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POPE BENEDICT XV.

Jfi?tltt OFFICIAL

ORGAN

OF

PUBLISHED 20

pages N o . 52.

CATHOLIC

ACTION

WEEKLY.

SINGAPORE, SATURDAY, 28th

DECEMBER,

10 c e n t s .

1935.

WHAT IS CATHOLIC ACTION ? ADDRESS BY FATHER A. GOODMAN, M. S. C.

TO

WORKERS I

In t h e following e x t r a c t from t h e P a p a l L e t t e r t o Cardinal B e r t r a m , we find w h a t m a y be t e r m e d a digest of Catholic Action. "Catholic Action c o n s i s t s not merely in t h e pursuit of personal holiness, which is, however, b e f o r e all o t h e r s , i t s first a n d g r e a t e s t end, b u t it also consists of a t r u e a p o s t o l a t e in which Catholics of e v e r y social class p a r t i c i p a t e , c o m i n g t h u s t o be united in t h o u g h t a n d , action a r o u n d t h o s e c e n t r e s of sound doctrine a n d multiple social activity, legitimately c o n s t i t u t e d , a n d , a s a result, aided and s u s t a i n e d b y t h e a u t h o r i t y of t h e b i s h o p s . " T h e r e m u s t be centres of Catholic W e should read t h i s definition Action. According t o t h e Holy carefully, s t u d y i t s v a r i o u s impliF a t h e r , P i u s XI, Catholics partic a t i o n s , and t r y to apply i t s m e a n cipate in Catholic Action by insi n g in o u r lives and in t h e o r g a n i cribing themselves in one of t h e s a t i o n s in w h i c h we a r e i n t e r e s t e d . A s w e dwell on t h e Holy F a t h e r ' s following organisations, namely, m e n , women, young men, young call t o Catholic Action, we shall s e e t h a t t h e r e is n o t h i n g new in women. University g r a d u a t e s and a group t h e m o v e m e n t which it describes. u n d e r g r a d u a t e s f o r m B u t we see t h e wonderful possibi- a p a r t . T h e s e are w h a t t h e Holy lities i t offers for service t o God, F a t h e r calls "centres of sound a n d w e recognise a t once t h e r e s - doctrine aided and s u s t a i n e d by ponsibility incumbent on u s t o p r o - t h e a u t h o r i t y of t h e Bishops." W h y ? Because all t h e above orgam o t e i t s w i d e r recognition a s a n e c e s s a r y a n d vital p a r t of t h e n i s a t i o n s depend immediately on p r e s e n t - d a y mission of t h e C h u r c h . t h e bishop, o r t h e bishops, who alone n o m i n a t e t h e p r e s i d e n t and _ Living t h e F a i t h . Following t h i s s t u d y our under- t h e ecclesiastical a s s i s t a n t s . T h e St. Vincent de Paul Society s t a n d i n g of Catholic Action will be (1) T h a t i t s first a n d g r e a t e s t end i l l u s t r a t e s t h e working of Catholic is t h e p u r s u i t of personal holiness. Action in a very s t r i k i n g m a n n e r . If we wish t o be t r u e apostles, we It is organised under t h e a u t h o r i t y m u s t r e c o n s t r u c t o u r own l i v e s ; of a bishop and t h e p a s t o r s of t h e we m u s t be living e x e m p l a r s of t h e p l a c e ; it a i m s a t t h e personal t r u t h b e q u e a t h e d t o u s b y C h r i s t ; sanctification of i t s m e m b e r s ; it w e m u s t m i r r o r H i s v i r t u e s ; w e c a r r i e s o u t a united a p o s t o l a t e ; it m u s t live H i s life in all its f u l n e s s ; is c o n s t r u c t e d on a p a r i s h basis, w e m u s t reflect in o u r lives t h e a n d each u n i t is united or linked m i n d of C h r i s t ; we m u s t t h i n k and up w i t h t h e diocesan and national a c t in t e r m s of t h e s u p e r n a t u r a l council. _ V a l u e of Co-operation. in e v e r y walk of life, so t h a t o t h e r s T h e value of co-ordination canw h o do n o t know a n d see t h e Every b e a u t y of C h r i s t i a n perfection m a y n o t be over-estimated. see it in action in t h e lives of Catholic m a n , w o m a n $nd child should a t t a c h himself or herself to e v e r y Catholic. W h e n w e h a v e a t t a i n e d indivi- one or m o r e of t h e s e " c e n t r e s " , d u a l perfection, we m u s t recons- a n d should enrol in t h a t organisat r u c t o u r h o m e s on t h e principles tion w h i c h affords t h e b e s t outlet of t h e g o s p e l s ; w e m u s t m a k e for apostolic zeal. E v e r y Catholic t h e m c e n t r e s of holiness a n d w e society o u g h t t o recognise and m u s t not allow t h e m t o be t a i n t e d accept t h e obvious fact t h a t the w i t h t h e p a g a n i s m of t h e a g e . Catholic laity can best serve, in Society will b e r e g e n e r a t e d w h e n t h e cause of C h r i s t t h e King, w h e n t h e s e p a r a t e activities of t h e h o m e s of t h e n a t i o n a r e t r u l y co-ordinated C h r i s t i a n . (2) Catholic Action is t h e i r societies a r e a n apostolate in w h i c h w e should u n d e r t h e guidance of t h e bishops all p a r t i c i p a t e . Catholic Action t h r o u g h a central m e d i u m or calls t o Catholics of every social a g e n c y in all those t h i n g s t h a t are class. T h i s apostolate is a p r o - for t h e common good. T h e purGod m o v e m e n t , a n d h a s for i t s pose of Catholic Action is t o cou l t i m a t e goal t h e conversion of t h e o r d i n a t e all Catholic activities. world t o t h e F a i t h of C h r i s t a n d T h e d a y s a r e gone w h e n each idealist s t r u g g l e d single-handed to t o t h e t e a c h i n g s of C h r i s t . (3) T h e r e m u s t b e u n i t y of t h o u g h t i m p r e s s h i s mind upon h i s neigha n d action. Only t h r o u g h a com- b o u r . H e is c a u g h t u p into a massm o n unity, in t h e p a r i s h , iir t h e m o v e m e n t , which t u r n s h i s energy diocese, in t h e n a t i o n , t h r o u g h o u t t o t h e b e s t account, backing t h e t h e world, c a n Catholics h a s t e n t h e effort of t h e individual w i t h t h e full realisation of t h e spiritual a n d d r i v i n g force of t h e whole body. m a t e r i a l benefits t o h u m a n i t y All o u r Catholic societies a r e doi ng (Continued on page 2) w h i c h Catholic Action seeks. (4) (

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2

MALAYA

PRESS

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

GLEANINGS By Air Mail

I S NAZISM COMMUNISM? The Nazis make a great show of haying saved Germany from Bolshevism, but the truth seems to be that they have served' u p the same sauce under a different labeL The Nazis labour under the dulusion that they are Fascists. In reality they are only Totalitarian, and that factor is common to Bolshevists and Fascists, and has led to many people failing to 'distinguish the two systems. The theory of Fascism implies through representation of the people in its many corporations. It is therefore essentially democratic in concept, whatever it m a y be in actual fact. Communist Totalitarianism implies that the individual or party gathers up all the functions of the State, of groups, and even the more important individual activities, and exercises tSem arbitrarily over the community. Fascism, on the other hand, is pledged in theory to the defence of private property, marriage, the family, individual rights, certain group rights, especially of religious communities, and to popular representation in the government. Its totalitarianism is not absolute nor despotic.

all the representing in a Bolshevik state in theory as well as practice.

SCHACHT V E R S U S HITLER. A week ago Dr. Schacht spoke like a true Fascist. He pointed out that the joint stock company, which is essentially Capitalist, is necessary to the modern state, and that Germany cannot keep up the pace in a mechanised world without it. On Sunday Hitler, speaking at Nuremberg on the centenary of the inauguration of t h e first German railway, like a true Communist exulted in the communal system. This plainly shows that Nazism has not y e t made up its mind on fundamental principles. It does not know whether it stands, with Fascism, for the principle of private property with such modifications in practice as a unified modem State requires, or, with Bolshevism, for the collective principle with toleration of the unavoidable minimum of private property. In its religious intolerance Nazism is Bolshevist, as it is also in its lack of popular representation. The party does

EUTHANASIA IS SINFUL. Dr. Killick Millard told a London meeting that thirteen religious leaders, including Dean Inge and his successor Dean Matthews, as well as the Rev. Dick Sheppard, had signed a statement that there was nothing contrary to Christian teaching in euthanasia. The command "Thou shalt not kill" would seem to have been abrogated by these reverend gentlemen, but they are not entitled to speak for Christianity, nor, so far as we know, for Anglicanism. They represent a very accommodating and up-to-date Modernistic Christianity which fears nothing so much as seeming to be behind the times. We are glad to read that there was considerable opposition a t . the meeting to the proposed new bill to legalise euthanasia. Dr. C. O. Hawthorn made a good point when he said that suffering unbalances the minds of both the sufferers and their friends. They were not in a position to know what they were doing, and he thought that it was repulsive to visualise a family council meeting to discuss the execution of one of its members. (Catholic Times, Dec. 13.) MR. HERBERT IN PARLIAMENT. We now know what we have to except from Mr. A. P. Herbert. On the second day of Parliamentary debate, and on a formal motion about procedure, he made his first speech, brilliant and witty, already capturing the attention of the House,ever ready to be entertained in relief of the average dullness of its duties. Mr. Herbert at first struck the note which so many of us welcome—the revolt of the individual citizen against the encroachments of ministries and bureaucracies. But before he had gone far he disclosed his main purpose. "I am ready to introduce a Bill next Friday, the Friday after that and on all the Fridays, until it is passed into law and I swear it shaft be passed before the end of this Parliament. It is the Matrimonial Causes Bill, a Bill to remove the indecent, hypocritical, cruel and unjust marriage laws of this country, based on the recommendations of the Majority Commission which reported twenty-two years ago." Considering that those recommendations issue logically in the substitution of temporary contracts terminable at will for Christian marriage, w e may see in advance what sort of a conflict we are in for. • * * * * HISTORY A gentleman with the decorative name of Tangye Lean has been writing in the News Chronicle apropos of *he third centenary 'of Richard Hakluyt's death. He evidently believes in writing decoratively, for this is how he leads off: "Staring in consternation at the skies, the Spanish Inquisition could see the threads stirring in those ancient clouds which had crept overhead and killed the intellectual sunlight of Greece and Rome. . . . But the growing light bathed everything like a running fire. It pierced the minds of men, breeding in its heat a race of heretics whose fertile brains devised new thoughts which grew in obedience to the force within them and \ ignored the tenets of the Rom \n Catholic Church." This naturally leads to our old friend Gallileo thus: "On his knees before the Inquisitors, Gallileo said: no the earth did not move round the sun. But a whisper, from him or from an unborn posterity, contradicted him. Then, one December mornir.g

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WOMEN IN T H E MINISTRY. After votes for women we get the agitation for Roman collars for women. The Archbishops' Commission has recommended that women be admitted to the deaconate, with restricted powers to read, teach and preach, to church women, to baptise, and even to administer the chalice. What effect the new order of deaconesses wiU have on the popular estimate of Anglican orders is not for us to determine, but it would seem calculated t o confirm the average man in his opinion that ordination is mere authorisation Sy men to perform certain functions. It has no divine sanction! The commission admits that there is no scriptural or traditional warrant for women exercising priestly functions, and one of i t s members, the Dean of St. Paul's, insists that equally jthere is nothing in those two sources to prove that women are debarred by their sex from being priests. If this movement goes on it will be hard to scandalise people with the Pope Joan fable.

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2 8 t h DECEMBER, 1935.

nearly a century after Columbus had been guided t o America by Saint Christonher, a Protestant called Francis Drake disappeared into the mists off Plymouth." The rest may be imagined. Thus is History purveyed to the readers o f the popular Press.

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" RED GAOLS " The line taken at Geneva during recent months by the Soviet representative may have given rise to the hope that " charity begins a t home," and that the days of brutal persecution in Russia are over and done with. Unfortunately solicitude for oppressed empire abroud does not necessarily mean justice at home, and one has. to believe that sincerity is not the handmaiden of international politics. Last week-end there came into our hands a book just published by the house of Burns Oates and Washbourne at the price of 2s. 6d., a record, under the title Red Gaols, of eight years spent in Soviet prisons. Written with a restraint which would appear humanly impossible after such terrible hardships and sufferings, truth is stamped on every link in the chain of evidence, and the reader cannot fail to be made aware of the insensate fury which animates the Bolsheviks against religion in general and Catholicism in particular.

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RELIGION A S CRIME. Arrested in November, 1923, the author, a Russian lady of birth, was condemned, without trial, to 10 years' imprisonment, this being, in her case and in that of thousands of other Catholics, the Soviet Government's reply to an Encyclical of the Holy Father. Under the infamous Criming! Code the mere fact of recognising the Pope as Vicar of Christ is sufficient evidence of guilty associations and transactions with the "foreign bourgeoisie." In a preface to the book, Archbishop Goodier says "If Bolshevism is what it claims to be, humanitarian, then it wiU npt merely hide the truth by cheap denial, but will set itself to clean the foul cesspool which makes it stir.k in the nostrils of men." If any of our readers have been lulled by the absence of direct news into believing that Bolshevism has turned over a new leaf, and at last set its house in order out of a desire to fit itself fpr an honoured place in the comity of nations, we strongly urge the perusal of this damning document. (Universe, Dec. 13.) ;

V I N C E N T I A N S TO CONTINUE MOTOR MISSIONS. St. Louis, U.S.A.—The success of t h e Vincentian Fathers' "Motor Missions" in t h e archdiocese here has been such a s to lead t h e Congregation t o plan for their continuance during t h e coming year. In the course of the last s u m mer, the "Motor Missionaries" g a v e street lectures in seven t o w n s and spoke before more than 10,000 persons, E n o u g h applications have already been received for n e x t summer t o keep several similar units at work. Choosing t o w n s where Catholicity is much in t h e minority, t h e Mission Band s e t up a pulpit and loud-speaker outfit in some central spot and remain there for about a week. Handbills are scattered about the t o w n announcing their advent and purpose and boxes are placed in convenient localities so t h a t anyone w h o i s interested m a y present questions without embarrassment. E a c h evening one speaker lectures on t h e subject chosen for t h e day and a second answers all questions, including t h o s e anyone of the audience m a y w i s h to ask. The reception accorded t h e m i s sionaries everywhere h a s been marked b y courtesy and often eagerness. T h e y have frequently been requested to remain longer than t h e y intended. (LumenN.C.W.C.) t h e Church; w h e n they have sufficient courage to stand on t h e platform and put forward fearlessly t h e social programme of the Church a s expounded by the Sovereign Pontiff in his great encyclical: "Reconstructing the Social Order According to Christian Principles," Communism will lose much of its appeal, and will vanish a s an international menace.

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W H A T IS CATHOLIC ACTION. (Contd. from page 1) excellent work but much more could be done if they were centrally controlled. All our parish societies are, according to the teaching of the Pope "precious auxiliaries of Catholic Action." His Holiness does not wish these splendid religious organisations t o be absorbed or weakened, but he does w i s h that Catholic Action should unify all activities and make t h e m militant battalions in the army corps of the King of Kings. "United Front" of Communism. T h e Communists boast of a "United Front" against the existing social order. Communist centres are organised everywhere. Many of t h e churches filched from Christian bodies in Russia have been converted into study circles, where t h e principles of Communism are taught t o the present

FAR EASTERN MUSIC SCHOOL l - A , Kirk Terrace (Off Dhoby Ghaut) SINGAPORE. The only and oldest institution of i t s kind in Singapore with 'up-to-date equipment. Had gained a series of successes in the Trinity College Examinations in t h e past. N o a g e restriction. Write for particulars. M. ANCIANO, Principal. generation in order to fit and prepare t h e m a s the future builders of the world Communistic societyThe stirring events of the revolution are capitalised by actual opportunities to see and hear the men who brought about t h e Communistic s y s t e m . T h e intriguing appeal of Communism cannot be gainsaid and it is nonsense to underestimate it. The need is for voluntary and frank examination of every constructive social reform advanced by Soviet theory, without its odious implications of class materialism and obscene irreligion. When Catholic men and women a r e schooled in the social teachings of (Contd.

on foot of previous

Col.)


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 28th DECEMBER, 1935. iSBEEEEEBBEEBI

On Win&> from Albion (FROM OUR SPECIAL

A F R U I T F U L STOCKTAKING.

f

l G U R E S have j u s t been made known in which the present strength of t h e Catholic Church in England and Wales (for t h e s e statistics do not include Scotland) i s compared with t h e position twelve months previously. As .always happen, t h e return i s a gratifying one, proving progress in various directions. Other religious bodies in t h e country deplore reductions in members and influence; for instance, there i s a proposal t o amalgamate t h e benefices of three Protestant Parishes in London y h e r e church attendance has fallen, in one case, t o a mere handful. In contrast t o this s t a t e of things, Catholics point t o increase, a steady increase every year. Without going into t h e figures in detail, it may be said that there are n o w nearly 140 more priests in England and Wales than there were t w e l v e months ago—the grand total i s about 5,120, including t h e members of religious orders. There are j u s t on fifty more churches and -chapels, now numbering not far short of 2,400 in all. A particularly -encouraging total is that showing the Catholic advance in provision for education. This is in marked contrast t o t h e constant giving up o f schools by t h e Church of England. Within twelve months the Catholic schools have increased by fifty, and the pupils in them by many hundreds. T h e statistics of conversions bring w i t h them, t h i s time, a remarkable circumstance: for t w o successive years t h e figure is identical, 12,206. Some dioceses received more persons into t h e Church than in t h e previous year, others had fewer; but by a coincidence t h e total works out a t e x a c t l y t h e same. Let anybody w h o likes try t o calculate t h e chances against t h a t particular happening! Although the London area, a s m i g h t be expected, supplied the largest number of converts taking one centre w i t h another, the chief provincial areas also have again given a very good account of themselves. Thus, in Lancashire, already t h e most Catholic county in England about 2,700 men and women made their submission a s Catholics in a single year. This flow of conversions goes on year after year, and in t h e aggregate it means added permanent strength. * * • * * T h e Bishops and Education. N s x t week, it m a y be, these notes will be able t o report a statement o f policy, from t h e Catholic Hierarchy, in t h e matter of education. The Archbishops and Bishops h a v e just held a meeting a t Westminster to discuss t h e whole subject. The Government, as h a s already been said, favour building grants t o t h e voluntary schools, t o enable t h e m to m e e t t h e requirements of t h e Board of Education; but in return t h e y propose that t h e local authorities shall have greater control in the appointment of t h e teachers. The question is, therefore, Can t h e Bishops g i v e way, w i t h safety, t o this latter proposal? Lay opinion, a t t h e moment, is uncertain. On

have some attempt at justice in her regard, and now it is curious that almost the first popular effort in t h a t direction should be by means of the Stage.

CORRESPONDENT)

There has just been .produced, in a West End theatre, a play, "Mary Tudor," which is easily the one side, it i s pointed out that in most discussed drama in London Scotland, where the Catholic at t h e present moment. The schools were made over t o the author, Mr. Wilfrid Grantham, has education authorities some years made the queen a sympathetic ago, things g o well; but others character, t h e heroine of t h e piece, draw attention to the attempts now showing her a s a woman with being made, by the anti-Catholic feelings of consideration, and camp in that country, to handicap having t o follow, rather than give our schools. In England and a lead to, t h e spirit of t h e time. Wales, at t h e moment, there is no E x t r e m e Protestants will be very question of taking over t h e build- cross about this play, more especiings but only of tightening control. ally because fine acting, and strong * * * * * dramatic situations, have earned it "Question! Question! a " good press," and theatre-goers The results of dishonesty do not, are flocking t o it. » » » * as a rule, lend themselves t o mirth, and thefts from churches are a T h e Oldest Woman. particularly despicable form of robbery. B u t one church thief, at Who is Malaya's oldest woman, any rate, h a s made for gaiety and t o w h a t a g e has she attained? during the past few days, a gaiety Here in England, Death's scythe in which h e himself, it is safe to has j u s t cut down an old lady who say, does not share. He entered a was in her hundred-and-eleventh Catholic church in a northern year. Her extraordinary longevity suburb, and there saw a substantial, she attributed to hard work and opulent looking box, with a slot in plain living, and almost up t o t h e it, which might contain any amount time of her death she retained, of money—but didn't. He did not considering her years, remarkable wait to break open the box, but vigour of body and mind. took it away with him. It w a s the The wonderful span of life j u s t Question Box, containing all sorts of questions put by inquiring non- closed linked our own days with a Catholics for t h e priest to answer remote time several years before from t h e pulpit later on. Unfor- the passing of Catholic Emancipatunately there is no record of what tion. This old lady was nearly old the thief said when he examined enough to have dim recollection of that e v e n t ; and she w a s a woman his booty! of twenty-five when t h e Catholic * * * * * Hierarchy was restored in England Queen Mary. A Stage Vindication. and Wales. B y many years she It has become traditional with was pre-Victorian, living from one English Protestants to look upon Georgian Era into another, under The Mary Tudor, England's last Catho- five successive Sovereigns. contain lic reigning queen, as the embodi- newspapers this week ment of bigotry, superstition, and obituary notices of an old Royal intolerance. Protestant historians Servant who has died at Windsor have written of her as "Bloody and whose service began under mother, the Mary," because of the executions Queen Victoria's in her reign, and hardly a history D u c h e s s of K e n t ; but Mr. Barker, book has had a good word to say at ninety-one, was a mere youngfor her. Queen Mary h a s waited ster compared with t h e ancient several centuries, in memory, to dame w h o w a s already at the close 99

• MASTER'S

of her 'teens when he was born! * * * * * Liverpool's Great Bazaar. All over the country, Catholics are holding bazaars and sales of work: t h e y are one of t h e s i g n s that " Christmas is coming." One bazaar i s much like another— except Liverpool's. In t h e Mersey side city they do things on an immense scale; s o in organizing a bazaar in aid of t h e building fund for the new Metropolitan Cathedral, t h e Catholics of Liverpool h a v e engaged for t h a t e v e n t one of England's largest and noblest assembly places, t h e great St. George's Hall. They asked for Bazaar Patrons, and without difficulty got a thousand of them i n a short time. They are putting into t h e hall, a s one of t h e chief attractions, t h e handsome, large-scale model of t h e Cathedral which h a d a place of honour when it w a s exhibited, in London, a t the Royal Academy. Meanwhile, t h e Cathedral makes steady progress. A week-by-week record would be too much, but later on t h e s e notes will be able t o detail a further substantial advance in the work of construction. A Church Builder Indeed. Hillsborough, on the outskirts of Sheffield, is to profit from an act of magnificent generosity* J s h i c k is also, w e may well believe, an answer t o prayer. The parish priest, Canon Dunford, made a pilgrimage, last year, t o the Continent, visiting famous shrines and invoking supernatural aid towards getting t h e means t o build a n e w church in his parish. Shortly after his return he learned that a benefactress, Mrs. Wake, intended t o help w i t h funds; and later t h e amount of her gift w a s known— ten thousand pounds. The church at Hillsborough is nearing completion. All being well, it will be opened on Lady Day. Her fellowCatholics who read these lines will say a prayer for the intentions of t h e generous donor.

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MALAYA CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY, 28th DECEMBER, 1935.

G eneraI Jottings of the M^eeh i ft E X P E N S I V E CHRISTMAS.

A N E W YEAR OF N E W DAYS.

C h r i s t m a s shopping t h i s year, i t is r e p o r t e d , h a s n o t been a s b r i s k a s it w a s l a s t y e a r . People, it is said, a r e n o t s p e n d i n g a s freely a s t h e y did once a n d a r e inclined t o complain of a n expensive C h r i s t mas. T h i s t r e n d of t h o u g h t indicates a return to a saner and h e a l t h i e r outlook. E x p e n s i v e g i f t s , a r e not a n essential p a r t of C h r i s t mas. T h e s p i r i t of C h r i s t m a s does n o t lie i n t h e price of a p r e s e n t , b u t in t h e good-will, of w h i c h t h e g i f t is a t o k e n . T h i s is t h e s p i r i t t h a t ought to actuate both sender and receiver. T h e modern tend e n c y i s to-<expect expensive p r e sents, a n d v e r y often t h i s e x p e c t a t i o n is t h e s o u r c e of d i s a p p o i n t m e n t . T h a t a reaction t o t h i s t e n d e n c y h a s s e t in, m a k e s u s e x p e c t a r e t u r n t o t h e old simple s p i r i t t h a t u n d e r l a y t h e celebrat i o n of C h r i s t m a s .

H o w careful w e a r e of a n y t h i n g t h a t is n e w ! We set a special value upon it, a n d m a k e u p o u r m i n d s to use it w i t h s u c h c a r e t h a t i t s new a p p e a r a n c e will l a s t a s long a s possible. T h e n e w carpet, t h e new c u r t a i n , t h e new c l o t h e s — t h e y m u s t n o t b e soiled o r spoiled, t h e y m a y n o t be subjected t o a n y r o u g h usage. E v e r y b o d y g e t s a new d a y every morning, "without money and It comes to u s without price. n e w - m i n d e d from t h e h a n d of God, p r e s e n t e d t o us often w i t h all t h e r a d i a n t glory of a w o n d r o u s sunrise, holding w i t h i n i t s compass ^undreamt possibilities. But, because everybody g e t s it, and it is j u s t t h e usual t h i n g — j u s t a new d a y a n d n o t h i n g else—we fail t o value it, fail to use it well, q u i t e often fail t o t h a n k o u r Heavenly F a t h e r f o r it. Does it ever s t r i k e you t h a t every n e w d a y is t h e b e g i n n i n g of e t e r n i t y ? W e a r e solemnised often by t h e d a y which, according t o a m a n - m a d e calendar, b e g i n s a n e w y e a r , b u t w e forget t h a t e v e r y d a y really b e g i n s a n e w life. All t h e y e s t e r d a y s are gone for ever. To-day is t h e b e g i n n i n g of, everyt h i n g for you and m e . Y e t it slips a w a y , q u i t e often, in neglect a n d uselessness. We even value t o m o r r o w m o r e t h a n to-day. We t h i n k w e will do g r e a t t h i n g s t h e n . Yet w h e n it comes it is j u s t a n e w day, a n d ceases t o be i n t e r e s t i n g . T o - d a y — n o w — i s really all t h a t is ours, all t h a t w e can use. T h e Bible c o n s t a n t l y s p e a k s of t h e value of to-day. L e t u s r e g a r d it as new a n d wonderful, a r a d i a n t o p p o r t u n i t y for s e r v i n g God a n d our fellow-creatures, of g r o w i n g in g r a c e a n d knowledge of God. W h e n t h e new d a y is also t h e first of a new y e a r i t s possibilities a r e increased a t h o u s a n d fold. L e t u s c o m m e n c e t h i s n e w y e a r of 366 n e w d a y s mindful of t h e value of e a c h a n d resolved t o u s e it to o u r e t e r n a l good and t h e honour a n d g l o r y of God. (The Catholic F i r e s i d e ) .

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(KUCHING.) Y e a r s of M i s s i o n a r y Work b y t h e F a t h e r s and S i s t e r s of S t . Joseph's Society (Mill-Hill) 1881-1935. ( F r o m o u r Special Correspondent/ The Catholic Mission a t K u c h i n g iin t h e course of fifty y e a r s . T h i s occupies a n extensive a n d excel- was t h e V e r y Rev. F r . A. Haideglent site in t h e town. I t lies in g e r w h o s e n a m e will ever be a s t h e m i d s t of delightful s u r r o u n d - sociated w i t h t h e K u c h i n g Misings and is so situated a s t o w a r - sion. r a n t t h a t peace and t r a n q u i l l i t y so Soon a f t e r his a r r i v a l , F r . H a i essential t o places of w o r s h i p and d e g g e r s t a r t e d S t . J o s e p h ' s School educational e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . for b o y s . T h e original building is The Mission b e g a n in 1881 w h e n still s t a n d i n g a n d is now doing a none-too-large wooden h o u s e , service a s a refectory for t h e roofed w i t h a t t a p leaves served b o a r d e r s and a hostel for t h e Old t h e dual p u r p o s e of a c h u r c h a n d Boys. Upon receipt of t h e news, a residence for t h e F a t h e r s . Two in 1885, t h a t five s i s t e r s were on y e a r s later, on E a s t e r S u n d a y of t h e i r w a y out, h e a t once concern1883, a tall y o u n g priest of t w e n t y - ed himself w i t h t h e erection of S t . eight a r r i v e d t o join his confreres. T e r e s a ' s Convent w h i c h Rev. MoThough slim a n d frail, h e w a s t h e r Helen a n d h e r S i s t e r s occunevertheless destined t o build u p pied in S e p t e m b e r 1886. and develop t h e Kuching Mission (Contd. on p a g e 19) Fifty-four

T h e r e c e n t a p p e a r a n c e s in l a r g e t y p e in t h e local p r e s s of t h e i m m i n e n t d a n g e r from t h e i n c r e a s e of m a l a r i a - c a r r y i n g mosquitoes in cert a i n p a r t s h a v e proved effective in b r i n g i n g t h e a t t e n t i o n of t h e a u t h o r i t i e s t o b e a r on t h e m a t t e r a n d it h a s been announced t h a t by t h e b e g i n n i n g of next y e a r a n t i m a l a r i a l w o r k in such a r e a s would h a v e b e e n t a k e n in h a n d , a n d p u s h e d t h r o u g h t o a conclusion w i t h i n a period of t w o m o n t h s . This announcement ought to bring relief t o m a n y w h o h a v e b e e n dist u r b e d b y t h e w a r n i n g s contained in the papers. W H E N T H E POPE WAS A SOLDIER. F o r a s h o r t pjeriod a f t e r h i s ordin a t i o n H i s Holiness w a s forced t o s e r v e a period of compulsory milit a r y s e r v i c e . Much to h i s relief, h o w e v e r , t h e Holy F a t h e r s e r v e d only fifteen d a y s . A t a b l e t in t h e e n t r a n c e hall of t h e Catholic U n i v e r s i t y of Milan c o m m e m o r a t e s this event. T h i s u n i v e r s i t y is s i t u a t e d in t h e a n c i e n t College of St. Ambrose, which was formerly a m i l i t a r y hospital, and it w a s h e r e t h a t young F a t h e r Ratti was stationed.

St. Joseph's School, Kuching.

#


MALAYA

CATHOLIC LEADER,

SATURDAY,

2Sth DECEMBER, 1335.

JOKES WHICH? Little girl: "Auntie." Auntie: Yes, dear, what is i t ? " Little, girl: Which side of you is the j soft side, auntie?" t h e place m e a n t n o t h i n g to h e m , Auntie: "I don't know, dear, why?" b u t t h e cave, of course, w a s t h e i r Little girl: "Because, mama said if I own cave in t h e woods. F o r a I got at the soft side of you you might buy m o m e n t Ronnie did not a n s w e r his ! me a bicycle."

THE BABY IN THE CAVE " P V E R since t h e y could r e m e m b e r —Elizabeth was five, and R o n n i e nearly s e v e n — t n e r e h a d b e e n no o t h e r c h i i l r e n hi t h e h o u s e . B u t n o w , on C h r i s t m a s Eve, t h e angels h a d b r o u g h t a newb a b y to t h e m , a n d everyone seamed t o be so busy looking a f t e r it. t h a t n o one had c o m e n e a r t h e n u r s e r y all t h e afternoon. W h i l s t it w a s light, t h e t i m e w e n t quickly e n o u g h , b u t w h e n d a r k n e s s b e g a n t o deeoen, t h e children had t o leave their t o y s , a n d , going i n t o t h e b a y window, t h e y stood t o g e t h e r w a t c h m g t h e s n o w t h a t lay on t h e ground f r o m t h e g r e y sky. I t was cold, e v e n in t h e n u r s e r y , a n d Elizabeth leaned up a g a i n s t R o n n i e , p a r t l y R e a l i s e she w a s cold, and p a r t l y t o m a k e s u r e +hat s h e w a s not alone in t h e g a t h e r i n g d a r k n e s s . T h e moon w a s r i s i n g , so that after a time, wh-n the s n o w stopped falling it g r e w no d a r k e r . Indeed, outside it seemed a s t h o u g h t h e d a y w a s coming back a g a i n , and t h e s h a d o w s in t h e N u r s e r y grew longer a r d Joeper t h a n those t h a t l a y upon the lawn. " L i s b e t h , " s a i d Ronnie suddenly, "do y o u k n o w to-night is C h r i s t m a s a n d w e h a v e f.>rgot t h e b a b y . " " I t ' s p p s t a i r s , silly," r e plied Elizabeth n o t u n d e m a n d i n g w h a t h e r b r o t h e r me*nt, a n d t h i n k i n g of t h e little s i s t e r in t h e n i g h t n u r s e r y overhead. " W h y n e e d n ' t we f o r g e t i t ? T has M u m m y a n d N a n n y and all of them." " I s It in t h e Cave now, R o n ? " a s k e d Elizabeth, looking out w i t h b a b y , I m e a n t h e One t h a t c o m e s .at C h r i s t m a s a n d s t a y s in t h e Cave, with n o b e d n o r a n y t h i n g . "Don't you r e m e m b e r M u m m y said I t c a m e because I t loved u O " I s it in t h e C a v e now, R o n ? " a s k e d E l i z a b e t h , looking out w i t h frightened eyes on to the snow " I s n ' t it v e r y cold o u t there, even w i t h plenty of woolies like o u r b a b y h a s ? " B u t Ronnie'.* m e m o r y w e n t back t o t h e C h r i s t m a s before w h e n t h e s t a t u e of t h e I n f a n t J e s u s h a d lain in t h e Crib, ai A h e s h o o k h i s h e a d . " I don't believe i t h a s woolies," h e said. " N o t h i n g only a little c h e m y . " " O h ! Ronnie h o w dreadful." E l i z a b e t h t h o u g h t of Nannie's w a r n i n g s . "Couldn't w e lend it a p a i r of our p v j a m a s t o sleep i n ? " R o n n i e ' s knowledge d i d not go b e y o n d two pairs of t h e s e useful g a r m e n t s , one p a i r g o i n g to t h e w a s h a n d the < i h e r r e p l a c i n g t h e m . " W h a t ''id w e do ourselves t h e n w h e n o u r s wont to t h e w a s h ? " h e s a i d doubtfully, b u t E l i z a b e t h w a s n o t t o be d a u n t e d . " I f t h e B a b y loves u s , " she r e a s o n ed, " w h y does i t s t a y out in t h e c a v e ? Couldn't I t j u s t a s well c o m e in h e r e t o o u r n u r s e r y , w h e r e I t wouldn't w a n t woolies w i t h t h e fire." To t h e s e children t h e r e w a s only one cave, a n d t h a t h y in t h e woods a t t h e e n d of t h e s h r u b b e r y . S t r i c t l y s p e a k i n g , i t w a s not a real cave, b u t only a hole in t h e g r o u n d a n d scooped in a little w h e n c e g r a v e l had l a t e l y been taken a w a y . B u t t o Ronnie a n d Elizabeth it w a s a c a v e — t h e c a v e w h e r e t h e y ima g i n e d e v e r y t h i n g happenino; t h a t t h e y heard in t h e stories tolr *hem or t h e books r e a d t o t h e m a s h a p p e n i n g in a c a v e . So, when t h e i r m o t h e r h a d t o l d t h e m of t h e r»fant J e s u s coming a t C h r i s t m a s t o t h e C a v e a t B e t h l e h e m , t h a r.nme of f

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sister's q u e r y ; but h e r s u g g e s t i o n h a d given him a n d e a a n d h e spoke a g a i n , eagerly a n d a l m o s t in a whisper as though fearing he m i g h t b e overheard. "Supposing, Elizabeth, supposing we b r o u g h t It in h e r e ? " "Would w e h a v e t o go out in t h e d a r k ? " a s k e d Elizabeth. " I t i s n ' t very d a r k , " replied Ronnie. " N o t a n y worse t h a n in here, a n v h o w . " " B u t we promised word of honour, we'd be good whilst N a n n i e w a s a w a y , " E l i z a b e t h ' s conscience w a s s t r u g g l i n g w i t h her inclination. " I t h i n k i t would be v e r y good indeed t o b r i n g t h e B a b y in out of t h e cold," r e t o r t e d Ronnie, in his most superior t o n e ; and Elizab e t h ' s r a t h e r half-hearted p r o t e s t w a s overruled, and Ronnie h a d h i s way. Luckily h e r e m e m b e r e d p a s t i n s t r u c t i o n s t o d r e s s ap w a r m a n d p u t on goloshes over h o m e shoes before g o i n g o u t ; a n d t h o u g h nothing w a s found w i t h i n r e a c h except a shawl of N a n n i e ' s , and t h e n u r s e r y - m a i d ' s coat t h a t s h e had forgotten, t h e y w r a p p e d t h e s e round t h e m , a n d opening t h e g a r den door a s gently as t h e y could t h e y stole out into t h e n i ? H

m

CHRISTMAS MEDITATION. With

all eagerness we waited for sometime, For our most cherished Christmastime, And now at last to us it has come, To make us wish each other a MERRY X'MAS. Ev'ry heart, even that of a child, With supreme joy this day is realized, And happiness rests, in every breast, Happiness that with no other can be compared. To think that in a long bygone year, He came to us as our Redeemer, Yet born so poor, in a stable's shelter, As such was the wish of Heavenly Father. He lived so poor, as Son of a carpenter. Being His the kingdom of heaven and earth, And through His deeds and examples for us, Taught us how to love Him and our neighbour. Though long long ago on 25th of December, He was ffom to Mary, our beloved Mother, Still the happiest day of His birth, Shall be within our memory forever. By Ans. Bart. D'Almeida.

Soon t h e i r eyes g r e w a c c u s t o m ed to t h e w h i t e light of t > e moon, and once s t a r t e d on t h e i r w a y t h e y were too m u c h t a k e n u p with* t h e errand t h e y w e r e on, t o fear, o r even to notice t h e black s h a d o w s under t h e t r e e s . N e i t h e r di.i t h e y see, as t h e y drew n e a r t h e cave, t h a t t h e footsteps of a n o t h e r child already l a y imprinted on t h e soft white s n o w . A t t h e o t h e r side of t h e wood t h e r e w a s a cottage, w h e r e Ronnie and Elizabeth h a d often seen r-oor little g i r l s and boys, a n d h a d felt s o r r y f o r t h e m because t h e v h a d been told t h a t their f a t h e r w a s dead, a n d t h a t some of t h e children—even quite young o r e s — had to w o r k h a r d to e a r n m o n e y to buy food for t h e i r m o t h e r and for t h e little ones w h o could n o t earn. On t h a t C h r i s t m n s m > h t , Tim, a boy of f o u r t e e n y e a r s old,

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Teacher: "Can you spell rain," Thomas: "R-A-N-E." Teacher: "That is the worst spell of rain we have had for a long time." #

* * * ANNOYING.

*

A man, accompanied by a very stout woman and a small girl, got into a bus; turning to the girl he said: "Get on your auntie's knee, Cissie, and then I shan't have to pay for you." "I don't want to," whimpered Cissie. "Why not?" asked the man. " 'Cos every time she breathes she pushes me off!" * * * * * MIND AT REST. The liner was ploughing its way across the Atlantic Ocean. Near the bridge stood a nervous old lady who, when the captain came out on deck, went up and touched him on the shoulder. "Could you put my mind at ease, captain?" she asked. "What is it," asked the captain. "Well," said the passenger, "what would happen if the ship struck an iceberg?" "The iceberg would go on as if nothing had happened," was the reply. "Oh, thank you," said the passenger, "I feel much relieved now."

b u t small a n 4 t h i n , h a d been allowed by t h e f a r m e r for whom h e worked t o g o h o m e for t h e e a s t d a y . In his h u r r y t o get back t o his m o t h e r , t h e boy h a d taken a s h o r t c u t t h r o u g h t h e wood, not k n o w i n g t h a t since h e h a d been a w a y t h e gravel pit had been enlarged, a n d t h a t q u i t e a deep hole now lay w h e r e formerly t h e p a t h h a d been. The moon had not r i s e n w h e n he d r e w n e a r t h e " c a v e , " a n d a s he had 1* er seen w h e r e t h e ground w a s broken away, without a momenta warning h e h a d fallen into t h e gravel pit, down, down. He felt a dreadful s h a r p s t a b of pain, and t h e n h e k n e w no more. H a n d in hand Elizabeth a n d Ronnie came t o t h e opening of t h e pit. T':ey knew t h e i r w a y so well t h a t e'ven in t h e d a r k t h e y w e r e safe, and creeping down t h e least s t e e p s i i e t h e y m a d e t h e i r w a y t o w a r d s t h e cave. B u t before they raeched it. even in t h e moonlight, t h e y could see t h a t s o m e t h i n g w a s lying where generally all was flat and bare, something that looked black a g a i n s t t h e snow. " B u t he's not a b a b y , " cried Elizabeth. "He's a g r e a t big b o y " Then drawing n e a r e r t h e y saw a still, whitefaced figure lying huddled up upon t h e snow. Ronnie w i t h t h e pict u r e s t h a t h e had seen of Bethlehem before his mind, stood wond e r i n g for a m o m e n t . " I don't

'EVERY

CHILD

NEEDS

MILK

EVERY

DAY."

MILKMAID MILK believe," he w h i s h p e r e d ; " I d o n ' t believe t h a t it is t h e H e a . e n Baby Himself — unless perhaps He's growed a lot since last y ^ a r ? O r m a y be He's got t i r e d of c c m i n g every C h r i s t m a s , and this y e a r he's sent this boy instead." (Maybe, Ronnie d e a r ! t h e Child J e s u s sent you a n d Elizabeth t o save t h i s o t h e r boy, who wa? g o ing home unexpected for the Christmas holiday). Jtfeanwhile t h e children's absence from tfreir n u r s e r y had been found out, and w h i l s t t h e y w e r e wonderfng w h a t t o do for a boy w h o would n e i t h e r m o v e nor s p e a k t o thc-m, t h e i r f a t h e r ' s voice w a s h e a r d '-ailing a s h e c a m e t o w a r d s t h e m , guided by t h e p r i n t s t h a t t h e i r own feet, and t h o s e of Tim, h a d m a d e upon t h e lawn. I t w a s h a r d for him to u n d e r stand the story t h a t both began to tell a t once. Only a quick glance told h i m t h a t it w a s the widow's boy, Tim, w h o lay t h e r e , and it did not t a k e long to c a r r y the unconscious boy a n d h u s t l e t h e o t h e r two children along t o t h e w a r m t h a n d s a f e t y of t h e house. A little c a r e soon brought T i m t o consciousness, a n d to a pa iifull knowledge of his bruises. A f t e r all h e had no bones broken in his fall, a n d he w a s soon able t o tell t h e m t h e w a y h e had come t > fall into t h e gravel pit. Then, fed a n d w a r m e d , he w a s s e t upon h i s ri<jht p a t h for t h e little w a y t h a t led him home. A s for Elizabeth and Ronald, t h o u g h n u r s e scolded t h e m h a r d for going o u t alone a n d at such a n h o u r , and t h r e a t e n e d p u n i s h m e n t s for C h r i s t m a s Day, next m o v i n g t h e i r f a t h e r decided t h a t t h e cold w h i c h both of t h e m had c a u g h t was punishment enough; for, a f t e r all, t h e y t h o u g n t they w e r e b e i n g , v^ry good and m e a n t no h a r m a t all. A n d after all w h a t would h a v e been t h e f a t e of poor Tim, h a d t h e y not gone to seek the B a b y in the "Cave" t h a t Christmas eve? ;

A box ot MARGO SOAP IS AN

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The Calcutta Chemical Co., Ltd., No. 8, Raffles Chambers, S'pore.

• • •

•• • • •


6

FR. E. LELIEVRE AND THE LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR. A BRIEF HISTORY OF. THE BEGINNINGS. ( D R A W N F R O M T H E E D I T I O N W R I T T E N BY BENEDICTINES OF (NINTH

THE

TEIGHMOUTH.)

INSTALMENT)

THE

WORK CONTINUED IN ENGLAND. T*HE house in Bristol m a d e a v e r y good friend in a m o s t unusual w a y . T h e sixty-five old people, h a d been installed n e a r Clifton in a c o t t a g e and a f o r m e r stable, while t h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s w a i t e d for Providence. A g e n t l e m a n w h o lived n e a r h a d lost a c a t — a pedigree c a t — a n d a d v e r t i s e d a r e w a r d of £10 t o w h o e v e r should b r i n g it back. T h e old people h a d perceived a fine tom-cat in t h e i r enclosure, and a f t e r a f o r t u n a t e h u n t t h e y got hold of it. T h e g e n t l e m a n w a s informed, and, w i t h a pleasant smile, paid t h e m a visit. 4' " T h a t is not m y c a t , " said h e . H e was a contractor and knew Clifton well, and w i t h a k e e n glance h e saw t h a t t h e S i s t e r s needed t o build. Half from love of h i s a r t and half t h r o u g h benevolence h e m a d e e n c o u r a g i n g offers. Alas! the purse was empty b u t h e promised t o give good c r e d i t a n d do good work. N e c e s s i t y finished t h e negotiation a n d t o w a r d s 1875, t h e h o m e a n d chapei looked like a respectable, h e a l t h y establishment. "At Plymouth/' wrote Fr. Lelievre, " w i t h o u t c h a n g i n g i t s locality, t h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s h a v e e n l a r g ed t h e i r building a n d h a v e s p e n t n e a r l y £850. They began with only t e n shillings. I say h u m b l y t h a t m y faith is not equal t o t h e i r s . I n no o t h e r place h a s God m a d e his protection m o r e sensibly felt. W h e n I a r r i v e d t h e y showed m e seven 'new old people' one of w h o m a little old w o m a n of n i n e t y five, is t h e very pearl of t h e whole family." A t Newcastle a g a i n , t h e r e w a s a n opening for t h e p u r c h a s e of a fine p r o p e r t y a t Meadowbank. T h e S i s t e r s h a d vainly been s e a r c h i n g f o r a place for ever so long. One d a y , t h e Good M o t h e r w a s p r a y i n g b e f o r e t h e Blessed Sacrament, a s k i n g t h a t t h e y m i g h t b e shown a good place. H e r p r a y e r w a s g r a n t e d , for t h e l a w y e r s e n t for h e r t h e r e and t h e n t o tell h e r of M e a d o w b a n k . A s s h e left t h e c h u r c h a poor old w o m a n on crutc h e s p r e s s e d t w o pennies into h e r h a n d , s a y i n g : "My God bless you, S i s t e r ! " " W h i c h , " a d d s F r . Lelievre, "God did not fail t o do, a n d M e a d o w b a n k is o u r s . " I t w a s in t h e s a m e y e a r t h a t h e wrote triumphantly: "At last we a r e g o i n g t o plant o u r t h i r d h o m e in London. Best of all, it is in t h e E a s t E n d , t h e little Poland of London. N o Christian population is w o r s e off t h a n h e r e . I t is o u r 151st foundation a n d is well in t h e m i d s t of 500,000 poor." E a r l y in 1874, in May, h e w a s a g a i n in F r a n c e , b u t a p p a r e n t l y looking e x h a u s t e d . T h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s of t h e P o o r in Spain. 1 f

T h e first foundation m a d e in Spain w a s a t Barcelona on 19th M a r c h , 1863, t h e F e a s t of S t . Joseph. The Sisters had arrived a t t h e same time as the letter announcing their coming and this w a s nine o'clock in t h e evening. A h o u s e h a d been hired, b u t t h e y h a d n o b e d s ; a -neighbour lent t h e m b l a n k e t s a n d pillows, a n d

t h e y h a d a room full of s t r a w . T h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s lay down, r e j o i c i n g in t h e i r p r i v a t i o n s . They did n o t know Spanish, only a little C a t a l a n , b u t as soon a s t h e y showed t h e m s e l v e s in t h e market-place t h e y w e r e s u r r o u n d e d by friendly | h e l p e r s . E v e r y o n e w a s glad to see ~ t h e m , t o s a y a good word, invoking t h e blessing of God on t h e m a n d b e g g i n g t h e m t o accept a n offeri n g . T h e y could only receive w o m e n a s t h e h o m e h a d b u t accomodation for t w e n t y - t w o . Soon a n old m a n of e i g h t y p r e s e n t e d himself, s a y i n g : " I h a v e come to s t a y h e r e ! " T h e y refused to accept h i m . "My n a m e is J o s e p h , " said t h e old m a n . H e a r i n g t h i s , t h e y consented t o receive him, in h o n o u r of t h e i r holy P a t r o n . But h e w a s covered w i t h r a g s , a n d t h e r e w e r e in t h e h o u s e n o clothes for m e n . Two L i t t l e S i s t e r s got r e a d y t o g o out and b e g for h i m . " J u s t t h e n , " w r o t e t h e Good Moj ther, "there came a t u g at the bell a n d a parcel w a s handed in. W h a t a s u r p r i s e ! I t w a s a coml plete suit of clothes for a m a n . } We d r e s s e d J o s e p h in t h e m a n d h e said in h i s simple w a y t h a t h e h a d n e v e r before h a d such a suit, a n d people would t a k e h i m for a s e n o r . " T h e work had a modern character which strongly aroused the a t t e n t i o n and s y m p a t h y of t h e I S p a n i s h people, for in Spain n u n s | w e r e not in t h e h a b i t of t a k i n g c h a r g e of men, a n d it w a s a new t h i n g t o see t h e m b e g g i n g . At Manresa, t h e same warm reception w a s given to t h e w o r k and, a few d a y s a f t e r t h e S i s t e r s ' a r rival, t w o p o s t u l a n t s p r e s e n t e d t h e m s e l v e s , t h e first-fruits of t h e i r S p a n i s h subjects. T h e collections h e r e took on a n e w c h a r a c t e r . W h e n t h e peas (of a kind m u c h e a t e n a n d liked in Spain) were t h r e s h e d out in t h e public t h r e s h ing-floors, t h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s p r e s e n t e d t h e m s e l v e s and obtained a good supply free of cost. A t t h e t i m e of v i n t a g e t h e y m a d e a round of t h e wine-presses, w i t h t h e donkey carying two large leathern bottles; and t h e same with the olive oil. M a n y i n t e r e s t i n g stories a r e told of t h e g e n e r o s i t y of benefactors, s o m e t i m e s miraculously r e w a r d e d . I n Grenada, w h e r e t h e next foundation was m a d e , g r e a t pov e r t y w a s for s o m e t i m e t h e portion of t h e S i s t e r s a n d t h e i r n u m e r o u s old c h a r g e s . A fervent devotion d u r i n g t h e m o n t h of St. Joseph at their humble Altar pleaded for t h e m , and t h e i r very needs opened t h e t r e a s u r y of P r o vidence. A t Lorca, t h e reception given t h e m w a s quite unique. " W e were v e r y m u c h surprised t o see t h e clergy a n d all t h e a u t h o r i t i e s of t h e t o w n w a i t i n g for u s . They m a d e u s g e t out of t h e stage-coach a n d t a k e o u r s e a t s in t h e c a r r i a g e p r e p a r e d t o c a r r y us to t h e town, for we still h a d an h o u r ' s j o u r n e y before us. T h e g e n t l e m e n accompanied us t o t h e house of t h e Sist e r s of St. Vincent de P a u l , a n d on leaving t h e M a y o r announced t h a t in t h e e v e n i n g t h e t o w n band would c o m e a n d play u n d e r o u r w i n d o w s ! It w a s a s e r e n a d e !

Malaga a n d A n t e q u e r a followed I in 1865. T h e l a t t e r house w a s poor and beset w i t h difficulties : d u r i n g its period of o r g a n i s a t i o n , | b u t t h e old men w e r e well-disposed. A circumstance, trifling in itself, showed t h i s . T o w a r d s 1867, provisions of all kinds w e r e lacking. T h e donkey h a v i n g finished t h e o a t s , t h e old m a n w h o took care of him could not m a k e up his m i n d to give him only s t r a w ; so on t h e following Sunday, when t h e Good M o t h e r came t o s a y g r a c e , t h e m e n r o s e and declared t h a t t h e y would no longer d r i n k wine, a n d t h a t w i t h t h e money t h u s saved t h e y could buy o a t s for t h e donk e y : " B e c a u s e , " t h e y said, " t h e poor beast w a s so s a d ! " H e a v e n , no doubt, willed t h a t t h e poor should not suffer, for a kind gent l e m a n sent a sack of o a t s for t h e donkey, a sack of m a i z e for t h e pigs and a big p a c k e t of tobacco for t h e old m e n .

For over a quarter century GOLD LEAF T E A has been recognised as symbolic of the utmost in skill in Blending, honour and integrity in the packing of Fragrant and Inimitable Tea. Of all dealers throughout Malaya,

F. A . BARTH0L0MEUSZ LTD.,

Agents: Madrid a n d J a e n w e r e t h e n e x t 12—A, Robinson Road, to welcome t h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s , a n d SINGAPORE. poor F r . Lelievre, w h e n t e n y e a r s a f t e r h e w a s sent to Spain, found himself confronted a t M a d r i d w i t h a h o u s e still in course of construc- j been less lively and, a f t e r a time, tion which, for t h e whole of t h e | m o r e difficulties h a v e been expei n e x t five y e a r s , w a s a source of rienced. F o r when t h e y a r e known j continual a n x i e t y to h i m . T h i s to b e really poor a n d living on I foundation h a d been m a d e w i t h a l m s f r o m day to d a y , e v e r y kind g r e a t pomp, unknown in t h e An- h e a r t will be r e a d y t o come t o | nals of t h e L i t t l e F a m i l y , t h e first t h e i r aid and t h e g i f t s of t h o s e \ s t o n e of t h e h o u s e h a v i n g been w h o a r e poor t h e m s e l v e s flow in,' laid on t h e F e a s t of t h e P a t r o n a g e " b l e s s i n g those w h o give a n d | of S t . Joseph, 1875, b y K i n g Al- t h o s e w h o receive." j p h o n s o X I I in company w i t h t h e S a l a m a n c a moved F r . Lelievre Cardinal-Archbishop a n d a g r e a t t o p i t y . " A city h a l f filled w i t h crowd of princes and nobles. ^ r u i n s , a n d t h e skeletons of t w e n t y B u t poverty a n d d e b t weighed five d e v a s t a t e d c o n v e n t s , land t h a t m o s t heavily here, w h e r e , a t first should b e fertile, b u t is completely in a small hired house, twelve old p a r c h e d ; and a clergy t h a t t h e G o v e r n m e n t has ceased t o s u p p o r t . men had been received (one of w h o m w a s n i n e t y - t h r e e a n d q u i t e T h a t is Salamanca. O u r Sisters,. blind) and t w e n t y old women lodged in a half r u i n e d h o u s e , h a v e (one, who i n s t r u c t e d t h e F r e n c h given u p t h e h a b i t a b l e p a r t t o S i s t e r s in t h e m y s t e r i e s of Spanish t h e i r old people and a r e t h e m s e l v e s cookery, being no less t h a n one devoured by r h e u m a t i s m a n d sciah u n d r e d a n d four y e a r s o l d ) . T h e tica. H e rested n o t u n t i l a s p a g r a n d large building a n d new p r e - cious h o u s e was p r o c u r e d , themises h a d t o be paid for, a n d v e r y ' S a v i n g s Box' c o n t r i b u t i n g m o r e soon F r . Lelievre w a s w r i t i n g t o f r a n c s t o i t s p u r c h a s e t h a n Salaone of his unfailing a n d g e n e r o u s m a n c a h a d provided r e a l s . " T h i s first visit t o S p a i n lasted b e n e f a c t o r s : " F o r M a d r i d it is I now hold o u t m y h a n d s for a l m s . b u t a s h o r t t i m e in comparison Madrid w h e r e it is impossible t o w i t h t h e work accomplished, a n d m e e t with a w o r k m a n w h o will w a s quickly followed b y l a b o u r s give c r e d i t ; Madrid, w h e r e t h e a n d j o u r n e y s in I t a l y , Algiers . Good M o t h e r h a s on h e r books t h e Malta a n d Sicily. n a m e s of one t h o u s a n d old a n d (Continued on p a g e 7) poor people w a i t i n g for u s t o shelt e r t h e m ; Madrid, w h i c h a p p e a r s To Our Readers so r i c h w h e n one considers t h e palaces, t h e houses, t h e c a r r i a g e s , t h e toilettes, and g a y doings and~ feastings, b u t is so poor where it —Because t h e y h a v e is a question of charity. O u r Sist e r s h a v e h a d incomparably m o r e Confidence i n y o u . t o suffer in Madrid t h a n in any o t h e r city in t h e whole world. I Our Advertisers beg you t o send m e a n a l m s for t h e m t h a t I m a y be able to p u t purchase Advertising a roof on t h i s house of m y t r i b u lation and t h a t I m a y h a v e , before space in t h e I leave Spain, t h e consolation of thinking t h a t these Sisters, these Malaya Catholic L e a d e r old people, will not h a v e t o sleep u n d e r t h e open s k y . " v

W i t h t h e coming of F r . Lelievre t o Spain, in N o v e m b e r 1876, new life seemed t o s t i r in t h a t land of c h a r i t y and in a n incredibly s h o r t space of t i m e (fourteen y e a r s in all), t h i r t y new f o u n d a t i o n s h a d been added t o t h e original t h i r t e e n m a d e before his first visit. I t h a s a l w a y s been t h e experience of t h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s t h a t small beginn i n g s in m u c h p o v e r t y a r e s u r e to a t t r a c t m a n y benefactors, and t h a t when, a t first s t a r t i n g , t h e r e h a s been publicity a n d c o m p a r a t i v e ease, t h e general i n t e r e s t h a s

Do Not Disappoint Them

Tell t h e m you a p p r e c i a t e t h e i r co-operation w i t h y o u r Catholic N e w s p a p e r

Reciprocate by patronizing t h e m w h e n e v e r possible.

and


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y ,

28th

DECEMBER,

1935.

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OP DANTE

rior. Revelation presents man with mysteries which m u s t be believed, a l t h o u g h t h e y can never be comprehended; it h a s also t w o channels: Scripture and C h u r c h t r a d i t i o n ; he, therefore, who would understand Theology m u s t familiarise himself with t h e Holy Scriptures, t h e writings of t h e 1240, C a m b r i d g e in 1280, Lisbon | F a t h e r s , and t h e decrees of t h e in 1290, etc., . . . . N o r did t h e Councils in such a m a n n e r a s t o Church discourage s t u d y : by dec- assimilate as it w e r e t h e revealed rees of P o p e s and councils, classes t r u t h s and t h e i r official i n t e r p r e in Hebrew, Arabic, Greek a n d tation by t h e infallible m a g i s t e Chaldaic w e r e established in Rome, rium. Reason, for St. T h o m a s , is Paris, Oxford, Bologna, P a d u a and not individual reason, b u t a founSalamanca, and t h e m a s t e r s w e r e tain of n a t u r a l t r u t h , fed by t h e bound t o t r a n s l a t e into L a t i n t h e various s y s t e m s of Philosophy, best w o r k s originally w r i t t e n in and especially t h e t h o u g h t s of t h e s e l a n g u a g e s . We m u s t not Plato, and t h e methods of A r i s forget t o mention t h e numberless t o t l e : "Philosophy, when interC a t h e d r a l s a n d C h a p t e r Schools, preted by wise men can p r e p a r e some of which, like t h o s e of and set so to say, t h e way to faith, R h e i m s , Cologne, and C h a r t r e s and lead t h e souls of its disciples were t a u g h t by t h e g r e a t e s t scho- to receive Revelation in a fitting lars of t h e d a y ; besides, each m a n n e r ; it gives a more precise abbey k e p t a school w h e r e t h e and broader knowledge of t h e children w e r e t a u g h t Religion, t r u t h s of faith." (3) r e a d i n g and w r i t i n g . " N o doubt T h e r e can never be any contrat h a t m a n y k n i g h t s could n e i t h e r read n o r w r i t e , even a L o r d C h a m - diction between t h e s e t w o sources berlain of F r a n c e in t h e r e i g n of of knowledge, between Reason and St. Louis h a d t o acknowledge it, j Revelation, for t h e y rest upon an still t h e g r e a t e r n u m b e r could absolute t r u t h , God, t h e absolute read t h e r o m a n c e s and w r i t e let- one; St. T h o m a s ' s m a s t e r , Albert e r s , some could even speak seve- t u s M a g n u s h a d already establishral l a n g u a g e s . " (1) Even in D a n t e ' s ed t h i s ; and hence t h e perfect t i m e t h e t w o g r e a t divisions of compatibility of Philosophy a n d philosophy, familiar to Alcuin and Theology. It w a s a t t h e bidding Pope S y l v e s t e r II, s u b s i s t e d ; t h e of his General, coming a f t e r t h e trivium, comprising G r a m m a r , earnest e n t r e a t y of St. R a y m u n d Dialectics, a n d Rhetoric, and t h e of- Pennafort, t h a t St. T h o m a s Q u a d r i v i u m : A r i t h m e t i c , Music, composed his " S u m m a Catholicae Fidei Contra Gentiles," which conG e o m e t r y and Astronomy. t a i n s an elaborate exposition of I t m a y be i n t e r e s t i n g t o get a his system. H e does not neglect general idea of t h e Classification any i m p o r t a n t work published u p of l e a r n i n g in t h e 13th c e n t u r y ; to his time, a n d h e b r i n g s within t h e Christian r a n g e of t h o u g h t all t h e following m a y be t a k e n as t h e t h a t is of value in Jewish, Moorish, t y p e of t h e curriculum generally and Arabic Science. B u t it w a s followed b y t h e g r e a t U n i v e r only a f t e r a tireless study of t h e sities. (2) Scriptures and t h e F a t h e r s t h a t h e

< Second Instalment > B u t , if we now t u r n to t h e world of learning, w e shall see t h a t t h e C h u r c h did n o t wait for t h e so-called r e f o r m e r s of t h e 16th cent u r y no f e w e r t h a n seventeen new U n i v e r s i t i e s were established, modelled principally on t h o s e of P a r i s and Bologna: Naples in 1230, Vienna in 1238, S a l a m a n c a in

MERCANTILE INSTITUTE. 61, Waterloo Street, Phone 5755. Has accommodation for boys from Primary to Senior Cambridge and Commercial. Astounding results in public examinations. AFTERNOON CLASSES: Shorthand, Typewriting, Book-Keeping and other Commercial Subjects taught. EVENING CLASSES: For all Commercial Subjects and Practical English Classes for Adults based on Basic English. LANGUAGES: Latin and French taught by a former teacher of Raffles and St. Joseph's Institutions EVENING CAMBRIDGE CLASHES: These classes will commence provided sufficient number of students enroL Commercial and Evening Cambridge Classes are open to girls. Religious instructions given to Catholic Children guided by a Catholic Minister. T h e best known and the largest school"—Straits Times/Free Press. For particulars apply to Director of Studies.

Philosophy— I

Theoretical— Theology, Physics a n d Mathematics (Quadrivium) — A r i t h m e t i c , Music, Geom e t r y and A s t r o n o m y .

n.

III.

Practical ( L a w ) — E t h i c s and Political nomy. Logic

(Trivium)—

G r a m m a r , Dialectics Rhetoric. IV.

Eco- : | | j and

Mechanics— Woollen I n d u s t r y , Manufact u r e of A r m s , N a v i g a t i o n A g r i c u l t u r e , Chase, Medicine, T h e a t r e , etc.

A SYMBOL ft is difficult to express the reverent love w e feel for those w h o are gone. A funeral here and a Symbol of remembrance aid and comfort the bereaved.

SINGAPORE CASKET CO. PENHAS ROAD. SINGAPORE.

T h e long-standing dispute between t h e nominalists and t h e realists h a d s o m e w h a t abated, t h e l a t t e r h a v i n g scored a t e m p o r a r y victory. The two great masters are incontestably St. Thomas A q u i n a s and Roger Bacon, c h a m pions of t w o schools t h a t will diverge m o r e and more, until a notable portion of t h e latter, h a v ing u n f o r t u n a t e l y rolled from h e r e s y to heresy, will a t last r e volt a g a i n s t t h e Church, and r e fuse t o acknowledge any a u t h o r i t y b u t t h a t of individual reason. Like all t h e scholastics, St. T h o m a s a d m i t s of two sources of knowledge: t h e m y s t e r i e s of f a i t h and t h e t r u t h s of reason, b u t Revelation is pre-eminently supe-

determined to compose his " M a g n u m o p u s " t h e " S u m m a Theologiae," t h a t visible empire of t h o u g h t , all embracing, e x h a u s tive and sovereign, t h e sum of all known learning, a r r a n g e d according to t h e best m e t h o d s t h e n known and always subordinate t o t h e dictates of t h e Church.

We m u s t not be surprised, t h e r e fore, if S t . T h o m a s is proposed by t h e Church t o t h e faithful, as t h e s u r e s t i n t e r p r e t e r of h e r t e a c h i n g : Pope J o h n X X I I said of h i m in t h e bull of his canonisation, 17th J u l y , 1323: "Quod scripsit articulos, t o t miracula fecit."* T h e F a t h e r s of t h e council of T r e n t wished t h a t , d u r i n g all t h e i r sessions, t h e " S u m m a " of St. T h o m a s should remain on t h e a l t a r along w i t h t h e Holy Bible and t h e decrees of t h e Sovereign Pontiffs, in o r d e r t o derive from it advice, a r g u m e n t s , and oracles. In t h e m i d s t of t h e conflicting religions and philosophical opinions of our t i m e s t h e voice of t h e ever-watchful S h e pherd in Rome w a s again h e a r d : Pope Leo XIII issued a Bull to " r e s t o r e C h r i s t i a n philosophy in t h e schools, according t o the t h o u g h t s of St. T h o m a s . " (To be continued) (1) Leon Gautier: La Chevalerie (Education du Baron). (2) The seven liberal arts are already described in Marcianos Copella's Satyricon corrposed n A.D. 490. (3) Leo XIII: Bull " Aertemi Patris." (4) As many articles as he wrote, co many miracles did he work. :

FR. E.

LELIEVRE.

(Contd. from p a g e 6) Foundations in Algiers and Sicily T h e d e a t h of J e a n n e J u g a n . On leaving Spain a f t e r t h i s first visit, F r . Lelievre's d e s t i n a t i o n w a s Algiers, w h e r e Cardinal ( t h e n Msgr.») Lavigerie w a s c a r r y i n g on his great a n d zealous apostolate on t h e ground rendered classic by t h e memory of St. A u g u s t i n e , whose city of Hippo became t h e site of an establishment of t h e Little S i s t e r s . Algiers had a l r e a d y a p r o s perous foundation, an old Moorish house in a n exquisite s i t u a t i o n having been t r a n s f o r m e d i n t o a European dwelling which w a s soon filled with poor old people, C h r i s t i a n s , J e w s and M o h a m m e d a n s . In F r . Lelievre, t h e g r e a t missiona r y Bishop found a k i n d r e d spirit and they became g r e a t friends. T h e two islands of Sicily a n d Malta next m a d e F r . Lelievre's acquaintance. In Sicily three foundations w e r e p r e p a r e d b y h i m , Catania, Acireale a n d Messina, t h e l a t t e r at t h e foot of Mount E t n a a m o n g t h e lava and t h e o r a n g e groves. A long account w a s w r i t t e n by F r . Lelievre of t h e o p e n i n g of St. A g a t h a ' s a t C a t a n i a , d e s cribing t h e decorations, t h e receptions, and t h e feast a t which H i s Grace designed to s a y t h e Grace and, t o g e t h e r with six o t h e r Benedictines who accompanied h i m , served t h e soup and o t h e r dishes t o t h e old people. A t Messina t h e h o m e seemed like a s a n c t u a r y , s o edifying w a s t h e piety of t h e old men, who h a d mostly been sea f a r i n g people. " T h e y h e a r Mass every d a y , " w r o t e F r . Lelievre, "said by a Capuchin, t h e n assist a t t h e S i s t e r ' s thanksgiving: a n d then h e a r m y Mass . ." One good old blind i n m a t e w a s h e a r d p r a y i n g : "Oh, m y God, if it could b e your will j u s t t o let m e see for o n e moment t h e s e good S i s t e r s w h o t a k e such care of m e ! " In t h e s p r i n g of 1878, F r . Lelievre w a s again in R o m e a s delegate of t h e L i t t l e F a m i l y t o obtain t h e Canonical Approbation of t h e Holy See to t h e Rule. T h e greatest i n t e r e s t of t h e discussion t u r n e d upon poverty a n d t h e vow of hospitality a s a f o u r t h vow. This was t h e vital question of t h e work. A f t e r much discussion t h e delegate w a s informed t h a t t h e decision of t h e Consultor w a s f a vourable. T h e advice of t h e P r e late who p r e p a r e d t h e case w a s identical: " t h e r e a r e to be no f u n d s ; no i n c o m e s ; n o r e g u l a r e n d o w m e n t ; t h e article concerning fixed revenues is crossed o u t . " Finally it w a s recognised t h a t hospitality p e r t a i n s t o t h e essence of t h e w o r k itself of t h e L i t t l e Sisters of t h e Poor, a n d t h e p r i n ciple of t h e vow w a s p e r m i t t e d . Eventually t h e Sovereign Pontiff pronounced t h e s u p r e m e s e n t e n c e of Approbation. T h e Decree w a s dated March 1st, i n a u g u r a t i n g t h e m o n t h of S t . Joseph. In A u g u s t of t h e s a m e y e a r , a s if h e r life h a d been prolonged t o t o see t h e joyful A p p r o b a t i o n of h e r I n s t i t u t e , died J e a n n e J u g a n " o u r Little S i s t e r M a r i e de la C r o ix," in h e r e i g h t y - s i x t h y e a r , a n d t h i r t y - s e v e n t h of profession. H e r entrance into H e a v e n m u s t indeed h a v e found a w a r m welcome f r o m t h e t h o u s a n d s of souls of t h e poor and neglected w h o h a d been s a v e d t h r o u g h h e r m e a n s a s well a s f r o m those of h e r Little S i s t e r s " w h o had been united w i t h h e r in w o r k s of c h a r i t y on e a r t h a n d were now enjoying t h e i r e t e r n a l r e w a r d in t h e Full Vision of H i m who is Divine L o v e . " (To be c o n t i n u e d ) *


tfALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y ,

28th DECEMBER, 1935.

Woman's Page

BB HQ OCf lI O BQ DO OB BD HCI B DD

THE

CATHOLIC BUSINESS GIRL.

In Several Respects She Has Heavy Responsibility to Her Fellows. N o w t h a t w o m e n a n d girls in a j THE SANCTUARY OF T H E b u s i n e s s office o r w o r k s h o p h a v e | FAMILY. become the rule r a t h e r t h a n t h e exception, t h e r e a r i s e s a wonderful | N t h e divine plan t h e family was intended to serve as a sancc h a n c e for t h e Catholic businessg i r l t o set a golden example for t u a r y w h e r e y o u t h f u l inexperience t h o s e a r o u n d h e r , particularly h e r m i g h t be saved from t h e perils of t h e world. God intended t h a t t h e non-Catholic a s s o c i a t e s . T h i s , however, does n o t m e a n gentleness of m o t h e r h o o d a n d t h e t h a t s h e m u s t " t a l k religion," o r s t r e n g t h of f a t h e r h o o d should be in a n y w a y t r y t o influence t h o s e every child's h e r i t a g e , a n a d m i r p e r s o n s t o w a r d h e r w a y of t h i n k - ably blended tuition designed t o i n g . Indeed, n o . I t simply m e a n s lead childhood along p a t h s of t h a t s h e m u s t b e faithful a n d con- "wisdom and a g e and g r a c e . " . . H u s b a n d s a n d wives in God's s c i e n t i o u s in t h e performance of h e r d u t i e s , t u r n a deaf e a r t o wisdom a r e also f a t h e r s a n d m o T h e g r a c e of p a r e n t h o o d cruel, a n d all too often injurious t h e r s . g o s s i p , a n d be k i n d a n d considerate imposes m o s t serious • obligations. t o w a r d all w i t h w h o m s h e comes In t h e p e r s o n of f a t h e r s a n d m o t h e r s God h a s raised up n a t u r a l in c o n t a c t . E v e r y o n e a d m i r e s t h e clever p r o t e c t o r s for t h e support of helpgirl—that young woman w h o less infancy. T h e solemn d u t i e s s h i n e s o u t from h e r less t a l e n t e d which h u s b a n d s and wives owe t c c o - w o r k e r s ; b u t if s h e is c u r t a n d each o t h e r a r e not m o r e sacred indifferent—if s h e t h i n k s n o t h i n g t h a n t h e obligation s h a r e d equally b y b o t h in r e g a r d t o t h e depenof p a s s i n g on t h e s h o r t c o m i n g s of Others, h e r associates quickly for- d a n t lives for which t h e C r e a t o r g e t all about t h o s e gifts t h e good h a s m a d e t h e m responsible. L o r d h a s g i v e n her, a n d a d m i t T h e w e i g h t of t h i s obligation is n o t diminished a s t h e i n f a n t a d A SURE TEST. advances t o adolescence. A t t h i s By Teresa O'Hara. critical a g e of g r o w t h and c h a n g e $ure,jyou might as well be still. t h e childish simplicity of life b e For rll never say "1 will," g i n s t o d e p a r t . W h e n life w i t h i t s And you needn't claim I treated you b e w i l d e r m e n t s unfolds before t h e with scornm': eyes of a child, t h e r e should s t a n d I but asked, you, plain and civil, before t h e child's side a good f a (And you answered, Oh, the t h e r and m o t h e r to i n t e r p r e t t h e vision. B o t h f a t h e r a n d m o t h e r a r e divill") needed. E a c h h a s s o m e t h i n g t o Do you laugh before your breaka r e give which n o o t h e r person can fast in the mournin*? supply. Oh, it's easy to be gay, + rr

rr

9

When the world goes just your way, And every flower blooms for your adornin'; hut I'm lookin' for a b y Who can sing to hide a sigh, And laugh before his breakfast in the mornin'. Well . . . . . That's my own affair; Sure, avic, you needn't care— If I'm left. But 1 give you timely warnin* Before you take a wife, To make or mar your life, Just ask her if she's pleasant in the mornin'.

HOW T O B E H A P P Y A N D MARRIED.

y

t h a t s h e is a discredit t o the* f a i t h s h e p r o f e s s e s — i n fact s h e is a s h a m a n d in capital l e t t e r s . E x a m p l e i s contagious. Let e v e r y girl r e m e m b e r t h a t plain, old-fashioned t r u t h . A Catholic's w o r d s a n d a c t i o n s a r e weighted, c a r r i e d in all directions, and v e r y often i m i t a t e d . H e n c e each one is in conscience b o u n d t o be faithful in disposing of w o r k i n g t a s k s , c h a r i t a b l e in speech, a n d c o u r t e o u s t o all. I t should be r e m e m b e r e d , too, t h a t real h a p p i n e s s is g a i n e d by trying to make others happy. T h e r e f o r e , e v e r y Catholic should, w h e n e v e r t h e o p p o r t u n i t y offers, e x t e n d some little k i n d n e s s t o t h i s o r t h a t less-favoured person a r o u n d us. T h e Catholic girl w h o t h u s dep o r t s herself will assuredly g r o w in t h e e s t i m a t i o n of h e r non-Catholic a s s o c i a t e s . Furthermore, s h e will reflect credit upon herself, a n d b e t t e r still, upon t h a t g r a n d old f a i t h w h i c h should be h e r h i g h e s t - p r i z e d a n d d e a r e s t possession.

, j

, j

" M A N Y excellent y o u n g m e n a n d women a r e r a t h e r impractical w h e n it comes t o t h e problem of marriage. T h e y a r e looking for r o m a n c e — which, f o r t h e g r e a t m a j o r i t y , is slow in coming, if not elusive. "Grand passions," says a French writer, " a r e a s r a r e as m a s t e r pieces." I t is a foolish egotism t o wait too long for romance. W h e n it comes, if it ever comes, it m a y b e r a t h e r uncomfortable than otherwise. Romance is not t h e essential element. Given fairly r i g h t conditions for a p r o p e r m a r r i a g e , m u c h m a y ^ b e left t o t h e r e l a t i o n ship itself t o improve and elevate t h e e n t e r p r i s e . T h e solid good should not be postponed for t h e will o' t h e wisp i n f a t u a t i o n . Good h e a l t h , no g r e a t d i s p a r i t y in y e a r s , m u t u a l esteem, h o m e m a k i n g qualities in h e r case, ind u s t r y and t h r i f t on his, a common creed sincerely held b y b o t h , and t h e n t h e m u t u a l i n t e r e s t s of t h e home and t h e coming f a m i l y — w i t h t h e fidelity and friendship s u r e to e n s u e — a n d you h a v e a r e a sonably h a p p y condition of wedded life. T h e r e a r e bachelors of f o r t y and fifty w h o can realise t h i s in t h e retrospect. T h e y would be h a p p i e r now if t h e y h a d been m o r e sensible in previous y e a r s ; a n d t h o s e w h o would h a v e m a d e t h e m good wives a r e also e n d u r i n g t h e s a m e a b n e g a t i o n of single " b l e s s e d n e s s . "

"Every child needs milk every day"

"MILKMAID" MILK THE

JEST.

A little girl, brought up on the Ten Commandments and held rather rigidly to observance of the third one, asked her mother if chickens laid eggs on Sunday. She was very young and had not been to the country enough to know that the beasts of the field and the denizens of the barnyard thought little of God's laws. So the question was as natural as if she had asked why cows lie down before a rain. However, those jokesters called let out one whoop and "grown-ups laughed till they cried. The child was mortified. The rest of the visit was spoiled. Memory alone would have been sting enough, but the joke was so good it had to be repeated over and over again to all who came near. The small girl was I. This and similar matters taught me something that I think all parents should know. If they have been sensitive children themselves they will not need telling. If not, they do. Humiliation is the best way to kill self-reliance and self-confidence. Children of the emotional or impressionable type can suffer enough agony—in—ar minute to cloud their lives for weeks. They lie awake and live such things over again, torturing themselves by imaginary titters and gibes behind their backs. Of course, in the touch and go of family life, it is almost impossible to keep the jest at someone's expense perpetually smothered. All children should be able to take it to a certain extent. But a discerning mother will be able to tell just what things injure and what will be taken in a spirit of fun. There is a distinct difference. A child may be supersensitive about features— ears or nose or hair. Again, he may be vulnerable about what he says or does, scarcely one lives who has not some raw spot that quivers with agony when touched." As the child grows older the commonplace roughage of life may thicken his skin, but as we now know, these private tortures of childhood quite as often lead to morbid-hysteria and self-pity beyond reclaiming. Such little things have gigantic results sometimes. Of all emotions in childhood, probably none leave such scars as those of humiliation and shame. 99

GOLD

CAKE

Vz cup shortening VA cup sugar 6 egg yolks Vz teaspoon lemon or vanilla extract 1% cups pastry flour 2 teaspoons Baking Powder VA teaspoon salt Vz cup milk Cream s h o r t e n i n g ; a d d s u g a r slowly, b e a t i n g in well. Add e g g yolks and b e a t until light a n d c r e a my. Add flavouring. Sift t o g e t h e r flour, b a k i n g powder a n d s a l t ; add a l t e r n a t e l y w i t h milk t o firstm i x t u r e . B a k e in greased s q u a r e or loaf p a n in m o d e r a t e oven a t 350 ° F . for 30 m i n u t e s . Makes 1 eight-inch c a k e or 1 small loaf or 2 eight-inch layers.

ARABIAN FRUIT LOAF 3 tablespoons s h o r t e n i n g 1 cup b r o w n s u g a r 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla e x t r a c t % cup s o u r cream Vz cup chopped a l m o n d s 1 cup chopped d a t e s 2 1 / 3 cups flour 3 teaspoons Baking Powder- * VA teaspoon soda Vz t e a s p o o n salt Cream s h o r t e n i n g ; add sugar., unbeaten e g g s , flavouring, s o u r cream, n u t s a n d d a t e s . B e a t well. Sift t o g e t h e r d r y i n g r e d i e n t s ; a d d to first m i x t u r e ; mix well. B a k e in greased loaf pan in m o d e r a t e oven a t 3 5 0 ° F . about 50 m i n u t e s . Makes 1 loaf.

OLD T I M E H I C K O R Y CAKE.

NUT

GRANDEUR. Lady, giving tea party to celebrate her granddaughter's twenty-first birthday, had her much-treasured silver teapot in use, but the spout refusing to work satisfactorily, the tea only trickled through. One of the guests whose patience was getting exhausted, remarked sweetly: "Madam, that tea-pot is choked with grandeur." FINISHED.

Vz cup shortening V/A cups sugar 3 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 /A cups pastry flour 2 /z teaspoons baking powder VA teaspoon salt 2 3 cup milk 1 cup chopped hickory nut meats x

l

A young married woman found it raMake t h e l a r g e cake recipe, u s i n g ther hard to make both ends meet on the housekeeping money and wondered how V\ cup s h o r t e n i n g instead of V-i cup. Mix hickory n u t m e a t s w i t h d r y she could get a little more. One night, as her husband was reading ingredients. B a k e in l a r g e g r e a s e d the newspaper, and clouds of smoke rose t u b e in m o d e r a t e oven a t 3 5 0 F . towards the ceiling from his pipe, she about H 4 h o u r s . Pecans o r black said: "Dick, do you know that a lot of | walnut m e a t s m a y be used in place men have given up smoking lately?" Makes 1 n i n e "Yes," he replied, "I'm just reading ! of hickory n u t s . • inch cake. their names in the deaths column." 3


MALAYA

CATHOLIC LEADER,

SATURDAY,

28th DECEMBER. 1935.

A Materialistic Plea F o r Science

And

Theology

9

Euthanasia

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A Local Columnist's Views Discussed < A N A K S I N G A P U R A ' h a s decidedly m a d e a bad b r e a k in referr i n g t o t h e subject of E u t h a n a s i a in t h e u s u a l column b y h i m in t h e ' S t r a i t s T i m e s ' of December, 19. U n d e r t h e caption 'Bosh' h e glibly a v e r s t h a t ' t h e use of t h e adjective " d e l i c a t e " t o describe e u t h a n a s i a a s a subject for discussion in t h e ' S t r a i t s T i m e s ' correspondence col u m n s , h a s caused h i m t o see red.' We quite agree with him t h a t the e p i t h e t 'delicate' in t h i s p a r t i c u l a r i n s t a n c e w a s quite i n a p p r o p r i a t e , a n d w e should h a v e p r e f e r r e d t h e word 'shocking" o r ' o u t r a g e o u s ' a s m o r e in keeping w i t h t h e subject. In t h e n e x t p a r a g r a p h h e begins b y a d m i t t i n g t h a t all h a v e t o die o n e day, a n d speaks of d e a t h bei n g robbed of i t s physical t e r r o r s b y m o d e r n science: W e suppose ' A n a k S i n g a p u r a ' is n o t a w a r e of t h e f a c t t h a t d e a t h h a s been robbed of i t s physical t e r r o r s by s o m e t h i n g else besides science. H a s h e n o t h e a r d of t h e n u m b e r s t h a t h a v e u n d e r g o n e p a i n a n d tort u r e for t h e love of s o m e t h i n g h i g h e r ! Such w a s t h e i r longing t o undergto suffering a n d d e a t h for t h e defence of t h e i r convictions t h a t t h e y could t r i u m p h a n t l y exclaim even in t h e t h r o e s of d e a t h : " W h e r e is t h y victory Oh D e a t h , W h e r e is t h y s t i n g ? " T h a t w a s indeed c o u r a g e ! T h a t w a s real fortitude! B u t w h a t w i t h our cynics of t h e p r e s e n t d a y ? T h e y w a n t t o enjoy t h e p l e a s u r e s of t h i s life, a n d s h i r k its o t h e r obligations. In life t h e y p u t on an a i r of n o n c h a l a n c e ; b u t a t t h e a p p r o a c h of d e a t h t h e y begin to saueal. W h a t a g l a r i n g e x a m p l e of cowardice? Shameless cowardice on t h e p a r t of intellectual m a n . W e submit t h a t "ninety-nine per cent of u s would like t o see t h e elimination of useless suffering"— b u t t h e n h o w much of t h e sufferi n g in t h i s world h a s been b r o u g h t on by m a n himself! How many a r e p a y i n g t h e price of t h e i r lustful a n d evil inclinations! N a y we m a y a s s e r t t h a t t h e m a j o r i t y of cases w e m e e t w i t h in life, a r e b u t r e a p i n g t h e fruit of w h a t t h e y h a v e sown. O u r columnist n e x t r e f e r s to w h a t h e calls 'theological corns.' I n t h e first place we positively obj e c t t o t h e unwholesome a n d disrespectful association of such an

DRINK FRUIT DRINK SUCH A S ORANGE PINEAPPLE LIME

SMASH, SMASH,

SMASH, E T C . . m

FRAMROZ & CO., 292,

Teluk Ayer

Street,

SINGAPORE.

u n b e c o m i n g word a s 'corns' w i t h t h e h i g h e s t religious s e n t i m e n t s conveyed by t h e word 'theology.' N e x t we do not q u i t e see t h e r e lation between t h e " d r a s t i c t r e a t m e n t " h e speaks of, and " t h e simple way o u t " h e refers t o in t h e v e r y next line. B u t to g e t down t o t h e real core of t h e s u b j e c t , o u r condemnation of E u t h a n a s i a is not because of a n y p r i v a t e opinion on the m a t t e r , b u t because of t h e essential e r r o r in t h e idea itself. Man h a s no r i g h t to t a k e a w a y h u m a n life.—That is t h e m o r a l issue at s t a k e , a n d no concessions can be m a d e w h e r e m o r a l issues a r e concerned. B u t it is in t h e last p a r a g r a p l i t h a t his confusion becomes worse j confounded. " A s for t h e r e s t of ; u s " he says "who refuse to believe t h a t t h e S u p r e m e Being t a k e s a n y p l e a s u r e in pain, we merely a s k t h a t we should not be interferred w i t h on Theological grounds." H e r e in t h e first p a r t of t h e sent e n c e h e implicitly a s s e r t s t h a t t h o s e outside h i s school of t h o u g h t J believe t h a t t h e S u p r e m e Being t a k e s pleasure in pain. This, however, we would b r i n g t o his notice, is not t h e case. We t h o r o u g h l y disclaim to identify ourselves w i t h t h i s viewpoint. W e a r e of t h e opinion t h a t t h e idea of pain and t h a t of Divine Providence are not incompatible. P a i n is an evil; b u t we c'o not believe t h a t God is t h e direct cause of evil. 'EviP is not a ' t h i n g ' in itself. I t is t h e negation of a ' t h i n g ' t h e absence of Good'; a n d it exists because of t h e existence of 'Good/ God created 4

' Goodness;' and 'Evil' t h u s e x i s t s a s a concomitant of 'Good.' T h e r e a s o n why God p e r m i t s the existence of 'EviP is not because H e w a n t s 'evir in itself, but bec a u s e H e w a n t s some 'good,' a n d consequently t h e r e f o r e 'evil' t h u s e x i s t s because of t h e existence of t h a t 'good.' ( L e t it be noted t h a t 'evil' h e r e is used in t h e sense of 'physical evil'). T h e lion killing t h e d e e r does n o t directly i n t e n d t h e killing of t h e animal but seeks for its food, and t h e slaying of t h e d e e r is inevitably incidental t o its s e a r c h for food. A g a i n we cannot, because of t h e existence of t h e accompanying 'eviP condemn t h e 'good' to w h i c h it is a t t a c h e d . A m a n passing u n d e r a t r e e m a y b e knocked on t h e head by a falling apple. Would he be wise inc u t t i n g down t h e t r e e ? — H e would h a v e no apples t h e n . The apple fell because of t h e physical laws of n a t u r e . T h a t it fell on t h e m a n ' s head w a s an accident.— T h u s God p e r m i t s the existence of 'evil' because of t h e 'good' which it accompanies, and He cannot be called t h e cause of t h e evil, j u s t a s t h e sun cannot be said directly t o cause a shadow. F r o m the t r e n d of ' A n a k S i n g a p u r a ' s ' a r g u m e n t s in favour of e u t h a n a s i a , which to our mind is n o t h i n g short of legalised m u r d e r a n d a direct violation of t h e c o m m a n d m e n t of God, we will not be surprised if f u r t h e r legislation w e r e advocated t o do away w i t h t h e r e s t of God's c o m m a n d m e n t s . In fact t h e p r e s e n t day ' d i v o r c e l a w s ' and t h e moral sanction given t o unconscionable capitalism h a v e gone a long w a y to taboo two other great commandments a g a i n s t adultery a n d injustice.

S t . J o s e p h ' s C h u r c h , Kuching, Built By Rev. F r . Haidegger.

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T r e a t i n g serious questions of p a r a m o u n t moral i s s u e , jas m e r e j o u r n a l i s t i c quips is a s dangerous a s a child playing w i t h edge-tools; and we quite endorse t h e Bishop of Singapore's letter in t h e ' S t r a i t s Times' of 23rd inst., calling t h e w r i t e r to a point of courtesy in debate. We deem it not o u t of place to close o u r r e m a r k s w i t h t h e following excerpts anent t h e same subject from an editorial in t h e Catholic Times, London. * * * *

EUTHANASIA. MULATING the Gadarene swine, some of our medical men are rush; ing downhill to their "own destruction. • The public executioner's office was i always regarded as the lowest civic i function which the community had to : bestow, but it is the r ambition to possess it. They are determined to kill if they cannot cure, to strain the quality of I mercy and force it to a new meaning in Catholic ears, one which will include I legalised murder, and to behave, not as j if they were the friends of the sick bat their bitter foes. We cannot sympathise with them, except in their ignorance of principles which are fundamental to the Catholic outlook on life. We can, however, understand how they have reached a position which must in the end undo all popular esteem of the medical profession, I which will finally make us look at a hospital with the same repugnance as at an abattoir. It is due to the decay of dogma. If there is nothing in man but his body, if he has no immortal principle, if suffering is at the best a waste of energy and at the worst a curse, if there

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be no God, or if He be an impotent God, a cruel God, or a God indifferent to human suffering—then is euthanasia common sense. Every one of these issues, and many more besides, is raised in this proposal to legalise suicide with the assistance of the doctor, or murder with the connivance of the State, for that is what euthanasia means to a Catholic. Like sterilisation it is one of those proposals which mark the parting of the ways. If you favour it you are assisting the country—whether you know it or not—to slip backwards and downwards into paganism.

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Contraception, abortion, sterilisation, and now euthanasia. We cannot take too rosy a view of the chances that the kite-flying, in which Lord Moynihan and his friends are now indulging, will be ended by an outburst of popular anger. After all, did not the Anglican bishops give a blessing to birthcontrol, so long as it is practised with a holy intention? And have not Dean Inge, Rev. Porfessor Creed, Canon Payne, Rev. Dr. Major, and a number of other, mainly Anglican, "divines" given the unction of their approval to this second step down the slippery slope? Is it thus that the boasted "voice of Chiistendem" speaks? In time, no doubt, we shall see all these things given the approval of the legislature, but we, at any rate, shall know what is happening. Great Britain is ceasing to be Christian. It is ceasing to have a practical belief in God, and is rot even decently theist. We Catholics know the measure of our task better each day that passes. It is to save civilisation in these par*s. All these "humane" measures, when viewed in the light of our faith, are essentially cruel and uncivilised and utterly pagan.


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M A L A Y A CATHOLIC LEADER, S A T U R D A Y , 28th DECEMBER, 1935.

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Posting these rules u p p r o m i (Payable in Advance) n e n t l y in all Catholic Churches will in n o wise ensure their POST FREE FOR MALAYA, B. N. BORNEO observance, unless Catholic m o AND SARAWAK. thers take it u p o n themselves and 12 Months $6.00 6 Months $3.00 see that they are strictly adhered to. Mothers besides being m o LET US PRAY FOR O U R PONTIFF—FIDES INTREPIDA— FOREIGN. dels o f propriety themselves, (Straits currency) MARIA MONK—APOLOGETICS IN CATHOLIC ACTION. should see that their daughters 12 Months $7.00 also c o n f o r m t o this standard. 6 Months .. $3.50 sidered by some t o be w i t h G r e g o r y Let u s pray for Our Pontiff. t h e G r e a t a n d o u r p r e s e n t Pope All correspondence and literary E v e n girls under t w e l v e should , i . . :, „ „ i ^„ „i „ I F r o m t h e short account publishone of t h e m o s t learned m e n of his contributions should be addressed m a k e i t a p o i n t t o k e e p t o these ^ t i m e a n d a veritable l u m i n a r y of regulations. N e i t h e r style, nor to The Managing Editor, Rev. would h a v e been able to l e a r n of t h e C h u r c h . Moreover, t h e coatR. Cardon, 73, Bras Basah Road health, nor sport, nor art should some of t h e glorious a c h i e v e m e n t s of-arms of h i s family (Pecchi) Singapore. be made an excuse for indecency. w h i c h m a k e t h e Pontificate of contained a comet. P i u s X w a s P i u s X I one of t h e most r e m a r k - designated a s Ignis ardens (BurnTel. 7376, Singapore. able t h e Church h a s ever seen. ing fire). P i u s X w a s in fact a W e need hardly add that in discernible end and m o t i v e b u r n i n g fire of zeal a n d is known ffi,nbtgx €xtk&l£c Xmbtt advocating the foregoing stand- Tt hhaet one a c t u a t e s all h i s e n d e a v o u r s a s t h e P o p e of t h e Holy Commuard of modesty, w e do n o t mean t o c a n be d r a w n f r o m his celebrated nion. M a y t h e 'intrepid f a i t h ' of S a t u r d a y , 28th D e c e m b e r , 1935. lay d o w n a u n i f o r m fashion or m o t t o ' T h e peace of Christ in t h e our p r e s e n t Pontiff overcome all style of dress, or t o evolve a f r o m R e i g n of Christ." 'Peace' b e i n g obstacles in t h e end. t h e p r i m e object of his longings, LEAGUE OF * * * * * o f attire that w o u l d radicallv ret h e present trend towards what volutionise the prevailing modes. a p p e a r s to forebode a n o t h e r world M a r i a Monk. MODESTY. K n o w i n g t h e t y p e of books T h e object is merely t o offer a w a r , t h e intense bickerings of t h e A n e w force against the threat guide, so that, f r o m a m o n g the l a s t few m o n t h s , a n d t h e failure found in s o m e of our book-stalls, o f m o d e r n paganism has appear- m a n y different styles that happen t o a r r i v e a t a n y s t a b l e basis for it was n o t w i t h s u r p r i s e t h a t we ed w i t h i n the last f e w months in t o be in v o g u e , w o m e n m a y t h e negotiation of peace, affects c a m e a c r o s s t h a t notorious volume. disclosures of Maria h i m m o r e t h a n a n y of us m a y r e a - The Awful A m e r i c a , i n the f o r m a t i o n of a select those that are i n full accord lise. I t was with s o r r o w we h e a r d , Monk. A c h e a p edition of t h i s League o f Modesty. Just as the w i t h Christian modesty. It must t h a t t h e recent r u m o u r of his being work it a p p e a r s finds a r e a d y sale Legion of D e c e n c y w a s started as be remembered that the mere fact seriously ill was founded on fact, w i t h a c e r t a i n class of r e a d e r s ala protest against immoral films, that certain styles are adopted b y a n d t h a t t h e h e a l t h of His Holiness w a y s on t h e look-out f o r a n y t h i n g w h i c h h a s withstood t h e s t r a i n of t e n d i n g t o vilify t h e Catholic reliso n o w this n e w crusade has for the majority does not i m p l y such The s u c h vigorous a c t i v i t y , h a d failed gion, a n d i t s i n s t i t u t i o n s . iQ o b j e c t the p r o m o t i o n of m o - styles are suitable for Christian in t h i s crisis. H o w r e p u g n a n t easiness w i t h which s o m e r e a d e r s desty i n female attire. T h e w o m e n . A w o m a n in u n b e c o m - m u s t be t h e idea of w a r t o a m a n swallow t h e fops concocted in t h i s headquarters of the league are in i n g attire m a y appeal t o man's w h o h a s made h i s a i m t h e a t t a i n - book, b l a t a n t l y a d v e r t i s e s t h e low g r a d e of logical d i s c e r n m e n t which C h i c a g o , and Cardinal Mundelein baser instincts, b u t o n l y the m e n t of peace. W a r — I t w a s t h e such r e a d e r s possess. T o a discernc a u s e of bringing t h e g r e y h a i r s has g i v e n the m o v e m e n t his a p modestly clad w o m a n possesses of t h e Saintly P i u s X t o his g r a v e ing r e a d e r , t h e illogicalities conprobation: a n d h a s now b r o u g h t affliction and tained in t h e book a r e q u i t e appatrue w o m a n l y charm. s o r r o w on t h e k i n d h e a r t of P i u s r e n t . T h e careful perusal, of a A n official letter f r o m the X I . I t ought t o b e t h e d u t y of single p a g e , would be e n o u g h t o c o m m i t t e e , explaining the aims T h e d i g n i t y and sacredness of e v e r y Catholic now t o p r a y for t h e convince a n y t h o u g h t f u l r e a d e r of q f the organisation, states that, t h e h u m a n b o d y as the living F a t h e r of C h r i s t e n d o m in t h i s h i s t h e fallacies t o be found t h e r e i n . "the t i m e is surely ripe for a t e m p l e of G o d are borne o u t b y h o u r of grief, a n d t o say often Maria M o n k t a k e s care n o t t o coms t r o n g counter m o v e m e n t , a veri- the words o f St. Paul: " K n o w w i t h fervour t h e ' p r a y e r for t h e m i t herself. E v e r y t h i n g w i t h h e r is v a g u e . S h e e i t h e r s p e a k s of a table crusade against the pagan y o u n o t t h a t y o u are the temple P o p e / convent ' t h a t it would b e b e t t e r " L e t us p r a y f o r our Pontiff practices o f our d a y ; and the o f G o d , and that t h e spirit o f God for h e r n o t t o m e n t i o n ' or of a Pius." purpose of the League of M o - dwelleth in y o u ? " person ' w h o s e n a m e s h e does not (I. C o r . ) "The Lord preserve h i m , q u i t e recollect! I t is m o r e t h a n d e s t y is t o rally the forces of good T h r o u g h Adam's sin mankind s t r e n g t h e n him, g r a n t h i m h a p p i to united action/' T h e league fell f r o m a state o f innocence, n e s s on e a r t h , a n d deliver h i m n o t probable t h a t Catholics h a v e a t t i m e s b e e n approached on t h e subcalls attention t o t h e f a c t that and that, in consequence o f that i n t o t h e hands of h i s e n e m i e s . " j e c t by non-Catholic a c q u a i n t a n c e s , * * * • * m a n y Bishops h a t e followed the fall, greater or lesser exposure of a n d confronted w i t h t h e g l a r i n g falsehoods contained in t h e book. e x a m p l e of the H o l y Father i n the b o d y easily gives rise t o u n - F i d e s Intrepida. A n able r e f u t a t i o n a n d exposure Fides Intrepida : t h e m o t t o c o n d e m n i n g the i m m o d e s t f a - seemly looks and t o unchaste of t h i s f r a u d is t o be found in a w h i c h according t o t h e prophesies thoughts and desires. It m a y shions o f dress and promiscuity o f of S t . Malachy, belongs t o t h e publication of t h e 'Catholic T r u t h m a n n e r s adopted b y m a n y Chris- reasonably be said t h a t the pre- p r e s e n t Pope, e x p r e s s e s well t h e S o c i e t y / T h i s little book o u g h t t o tian w o m e n and girls in our day, sent day corrupt morals are o u t s t a n d i n g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of t h i s be a g r e a t help t o Catholics in r e and enlightening their a n d f o l l o w i n g t h e mandate o f traceable t o the general lowering illustrous Pontiff. H i s " F e a r l e s s futing friends w h o m a y be inclined t o H i s Holiness urges the organisa- o f the standards of d e c e n c y b y F a i t h " h a s c e r t a i n l y been t h e give too e a s y credence t o t h e falseeasily discernible m a r k of all h i s t i o n o f w o m e n w h o b y their familiarising w i t h the nude. W o - a c t i o n s . With t h a t s t r o n g a n d hoods w h i c h t h e y read. One t h i n g counsel, example and propaganda m e n are the makers o f morals, fearless hand h e h a s held t h e r e i n s w e a r e convinced we m a y a s s e r t and the p u r i t y and d e c e n c y o f of t h e Church, a n d ably guided it a priori w i t h o u t a n y f e a r of being shall c o m b a t the wearing o f S t . c o n t r a d i c t e d — M a r i a M o n k h a s by apparel unsuited t o Christian the world will be such as they t h r o u g h troublous t i m e s . Malachy, an I r i s h Bishop it is r e - now achieved h e r end. T h e royalthemselves m a k e it. T h e scourge modesty. lated, from a vision t h a t h e saw, t i e s b r o u g h t in b y t h e m a n y ediF o r t h e benefit o f our lady o f paganism w h i c h is afflicting d r e w u p a list of illustrous Pontiffs tions of h e r w o r k would b y now readers w e give b e l o w in outline the world t o - d a y can o n l y be m e t w h o w e r e to rule t h e C h u r c h from h a v e a m o u n t e d t o a n e a t little pile. T h e s e pro- I t is f u r t h e r significant, a s t h e the prescribed standard of m o - and countered b y the word and his t i m e forewards. phesies t a k e t h e form of s h o r t editor of a n E n g l i s h M a g a z i n e h a s example of valiant Christian d e s t y i n dress:— a n n o u n c e m e n t s indicating some r e m a r k e d , t h a t t h i s book t o g e t h e r woman. Therefore it becomes 1. T h e dress should n o t be c u t noticeable t r a i t of t h e f u t u r e w i t h s u c h o t h e r s a s deal w i t h t h i s l o w e r in f r o n t or in back the special d u t y of w o m e n t o be Popes, enunciated u n d e r m y s t i c a l u n s a v o u r y subject is " s t o c k e d by t h a n one o r t w o inches the guardians of modesty and t i t l e s . Though t h e i r a u t h e n t i c i t y p u r v e y o r s of p o r n o g r a p h i c books h a s not been firmly established, or and p i c t u r e s for t h e m o s t p a r t . " b e l o w the little hollow of purity. t h e i r prophetic n a t u r e accepted b y * * * * * the throat. W e do not seek t o make t h e Church, t h e r e is s o m e t h i n g Apologetics in Catholic Action. m o r e t h a n coincidence in t h e de2 . T h e sleeves should at least 'prudes' or 'frumps' of our girls s i g n a t i o n given t o certain Popes. Most Catholics, it would seem to cover the elbows, and the b y preventing them from living us, a r e c o n t e n t w i t h t h e a m o u n t of To t a k e but for i n s t a n c e t h o s e of skirt fall far below the u p t o the age: But w h a t is really s o m e of our l a t e s t Popes. T h e 'Religious Knowledge' i m p a r t e d to t h e m a t school, and scarcely give knees. t i t l e given to P i u s IX w a s Crux m e a n t b y living up t o the age? de ci~uce (cross from a c r o s s ) . H i s a t h o u g h t t o i m p r o v i n g t h e i r know3 . T h e stockings should be D o e s it mean that they must subw a s a reign of sorrow, a n d t h e ledge of Religious doctrine, and w o r n full LENGTHS and be J * * ^ ™ ^ ^ from t h e t e a c h i n g of t h e C h u r c h . T h u s neither flesh-coloured nor immodest fashions in dress? t h e house of Savoy whose e m b l e m too it often h a p p e n s t h a t t h e y find transparent. is a cross. T h a t given to Leo X I I I t h e m s e l v e s unable t o a n s w e r t h e O f t e n , these fashions are introw a s Lumen in caelo (light in t h e most trifling objections w h i c h t h e y 4 . T h e c l o t h i n g in general duced b y unscrupulous capitalists s k y ) . This Pope h a s been con- m i g h t h e a r t h e i r f r i e n d s raise should be o f such quality whose only concern is t o make a g a i n s t t h e i r religious t e n e t s . Such and q u a n t i t y as t o conceal m o n e y . Catholic ladies all over If they do not lose sight o f this ignorance should not b e w o r t h y of One of t h e rather than reveal the f o r m the world should strive to set essential condition, w e certainly m i l i t a n t Catholics. chief a i m s of Catholic A c t i o n ought and the person o f the fashions in dress w h i c h w o u l d d o n o t mind our girls 'living u p t o be t o p r e p a r e oneself t o answer wearer. reach a high Christian standard. t o the age.'

NOTES A N D COMMENTS

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M A L A Y A C A T H O L I C L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 28th D E C E M B E R , 1935.

WORLD CATHOLIC PRESS EXHIBITION. MANY

COUNTRIES

PLAN

PARTICIPATION. V a t i c a n City. A L I S T of t h e c o u n t r i e s w h e r e n a t i o n a l o r g a n i z a t i o n s a r e arranging exhibits for the International Catholic P r e s s E x h i b i t i o n to be held h e r e from A p r i l t o October, n e x t y e a r , indicates t h e world i n t e r e s t b e i n g t a k e n in t h a t event. These countries a r e : Argentine, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Czechoslovokia, Chile, C o s t a Rica, Cuba, Dantzig, El Salvador, Philippines, F r a n c e , Germany, Great Britain, Haiti, H o n d u r a s , Ireland, Italy, Jugoslavia, L a t v i a , L i t h u a n i a , L u x e m bourg, Malta, Mexico, N i c a r a g u a , Holland, P a n a m a , P a r a g u a y , P e r u , Poland, P o r t u g a l , P u e r t o Rico, R o u m a n i a , S a n Domingo, Spain, U n i t e d S t a t e s of America, Switzerland, H u n g a r y , U r u g u a y a n d Venezuela. Committees representing 19 c o m m u n i t i e s of Oriental r i t e s a r e t a k i n g p a r t in t h e exhibition. T h e religious O r d e r s a n d cong r e g a t i o n s e x h i b i t i n g will include t h e P r e m o n s t r a t e n s i a n s , Benedict i n e s , Basilians, Scolopi, Domini cans, F r a n c i s c a n Minors, Convent u a l Minors, Capuchin Minors, A u g u s t i n i a n s , Carmelites of Ancient Observance. Discalced Carmelites, S e r v a n t s of M a r y , B a r n a bites, J e s u i t s , Congregation of t h e Mission, Oblates of M a r y I m m a c u late, Oblates of t h e Virgin Mary. Pallottines, Marists, Marianists, A s s u m p t i o n i s t s , M i s s i o n a r y Daug h t e r s of t h e I m m a c u l a t e H e a r t of M a r y , Salesians, Society of t h e D i v i n e Word, M a r i a n Regular Clergy, L i t t l e Mission of t h e Deaf a n d D u m b , Sons of t h e Holy F a mily, P r i e s t s of t h e Sacred H e a r t of J e s u s a n d C h r i s t i a n B r o t h e r s . (N.C.W.C).

A N E W MISSION IN T H E PACIFIC. Rome.—Missionaries of t h e Soc i e t y of M a r y h a v e been given c h a r g e of t h e newly erected Vicar i a t e Apostolic of Wallis and F u t u n a . T h e s e islands h a v e been d e t a c h e d from t h e V i c a r i a t e of C e n t r a l Oceania. T h e Most R e v . A l e x a n d e r Poncet, w h o before h i s d e p a r t u r e for t h e missions of t h e Pacific in 1925 w a s in c h a r g e of t h e F r e n c h p a r i s h in London a n d t a u g h t a t t h e M a r i s t Scholasticate a t Paigton, h a s been named first V i c a r Apostolic of t h e new region. Bishopelect P o n c e t is 51 y e a r s of age. H i s nomination a n d t h e erection of t h e n e w v i c a r i a t e a r e announce d in decrees of t h e Sacred C o n g r e g a t i o n of P r o p a g a n d a Fide d a t e N o v e m b e r 1 1 , 1935. ( F i d e s ; .

OUR RESPONSIBILITY. W e a r e a n s w e r a b l e , n o t only for w h a t we know, b u t for w h a t w e m i g h t know. W h e n e v e r t h e light comes w i t h i n t h e reach of o u r s i g h t , or t h e voice w i t h i n t h e reach of o u r ear, we a r e bound to follow i t , t o i n q u i r e and t o l e a r n ; for we a r e answerable, not only for w h a t w e can do by absolute power now, b u t for w h a t we m i g h t do if we u s e d all t h e m e a n s we h a v e ; and, t h e r e f o r e , whensoever t h e Church of God comes i n t o t h e m i d s t of u s i t lays all m e n u n d e r responsibility.

GOSPEL for

S U N D A Y W I T H I N T H E OCTAVE O F C H R I S T M A S . (Luke, 33-40). A t t h a t t i m e J o s e p h a n d M a r y t h e m o t h e r of J e s u s were wond e r i n g a t t h o s e t h i n g s which were spoken concerning h i m . And Simeon blessed t h e m , and said t o M a r y his m o t h e r : Behold, t h i s child is set f o r t h e fall and for t h e resurrection of m a n y in Israel, a n d for a s i g n which shall be c o n t r a d i c t e d : and t h y own soul a sword shall pierce, t h a t out of m a n y h e a r t s t h o u g h t s m a y be revealed. And t h e r e w a s one A n n a , a prophetess, t h e d a u g h t e r of P h a n u e l , of t h e t r i b e of A s e r : she far advanced in years, a n d had lived w i t h h e r h u s b a n d seven y e a r s from h e r virginity. And s h e w a s a widow u n t i l fourscore and four y e a r s : who departed not from t h e t e m p l e , by f a s t i n g a n d p r a y e r s s e r v i n g night and d a y . Now s h e a t t h e s a m e h o u r coming in, confessed to t h e L o r d : and spoke of H i m t o all t h a t looked for t h e redemption of Israel. And a f t e r t h e y h a d performed all t h i n g s according to t h e law of t h e Lord, t h e y returned* i n t o Galilee, t o t h e i r city N a z a r e t h . And t h e child g r e w a n d w a x e d s t r o n g , full of w i s d o m : a n d t h e g r a c e of God w a s in h i m . COMMENTARY. I t is a s t r a n g e fact t h a t it is always St. L u k e t h a t speaks a b o u t things related t o O u r Lady. W e can i m a g i n e S t . L u k e seated by t h e side of t h e Holy Virgin Mot h e r , after t h e Ascension of h e r Son, a t which t i m e it was t h a t he was g a t h e r i n g t h e m a t e r i a l s for his Gospel, a n d n o t i n g down w i t h scrupulous a n d reverential care every word w h i c h she, under t h e guidance of t h e Holy Spirit, w a s moved to u t t e r . S h e tells h i m first, by w a y of introduction t o a g r e a t e r M y s t e r y , t h e wonders t h a t had a t t e n d e d t h e b i r t h of t h e B a p t i s t ; for sfce w a s present a t t h e t i m e t h a t h e r cousin St. Elizabeth, a l r e a d y in h e r old age, became t h e m o t h e r of our L o r d ' s precursor. T h e n s h e passes on t o relate w h a t happened to herself, when t h e A r c h a n g e l Gabriel came from h e a v e n w i t h his solemn message t o h e r . She tells him of t h e Magnificat, a n d from h e r dictation he w r i t e s it down. She goes t h r o u g h t h e anxieties of t h e j o u r ney t o B e t h l e h e m , a n d tells of t h e a n s w e r s h e so often received, t h a t t h e r e w a s no room for h e r anyw h e r e except in t h e poor ruined stable, w h e r e s h e b r o u g h t f o r t h t h e Saviour of t h e world, and wrapped Him u p in swaddling clothes, a n d laid H i m in t h e m a n g e r . S h e r e cords t h e s o n g s of Angels, and t h r o u g h h e r t h e "Gloria in excels i s " is c o n t r i b u t e d t o t h e rich L i t u r g y of t h e Church. She describes t h e coming in of t h e wondering half-affrighted shepherds, w h o h a d been summoned b y t h e A n g l e s ' song. T h e Circumcision and imposing t h e sacred n a m e of J e s u s is t h e n n a r r a t e d ; and next follows t h e history of t h e P r e s e n t a t i o n of t h e Child in t h e Temple, h e r own Purification, and t h e painful prophecy of t h e aged Simeon. T h e n s h e goes over again t h e details of t h e F i n d i n g in t h e Temple, a n d of h e r a d m i x t u r e of sorrow and j o y on t h a t one recorded even in t h e boyhood of h e r Son. O u r L a d y ' s Silence. Twice, however, one will notice t h a t she seemingly refuses t o conN O T E S & COMMENTS. (Contd. from p a g e 10) t h e objections m o s t frequently b r o u g h t a g a i n s t Catholics, a n d t o be in a position t o explain t h e doct r i n e s of t h e C h u r c h to enquiring non-Catholic friends. We o u g h t t o realise t h a t religion does n o t consist m e r e l y in o u t w a r d a c t s of devotion, b u t t h a t we ought t o be p r e pared t o defend our religious convictions ; a n d we cannot be p r e p a r e d if we lack t h e n e c e s s a r y knowledge. O u r Catholic y o u t h usually leaves

11

DIOCESE OF MALACCA. Calendar for t h e Week. December 29. S U N D A Y — S u n d a y w i t h i n t h e Octave of Christm a s . Mass a n d Vespers of t h e ' Sunday. December 30. Monday—Of the Octave. December 3 1 . T u e s d a y — S t . Sylvester. E v e n i n g s e r v i c e : Solemn Benediction of t h e Most Holy S a c r a m e n t , a t which shall be s u n g t h e P s a l m Miserere and t h e Te Deum w i t h t h e a p p r o p r i a t e w . & P r a y e r s t o a s k God p a r d o n for all t h e sins committed a n d t h a n k H i m for all His bounties during the year. 1936. J a n u a r y 1. W e d n e s d a y — T h e Circumcision of O u r Lord. J a n u a r y 2. T h u r s d a y — Octave Day of St. S t e p h e n , 1st M a r t y r . January 3. Friday—Octave Day of St. John, t h e Apostle. J a n u a r y 4. S a t u r d a y — O c t a v e D a y of t h e Holy Innocents.

t i n u e t h e n a r r a t i o n , and keeps to herself w h a t concerned t h e hidden life of h e r Son, and w a s not t h e r e fore intended t o be recorded. J u s t after r e l a t i n g how t h e s h e p h e r d s came in a n d adored h e r newlyDIOCESE OF MACAO. born Child, she suddenly stops, C H U R C H O F ST. J O S E P H . a n d declining, a s it would seem, to a n s w e r t h e question as t o w h a t followed, n o t h i n g r e m a i n e d for the Calendar for t h e Week. Evangelist b u t to w r i t e down, as December 29. S U N D A Y — S u n d a y h e does: " B u t M a r y k e p t all t h e s e w i t h i n t h e Octave of C h r i s t m a s . words, pondering t h e m in h e r Semi-double. W h i t e v e s t m e n t s . h e a r t . " A n d a little l a t e r on, afP r o p e r of t h e Mass in t h e "Small t e r t h e account of t h e finding of Missal" p. 79. Second collect of t h e Child J e s u s in t h e Temple, St. T h o m a s , t h i r d of t h e Octave having s t a t e d t h a t " H e w e n t down w i t h t h e m a n d came t o N a z a r e t h , of C h r i s t m a s . Preface of t h e and w a s subject to t h e m , " once N a t i v i t y . V e s p e r s of t h e S u n more h e r lips a r e closed: she treaday a t 5 p.m. sures u p for herself t h e details of December 30. Monday — Semia Life which w a s t h e n for m a n y double. Of t h e octave. y e a r s t o be spent w i t h h e r a n d for December 3 1 . T u e s d a y — S t . Sylher, in t h e h a p p y r e t i r e m e n t of vester, P.C. Double. Thanks^ their simple home, and a g a i n the giving Service a t 5-30 p.m. Evangelist is obliged to s t a t e t h e fact of t h i s silence: " A n d his 1936. M o t h e r k e p t all t h e s e words in J a n u a r y 1. W e d n e s d a y — T h e Cirh e r h e a r t . " She w a s not t o give cumcision of O u r Lord. P r o p e r testimony upon w h a t so i n t i m a t e of t h e Mass in t h e "Small ly concerned herself, b u t not M i s s a l " p. 84. One p r a y e r only. o t h e r s ; a n d therefore, t h e secrets Solemn H i ^ h Mass a t 8 a.m. of t h e first t h i r t y y e a r s of Him, Double of t h e 2nd cl. whose h i s t o r y is given to us in t h e Gospel, a r e t r e a s u r e d up for t h e J a n u a r y 2. T h u r s d a y — F e a s t of use of contemplatives, who, by t h e t h e Most Holy N a m e of J e s u s . example of t h o s e who lived at Double 2nd cl. N a z a r e t h , a r e t o a i m a t t h e privileges of a "life hidden w i t h i n . " J a n u a r y 3 . F r i d a y Octave D a y of St. J o h n . Simple. Abstinence. Here t h e n we have s o m e t h i n g to Holy H o u r from 5-30 t o 6-30 encourage us in connexion with p.m. t h e g r e a t Solemnity of t h e B i r t h of our D e a r e s t Lord. W e must J a n u a r y 4. Saturday — Octave t r e a s u r e up o u r life of silence and Day of t h e Holy Innocents. r e t i r e m e n t , a n d t r y t o live a s Mary Simple. and Joseph did in t h e i r simple home of N a z a r e t h in t h e company of t h e I n f a n t J e s u s . CREATION OF TWENTY N E W CARDINALS. We m a y well r e m e m b e r t h a t Richest Mediaeval P a g e a n t r y IN J e s u s will not speak to us amid t h e Evidence. dealings of a world intent upon Vatican City, 19/12.—The ceret h i n g s which do not s a v o u r of heaven. J e s u s will not communi- mony of c r e a t i n g t h e t w e n t y n e w cate to us, under t h e s e circum- Cardinals was conducted w i t h t h e stances, t h o s e particular graces richest mediaeval p a g e a n t r y in S t . which H e loves t o bestow on his P e t e r ' s C a t h e d r a l and before S t . P e t e r ' s Tomb. T h e Papal T h o m e i n t i m a t e friends. w a s s u r r o u n d e d by crimson h a n g ings a n d magnificent tapestry. Resplendent a n d g l i t t e r i n g uniI school w i t h quite a sufficient know- forms w e r e seen on all sides. A ledge of his religion, b u t if he neg- long roll of d r u m s heralded t h e lects t h e s t u d y of it for a n y con- e n t r y of His Holiness t h e Pope in siderable period, he is bound to t h e Sedia G e s t a t o r i a , w e a r i n g a forget all t h a t h e m a y have assi- gold m i t r e a n d flanked b y t w o 'duously l e a r n t a t one time, and a t t e n d a n t s b e a r i n g enormous f a n s : find t h a t h e possesses scarcely any of ostrich f e a t h e r s . T h e new individually I knowledge of his religion, j u s t as Cardinals advanced z pond t h a t is not fed continually and kissed t h e Pope's feet a n d will eventually d r y up. T h i s is one hand, a f t e r w h i c h t h e Cardinal of t h e activities of Catholic Action Deacon held t h e Red H a t over e a c h which should be given more a t t e n - of t h e new C a r d i n a l s ' head. —Reuter. tion b y all Catholics.


12

rfALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

28th DECEMBER, 1935.

Little French Isle Receives Card. DURING ILLNESS Villeneuve. Visit To The Land Of His Forbears. AND CONVALESCENCE (N.C.W.C. N e w s

Service).

P a r i s . — I t w a s a notable day*in was s u n g for t h e C a r d i n a l ' s p a in l i t t l e Isle de R e , off t h e west r e n t s , b o t h of w h o m died l a s t coast of F r a n c e , w h e n H i s E m i - y e a r . F r o m t h e pulpit, H i s E m i nence R o d r i g u e Cardinal Ville- nence e x a l t e d t h e f a i t h t h a t h a s n e u v e , A r c h b i s h o p of Quebec, dis- remained t h e s t r o n g e s t t i e bett i n g u i s h e d d e s c e n d a n t of M a t h u r i n ween t h e i n h a b i t a n t s of t h i s little Villeneuve, t h e cooper a n d cultiva- corner of t h e world a n d t h e i r t o r w h o d e p a r t e d for Canada in b r e t h r e n in C a n a d a . H e p r o m i s e d 1666, p a i d a visit t o t h e land of his t h a t w h e n h e r e t u r n e d t o h i s A r forebears. ch iepiscopal city, h e would n e v e r S i t u a t e d a few miles from L a fail t o p r a y for h i s friends on t h e Rochelle, t h e island is seventeen Isle of R e . a n d a half miles long a n d t h r e e I n procession t h e people w e n t t o miles wide a n d h a s a b o u t 10,000 t h e little c e m e t e r y , a n d each i n h a b i t a n t s in 11 p a r i s h e s , w h o knelt silently b y t h e g r a v e s of cultivate fruits, cabbages and t h e i r loved ones, while t h e Cardvineyards. inal recited t h e D e P r o f u n d i s . Cardinal Villeneuve, accomT h a t a f t e r n o o n Cardinal Villenp a n i e d b y t h e Most Rev. E u g e n e euve visited t h e r e s t of t h e island, Curien, B i s h o p of L a Rochelle, s t o p p i n g a t all t h e c h u r c h e s w i t h w a s received officially b y t h e au- t h e i r vine-clad e x t e r i o r s a n d walls t h o r i t i e s a t t h e t i n y p a r t of La covered w i t h models of s h i p s , t h e F l o t t e . A f t e r v i s i t i n g t h e church, votive offerings of s e a m e n saved His E m i n e n c e e n t e r e d a n a u t o m o - from t e m p e s t s . bile, b u t t w o miles from t h e vilVisits Lighthouse. lage of S a i n t e Marie, t h e h o m e of A t t h e e x t r e m e p o i n t of t h e his a n c e s t o r s , w h e n t h e y h a d island, a f t e r v i s i t i n g t h e lightr e a c h e d t h e fields w h i c h h i s peo- house, t h e Cardinal stood for ple h a d cultivated, h e g o t out of a while on a d u n e , t h e w i n d t u g t h e c a r . On foot h e t r a v e r s e d a g i n g a t his h a t , a n d gazed o u t t o r o a d b o r d e r e d w i t h t a m a r i s k s , sea, in m e d i t a t i o n before t h e imbetween little plots of land crissm e n s i t y of t h e ocean w h i c h Macrossed w i t h walls of seared t h u r i n Villeneuve. alone a n d poor, s t o n e s , w i t h cabbage-patches and h a d h a d t h e t e m e r i t y t o face. little vineyards empurpled by R e t u r n i n g t o t h e continent, t h e autumn^ P r i n c e of t h e C h u r c h w a s feted b y Cottages Bear Garlands. by t h e city of L a Rochelle. He T o w a r d s h i m c a m e t h e Mayor, w a s received a t t h e C a t h e d r a l and w e a r i n g h i s baldric of office, and a t t h e Hotel de Ville, a n d a t t e n d all t h e m e n of t h e vicinity a n d t h e ed a b a n q u e t in h i s h o n o u r given w o m e n w i t h t h e l a r g e w h i t e coif b y t h e C h a m b e r of Commerce. H e of t h e p e a s a n t . Joyously t h e y visited B r o u a g e , once o n e of t h e escorted t h e Cardinal i n t o t h e finest p o r t s of F r a n c e b u t t o d a y village w h e r e all t h e dazzling a dead city because its t i d e s a r e w h i t e c o t t a g e s w e r e en fete w i t h too f a r off. H e s a w t h e s i t e of t h e garlands. n a t a l h o u s e of Champlain, foundA t t h e t o w n hall t h e eminent e r of Quebec. H e saw t h e spot, g u e s t w a s introduced. T h e Mayor now choked w i t h sand, f r o m w h i c h p r e s e n t e d h i m w i t h a copy of t h e t h r e e c e n t u r i e s ago, t h e s h i p s left H e admired the b a p t i s m a l r e c o r d s of h i s ancest- for America. o r s a n d a sack of w h i t e silk, w i t h little chapel of shells, b u i l t by armorial decoration, containing seamen. A t Rochefort, t h e Cardinal w a s e a r t h t a k e n frfem t h e foot of a v e r y a n c i e n t s t a t u e of t h e Blessed t h e g u e s t of t h e A d m i r a l P r e f e c t V i r g i n t h a t g r a c e s t h e t e r r i t o r y of M a r i n e w h o showed h i m t h e r e c e n t l y discovered p a p e r declarof t h e p a r i s h . Cardinal Villeneuve t h a n k e d i n g t h a t M a t h u r i n Villeneuve h a d h i m a n d , in p e a s a n t t e r m s , ad- enlisted in t h e m a r i n e , offering to d r e s s e d t h e people. " Y e s , " he leave on t h e first occasion. said, " I a m R o d r i g u e , son of Rodr i g u e , son of J o s e p h , son of Senis, son of J a c q u e s , son of M a t h u r i n w h o w a s baptized in F r a n c e a t S a i n t e M a r i e de R e , in t h e Diocese of L a Rochelle. On t h i s day I r e a l i z e one of t h e d r e a m s of m y y o u t h , b y v i r t u e of t h a t s a m e ins t i n c t w h i c h m a k e s t h e son r e t u r n to h i s f a t h e r . " Still C u l t i v a t e D o m a i n . H e t h e n told t h e s t o r y of t h e Villeneuves, b e g i n n i n g w i t h Mat h u r i n w h o , in 1666, left S a i n t e M a r i e t o s t a y for a while w i t h an old colonist in C a n a d a . T h e r e h e m a r r i e d a y o u n g girl, J e a n n e C h a u s s e t , w h o h a d also come from F r a n c e , in t h a t old Quebec church, J(he bells of w h i c h t h e Cardinal h e a r s daily from t h e window of his h o m e . M a t h u r i n Villeneuve h a d n i n e children, a g u n . five cows a n d t e n a r p e n t s of land. H e died J u l y 1 1 , 1715, h a v i n g founded a f a m i l y w h i c h w a s t o h a v e thous a n d s of C h r i s t i a n d e s c e n d a n t s , s o m e of t h e m still c u l t i v a t i n g his domain. T h e n everyone w e n t t o t h e c h u r c h , w h i c h w a s decorated w i t h a u t u m n foliage a n d crowded with t h e faithful. A r e q u i e m Mass

CHURCHES OF FRANCE R E C O V E R I N G LOOT O F WAR PERIOD. P a r i s . — C h u r c h e s in t h e devast a t e d regions of F r a n c e a r e receiving, from t i m e t o t i m e , almost t w e n t y y e a r s later, objects t h a t w e r e carried off, a n d recovered alm o s t miraculously, d u r i n g the World W a r . I t w a s some m o n t h s a g o t h a t a missal w a s r e t u r n e d t o a c h u r c h in t h e N o r t h from G e r m a n y . Tod a v it is t h e R h e i m s C a t h e d r a l which recovers a precious sevent e e n t h c e n t u r y Crucifix w h i c h h a d been m i s s i n g since 1916. T h e Crucifix w a s discovered in London. It is t h o u g h t t h a t a soldier m u s t h a v e picked u p t h i s r e m a r k a b l e a r t t r e a s u r e from t h e r u i n s of a chapel t h a t h a d been shelled. Recently it w a s t o be sold a t public auction in London. I t a t t r a c t e d t h e a t t e n t i o n of a n E n g l i s h w o m a n , M r s . Coombe-Tenn a n t , who, h a v i n g verified i t s origin, b o u g h t it for t h e p u r p o s e of r e s t a r t i n g it t o t h e C a t h e d r a l . M r s . Coombe-Tennant c a m e t o R h e i m s to p r e s e n t t h e Crucifix t o t h e Most R e v . E m a n u e l S u h a r d , A r c h b i s h o p of R h e i m s . ( N . C . W . C )

T

HE accumulated experience of over half a century shows Horlick's to be an ideal diet during illness and convalescence Horlick's is made from fresh full-cream cow's milk combined .with the nutritive extracts of wheat and malted barley. It contains no starch, and a certain proportion of its protein is available for direct assimilation. Its ease of digestion and assimilation, and its ready utilization in the body have been proved by actual physiological experiments.

Horlick's is pleasing to the palate, appetizing, refreshing and sustaining. It is easily prepared, and is especially useful where frequent, small, light, easily digested meals are indicated. Ordinarily, Horlick's requires mixing with water only; it is, however, an excellent medium for the addition of milk, cream,* eggs or similar articles to the dietary.

"OA THE ORIGINAL MALTED MILK Available Everywhere

Works of Japanese Catholic Press of 16th and 17th Centuries Tokyo. M A N U A L for Confessors A p h o r i s m i Confessariorium e x Doctorum Sententiis Collecti). published in 1603 in t h e J a p a n e s e College of t h e Society of J e s u s a t A m a k u s a , h a s been discovered r e cently a t P e k i n g in t h e L i b r a r y of t h e E a r l y J e s u i t s in China, by F a t h e r H e n r y B e r n a r d , S. J . T h e book, till now unknown, is t h e work of a J a p a n e s e J e s u i t , F a t h e r E m m a n u e l Sa, called "Doctor T h e o logus." A

L a s t y e a r a copy of t h e " M a n u a l e ad S a c r a m e n t a Ecclesiae Minist r a n d a , " p r i n t e d in 1605 a t the Missionary P r e s s of N a g a s a k i , w a s discovered in t h e procure of t h e Spanish J e s u i t s a t Tokyo. T h e r e are only t h r e e copies of t h i s w o r k extant. The "Exercitia Spiritualia I g n a t i i de Loyola" published in 1597 in t h e J a p a n e s e College of t h e Society of J e s u s , w a s until r e c e n t ly known only by n a m e . A copy h a s now been found in t h e l i b r a r y of a n old castle in G e r m a n y . T h e owners of t h e castle received it from a J e s u i t F a t h e r in 1642. A description of t h e s e recent discoveries h a s been given by F a t h e r J o h n L a u r e s , S.J., of t h e Catholic U n i v e r s i t y of Tokyo, well k n o w n collector of J a p a n e s e C h r i s t i a n antiquities. Since 1926 t h e r e h a v e been various discoveries of ancient C h r i s tian d o c u m e n t s in J a p a n . T w o y e a r s ago, in t h e B u d d h i s t Temple of Josei-Ji, n e a r T a k a t s u k i , a J a panese collector, n a m e d H a t a n o , came upon t w o m a n u s c r i p t s a n d a little casket containing a crucifix, all hidden a s forbidden objects under a s t a t u e of B u d d h a . On one of t h e m a n u s c r i p t s , a single s h e e t of paper, a b o u t 12 by 8 inches in

size, dated "on t h e t h i r d d a y of t h e l a s t m o n t h of t h e y e a r of O u r L o r d 1595," is recorded t h e p r o mise made by the Christians under o a t h t o be faithful a l w a y s t o t h e F a t h e r s of t h e Society of J e s u s . T h e second m a n u s c r i p t i s a n e c clesiastical calendar in 14 s h e e t s , t> b y 7 inches in size, going f r o m F e b r u a r y 20, 1594 t o F e b r u a r y 4, 1595. The original w a s t h e w o r k of a Neapolitan J e s u i t , Father O r g a n t i n i , called U r u k a n i b y t h e Japanese. This missionary r e ached J a p a n in 1568 and for 40 y e a r s was t h e confessor of J a p a nese nobles w h o a f t e r t h e i r conversion to C h r i s t i a n i t y found themselves in trouble w i t h t h e p a g a n a u t h o r i t i e s . H e figures in t h e h i s t o r y of t h e C h u r c h in J a p a n a s a comforter a n d s u p p o r t of t h e suffering C h r i s t i a n s d u r i n g t h e persecutions. The most valuable p a r t of t h i s d o c u m e n t lies in t h e n o t e s w r i t t e n b e t w e e n t h e lines a n d in t h e m a r g i n s , r e f e r r i n g t o t h e m e e t i n g s held by t h e C h r i s t i a n s in t h e p r i v a t e chapel of a c e r t a i n noble n a m e d Y a s a e m o n . T h e s e secret g a t h e r i n g s a r e r e corded in m a n y i n s t a n c e s w i t h n a m e s and d a t e s . (Fides.) PENANCE. W e shall e m b r a c e penance w i t h facility and easily accustom o u r selves to mortification if w e a t t e n tively consider t h e a u s t e r e lives of t h e saints of b o t h sexes w h o w e r e m o r e delicate t h a n we a n d who h a d not offended God so m u c h . C h a r i t y is p r e c i o u s — t h a t c h a r i t y which s t r o n g l y impels u s t o help our n e i g h b o u r , and w h i c h i s willing to endure a thousand d e a t h s t h a t o u r n e i g h b o u r mayadvance in v i r t u e .


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y ,

i Our Serial X.

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VICTORIA

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THE WAKING OF AUDREY MARR. BY MARY T. WAGGAMAN (THIRD INSTALMENT) h e t u r n e d a w a y from t h e house t h e limousine of t h e Grosvenors, n e i g h b o u r s of Madam M a r r ' s , swept u p t h e a v e n u e and soon a g a y g r o u p w a s g a t h e r e d a r o u n d t h e m i s t r e s s of Glenevin on t h e porch, for A u d r e y , forgott e n a s s h e h a d been d u r i n g h e r y e a r s of exile, h a d been welcomed back t o h e r own cordially, t h o u g h , no doubt, w i t h a goodly s h a r e of quiet comment and criticism. F o r t h e y e a r s h a d left t h e i r t r a c e on her, s h e knew. S h e h a d lost t h e poise, t h e ease, t h e g r a c e of t h e class t o which s h e w a s b o r n . B u t for M a y s i e ' s s a k e s h e m u s t win back all—all. A n d so, a s s h e stood masked in t h e quiet dignity t h a t well beeame h e r , t h e r e w a s a n e a g e r n e s s to please, t o c h a r m , b e n e a t h all her seeming hauteur. H e r g u e s t s h a d come, a s t h e y said, t o a s k Maysie t o t a k e p a r t in t h e "Children's C a n t a t a " a t S t L u k e ' s M a y Festival. T h e proceeds w e r e t o p u r c h a s e a new lectern for the Sunday-school chapel which t h e r e c t o r was remodelling. "Mr. Verrill is such a n e n t h u s i a s t in religious a r t , " said t h e eldest Miss Grosvernor, " a n d it is such a beautiful idea t o h a v e t h e children impressed e a r l y w i t h i t s significance." " B u t , really, Maysie does not belong t o y o u r Sunday-school/' hesitated Madam Marr. " O h , t h a t is not n e c e s s a r y at a l l ; o u r c h u r c h does n o t d r a w any lines," g u s h e d Miss E d i t h . " J u s t h a v e h e r w e a r one of h e r p r e t t y w h i t e g o w n s a n d loosen h e r lovely h a i r . W e will call for h e r in t h e car a n d b r i n g h e r b a c k . " ^ A n d a s it would h a v e seemed q u i t e churlish t o refuse so gracious a n invitation, Maysie's m o t h e r agreed, a n d t h e visitors remained t o a n informal lunch in t h e dark wainscoted dining-room, where A u d r e y presided a t t h e g r e a t mah o g a n y , s p r e a d with family silver, a n d A u n t Selina, w i t h h e r oldt i m e cap a n d kerchief, looked down from t h e g r e a t c a n v a s over t h e m a n t e l on t h e w o m a n w h o held h e r place. " R e a l l y , " confessed Miss E d i t h , who w a s of a n i m a g i n a t i v e t u r n of m i n d — w h e n t h e p a r t y took its way home^—"that picture g o t on my n e r v e s , t h e eyes seemed t o have such a fierce, a n g r y g l a r e ; for A u d r e y M a r r a n d h e r child a r e t h e r e a g a i n s t Miss Selina's will in life and d e a t h a s every one knows." " D o n ' t s a y t h a t , m y d e a r , " said h e r f a t h e r . " W e c a n ' t tell w h a t c h a n g e came over t h e old woman a t t h e l a s t ; for Miss Selina w a s a changeful person. S h e m a d e a dozen different wills in t h e last t w e n t y y e a r s , a s I h a p p e n t o know, and a t t h e l a s t destroyed t h e m all, leaving t h e law to do t h e justice t h a t s h e would not do herself; which w a s only doing t h e r i g h t t h i n g in h e r peculiar w a y . " So all h e r new world agreed, so A u d r e y herself w a s beginning to

28th D E C E M B E R , 1935.

feel, with a c e r t a i n softening in h e r h e a r t t o t h e old woman w h o h a d been so u n r e l e n t i n g in life, t h a t A u n t Selina h a d wished t o do j u s t i c e at last. Only j u s t i c e ! All t h a t she held h a d come to h e r by right, s h e t h o u g h t as with a proud swelling in h e r h e a r t s h e was looking over t h e carefully docketed papers in A u n t Selina's old escritoire for t h e copy of a fease t h a t w a s disputed b y one of h e r small t e n a n t s on t h e r i d g e . It was t h e n i g h t a f t e r t h e Grosvenor's visit, a f t e r t h e discussion with Philip Carleton, a n d A u d r e y w a s conscious of a t u m u l t in h e r soul t h a t s h e could not r e press. She seemed t o feel t h e kind, friendly e y e s fixed r e b u k i n g ly on h e r as h e pleaded for h e r child. W h a t would he s a y t o S t . L u k e ' s C a n t a t a a n d t h e Sundayschool of a c h u r c h not h e r o w n ? A h , s h e would n o t t h i n k of it. S h e would not t h i n k of t h e poor little chapel with its bare-legged " b e g a r s . " Maysie m u s t h a v e t h e best, t h e brightest t h e world could give n o w — t h e world in which she h a d found h e r place, h e r r i g h t ; s h e m u s t grow up in it, glad and free, w i t h o u t a n y dull r e s t r a i n t . All t h e b e a u t y , t h e w a r m t h , t h e light denied h e r own y o u t h , should showered on h e r child. Already, w i t h k e e n w i t s s h a r p ened by adversity, t h e m o t h e r w a s b e g i n n i n g to w a t c h h e r bonds, h e r stocks, h e r m o r t g a g e s ; t o look t o i n v e s t m e n t s , t o securities. Great a s was A u n t Selina's fortune, s h e m u s t double it, treble it, if possible, for her child. T h e r e was t h i s lease which L e m H a r d i n g was disp u t i n g now. S h e h a d been offered a double price for it only t h i s m o r n i n g ; she m u s t find it and sett l e t h e m a t t e r a t once. A n d a s w i t h e a g e r impatience s h e t u r n e d over t h e well-arranged p a p e r s , a hidden s p r i n g clicked ben e a t h her hand, a secret d r a w e r flew open. T h e r e in t h e full glow of t h e light above t h e desk lay a p a p e r folded, sealed, inscribed in legal form. " T h e Last Will and T e s t a m e n t of Selina Brooks. Given a t h e r h o m e , Glenevin, March 15, 1 9 — . " F o r one m o m e n t Audrey M a r r s a t stunned, b r e a t h l e s s , almost paralyzed in e v e r y limb. The L a s t Will and T e s t a m e n t of Selina B r o o k s ; Aunt Selina's will! H e r will! Then—then a s if by l i g h t n i n g flash t h e whole t r u t h s t a r e d out in b u r n i n g light a g a i n s t t h e bewildered woman's d a r k e n e d sky. T h e r e h a d been—there w a s a will—after all, t h e lawyers, t h e court's decision—Aunt Selina had been no weakling a t last. With her dying, nay, w i t h h e r dead h a n d s s h e still g r a s p e d h e r own, a n d all t h a t g r a s p held—forbade—denied . — A u d r e y M a r r ' s quickened b r a i n s a w and knew. T h e r e w a s no justice, no m e r c y , no pardon in t h a t folded p a p e r — i t m e a n t begg a r y again for herself a n d h e r child.

13

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W h e r e — how — to whom had dead hands hold. T h e new misA u n t Selina left her f o r t u n e . Au- t r e s s of Glenevin h a d t u r n e d w i t h d r e y did not know or c a r e ; she feverish defiance i n t o ways t h a t w a s only s u r e w i t h a f a t a l s u r e t y A u n t Selina had n e v e r known. S h $ t h a t it w a s not t o h e r , t h e niece h a d flung aside t h e g r a y shadow w h o m w i t h fierce, u n d y i n g h a t e of h e r past and w a s meeting t h e s h e had cast out of h e r home and g a y world on its own ground. If doubt, fear, t e r r o r , r e m o r s e assaillife. ed h e r as s h e t h o u g h t of t h e old A u n t Selina's will! T h e white- escritoire and its buried secret, faced w o m a n sat, h o w long she she g a v e no sign. B u t it w a s a n e v e r knew, looking a t it with changed Audrey M a r r t h a t reignd i l a t i n g eyes, realising more and ed over Glenevin t h i s brilliant m o r e its deadly p o w e r t o ruin, to w i n t e r , an A u d r e y M a r r who h a d d e s t r o y all t h a t s h e held dear. g r a s p e d h e r sceptre of power w i t h absolute hand and w a s every inch Maysie—Maysie, j u s t opening a queen. i n t o bloom, like a frail frost-touchT h e r e had been a reception a t ed flower in t h e sun, t o Maysie p o v e r t y , w a n t , p r i v a t i o n , would t h e Grosvenor's on t h i s late Demean blight—doom—death! A s c e m b e r evening a n d it was after t h e picture of those l a s t d a y s of m i d n i g h t w h e n s h e swept into h e r t h e old life rose vividly before own wide hall, a regal vision in A u d r e y — t h e close, fetid rooms, h e r f u r s and velvet, t h e gleam of and t h e sun blazing t h r o u g h t h e nar- j e w e l s showing a t wrist throat. r o w window t h e ceaseless w h i r r of t h e machine dulling e a r a n d brain, S h e s t a r t e d a t s i g h t of Philip t h e white-faced child on t h e bed. Carleton, w h o r o s e from his seat d y i n g for t h e air a n d light and before t h e l i b r a r y fire a t h e r apfood h e r m o t h e r could not give p r o a c h . h e r , wild, passionate revolt surged " M a y s i e ? " she gasped, s u d d e a fiercely through that mother's t e r r o r blanching h e r face. soul. A u n t Selina's will! W h a t " Y e s , " h e a n s w e r e d gravely, r i g h t had t h e dead t o will?—to will a g a i n s t j u s t i c e a n d r i g h t and " s h e is ill. I h a p p e n e d to drop in her m e r c y a n d p i t y ? — t o s t a r v e , to a f t e r you felt, a n d found deny, to blight young lives in bud h o a r s e and feverish. I have s e n t for a nurse, but s h e can not come a n d bloom? immediately. I t is croup in a Aunt Selina's will! W h a t d a n g e r o u s form, I fear, and I m u s t s t r e n g t h had those dead hands, al- w a t c h h e r t h r o u g h t h e n i g h t . " r e a d y crumbling into d u s t , to hold T h e f u r - t r i m m e d cloak slipped a g a i n s t life and love? None!— f r o m M a d a m M a r r ' s shoulders, none!—none! With t r e m b l i n g a n d she sank on h e r knees before g r a s p A u d r e y s n a t c h e d up t h e t h e h e a r t h , w h i t e and s h a k e n . p a p e r — t o rend—to d e s t r o y it, " C r o u p , in a d a n g e r o u s f o r m ! " She w h e n a sudden fear overcame her. k n e w — t h a t g r a v e , k i n d voice never N o t t h a t w a y — s h e d a r e d not sin spoke idly or w i t h o u t cause. " B u t a g a i n s t m a n ' s law, a n d t h a t held you will save h e r , " s h e whispered, wills sacred, a s she k n e w . B u t of lifting a face s t r i c k e n into a s h e n God's law she had no t h o u g h t a s hue. s h e dropped t h e sealed p a p e r back " I do n o t k n o w , " h e answered in t h e secret d r a w e r and clicked t h e hidden spring t h a t would hold pitifully. "You can, you m u s t , " she cried it unseen—buried—like t h e dead desperately. " O h , God! do not A u n t Selina herself—forever. look a t me like t h a t ; you a r e all T h e C h r i s t m a s snow lay w h i t e wise and skilful. Save h e r and on t h e g r a s s y slopes of Glenevin. you can claim a n y t h i n g from m e — t h e fountain was a sheen of glit- a n y t h i n g I can g i v e . Oh, Doctor t e r i n g icicles; cedars a n d hedges Carleton, save m y child!" w e r e feathered w i t h brief, spot" I will do all t h a t I can, a s you less bloom. Within, t h e g r e a t con- j k n o w , " he said g e n t l y , " b u t it will s e r v a t o r i e s glowed w ith tropic ; b e a s t r u g g l e . A r e you s t r o n g blossoms, t h e a i r w a s sweet with I e n o u g h to m a k e it w i t h m e ? " s u m m e r fragrance, mingling with ! "Oh, yes, y e s ! " w a s t h e agonizt h e spicy b r e a t h of t h e evergreens ed answer, as a h o a r s e , choking w r e a t h i n g windows a n d walls. It i c r y came from above. " L e t u s go h a d been a g a y C h r i s t m a s at t o h e r — m y Maysie, m y darling, Glenevin, t h e g a y e s t t h e old m y child, m y child." And careless m a n o r h a d known for m a n y a year. of lace a n d j e w e l s a n d g l i t t e r i n g F i r e s had leaped a n d sparkled in evening gown, t h e w r e t c h e d moe v e r y open h e a r t h , light and t h e r d a r t e d u p t h e s t a i r s to t h e w a r m t h and seeming gladness had room w h e r e M a y s i e w a s g a s p i n g filled t h e dark wainscotted rooms. piteously for b r e a t h in old M a r n a A u n t Selina's wide m a h o g a n y t h e housekeeper's a r m s . And t h e n table had groaned u n d e r its Christt h e struggle began—the fierce m a s cheer. W h a t if t h e g r i m old b a t t l e between life a n d d e a t h t h a t p o r t r a i t looked down from the m a n y a stricken household k n o w s . mantlepiece with s t e r n disapprov(To be continued) al ? Dead lips could n o t speak, nor r


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M A L A Y A C A T H O L I C L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 28th D E C E M B E R , 1935.

Morocco Catholics Discuss Their Part in Politcs.

Reds Destroy Remarkable Growth Belgian Missionary Of Catholicism in Of Fiji Attacked By Mission On Tibetan Frontier. Leprosy. East Africa N y e r i ( K e n y a Colony). I N a l a r g e A r a b h o u s e on t h e island of Z a n z i b a r , t h e site of w h i c h i s n o w occupied b y a beautiful c a t h e d r a l , M a s s w a s celebrated en C h r i s t m a s n i g h t 1860; it w a s t h e first t i m e in 150 y e a r s t h a t t h e Holy Sacrifice w a s offered in E a s t Africa. T h e r e w e r e t w o p r i e s t s o n the i s l a n d a t t h a t t i m e , t h e only clergy w o r k i n g in t h e s e t e r r i t o r i e s . T o - d a y i n K e n y a Colony, T a n ganyika Territory, Uganda and Zanzibar there are more than 800,000 Catholics, besides h u n d r e d s of t h o u s a n d s of c a t e c h u m e n s w h o a r e being i n s t r u c t e d for B a p t i s m . T h e s e figures a r e really i m p r e s s i v e w h e n i t is recalled t h a t in 1860, only 75 y e a r s ago, t h e C h u r c h w a s practically, if not entirely, n o n - e x i s t e n t in t h i s p a r t of Africa. T h e h a r d s h i p s of t h e early d a y s were many. It is n o t yet 40 y e a r s , for i n s t a n c e , since missiona r i e s w o r k i n g in U g a n d a h a v e been able t o g o f r o m t h e coast t o t h e i r s t a t i o n s in t h e i n t e r i o r b y t r a i n . Before t h e building of t h e railway t h e y h a d t o walk t o t h e lakes, t r a v e l l i n g t h r o u g h a l m o s t unknown c o u n t r y i n h a b i t e d b y unfriendly n a t i v e s . Living conditions of all tropical diseases. M a n y t i m e s , o w i n g t o persecution, w a r s a n d o t h e r circumstances, t h e y s a w t h e i r m i s s i o n s destroyed a n d t h e i r flocks s c a t t e r e d . But they clung to their purpose, rebuilt t h e i r missions, a n d to-day t h e y c a n p o i n t t o a r e c o r d of which even t h e m o s t critical m i g h t well be p r o u d . A f t e r less t h a n a c e n t u r y of evangelization, t h e s e territories a r e divided into 20 ecclesiastical u n i t s , i.e. v i c a r i a t e s , p r e f e c t u r e s o r m i s s i o n s , in w h i c h t h e r e a r e 250 mission s t a t i o n s s e r v e d b y m o r e than 10,000 clerical a n d lay workers. T h e missionaries themselves obs e r v e , however, t h a t t h e s e e n c o u r a g i n g figures m u s t n o t lead a n y o n e t o believe t h a t Africa i s already won to the Church. Catholics f o r m b u t an infinitesimal p r o p o r t i o n of t h e population of t h e s e t e r r i t o r i e s . T h e r e i s need of constant labour and much prayer t h a t t h e w o r k being done, t h o u g h successful i n t h e p a s t , m a y m e e t w i t h e v e n g r e a t e r success in t h e future. (Fides.) A

BI-LINGUAL CATHOLIC W E E K L Y IN INDIA. Tuticorin (India).—The first n u m b e r of a n e w bi-lingual weekly edited a n d published b y t h e C a t h o lic A c t i o n of T u t i c o r i n a n d called The Catholic Champion, appeared September 23. The p a p e r is printed in E n g l i s h a n d T a m i l and i s believed t o b e t h e o n l y bi-lingual weekly of I n d i a . A f o r e w o r d by t h e M o s t Rev. F r a n c i s T . Roche, B i s h o p of T u t i corin, explains t h e a i m of t h e paper. " I consider t h i s v e n t u r e a s a s t e p in t h e r i g h t direction," he writes. "Fas est ab hoste d o c e r i . " W e h a v e t o t a k e a leaf from t h e books of o u r deadly enem i e s : T h e r e is no-one w h o is i g n o r a n t of t h e g r e a t h a r m done by t h e b a d , t r a s h y , salacious p a p e r s sold f o r a m e r e song. T o c o u n t e r a c t t h i s baneful influence it s t a n d s t o reason t h a t w e should m a k e u s e of t h e s a m e t a c t i c s . f o r a nobler cause." (Fides).

Cawaci (Fiji I s l a n d s ) . 1 > E V . Leo L e j e u n e , of t h e M a r i s t ' ' F a t h e r s , a missionary in t h e Fiji Islands, h a s c a u g h t leprosy of a v e r y contagious form a n d h a s been t r a n s f e r r e d t o t h e isolation colony o n t h e island of Magokai. H e w a s p r e s e n t at t h e recent provincial c h a p t e r of t h e Society of M a r y a t Sydney and r e t u r n e d t o Cawaci a p p a r e n t l y in perfect h e a l t h w h e n t h e disease w a s discovered. F a t h e r L e j e u n e w a s b o r n in Petitvoir, Belgium, in 1876 and h a s been in Oceania since 1901. F o r t h e last 13 y e a r s h e h a s had c h a r g e of t h e intellectual and m o r a l t r a i n i n g of t h e n a t i v e t e a c h e r s employed by t h e M a r i s t Missionaries in t h i s p a r t of t h e Pacific. The success of h i s catechist s y s t e m is well known in missiona r y circles, a n d t o it m a i n l y m u s t be a t t r i b u t e d t h e success of t h e Church here. Every year he has assembled t h e catechists a n d all influential Catholics, including t h e Chiefs, and h a s preached a r e t r e a t t o p r e p a r e t h e m for Catholic social service a n d evidence work. H e h a s published several books in t h e native l a n g u a g e . T h e r e a r e 525 lepers in t h e Magokai colony, F a t h e r L e j e u n e ' s n e w home. I t is an a d m i r a b l y equipped a n d conducted establishm e n t , founded by t h e B r i t i s h G o v e r n m e n t a n d staffed b y t h e Missionary S i s t e r s of t h e Society of M a r y . T h e r e a r e 15 E u r o p e a n a n d American Sisters a n d 12 N a t i v e Sisters w o r k i n g a m o n g t h e lepers. F r o m t i m e t o t i m e cures h a v e been declared h e r e , a n d t h e fortunate persons sent back to t h e i r homes u n d e r observation. I t is not impossible, therefore, t h a t , u n d e r t h e c a r e of a skilled doctor, F a t h e r L e j e u n e m a y b e freed from t h e dread disease. F a t h e r F r a n cis Xavier Nicouleau c o n t r a c t e d leprosy while a c t i n g a s chaplain a t Magokai a n d died t h e r e in 1928. (Fides). CHRISTIAN WORKMEN G E T NEW PARIS HOME. Paris.—Four y o u n g w o r k m e n , affected b y t h e spiritual d i s t r e s s of t h e i r companions in t h e factory, a t t e m p t e d j u s t ten y e a r s ago, t o found, w i t h t h e aid of a p r i e s t , a n association which would w o r k for t h e re-Christianization of t h e industrial w o r k e r : t h e Jeunesse Ouvriere C h r e t i e n n e . T h e y w e r e inspired by w h a t had been accomplished in Belgium. F o u r y e a r s l a t e r , t h e association h a d 750 b l a n c h e s w i t h a m e m b e r s h i p of 34,000 w o r k e r s . B o r n in a little room in a r e m o t e corner of an industrial s u b u r b of P a r i s , t h e 'Young C h r i s t i a n W o r k m e n ' h a s known a rapid r i s e . Little b y little, it enlarged i t s social c e n t r e and h e a d q u a r t e r s , b u t t h e place w a s still too small. N o w it has p u r c h a s e d a seven-story hotel in P a r i s . T h e top-floor of t h e building will b e t r a n s f o r m e d into a chapel. On t h e lower floors will be r o o m s for chaplains, organizers, halls for r e t r e a t s a n d conferences, offices, and t h e editorial offices of i t s t h r e e periodicals. Clinics, dispensaries, mutual aid services, education and p r e vention of accident c e n t r e s a r e located elsewhere. (N.C.W.C.)

C h e n g t u (Szechwan, China) T W O p r i e s t s of t h e P a r i s F o r e i g n Missions, F a t h e r J o h n B. C h a r r i e r and F a t h e r Lucien P e zous, a r r i v e d in C h e n g t u a t t h e end of October a f t e r a m a r c h of several days from t h e i r mission in t h e V i c a r i a t e of Tatsienlu w h i c h w a s destroyed b y Reds. They w e r e accompanied b y two Chinese p r i e s t s and several C h r i s t i a n s . T h e C o m m u n i s t s , w h o have been i n v a d i n g t h e villages of s o u t h w e s t e r n Szechwan, w e r e only t h r e e miles from t h e mission when t h e p r i e s t s took to flight; t h e r e w a s n o t . even time, t h e y said, to p r e p a r e supplies of food and extra clothing. T h e following m o r n i n g a t d a w n , when t h e missionaries looked back on t h e t o w n from t h e t r a i l h i g h in t h e m o u n t a i n s , t h e y s a w t h e i r church in flames. T h e Reds h a v e b e e n very cruel d u r i n g t h i s invasion. It s e e m s t h a t t h e y h a v e suffered several r e v e r s e s and t h e y wish .to b e a v e n g e d upon whomsoever crosses t h e i r p a t h . G r e a t n u m b e r s of L a m a s of t h e T i b e t a n marches h a v e been m u r d e r e d by t h e m . T h e y accuse t h e L a m a s of b e i n g spies a n d of s p r e a d i n g injurious reports. The Reds torture t h e m for a few d a y s a n d t h e n p u t t h e m to death. One of t h e last despatches r e ceived from t h e F r a n c i s c a n Missionaries of M a r y in western Szechwan, before t h e telegraph lines between Y a c h o w and T a t sienlu were cut, said t h a t t h e situation there was very grave. (Fides)

R a b a t ( F r e n c h Morocco). "DELATIONS between religion a n d politics w e r e discussed a t Casablanca N o v e m b e r 17 d u r i n g t h e Sixth C o n g r e s s of t h e Catholic U n i o n s of Morocco. T h e Most Rev. H e n r y Vielle, O.F.M., Vicar Apostolic of R a b a t , presided a t t h e C o n g r e s s . T h e s u b s t a n c e of t h e view e x p r e s s e d b y t h e deleg a t e s is g i v e n in t h e resolutions d r a w n up a t t h e conclusion of t h e Congress. " I t is a m i s t a k e to p u s h too f a r t h e separation between religion a n d politics, a n d it is also a mist a k e t o confuse religion with a political p a r t y . If politics affect religion, t h e n religion h a s t h e r i g h t a n d d u t y of defending itself. Being citizens, Catholics h a v e t h e d u t y of t a k i n g p a r t in political life, provided t h a t by politics we m e a n , not p r o m o t i n g t h ? i n t e r e s t s of a p a r t y or faction, b u t renderi n g service t o t h e public welfare. FaiJti and conscience m u s t rule all a c t s of Catholics in political life a s well a s in p r i v a t e life, a n d t h e i r political a c t i o n s m u s t b e c h a r a c t e rized by C h r i s t i a n v i r t u e s and principles. W h e n t h e r e a r e elections, Catholics m u s t realize t h a t t h e y h a v e t h e responsibility of p u t t i n g in office t h o s e m e n who, charged with t h e administration of public affairs, seem m o s t capable of w a t c h i n g over t h e i n t e r e s t s of religion a n d t h e i n t e r e s t s of t h e c o u n t r y . B e n t on e l i m i n a t i n g all s t r i f e a m o n g citizens of t h e s a m e c o u n t r y , t h e Catholics of Morocco, w h e n called b y d u t y t o defend t h e i r r i g h t s a n d liberties, m u s t alw a y s m a k e a p o i n t of b e i n g t r u t h ful, n e v e r a c c u s i n g a n y o n e w i t h o u t proof, of b e i n g j u s t , recognizing t h e i r o p p o n e n t s ' sincerity, and of being c h a r i t a b l e , not looking on p e r s o n s a s e n e m i e s simply because t h e y do n o t t h i n k a s w e do. Violence m a k e s t h e s i t u a t i o n w o r s e : it does n o good. I t m a k e s blood flew b u t n e v e r c h a n g e s m e n . "

CHINESE BISHOPS JUBILEE P U R S E GIVEN TO SUFFERING COUNTRYMEN. T s i n i n g (Shensi, C h i n a ) . — T h e Catholics of T s i n i n g , I n n e r Mongolia, took u p a collection d u r i n g t h e s u m m e r w i t h which t h e y int e n d e d to celebrate t h e Silver Jubilee of t h e i r B i s h o p ' s Ordination. W h e n t h e festivities w e r e a b o u t t o t a k e place, Bishop F a n l e a r n e d of t h e p r e p a r a t i o n s a n d a s k e d t h e people t o g i v e t h e m o n e y t o t h e m a n y poor people suffering f r o m t h e effects of floods, d r o u g h t and bandits. T h u s a s u m of 230 dollars w a s set aside for relief work, and t h e balance of t h e p u r s e w a s deposited in t h e t r e a s u r y of t h e local b r a n c h of Catholic Action. Bishop Joseph F a n is one of t h e Chinese Bishops ordained by t h e Holy F a t h e r in St. P e t e r ' s , R o m e , J u n e 1933. ( F i d e s )

A N AGE OF " N E R V E S

(Fides) A

NEW CATHOLIC PAPER FOR T H E PHILIPPINES.

Manila.—The first i s s u e of t h e Philippines Commonweal, which a p p e a r e d October 3 1 , is dedicated t o t h e 23rd I n t e r n a t i o n a l E u c h a ristic C o n g r e s s t o be held in t h e Philippines in F e b r u a r y 1937. T h e new p a p e r is published b y t h e National Headquarters of Philippine Catholic Action a n d r e places L a D e f e n s a w h i c h h a s been t h e official o r g a n of Catholic A c tion till now. (Fides)

99

HOW MANY

SUFFER

TODAY. In this age of nerves Nearly all women and most men Suffer at times from depression and low spirits "Three years ago my nerves were fn such a state that I became subject to attacks of hysteria." So states Mrs. C. Bridges, of 34. Woodbridge Avenue, Leatherhead, England. "The feeling was terrible and the attacks usually ended in my going off into a fainting fit. The doctor said I was suffering from extreme bloodlessness and tonics seem to make no diffeience. I alwjfys felt miserable and depressed. " At last I decided to try Dr. W i l l a m s ' Pink Pills and after the first few doses I felt a great deal better. The j ills put new life into me. They enriched my blood and I had more energy, my nerves became steady, and before long my health was completely restored." "From chemists everywhere you crn obtain Dr. Williams' Pink Pills.


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 28th D E C E M B E R , 1935.

Humanity's Great Watchword 'For God And Country'

Signal Unity and Extension of the Church To-day.

o

MGR. Q U I N N , IN 'CATHOLIC H O U R , ' S A Y S " W H I L E N A T I O N S H A V E BECOME W E A K E R S I N C E W A R S H E H A S GROWN STRONGER."

" T H A T C R Y E X P R E S S E S T W O P R I N C I P A L D U T I E S O F MAN,' S A Y S MGR. B E L F O R D .

(N.C.W.C. News Service.) (By N.C.W.C. News Service.)

"J?0E

God a n d C o u n t r y " w a s

called h u m a n i t y ' s universal watchword by the Rt. Rev. Msgr. J o h n L. Belford, p a s t o r of t h e C h u r c h of t h e N a t i v i t y of O u r Blessed Lord, Brooklyn, in his add r e s s in t h e Columbia B r o a d c a s t i n g S y s t e m ' s " C h u r c h of t h e A i r " period r e c e n t l y . S p e a k i n g on "Religion and P a t r i o t i s m , " Monsignor Belford said t h a t cry " e x p r e s s e s t h e t w o g r e a t duties of m a n — h i s d u t y t o God a n d his d u t y t o his k i n g or count r y . " I t proceeds " f r o m t h e soul," h e said, " w h i c h recognises God a s i t s a u t h o r a n d heaven a s its destiny, a n d f r o m t h e h e a r t , which loves t h e land of its b i r t h or i t s adoption a n d c h e r i s h e s t h e t i e s of h o m e family a n d f r i e n d s h i p . " Continuing, Monsignor Belford pointed out t h e . d u a l i t y of m a n ' s n a t u r e . H e said " t h e mission of m a n in t h i s world can be s u m m e d u p in a single s e n t e n c e — H e is t o glorify God a n d help his neighb o u r . " " T o do t h i s w o r k well and w i t h p l e a s u r e , " h e added, " t h e L o r d h a s given u s t w o v i r t u e s , religion a n d p a t r i o t i s m . Religion regulates our duties t o God; patriotism i n s p i r e s a n d d i r e c t s o u r duties to our Country. The former works t h r o u g h t h e C h u r c h ; t h e l a t t e r , t h r o u g h t h e S t a t e . T h i s is t a n t a m o u n t t o saying t h a t h u m a n Society is, like m a n himself, composed of t w o elements,—one is s p i r i t u a l , t h e o t h e r is m a t e r i a l . One deals w i t h t h e soul primarily a n d w i t h t h e body s e c o n d a r i l y ; t h e o t h e r r e g u l a t e s e x t e r n a l cond u c t directly a n d i n t e r n a l life indirectly. T h e object of t h e S t a t e is to r e g u l a t e t e m p o r a l welfare a n d enable m a n t o r e a c h t h e ext e r n a l goal of h i s existence. T h e object of t h e C h u r c h is t o b r i n g God i n t o t h e life of m a n ; t o inspire h i s t h o u g h t s a n d r e g u l a t e h i s affections, t h u s m a k i n g h i m honest, t e m p e r a t e , t r u t h f u l and useful. T w o Societies Distinct. '•These t w o societies a r e distinct, b u t t h e y a r e n o t a n t a g o n i s t i c . On t h e contrary, they a r e mutually helpful. God i n s t i t u t e d t h e Church. H e g a v e it i t s constitution, i t s laws a n d i t s a u t h o r i t y . M a n h a s no power o v e r t h e m . H e cannot change, s u s p e n d o r d e s t r o y t h e m a n y m o r e t h a n a n individual can i n t e r f e r e w i t h t h e plan and purpose of his C r e a t o r .

"Civil society, or t h e S t a t e , is t h e w o r k of m a n . Men m a k e i t s c o n s t i t u t i o n a n d laws. T h e y rule it, guide it a n d protect it. I t safeg u a r d s life, p r o p e r t y , order. B u t it cannot r e g u l a t e t h o u g h t and desire, j n o t i v e s a n d t h e i n t e r i o r life in which e x t e r i o r conduct h a s i t s source a n d i t s value. I t s end is t o | secure t e m p o r a l good a n d m a t e r i a l | prosperity. . . . . " S t a t e r e g u l a t i o n s cannot secure a n y t h i n g m o r e t h a n a m i n i m u m of order o r m o r a l i t y . Religion end e a v o u r s t o produce a m a x i m u m . T h e S t a t e o r d e r s men to do and avoid o r be fined, imprisoned or p u t t o d e a t h . Religion gives h i m t h e h i g h e r a n d nobler m o t i v e of s e r v i n g God because it is r i g h t ; because God wills i t ; because God deserves it . . . . 1

'J'HE extension of t h e Catholic found chapels a n d hospitals of t h e T h e C h u r c h is Church h a s never been m o r e Catholic C h u r c h . m a r k e d in h e r history t h a n a t t h e not pent up w i t h i n four seas, o r Religion h a s A d v a n t a g e . present t i m e , declared t h e R t . Rev. limited to one n a t i o n ; nor is h e r " T h e r e is, and t h e r e h a s always Msgr. William Quinn last night in h e a r t feeble; but t h e pulsations of been, some m i s u n d e r s t a n d i n g bet- t h e course of his address over t h e h e r m i g h t y and u n d y i n g life a r e ween C h u r c h a n d S t a t e . . . Assoconstantly sending out light and "Catholic H o u r . " ciation does not destroy greed, grace with which t h e H e a r t of God T h e "Catholic H o u r " is broad- inspired h e r , even t o t h e ends of a m b i t i o n or sloth. In religion w e m u s t a l w a y s distinguish between cast over a network of t h e Nation- t h e e a r t h . She is accomplishing t h e divine t r a d i t i o n of faith a n d al Broadcasting Companv, t h r o u g h h e r mission t h e m e n w h o receive a n d interpret Station W E A F , a t New York, and " T h e r e a r e several signs which int h a t t r a d i t i o n . In t h e s a m e way, is produced by t h e National Coun- dicate t h a t t h e Catholic Church is o n in t h e S t a t e we m u s t distinguish cil of Catholic Men. t h e eve of a g r e a t expansion. T h e b e t w e e n t h e constitution and t h e Monsignor Quinn a s s e r t e d t h a t f i r s t . . . is t h i s : T h a t t h e field is ripe m e n w h o m a k e a n d execute o u r while all t h e nations which p a r t i - for it. Men of all races sense t h e laws. T h e S t a t e itself recognises cipated in t h e World W a r "indeed need of a God-given organization, t h i s necessity b y establishing a have lost," while it is evident t h a t a spiritual league of nations in S u p r e m e C o u r t t o i n t e r p r e t law "political organizations h a v e grown w hich all m e n can s h a r e t h e gifts and, a s f a r a s is h u m a n l y possible, w e a k e r since t h e W a r , t h e Catho- from on high. Races which u p decree j u s t i c e . lic Church h a s grown more united until recent times have been con"Religion, however, h a s an ad- internally and more widespread sidered backward, a r e now m a k i n g g r e a t strides forward. T h e y h a v e v a n t a g e . It is a divine institution e x t e r n a l l y . " m a d e scientific and mechanical a n d t h e Lord Himself h a s providWrestled with Rulers. ed in t h e C h u r c h a s u p r e m e court. " A t no t i m e in h e r long his- progress, b u t like our own people, Men do not preside in t h a t court. t o r y , " he continued, " h a s h e r ex- t h e y w a n t something more t h a n T h e Spirit of T r u t h presides a n d tension been m o r e m a r k e d t h a n it material t h i n g s . T h e y w?^it t h e p e r m i t s of no r u l i n g c o n t r a r y t o is a t t h e p r e s e n t t i m e . A t no t i m e t h i n g s of t h e spirit. T h e y w a n t t r u t h and justice. . . . h a s h e r u n i t y , both w i t h i n and communion with t h e i r Maker. T h e y " T h e r e have been conflicts bet- without, been so complete. N e v e r w a n t t h e graces won by Our R e ween religion and government, b u t has h e r universality so n e a r l y ap- d e e m e r on t h e Cross. This univert h e y h a v e been, a s a rule, about proached i t s fulness. F i r s t , I will sal desire can be rilled only by a t e m p o r a l m a t t e r s , not about doc- refer to t h e u n i t y of t h e C h u r c h : universal Church—not confined to t r i n e . T h e y h a v e been caused b y in t h e p a s t centuries s h e h a s h a d one nationality, not discriminating c h u r c h m e n and s t a t e s m e n — n o t b y t o pass t h r o u g h t i m e s of dissen- between m e n on account of their t h e Church. I n t h o s e disputes sion, periods of internal intellec- colour. Depended upon a T h r o n e . c h u r c h m e n h a v e often been wrong. tual conflicts of every kind. T h e r e T h e y h a v e injected personal inter- have been separations and e x t e r n " T h e second s i g n . . . . is t h e e s t i n t o t h e disputes, or t h e y h a v e al disunion, b u t also i n t e r n a l con- downfall of t h e so-called National allowed princes a n d s t a t e s m e n t o fusion. In p a s t centuries s h e h a s C h u r c h e s . F o r c e n t u r i e s t h e y have had to contend with Byzantine leaned upon t h r o n e s and d y n a s t i e s . use them. E m p e r o r s , Kaisers, Czars, a n d National " B u t religion is really t h e Kings, who t a i n t e d t h e C h u r c h by W h e n t h e s e fell, t h e s t r o n g e s t b u l w a r k of h u m a n au-4 t h e i r p a t r o n a g e , s m ^ h e r e d ^ i e r ^ b y Churches w e r e doomed t o fall w i t h t h o r i t y . While it denies t h a t a n y t h e i r protection, and s t r o v e a g a i n s t t h e m . T h e World W a r served only r u l e r m a y ignore or deny t h e h e r in proud boldness. T h e r e w a s t o b r i n g out a confusion which alr i g h t s of his subjects, or rule un- never a period, down to t h e vanish- r e a d y existed. I t w a s only t o emj u s t l y , it r e m i n d s him t h a t he is ing way of t h e last of t h r e e g r e a t phasise t h e need of one Lord, one F a i t h , one B a p t i s m . National not absolute. . . . Empires, in which t h e y did not Churches, dependent upon a "Society h a s r i g h t s , religion h a s wrestle foot to foot w i t h t h e Cat h r o n e , a r e rapidly becoming only r i g h t s , e v e r y individual h a s r i g h t s . tholic Church. t h e shadows of a d r e a m . Even These rights Church and State "Then c a m e a period of g r o w i n g primitive peoples discern in t h e m m u s t respect. W h e n t h e y refuse t h e h a l t i n g step a n d faltering voice t o respect t h e m , t h e y a r e answer- nationalism, w h e n t h e u n i t y of t h e of h u m a n guides not sure of t h e i r Church w a s t o r n asunder. W h e r e able not merely t o God b u t to t h e way. i n s t i t u t i o n or individual. W h e n a r e t h e s e monarchies a n d t h e i r " T h e t h i r d sign which holds C a e s a r is u n j u s t , h e forfeits his dynasties n o w ? They a r e forgotr i g h t t o r u l e — t h a t is, h e ceases t o ten. Yet, t h e Catholic Church is g r e a t promise for t h e advance of flourishing, whether under t h e t h e Church is t h e m i g h t y increase be C a e s a r . " tropical sun, or in t h e frigid n o r t h . in t h e mission spirit which h a s come over our people, not only i a C H R I S T M A S CAROLS " N e v e r in h e r long h i s t o r y of t h e Catholic n a t i o n s of E u r o p e , OF EARLY CENTURIES t w e n t y centuries h a s h e r univer- which h a v e a l w a y s sent missionsality advanced so n e a r t o t h e full aries, b u t also in America. . . . Songs of t h e People. " A n d a n o t h e r hopeful sign for In addition t o t h e i r l i t e r a r y circumstance of t h e h u m a n race. t h e advance of t h e Church in our . . . She is pressing forward into value, carols—songs of t h e people t h e five continents of t h e world. t i m e is t h a t in t h e designs of Di—offer a n a t t r a c t i v e field to t h e E u r o p e and t h e two A m e r i c a s vine Providence a g r e a t missionary r e s e a r c h s t u d e n t of social history, h a v e opened t h e i r doors t o her. now sits in t h e C h a i r of P e t e r and S i s t e r J o h n Elizabeth C r e a m e r Africa is unfolding i t s g a t e s — o u r wears t h e r i n g of t h e F i s h e r m a n . . . points out in a dissertation on missionaries a r e t h e r e in g r e a t " T h e missionary p r o g r a m m e of E n g l i s h F i f t e e n t h C e n t u r y Carols, numbers. Asia is being p e n e t r a t e d t h e Catholic C h u r c h h a s never p i e p a r e d for t h e faculties of t h e on every side. In t h e lonely isles changed since P e t e r ' s time. I t c a s G r a d u a t e School of t h e Catholic of t h e Pacific t h e r e a r e to be « never c h a n g e ! . . . " U n i v e r s i t y of A m e r i c a . T h e verses of carols a r e not t h e D E A T H OF A N O T A B L E c u l t u r e d work of a superior class Several classifications of carols of poets, t h e a u t h o r points out, h a v e been suggested b y different PRIEST. but belong t o t h e people a t large a u t h o r s , b u t t h e two main divisions S h a n g h a i . Rev. A u g u s t Savio, a n d b r e a t h e t h e spirit which generally a r e t h e Sacred and t h e a n i m a t e d t h e i r lives. T h e songs S e c u l a r — o u t g r o w t h s of t h e double founder a n d d i r e c t o r of t h e H e u d e a n d carols of t h e early centuries aspect of worship a n d m e r r y - Museum a t S h a n g h a i a n d a u t h o r w e r e t r a n s m i t t e d orally for t h e m a k i n g a t t e n d a n t upon t h e C h r i s t - of N o t e s d'Entomologie Chinoise, m o s t p a r t a n d w e r e recorded only m a s feast. It is believed t h a t t h e h a s died a t S h a n g h a i a t t h e a g e r a r e l y , o r b y accident. In t h e f o r m e r w e r e s u n g by t h e C h r i s t of 53. H e was a m e m b e r of t h e F i f t e e n t h C e n t u r y , however, t h e m a s " W a i t s , " g r o u p s of villagers g r e a t bulk of t h e m were w r i t t e n who travelled t h r o u g h t h e c o u n t r y - Society of J e s u s for 35 y e a r s , p r a c down, t h o u g h not necessarily p r o - side singing t h e i r joy, while t h e tically all of which w a s s p e n t in duced a t t h a t t i m e . The Oxford l a t e r are associated m o r e properly t h e education of y o u n g m e n . H e Book of C h r i s t m a s Carols refers w i t h t h e f e a s t i n g in t h e g r e a t was professor a t St, I g n a t i u s ' College, Siccawei, a n d Chancellor of to t h e m a s "songs w i t h a religious halls of t h e nobles. impulse." (N.C.W.C.) t h e A u r o r a University. ( F i d e s ) . T

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M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 2 8 t h DECEMBER, 1935.

16

FOR

A CHRISTMAS COMMUNION AT BETHLEHEM

PERFECT SNAPSHOTS

T T w a s C h r i s t m a s n i g h t in t h e lines of brown-clad figures; w i t h 2 8 ° She. C a v e a t B e t h l e h e m w h e r e O u r h e r e a t o n s u r e d head, a n d t h e r e a L o r d w a s born n e a r l y t w e n t y cen- sandalled foot, revealed m o r e plaint u r i e s a g o . T h e Cave is long, a n d ly a s t h e light fell m o r e clearly on very dark. Leather h a n g i n g s , t h e kneeling friars. T h e candles on t h e a l t a r itself e m b o s s e d w i t h a d e s i g n of gold n o w dulled by a g e , cover t h e m all. lit t h e first r o w s of k n e e l i n g worO n l y in one place is t h e n a t u r a l s h i p p e r s , b u t F a t h e r L o u i s h a d no l i m e s t o n e of t h e hillside visible, t h o u g h t of a n y t h i n g except t h e a n d t h a t is in t h e r e c e s s n e a r t h e Divine M y s t e r i e s h e w a s a b o u t to Obtainable from s t a i r w a y of f o u r t e e n s t e p s t h a t c e l e b r a t e . l e a d d o w n into t h e C a v e from t h e I t w a s only when h e t u r n e d to g r e a t c h u r c h t h a t h a s been built give H o l y Communion t h a t h e saw, a b o v e it upon t h e hillside. k n e e l i n g a m o n g s t t h e p i l g r i m s , on F a t h e r Louis h a d been f o r s o m e t h e r o u g h stone floor of t h e Cave, m o n t h s a t B e t h l e h e m ; b u t t h i s a m a n w h o m h e h a d l a s t seen in w a s h i s first C h r i s t m a s t h e r e . P a r i s , a m a n of high intellect, wellW h e n e v e r d u r i n g t h e y e a r i t h a d k n o w n a s a n upholder of infidel, if b e e n h i s t u r n t o s a y M a s s in t h e n o t of actually a n t i - C h r i s t i a n , doch o u s e , w a s s t a y i n g u n d e r t h e conCave, h e h a d said t h e M a s s of t r i n e s . " C h r i s t m a s (for t h a t is t h e M a s s I t w a s a n almost irresistible dis- v e n t roof, h e p a i d h i m a C h r i s t m a s t h a t i s said t h e r e e v e r y d a y ) , a n d t r a c t i o n . M. B e r t r a n d ' s h e a d w a s visit, h i s curiosity keenly a r o u s e d e a c h t i m e h e h a d said t h e w o r d s , b o w e d ; h e knelt a p p a r e n t l y un- concerning a conversion of so m u c h " P u e r n a t u s e s t n o b i s / ' " A Child is d i s t u r b e d by t h e j o s t l i n g n e a r n e s s i n t e r e s t t o a n y o n e familiar w i t h Bern f o r u s , " h i s h e a r t h a d thrilled. of c r o w d s whose piety f o r t h e mo- t h e intellectual life of F r a n c e . M. S o t o - n i g h t , m o r e t h a n ever t h i s m e n t o u t r a n t h e i r politeness, and B e r t r a n d told h i m willingly and f e e l i n g of n e a r n e s s t o t h e I n f a n t in h i s t u r n h i s head w a s r a i s e d t o gladly of t h a t conversion. F o r J e s u s , b o r n on e a r t h f o r u s , h a d receive t h e Body of C h r i s t w i t h twenty-five y e a r s h e h a d g i v e n up t o u c h e d him. e v e r y m a r k of r e s p e c t — t h e Body all p r a c t i c e of religion. H i s f a i t h H e c a m e slowly down t h e s t a i r s of t h e God W h o m o r e t h a n nine- in God a n d in all revealed religion t h a t lie between t h e Greek a l t a r , t e e n h u n d r e d y e a r s a g o w a s born w a s g o n e a s completely a s t h o u g h w h i c h s t a n d s o v e r t h e spot w h i c h in t h a t v e r y Cave f o r u s . T h e r e h e h a d never been t a u g h t , a n d h a d is m a r k e d b y a m a r b l e s t a r , on w a s n o d o u b t i n g t h e f a c t t h a t t h i s n e v e r accepted t h e t r u t h s df t h e w h i c h a r e e n g r a v e d t h e w o r d s , m a n w h o h a d been a n e n e m y of God c a t e c h i s m which God h a s revealed • H e r e J e s u s C h r i s t w a s b o r n of a h a d r e t u r n e d t o t h e F a i t h of h i s t o m a n ; a s t h o u g h h e h a d n e v e r F a t h e r L o u i s t h a n k e d received h i s F i r s t Communion, and V i r g i n , " and t h e t h e a l t a r , close by, childhood. God f r o m t h e b o t t o m of h i s h e a r t g o n e for some y e a r s , r e g u l a r l y t o belonging to t h e " L a t i n s , " a s we, C a t h o l i c s , a r e called in P a l e s t i n e . for w h a t h e saw, b u t did n o t un- t h e S a c r a m e n t s . W i t h h i s college F i f t e e n l a m p s b u r n <iay a n d n i g h t -Hgcgiand, ATid t h e n w i t h a n effort, life h a d come i n t e r c o u r s e w i t h m e n r o u n d t h e a l t a r of t h e b i r t h p l a c e , t h e y t u r n e d h i s a t t e n t i o n a g a i n to w h o believed n o t h i n g , a n d w h o scoffed a t o t h e r s for b e l i e v i n g ; a n d a n d t h e whole l e n g t h of t h e Cave h i s M a s s . A f t e r w a r d s h e m a d e inquiries b e i n g weak, t h o u g h clever, t h e a s dimly lighted b y t h i s r o w of h a n g i n g l i g h t s t h a t flickered faint- a n d finding t h a t M. B e r t r a n d , consequence f o r himself w a s unly, s h o w i n g a crowd of pilgrims, in whose i d e n t i t y w a s u n k n o w n t o t h e belief. Y e t h e h a d a l w a y s h a d a feeling s e r r i e d r a n k s , a n d t h e b l u r r e d out- b r o t h e r in c h a r g e of t h e g u e s t of sorrow, of r e g r e t , for t h a t childlike f a i t h which h e h a d lost. T h e n one day, a m o n t h or so before t h i s Christmas night a t Bethlehem, a J e s u i t w h o m h e h a d m e t a t Beyr o u t h , h a d a s k e d h i m point b l a n k w h y h e w a s no longer a Catholic. M. B e r t r a n d t h o u g h t t h a t h e h a d a g r e a t m a n y r e a s o n s for h i s loss of f a i t h , b u t t h e only t h a t h e g a v e t o t h e J e s u i t w a s t h a t h e could n o t believe. "My friend," said t h e p r i e s t , " c a n n o t " is a different t h i n g f r o m "will n o t , " a n d before now, p r a y e r h a s done m o r e difficult t h i n g s t h a n w i n n i n g you back y o u r f a i t h . To-morrow is t h e F e a s t of All S a i n t s , I will p r a y for y o u , and will you p r o m i s e m e t o a s k , yourself, t h e s a i n t s to intercede for you?" B u t M. B e r t r a n d would m a k e no promises. On t h e F e a s t of All S a i n t s , however, h e a t t e n d e d Mass a t t h e F r e n c h Consulate, not a s a m a t t e r TRY AN ELEGANT "GOLDEN of devotion, b u t a s a n official form, b e c a u s e t h e o t h e r m e m b e r s of t h e A R R O W " VACUUM FILTER P E N ! ! F r e n c h colony in B e y r o u t h , w i t h w h o m h e w a s s t a y i n g , did so. Golden A r r o w " p e n s t i p p e d w i t h t h e b e s t iridium vouch you D u r i n g t h e M a s s t h e w o r d s of t h e f o r q u i t e s m o o t h c a l l i g r a p h y a n d s p o n t a n e o u s ink-flow. J e s u i t c a m e b a c k t o him, a n d w i t h N o p e n on t h e m a r k e t can s u r p a s s " Golden Arrow " in C h e a p a cynical smile upon h i s lips h e ben e s s , Refinement, Solidity a n d Novelty. Once used, a l w a y s used. g a n t o r e p e a t t h e words of t h e p r a y e r of t h e philosopher t o t h e " U n k n o w n God." I m p o r t e r s a n d Sole A g e n t s : H e w a s s t a n d i n g a t t h e b a c k of t h e chapel, a n d a s h i s lips moved, h i s eyes fell upon t h e w h i t e corn e t t e s of t h e grey-clad n u n s kneelN o . 2, The Arcade, Singapore. i n g h u m b l y , p r a y i n g devoutly a t BRANCH OFFICE: LONDON, N E W YORK, S H A N G H A I . s o m e little d i s t a n c e from h i m .

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T h e y w e r e S i s t e r s of C h a r i t y , d a u g h t e r s of S t . V i n c e n t de P a u l , j a n d M. B e r t r a n d k n e w not only t h e k i n d of w o r k t h e y did gladly a n d cheerfully f o r God's s a k e , work amongst Eastern horrors, more revolting b y f a r t h a n t h e - w o r s t miseries of t h e W e s t , b u t h e also k n e w t h e kind of h o m e s t h a t m a n y of t h e m h a d left. T h e n it c a m e t o h i m in a flash t h a t n o t h i n g less t h a n t h e love of God a n d t h e C h r i s t i a n v i r t u e s of h u m i l i t y could w o r k t h e m i r a c l e of c h a r i t y of w h i c h t h e y w e r e t h e living w i t n e s s e s . W i t h o u t k n o w i n g t h a t h e did so, t h e infidel w r i t e r w e n t upon h i s knees a n d t h e w o r d s , e v e r old a n d ever n e w of t h e H A I L M A R Y r o s e t o his lips, " P r a y for n s sinners now." T h e M a s s w e n t on. S o m e w h e r e in B e y r o u t h t h e J e s u i t w a s k e e p i n g h i s word a n d p r a y i n g f o r h i m ; t h e S i s t e r s , t h o u g h u n a w a r e of h i s need so close beside t h e m , w e r e surely p r a y i n g for s i n n e r s such a s he, and, m o s t powerful of all, a t h i s own r e q u e s t , t h e M o t h e r of God w a s p r a y i n g to h e r Son f o r him. "It was the HAIL MARY that { did i t . " M. B e r t r a n d concluded, "for a s t h e w o r d s c a m e back t o m e it seemed a s t h o u g h t h e cloud of doubt in which m y m i n d h a d been w r a p p e d for so long, rolled a w a y , and I s a w a g a i n t h e God W h o m a s a child I h a d k n o w n a n d loved." On m y k n e e s I a s k e d H i m — W h o s e existence I in m y wicked folly h a d dared t o d e n y — I a s k e d H i m t o forgive m e , a n d I longed for a p a r t i c i pation in t h e religion from which I h a d for so m a n y y e a r s held m y self aloof^ I h a d n o b u s i n e s s to bring me to Jerusalem, but I felt t h a t w h e r e t h e Son of God h u m b l e d Himself t o become M a n for me, I would a s k H i m t o c r o w n H i s w o r k of love a n d f o r g i v e n e s s on t h e a n n i v e r s a r y of t h a t d a y b y coming t o m y h e a r t . N o w t h r o u g h His m e r c y , a n d w i t h t h e h e l p of His Mother, whose prayers have won so m u c h for m e , I hope t o b e faithful t o H i m for e v e r . H o w fully M. B e r t r a n d did r e s pond t o t h e g r a c e s t h a t God b e s t owed on h i m is unconsciously, p e r h a p s , b u t clearly s h o w n in t h e "Life of S t . A u g u s t i n e " which h e a f t e r w a r d s w r o t e , a n d which, of h i s l i t e r a r y w o r k s , is t h e one b e s t known t o Catholics.


17

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NOTES

in

CATHOLICS IN THE LIMELIGHT (By O u r C o r r e s p o n d e n t ) .

g » B B g B B B 5 f f l a m HOCKEY. S i n g a p o r e Defeat Selangor and Perak. S i n g a p o r e defeated Selangor and P e r a k a t Hockey l a s t S a t u r d a y and Sunday. Choo B e n g , A e r i a , N . Sullivan and M. V a l b e r g p l a y e d in both g a m e s and w e r e v e r y p r o m i n e n t . Choo B e n g w a s left half, A e r i a t h e goalkeeper a n d Sullivan a n d Valb e r g inside r i g h t a n d centre-forward respectively. T h e l a s t n a m e d was a t h r u s t f u l leader while Sullivan initiated some good moves.

BOXING. T o m m y L o u g h r a n in Splendid Form. E v e r y n e w s p a p e r h a s showered t h e m o s t delightful b o u q u e t s on T o m m y L o u g h r a n t h e I r i s h American ex-cruiser w e i g h t champion of t h e world, w h e n h e m e t Maurice Strickland of N e w Zealand a t Wembley l a s t m o n t h . Loughran m i g h t h a v e knocked out h i s opponent in t h e first 2 o r 3 r o u n d s but he p r e f e r r e d t o box, because he m o s t probably w a n t e d t o show in his first fight in E n g l a n d t h e t r a d i tional h o m e of t h e a r t of self defence t h a t h e can box. H e also t h o u g h t w e believe t h a t a n English crowd would a p p r e c i a t e a boxer w h o by r i n g craft could nullify all t h e efforts of a r u g g e d a n d e n t h u siastic fighter. L o u g h r a n lived in a P a r k L a n e Hotel in London d u r i n g h i s t r a i n ing a n d did h i s r o a d w o r k in Hyde P a r k . R e g u l a r a t t e n d e r s a t early mass at~the—Church round the corner m a y have recognised in t h e quiet fit looking m a n s h a r i n g t h e i r daily w o r s h i p T o m m y L o u g h r a n , ex newsboy and c r u i s e r weight champion of t h e world.

BASEBALL. Mr. E . F . O'Connor's D e p a r t u r e for J a p a n . Local Baseball will suffer a | severe loss by t h e coming depart u r e on t r a n s f e r t o Tokio, J a p a n , of- Mr. E. F . O'Connor, of t h e Metro-Goldwyn M a y e r Corporation. Mr. O'Connor leaves in t h e e a r l y p a r t of next y e a r for Japan. T h e local American side is going to mis? h i m most f o r h e w a s a fine allr o u n d e r . H e can fill any position in t h e field, leads t h e b a t t i n g a m o n g t h e S i n g a p o r e Americans a n d is a good c h a n g e pitcher. He hails from Boston, U.S.A. a n d one of h i s home t o w n newspapers calls h i m " T h e B a b e R u t h of t h e O r i e n t . " Besides being a m a g n i ficent baseball s t a r , h e is also a n j o u t s t a n d i n g polo player, a v e r y efficient a m a t e u r rider and a n excellent golfer. Singapore's loss is sure t o be I Tokio's gain. Mr. O'Connor is a parishioner of t h e Cathedral of t h e Good Shepherd.

P O R T

\ B A B E R U T H TO A C C E P T J O B IN B R I T A I N ? B a b e R u t h , American baseball I hero, h a s been offered a j o b a s i Baseball. Coach in Great Britain is ; seriously considering acceptance. I O t h e r foreign countries too h a v e i approached h i m . R u t h is a C a t h o ! lie. CATHOLIC T O P N Q T C H E R S . j F i v e r e g u l a r m e m b e r s of t h e I D e t r o i t Tigers, w h o have won t h e j Championship of t h e A m e r i c a n i iJraseball league for t h e second I y e a r in succession, a r e Catholics. | One of t h e m is Charles G*hringer, j w h o h a s no p e e r a s a second b a s e | m a n . Alvin Crowder, one of t h e ; pitchers, is a convert. The o t h e r | t h r e e a r e M a r w i n Owen, William Rogell and Gerald Walker. 1

CRICKET. O x e n h a m in Deadly Form. R. K. Oxenham, t h e Queensland Catholic Cricketer, is reaping a h a r v e s t of cheap wickets for t h e A u s t r a l i a n XI in India. He took 14 wickets for 44 (7 for 31 and 7 for 13) against a Central India X I a t A j m e r . A u s t r a l i a made 149 in t h e first innings and t h e n scored t h e 101 r u n s necessary for victory for t h e loss of 3 wickets. * * * • New L.B.W. Rule not favoured in Australia. T h e A u s t r a l i a n Board of Cricket

Control h a s declined even t o consider Lord H a w k e ' s unofficial r e quest t h a t t h e y a d o p t t h e n e w l.b.w. rule. BOXING. British Middle W e i g h t Champion. Jack McAvoy, B r i t i s h Middle W e i g h t champion, knocked out I Eddie Risko, world's Middle W e i g h t \ champion, in t h e first r o u n d of a | 10 rounds, n o n title c o n t e s t a f t e r flooring him six t i m e s . McAvoy l is generally r e g a r d e d in A m e r i c a a s t h e virtual world m i d d l e w e i g h t champion. H e is also leading con| t e n d e r for t h e world's c r u i s e r weight title. '•'•I

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4, Battery Road, Singapore.


18

MALAYA

CATHOLIC LEADER,

SATUBDAY,

2 8 t h D E C E M B E R , 1935.

AROUND T H E SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE o C A T H E D R A L OF T H E GOOD SHEPHERD. Baptisms. D e c 13. Philomena Iris, daughter of Leopold Samuel Attias and Theresa Mary Attias, born on December 20, 1932. Godparents: Vincent Napoleon Pereira and Dina Josephine Pereira. D e c 14. Clara Mercier, adopted daughter of John and Regina Anderson, born on August 6, 1985. Godparents: Cyril Oliveiro and I v y Oliveiro. D e c 14. Kathleen Florence, wife of Dudley Edward Siddons, born on February 12, 1912. D e c 15. Andrew Charles son of Charles A n t h o n y Watson and Clara Magdalene Watson. Godparents: Eric de Silva and Sybil Gomez.

*

*

*

*

DEATH. On December 14, 1935, at t h e General Hospital, Johore, Frank James Allan, seaman H. M. S. "Duncan" in h i s 18th year. CHRISTMAS TREAT. The usual Christmas Treat of t h e Cathedral of T h e Good Shepherd will be held on the 30th ins t a n t a t t h e Victoria Theatre. Besides there will be a cinema s h o w and t h e distribution of t o y s t o children under 10 years in t h e evening followed by a dance later i n t h e evening.

j • ? !

Prize Distribution at the Convent of t h e Holy Infant Jesus, S'pore. Thursday, 12th Dec. saw the Convent Hall full of a well arranged and v e r y happy crowd of children including all t h e classes from Standard HI up t o t h e Commercia l . T h e happy function at which H i s Excellency Monseigneur A. D e v a l s presided, w a s indeed an excellent one. A P r o g r a m m e of well chosen recitations, songs, drills and Folk dances w e n t off w i t h an ease that spoke well f o r t h e good training received. T h e n Miss M. Leicester read a report on t h e work of t h e school year, w h i c h m u s t have filled t h e h e a r t s of both pupils and Staff w i t h legitimate pride and heartfelt gratitude t o God. Prhtes w e r e t h e n distributed t o t h e winners i n the, respective classes. We are pleased to mention Miss Olive Finck of Senior Cambridge, w h o w a s awarded t h e "Olga Marten's Memorial Prize," which consisted of a beautiful silver brush and comb, and Miss Lily Suzuki, w h o had a lovely desk writing-set, a s winner of t h e Prize of Honour for Standard VH. Aft e r t h e distribution of prizes, t h e results of t h e Standard VII E x amination w e r e read out b y \he Lady Superior and Certificates were handed t o t h e successful candidates by H i s Excellency Monseigneur D e v a l s . H i s Excellency in a short add r e s s thanked t h e children, e x presed t h e great pleasure t h e function gave, him, congratulated those w h o w o n prizes and received Standard V H Certificates, and aft e r h e had wished t h e m pleasant holidays, t h e assembly scattered full of j o y a n d satisfaction.

PARISHES

PENANG, KUALA LUMPUR,

CATHEDRAL OF T H E SHEPHERD.

IPOH,

GOOD

Ladies'

Catholic Action Society, Singapore T h e first organised m e e t i n g of t h e recently established b r a n c h of t h e L a d i e s ' Catholic Action Socie t y in t h e p a r i s h of t h e Good S h e p h e r d , Singapore, w a s held on t h e 12th December, a t t h e C o n v e n t of t h e H o l y I n f a n t J e s u s . M r s . Hoffman who w a s previously n a m e d P r e s i d e n t of t h e Soc i e t y b y H i s Excellency Monseign e u r Devals, presided. T h e first _workjrf t h e m e e t i n g w a s t o elect t h e C o m m i t t e e . Mrs. W. Mosberg e n w a s elected Vice-President, M r s . L. W. E s s , S e c r e t a r y , a n d M r s . A. V . P e r a l t a , T r e a s u r e r . I t w a s decided t h a t t h i s C o m m i t t e e should hold a m e e t i n g l a t e r o n t o n a m e t w o office-bearers t o help t h e C o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s in c a r r y i n g o u t t h e i r functions. Mrs. Hoffman a d d r e s s e d the m e e t i n g a n d solicited t h e good will a n d kind a s s i s t a n c e of e v e r y o n e t o help t h e Society in doing t h e good w o r k for which it h a s been founded, and, i n k e e p i n g w i t h t h e desire of our good Bishop, s h e hoped w i t h God's help to b e able t o do h e r p a r t a s P r e s i d e n t , b u t s h e felt s h e needed t h e h a r m o n i o u s coo p e r a t i o n of all t h e m e m b e r s . The younger members then anded r o u n d r e f r e s h m e n t s a n d a s t h i s w a s i n p r o g r e s s H i s Excellency Monseigneur Devals a r r i v e d accompanied b y Rev. F a t h e r N . Maury. H i s Excellency expressed h i s pleasure t o see t h e good a t t e n dance a n d spoke on different topics troneerning—the activities of t h e Society a n d gave m a n y useful h i n t s f o r c a r r y i n g on t h e w o r k . A r r a n g e m e n t s were discussed for t h e forthcoming Christmas Tree, f o r all children, between t h e a g e s of 2 a n d 10. T h e function will t a k e place t h i s y e a r in t h e C o n v e n t H a l l a n d H i s Excellency hoped t h a t t h e Ladies of t h e Society would g e t in touch w i t h all t h e p o o r children a n d invite t h e m , a n d offer t h e m m e a n s of t r a n s p o r t so t h a t all would profit b y t h e C h r i s t mas Treat. D a t e of n e x t m e e t i n g w a s t h e n fixed f o r 1 3 t h F e b r u a r y , 1936, a t 4 p.m. * * * * CATHOLIC CLUB RECEPTION. Patronal Feast of t h e President. I n h o n o u r of t h e P a t r o n a l F e a s t of t h e P r e s i d e n t , t h e R e v e r e n d F a t h e r N . M a u r y , t h e r e will b e a Reception a t t h e Club on S u n d a y , 29th instant, after t h e High Mass. A t t h i s function a p h o t o g r a p h of t h e R e v e r e n d F a t h e r will b e unveiled b y H i s Excellency B i s h o p Adrien Devals. M e m b e r s of t h e Club a n d t h e i r families, t h e p a r i s h i o n e r s of t h e C a t h e d r a l of t h e "Good S h e p h e r d " a n d of the Kiatong C h u r c h a r e cordially invited t o b e p r e s e n t t o offer t h e i r good w i s h e s . Singapore, 2 0 t h December, 1935. W. F . M O S B E R G E N , Honorary Secretary. • * * * HOLY

INNOCENTS

ENGLISH

SCHOOL. Annual Prize Distribution. The Holy Innocents English School had the Annual Prize Distribution on Friday, 13th instant

T h e aged a n d d e s t i t u t e i n m a t e s of t h e P o o r Home, D a r b y s h i r e Road, Singapore, u n d e r t h e care of t h e Little S i s t e r s of t h e Poor. [The temporary premises of the Poor Home is quite full to capacity now, and it is regretted that no further applicants can be accepted. Gifts in cash or kind may be forwarded directly to the Mother Superior of the Home or to His Lordship the Bishop of Malacca, and they will be thankfully received.]

i n t h e school-hall, which w a s well d e c o r a t e d b y t h e pupils. T h e hall w a s overcrowded w i t h g u e s t s , p a r e n t s a n d friends of t h e school. A m o n g s t those p r e s e n t w e r e H i s L o r d s h i p . JMtonsignor A . Devals, t h e Bishop of Malacca, Kev. F r s . L . Auriol, P a g e s and M. K o h nd the Seminarists of St. Xavier's Seminary. %

A concert consisting of H a w a i i a n Music, Songs a n d a s h o r t d r a m a b y M r . H . R. C h e e s e m a n , " J a a f a r a n d t h e F o u r T h i e v e s , " preceded t h e prize distribution. This w a s w a r m l y received b y all t h o s e p r e sent. Before calling on Monsignor A . D e v a l s t o p r e s e n t t h e prizes, t h e Director, F r . M. Koh t h a n k e d h i s Lordship, the Rev. Fathers., and p a r e n t s for t h e i r presence a n d spoke of t h e y e a r ' s work a n d a c t i v i t i e s of t h e school. H i s L o r d s h i p t h e n addressecTihe g a t h e r i n g and said t h a t h e cong r a t u l a t e d t h e prize-winners, a n d hoped t h a t n e x t y e a r t h e pupils would work h a r d e r . He was pleased w i t h t h e work done a n d t h a n k e d t h e Rev. F r . E. B e c h e r a s , t h e benefactor of t h e school, for h i s f o r e s i g h t in h i s educational w o r k f o r t h e children of Serangoon, a n d t h e Rev. F r . Director for c a r r y i n g on t h e good work done. H e p r a y e d t h a t all would be t r u e to t h e i r religion a n d be good citizens of t h i s Colony. Mr. T a y K e n g Hock, t h e A c t i n g H e a d m a s t e r t h e n r e a d out t h e l i s t of t h e prize-winners. Junior 1934— Lee Ah Tony and Lee Keok Leang. Junior 1935— Teo Boon Hiang, Teo Siak Khee, Tan Ah Kok, Tay Keok Heng and N g Swee Kim. Std. VII 1935— Low Kfok Pheng, Heng Joo Seng, Goh Leng Chuan, Chia Joo Song, Lee Cheng Siang, Phua Boon Liang and Teo Boon Meng.

J Std. VI 1935— j Tay Chin Meng, Leong Hon Khoon, Tay Eng Kiat, Sng Choo Hui and Phua Boon Leng. j Std. V 1935— Lee Kheng Chiang, Chan Ee Tak, li>h I Ser Hock, Koh Khoon Hock and Tan Poh Chye. — Std. IV 1935— Ang Yong Boon, Tay Chin Liang, Tan Hock Kheng and Lim Joo Guan. Std. I l l 1935— Chan Ee Heem, Tan Toon Seng, Soh Hock Seng. Er Tua Bah, Lee Khoon Yong & Lim Kwang Heng. Std. II 1935— Goh Gek Khoon, Goh Ew Khoon, Goh Lye Chye, Teo Siak Lim, Tan Chiang Meng and Lim Poh Leng. Std. I 1935— Kua Hiok Chor, Lek Kang Hock, Tay Chin Hong, Ng Yong Seng, Augustine Seng, N g Boon Seng. Primary 1935— Lim Joo Hong, Hia Ngi Seng, Lee Khuen Joo, Loh Ser Cheng and Low Kok Kay. Holy Innocents Chinese Boys' School:— 6th Year Kuek Cheow Tek. 5th Year Yeo Siew Hong. 4th Year Lee Lip Heng. 3rd Year N g Seng Heng. 2nd Year Lee Seng Hak. 1st Year Er Choon Tek. The function was brought to a close by three hearty cheers for His Excellency and the students then sang "GoJ save the King."

RENE ULLMANN for JEWELLERY of every description and THE B E S T WATCHES RENE ULLMANN Raffles Place,—Singapore.


MALAYA CATHOLIC LEADER, S A T U R D A Y . 28th DECEMBER, 1935.

AROUND THE PARISHES. CHURCH OF OUR L A D Y OF LOURDES—IPOH. Catholic Action Meeting. T h e usual m o n t h l y m e e t i n g of t h e Catholic Action Society, of t h e C h u r c h of O u r L a d y Lourdes, I P O H , w a s held a t t h e Parochial H o u s e on S u n d a y t h e 15th i n s t a n t . T h e r e w a s a good a t t e n d a n c e of m e m b e r s , and t h e m e e t i n g s t a r t e d a t 10.30 a.m. w i t h t h e Rev. F r . J . E d m o n d in t h e C h a i r . T h e m e e t i n g a f t e r « o m e discussion decided t o hold a n o t h e r t h e following Sunday, t h e 22nd i n s t a n t , for t h e double purpose of c e l e b r a t i n g t h e first a n n i v e r s a r y of t h e Society and also t o elect new Office B e a r e r s for t h e ensuing year T h e m e e t i n g t h e n dispersed aft e r t h e usual p r a y e r s in t h e Church. PERSONALIA. M r . A. D. T h a v a r a j a h , of t h e t e c h n i c a l staff of t h e P.W.D., Ipoh a n d a n active m e m b e r of t h e Catholic Action Society of t h e C h u r c h of Our L a d y of Lourdes, is on t e m p o r a r y t r a n s f e r t o P u l a u Tiga.

KUALA LUMPUR CHURCH OF ST. JOHN T H E EVANGELIST. Interesting Lecture by D r . L . S. P e r e r a . U n d e r t h e auspices of t h e Catholic Action Society and w i t h t h e kind permission of t h e Rev. Brot h e r Director of t h e S t . J o h n ' s I n s t i t u t i o n , Kuala L u m p u r , Dr. L. S. P e r e r a , L.M.S., M.R.C.S., L.R. C P . ( L o n d o n ) , delivered a lecture on t h e life of St. F r a n c i s Xavier, P a t r o n of t h e Catholic Action Society, in one of t h e school rooms on Sunday, 15th December, 1935. T h e r e w a s a large g a t h e r i n g of different communities. In his one and a half h o u r s ' lecture, D r . P e r e r a dealt w i t h t h e different p h a s e s of t h e S a i n t ' s life, t h e conversions he m a d e a n d t h e miracles h e performed in different countries. Dr. P e r e r a called special a t t e n t i o n to t h e w o r d s t h a t converted t h e S a i n t himself from a proud a n d ambitious y o u n g m a n t o a h u m b l e soldier of A l m i g h t y God a n d t h o s e w o r d s were " w h a t doth it profit a m a n if h e gain t h e whole world a n d suffer t h e loss of his own soul." In concluding his lecture, D r . P e r e r a e x h o r t e d his h e a r e r s to t r y and e m u l a t e t h e Saint in p r a y i n g for t h e conversion of all m a n k i n d t o t h e t r u e fold. SODALITY O F T H E B L E S S E D VIRGIN MARY. A t t h e Annual General Meeting of t h e Sodality of t h e Blessed Virgin M a r y held a t t h e Parochial House on Sunday, 8 t h December, 1935, t h e following w e r e elected: Office-bearers. P r e f e c t — M r . M. C. E . Rebello Vice-Prefect—Mr. C. de Silva Hon. Sec.—Mr. R. A. S p y k e r m a n Councillors—Mr. L. D a n k e r Mr. J. L. Skelchy Mr. N . T h e s e i r a Mr. S. C. Marbeck Mr. M. d e Silva R e s e r v e s — J . Danker.

Group—Scoutmaster John Emm a n u e l of t h e L o u r d e s English School G r o u p , Ipoh. OUR LADY O F LOURDES. T h i r d Ipoh T r o o p Scouts. M r . H . R. H e r s t l e t , A s s i s t a n t Commissioner, M a l a y a , and Mr. M a n g a l Singh Staff S c o u t m a s t e r , Perak* inspected the Lourdes' E n g l i s h School G r o u p Scouts a n d Cubs on t h e 14th i n s t . a t 3 p.m. a t t h e g r o u n d s of t h e C h u r c h of O u r L a d y of Lourdes, Ipoh. A f t e r inspection, t h e Scouts took p a r t in a p r e l i m i n a r y Test for t h e S u l t a n Shield Competition in t h e following s u b j e c t s : Troop drill, knot tying, A m b u l a n c e , Scout L a w s a n d t h e i r m e a n i n g s , and m a p reading. A t t h e close of t h e competition, Mr. H e r s t l e t said t h a t h e w a s q u i t e pleased w i t h t h e w o r k of t h e Scouts. He t h e n p r e s e n t e d w a r r a n t s to Mr. J o h n E m m a n u e l w h o is p r o m o t e d t o t h e r a n k of G r o u p S c o u t m a s t e r a n d M r . B . V. P e r e i r a w h o h a s succeeded Mr. J. E m manuel as Scoutmaster. T h e Cubs t h e n rallied with t h e i r yells in a circle a n d d e m o n s t r a t e d t h e v a r i o u s j u n g l e dances. T h e Commissioner c o n g r a t u l a t e d t h e S c o u t s a n d told t h e m t o work h a r d a n d j o i n a s Scouts w h e n t h e y g r e w big. A g r o u p p h o t o g r a p h , with M r . H e r s t l e t a s t h e c e n t r a l figure concluded t h e proceedings.

BAPTISMS. On 14th December—Mary, Ann, d a u g h t e r of A u g u s t i n e Alexander and Suzan Alexander—God-parents A l e x a n d e r M a t h e w a n d Victoria Mathew. On 15th December—T e r e s a. d a u g h t e r of F r a n k P i n t o and Mildred P i n t o — G o d - p a r e n t s Charles de Souza and Nellie P i n t o . B e a t r i c e Eveline, d a u g h t e r of Patrick King and Maggie King— God-parents Robert K i n g and Flora King. F r a n c e s Helen, d a u g h t e r of A r t h u r C h a p m a n a n d Thrasilla C h a p m a n — G o d - p a r e n t s Noel Chapm a n (by p r o x y ) and E t h e l d r e d a de Silva. PENANG. F E A S T OF T H E IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. T h e F e a s t of t h e I m m a c u l a t e Conception of t h e Most Blessed Virigin w a s celebrated in t h e C h u r c h of t h e I m m a c u l a t e Conception on Sunday, t h e 8 t h instant, when a H i g h Mass, in t w o p a r t s , was sung. T h e Rev. F a t h e r R. D'Souza officiated. A n o r c h e s t r a formed by t h e m e m b e r s of t h e P a r i s h , and which rendered a p p r o p r i a t e music d u r i n g t h e Communion, and before a n d a f t e r Mass, helped in no small w a y t o m a k e t h e celebration of t h e F e a s t more impressive.

SARAWAK

LETTER

Vos of S t . Joseph's School. T h a n k s to his zeal and t o t h a t of h i s able co-operator, t h e Rev. F r . d e Wyn, also of S t . Joseph's School, t h i s choir is n o t only a success, b u t i t s efficiency bids fair t o r i v a l t h a t of some of t h e best choirs in Malaya. N o r a r e t h e School a n d Convent less successful. Both b e g a n in a very m o d e s t scale; • St. J o s e p h ' s School commenced w i t h b u t five boys whilst, for a t i m e , no girl w a s to be found to a t t e n d t h e Convent Schools. B y way of c o n t r a s t , it m a y be mentioned t h a t , a t t h e moment, both School a n d Convent a r e in t h e forefront of educational e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in B o r n e o . T h e r e a r e about 400 pupils on t h e roll in St. J o s e p h ' s School a n d a n o t h e r 300 or so a r e to be found in t h e Convent.

(Contd. from p a g e 4) In 1891, t h e r a m s h a k l e a t t a p shed proved i n a d e q u a t e t o h o u s e b o t h boys and girls, b u t F r . H a i d e g g e r rose t o t h e occasion a n d s t a r t e d p u t t i n g u p a solid school building and a n o less solid c h u r c h dedicated to St. J o s e p h . T h e ina u g u r a t i o n of t h e c h u r c h was followed, t h r e e y e a r s later, by t h e opening of t h e p r e s e n t main portion of t h e B o y s ' School. T h e n followed a period of comparative lull in building operations exceDc in 1907 a n d 1914 when St. Michael's Club a n d t h e P r o c u r e w e r e erected. Owing p a r t l y t o t h e devastation of t i m e and p a r t l y to t h e need for expansion, it w a s found necessary, some t e n y e a r s ago, t o replace t h e old Convent. Accordingly the p r e s e n t up-to-date and imposing s t r u c t u r e w as opened in 1925 w h e n , save for t h e main portion, t h e old buildings w e r e demolished in o r d e r to m a k e room for m o r e e x t e n s i v e r e c r e a t i o n grounds. As it h a d been t h e case forty y e a r s previously, t h e erection of t h e new Convent was t h e prelude to m o r e i n t e n s i v e building operations. To r e m o v e congestion in t h e m a i n body of t h e c h u r c h , t h e gallery

One characteristic f e a t u r e of both establishments is t h e large number of orphans and o t h e r poor children brought up a n d educated free. Indeed, ever since i t s inception t h e Mission has t a k e n a lively interest in t h e poor, a n d i t s devotion t o t h i s section of t h e community h a s , time and again, evoked the highest p r a i s e from all classes of t h e people. T h e r e a r e still, a s usual, a very considerable number of poor children in St. Joseph's School, whilst, in t h e Con-

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addition of t w o spacious w i n g s ! w e r e m a d e t o St. J o s e p h ' s School. Such, in fact, is t h e r e s u m e of s o m e of F r . H a i d e g g e r ' s activities. Most people would h a v e been a p palled by t h e e n o r m o u s n e s s of t h e costs such building operations m u s t inevitably h a v e entailed. N o t h i n g d a u n t e d however, h e had, a l m o s t single h a n d e d , p u s h e d on w i t h c h a r a c t e r i s t i c vigour and w i t h u n s w e r v i n g f a i t h in Divine Providence. H i s firm t r u s t in God w as amply r e w a r d e d t h r o u g h o u t ; his n u m e r o u s friends a n d Old B o y s never failed t o rally round h i m when—occasion required it. i Indeed, so unbounded had been t h e i r generosity t h a t h e ever aft e r w a r d s r e f e r r e d to t h e m in t e r m s of t h e h i g h e s t praise and gratitude. r

T h a n k s t o t h e u n t i r i n g efforts a n d wise g u i d a n c e of t h e l a t e Fr., ably assisted b y h i s confreres, t h e Mission is now in a flourishing condition. T h o u g h a t its inception C h r i s t i a n i t y w a s practically u n k n o w n in K u c h i n g , t h e Mission now counts s o m e 1860 Catholics. A n y article w h i c h p u r p o r t s to give, in however h u m b l e a w a y , an account of S t . J o s e p h ' s C h u r c h is incomplete w i t h o u t due reference to i t s choir. F o r y e a r s t h e Rev. S i s t e r s of t h e Convent h a v e been d o i n g yeomen service in t h i s connection. T h e h i g h s t a n d a r d of efficiency a t t a i n e d by t h e p r e s e n t g i r l s ' choir is in n o small m e a s u r e d u e t o t h e t i r e l e s s efforts of Sister F r a n c i s who is a t once o r g a n i s t a n d choir-mistress. There is also a n o t h e r choir composed entirely of boys. It c a m e into being some y e a r s ago as a consequence of t h e initiative t a k e n by t h e Rev. F r . de

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Associated with t h e Convent, too, a r e a large Hospital for poor a n d abandoned babies and a Home for d e s t i t u t e widows. The Gove r n m e n t h a s generously granted subsidies in this noble work, but these, t h o u g h munificent, a r e totally i n a d e q u a t e , a n d m u c h h a s to be relied on p r i v a t e c h a r i t y . A t t a c h e d to St. J o s e p h ' s School t h e r e is now a branch-school where evening classes in Chinese are given. T h e building w a s erected by t h e p r e s e n t P r e f e c t Apostolic, Msgr. Hopfgartner, w h o s e t e n u r e of office as Principal of St. "Joseph's School, t h o u g h brief, was nevertheless crowded with activities. T h i s new v e n t u r e will doubtless prove a boon to those p a r e n t s who are desirous t h a t their children, while s t u d y i n g E n glish, should also a c q a i n t themselves w i t h a knowledge of t h e i r mother-tongue. In conclusion, it is not inopportune, d u r i n g this season of "peace and goodwill," to ask t h o s e charitably inclined to be good enough to give a kind t h o u g h t t o t h e noble work c a r r i e d on in Kuching. That V e t e r a n Missionary, t h e Rev. Mot h e r St. Helen, at a n y rate, deserves especial consideration. Here h a s e v e r been a life of devotion and love in the service of t h e poor, and, t h o u g h advanced in age, she is happily still able to t a k e an active p a r t in the noble work so dear to her h e a r t . She r e m a i n s t h e t h e energetic and much loved Superior of St. T e r e s a ' s Convent a s well a s t h e Mother Provincial of h e r Order in S a r a w a k . May God Keep her for m a n y more fruitful y e a r s of labour in o a r dear mission of K u c h i n g .

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N o . 52.

CATHOLIC

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WEEKLY.

L E A D E R . S A T U R D A Y , 2 8 t h D E C E M B E R , 1935.

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ST. T E R E S A ' S CONVENT,

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THIRD IPOH TROOP SCOUTS OF OUR LADY O F LOURDES, IPOH

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DECEMBER 28, 1935, VOL 01, N0 52