it had reached $825, a 61 percent increase. By the state’s figures on crop production, however, the value of production per acre went from $475 in 2006 up to $719 in 2011, a 51 percent increase.


Somebody’s eating that missing 10 percent. (Spoiler alert: it’s farmers.) Things haven’t slowed down, either. This year, the base assessment value is $999. The massive hikes on assessment values must be slowed, but the real question is why they are skyrocketing when the value of farmers’ crops is rising more modestly? It also gives some credence to the worries of farmers we spoke with, who while in favor of the assessment cap, suppose the state will get its money from somewhere. They may well be right, but inflating the value of farmland year after year will only create a bubble that, when it bursts, will leave everyone hungry for a more sensible solution. www.spotlightnews.com =======================================================================

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Reality TV Show Makes Farming Cool Again American television hasn’t had a hit show about farming since Green Acres almost 50 years ago. That’s all changing now. The August/September issue of Farm & Ranch Living takes a look at the new television show Farm Kings to see how Joe King and his clan are making farming cool again. While Joe King, 29, and his 10 siblings, nine boys and one girl, grew up farming, they took things into their own hands by getting a loan to start Freedom Farms on a property their mother owns in Pennsylvania. Joe hopes the show will draw more young people back to the land, especially at a time when so many people are disconnected from where their food comes from. As you might expect, the Kings quickly discovered that farming with a camera crew takes some serious time and patience, but they think it’s worthwhile to inspire and encourage entrepreneurial spirit. For more information on the show, go to gactv.com/farmkings or freedomfarmspa.com From a release by Farm & Ranch Living


The American Angus Association Taps Lee Trade Shows for 2014 Inaugural Event Palatine Bridge, NY - The American Angus Association (www.angus.org), St Joseph, MO has hired Lee Trade Shows Inc. to produce and manage the trade show portion of their 2014 National Angus Convention and Trade Show. This first-time association event will take place November 4, 5 and 6, 2014, at the KCI Expo Center, which is conveniently located near the MCI Airport, lots of hotels, shopping centers and entertainment options. The event will feature the "Angus University", renowned industry speakers, association meetings and trade show. The American Angus Association is an organization that is 25,000 members strong, with more than 70,000 affiliate members. From New York to California, and everywhere in between, the Angus breed comprises nearly 70 percent of the nation’s cow herd. Bryce Schumann, CEO of the Angus Association says "We expect people from all sectors of the beef industry to join us in Kansas City – seedstock producers, commercial cattlemen, feedlot operators and much more. Between educational events, keynote speakers, social activities and an expansive trade show, the Association believes this will be the breed’s premier event of the year." Bruce Button, VP/GM of Lee Trade Shows Inc. and the parent company, Lee Publications Inc., is very proud to be associated with this event and the American Angus Association.“ The American Angus Association represents the best known brand in the beef industry”. This event will bring some of the country's premier beef producers together for a first-class convention and trade show. We bring to the association the experience of producing over 200 trade shows, with most of them focused on agriculture. Our goal is to make this the most productive event in the industry for marketers and producers alike. For information on exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities, contact Bruce Button, bbutton@leepub.com or Kathy LaScala at katelascala@gmail.com. Lee Trade Shows, Inc. is a division of Lee Publications Inc., publishers of Country Folks weekly farm newspapers on the east coast and producers of the Keystone Farm Show, The Virginia Farm Show and the Empire State Producers Expo. www.leepub.com. =======================================================================


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Tullyfergus – Fleur de lis – McCracken Vu Annual Production Sale – September 28th 2013, 1pm


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safe image area - nothing goes beyond this line.

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Special Edition Set

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ANGUSJournal

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August 2013

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Biotech scientists will share 2013 World Food Prize ! Three scientists who helped introduce biotechnology into crop production will share the 2013 World Food Prize. The Iowa based award is often referred to as the “Nobel Prize for agriculture.” ! Marc Van Montagu, Mary-Dell Chilton, and Robert Fraley will be formally awarded with the World Food Prize at the Iowa State Capitol on October 17, but they were identified as this year’s winners today during a ceremony in Washington, D.C. The 60-year-old Fraley is an Illinois native who’s worked on genetic engineering of crops for Monsanto since 1981. ! “The biotechnology area has been really exciting and it’s also had some controversy, so the fact that the World Food Prize chose to recognize the three individuals who really helped move biotechnology into crops is really special,” Fraley told Radio Iowa. ! Among other things, critics of biotechnology in agriculture have raised concerns about the safety of food produced from genetically modified crops. ! Fraley believes supporters and critics of GM crops should find common ground in the challenge of doubling food production in the next 30 years to keep up with the anticipated population boom. ! “I think the only way to really do that is to use technologies like biotechnology, molecular breeding, and new information based technologies that can provide growers with new tools,” Fraley says. The biotech crop debate has always been a hot topic during the World Food Prize festivities, but Fraley says it will obviously be ramped up a notch this year. “I really look forward to kind of resetting the stage and the important dialogue around new technologies in agriculture,” Fraley said. For roughly three decades, Mary-Dell Chilton has been in a bit of a battle with Fraley as she works for Monsanto’s top competitor, Syngenta. Chilton notes more countries are beginning to accept GM crops from the U.S. ! “I think it helps to emphasize the safety and normalcy of genetically engineered crops,” Chilton said. The “easy work” on agricultural biotechnology has been completed, according to Chilton. While scientists continue to alter plants cells to produce more food, Chilton said they can also make food more nutritious. ! “An example of that would be the vitamin A enrichment in the golden rice crop and projects of that kind,” Chilton said. “We certainly know how to do that sort of thing and if we can persuade the public that’s an acceptable food crop, I think much more of that will be done in the future.” ! While Chilton and Fraley are from the United States, Marc Van Montagu is from Belgium. He’s the founder and chairman of the Institute of Plant Biotechnology Outreach at Ghent University. The


World Food Prize was created in 1986 by Cresco, Iowa native Norman Borlaug, who’s known as the “Father of the Green Revolution.” Borlaug died in September 2009 at the age of 95. www.radioiowa.com =============================================================================

Beef pricing based on quality "If beef producers followed their animals all the way through the packing plant to the meat counter they would have a much better idea of what they’re raising,” says Robert Hogan. ! Beef producers using long-time marketing and selling strategies may be selling themselves short in today’s market because industry pricing strategies have changed so much in recent years. Live cattle pricing, dressed weight pricing and grid pricing are the most common methods beef producers use to sell cattle. While selling cattle on averages is really detrimental to the beef industry, problems with identifying beef quality have inhibited development of value-based pricing. ! Robert Hogan, Jr., PhD., Assistant Professor and Extension Economist at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, says producers may be able to further maximize individual beef profits by thoroughly understanding the quality of the cattle they’re selling in order to select the most profitable selling method for their operation. ! “Until you know what meat quality grades you have to offer, you can’t decide which pricing method gives you the best profit option,” Hogan says. “Cattle with genetic potential to grade well and yield well should be sold on the grid to get the best possible selling price. If a producer picked cattle up at an auction or private sale and isn’t certain what the meat average quality and average yield will be, live pricing is probably the best option.” ! What keeps many producers away from pricing on the grid is the knowledge that they could get burned economically by selling cattle on the grid if the carcass quality and yield don’t match expectations. Grid pricing on a grade and yield (grid basis) is essentially the same as pricing on a dressed-weight basis, except that in addition to dressing percentage, the seller assumes the risk of the quality and yield grade of each animal sold. ! Most packer grids list a base price for a Choice (yield grade 3) 550-900-pound steer carcass. If an animal dresses out at a lower grade or yield, the seller loses a portion of the base price which increases with each level that the animal falls below the base requirements. ! “The flip side of that risk is that there are bonuses and premiums when you sell on the grid if you know exactly what your cattle can deliver in terms of quality and yield,” Hogan says. “The best way to maximize profits in today’s beef industry is by producing beef for a targeted market and/or grid. That process begins with talking to and getting to know packers and what types of beef they need to meet consumer demands.” ! Understanding the premium/discount structure of different packers could also help producers make a better choice regarding which packing plant will yield the most economic return for their animals. Different grids can offer significantly different prices for the same quality of cattle. ! “For example, one packer might not discount select cattle and another packer might not discount yield grade 4 as much as their competitors,” Hogan says. “Pens of cattle that are fairly uniform generally bring similar prices with different packer grids. However, pens with even, small percentages of higher or lower grade carcasses, heavier or lighter animals, or more than the average


number of ‘out’ cattle (dark cutters, stags, bullocks, etc.) have much more variable prices. Cattlemen need to know their cattle and sort them for uniformity and then target each group of animals for specific packers.” ! In terms of a timeline, beef producers should consider having a conversation with a packer two to three years in advance of producing market-ready animals. While no one can accurately predict market trends 100 percent of the time, packers are likely to have a good idea of where beef trends are headed in the next 24 to 36 months. ! “Producers could also consider raising beef for a buyer that wants a specific type of meat, such as lean, low-fat beef or highly marbled, flavorful meat,” Hogan says. “Cattlemen who operate their beef herd that way have been pretty successful.” ! Hogan believes beef producers would benefit economically from a better understanding of meat science, which helps cattlemen evaluate a carcass and gain a better understanding of what kind of meat they’re producing. ! “I went through TAMU’s Beef 706 meat science workshop program and was blown away by what I learned,” Hogan says. “I was born and raised on a cattle ranch, but I had little understanding of how a packer harvests and fabricates a carcass into specific cuts of meat. If beef producers followed their animals all the way through the packing plant to the meat counter they would have a much better idea of what they’re raising.” ! The percentage of beef priced on the grid declined between 2010 and 2012. Hogan believes lowa’s lack of grid pricing incentives is responsible for at least part of that downward trend. ! “Unless carcass premiums are great enough to economically reward producers for using price grids, they’re not going to sell that way,” Hogan says. “Another factor in grid pricing is that packers haven’t identified a way to consistently offer significant premiums for grid pricing.” ! Producers can affect their bottom line more consistently by tracking grid price variability on a regular basis. Small changes in dressing percentages alter the relative advantages of selling on either a live or dressed basis. ! “Over time, one of the most important determinants of price grid premiums and discounts is the Choice-Select carcass price spread,” Hogan says. “The greater the Choice-Select spread, the greater the price discount for lower quality cattle. The Choice-Select price spread varies over time as the cattle supply and demand for specific quality grades change. ! “There’s a seasonal pattern to the Choice-Select spread and it has changed in recent years,” Hogan adds. “It widens and narrows based on seasonal patterns iand with changes inn relative supplies of Choice and Select cattle. Yield grade premiums and discounts have remained relatively stable over time for all packer grids, so that pricing factor is expected to remain more predictable than the Choice-Select price spread.” ! Hogan notes that cattlemen who could judge the average quality of a pen of cattle by briefly observing them are now few and far between. ! “My father forgot more about marketing beef than I’ll ever learn,” Hogan says. “These days buyers are likely to be on the other end of a cell phone telling their representatives what they can pay for a pen of cattle. Many cattlemen love their animals. They’re more interested in the welfare of the cattle than the selling price. In this age of high inputs and rapidly changing markets, efficiency can be greatly improved through specific marketing strategies. Raising cattle these days is a big risk. The more producers know about marketing their animals the less risk they take on.” By Loretta Sorensen for Tri-State Livestock News sorensenlms@gmail.com www.tsln.com =============================================================================


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Faces of Progress

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Agriculture majors face future with confidence The careers in agriculture are diversifying, leading to changes at the university level.

People are never going to stop needing food. That simple truth is what drives the agriculture industry and keeps students studying the field from worrying about the economic pressures that may soon face it. Agriculture science is seeing a surge at universities; the major’s popularity has led to both a broader field of study and curriculum changes to better prepare students for the field. “When most people hear the word agriculture, the immediate thing that comes to mind is farmer,” Emmaline Long said, a first-year graduate student at Cornell University. “But now the industry is trending much more toward broader and more diverse careers.” These diverse careers are what are modernizing the agriculture sector and keeping undergraduates confident in their choice of major. Despite farmland availability and fluctuating monetary value, working in agriculture is not scaring all students. Some said they were not nervous about entering the agriculture field because it has been a part of their family histories. “I became interested in the field because my grandfather and family had ties to agriculture whether it be cows or cotton,” Jacob Gomez said, a junior at University of California – Davis. “I kind of had the best of both worlds through plant sciences and animals sciences. When it came time for me to decide, I never thought of it as career choice but a lifestyle.” It is not just tradition that has soothed fears about the rocky farming market. Curricula and career services have work to give students peace of mind when preparing for post-academic life. Often, programs require at least one agriculture business class to establish a better understanding of subsidies, land purchases and other financial issues of the trade.


Understanding business is key for students interested in agriculture because they may end up making all of the financial decisions during their careers. “Any agriculture major could end up running his or her own business, and agriculture is in all industries,” Davis Neary said, a freshman at California Polytechnic State University. “It’s important to understand the business side, and I feel like I’m getting that.” Agriculture and natural resource majors have little to worry about, according to the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. Only 3.5% of experienced college graduates in the field are unemployed, rivaled only by 2.2% of health care grads. Kari Richards, coordinator of Cornell’s agricultural sciences major, helps more than 25 students search for careers and internships each year. She said the low unemployment rate for agriculture students is not surprising. “While the financial situation with Midwest land values is an interesting agricultural economic trend, it is not directly related to the range of agricultural career opportunities available to today’s students worldwide,” Richards said. “It is definitely a ‘buyer’s market’ these days; students have a wealth of employment opportunities in agriculture both during the undergraduate years and post-graduation.” This isn’t to say agriculture majors have it easy. With unpredictable weather patterns, varying feed and fertilizer prices and other factors, Cornell student Emmaline Long said there are some things that a formal education can help prepare for. “Being an agriculture student alone takes a different caliber of student,” Davis Neary said. “You’re taught responsibility at a young age when you grow up on a farm, and I feel like we definitely will be prepared for the field’s challenges. It’s going to cause a lot of headaches, but at the end of the day, we’ll be able.” By Rebecca Wickel @rebeccawickel USA TODAY Collegiate Correspondent Rebecca Wickel is a Spring 2013 USA TODAY Collegiate Correspondent Article Originally appeared on USA TODAY College =============================================================================


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At Windy Point we have a team approach to raising and marketing our product. We are dedicated to the preservation of Agriculture, we have a farm staff that consists of professional cattlemen who have many years of experience raising and caring for beef cattle. Customers can purchase any of our products, from burgers to steaks; even feel free to take a package of our protein rich, locally cured, signature Beef Jerky home with you to have on hand as a healthy snack! Our purebred Angus herd has genetics that meet the carcass and maternal parts of our industry. From our beef trade, to our registered breeding stock, we have what you need.

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E1 Erianna Equals Excellence

Her 5050 son "Welytok Prime Premier 2A20" Reg. #17217052 was purchased by Select Sires as the Record Breaking Bull at the Penn State Bull Test. Now valued at $20,000 and has semen available. Top 1% of the Breed EPDs for Calving Ease, Growth Rate, Docility and Carcass Value. Recorded 18.4 Ribeye, 125 WW Ratio and 119 YW Ratio

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E2 8004 comes from a long line of value added donors stemming from the $7.5 million producer G A R Precision 2536 to the over $1 million dollar producer G A R Plowman G240 to her dam who is a full sister to the $210,000 VT 1407 New Design Z38. She in her own right ranks in the Top 1% of the breed for Marbling, Ribeye, $Weaning, $Grid, $Quality Grade and $Beef. She also ranks in Top 3% for Weaning Weight and Top 10% for Yearling Weight. Her Ten X son "Welytok Divine Prime 3B20" Reg. #17456955 (has A.I. interest) Ranks in the Top 1% of the Breed for Marbling, $Weaning, $Grid, $Quality Grade and $Beef. Ranks in the Top 3% of the Breed for CED, Weaning Weight, Yearling Weight, RADG, Ribeye and $Feedlot.

"Welytok Angus -  Breeding For The Next Generation"

E3 Her Donor Dam is linebred to the Blackcap family through the "Famous Full Sisters"- $7.5 million producer G A R Precision 2536 and over $500,000 producer G A R Precision 4519. The grandam G A R 1407 New Design 292 ranked among the top Marbling EPD cows and ranked number one in the breed for %IMF. Dam- N106 ranks in the Top 1% of the Breed for Ribeye, $Grid and $Yield Grade. Blackcap 2154 ranks in the Top 1% of the breed for + 14 CED, DOC, Marbling, $Grid and $Quality Grade. Ranks in Top 3% for Ribeye, $Yield Grade and $Beef.

*All EPDs' Numbers are from the Results of Zoetis HD50K, Progeny, Ultrasounds and Third Party Testing - Which ensures greater Accuracy and Reliability for Predicted Results- Buy with Confidence.*

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NY Angus Angles Newsletter August 2013 online issue