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fJpHE w o r k of the Catholic p a p e r s h a s beta meat praiseworthy. They hare bees a n effective auxiliary to the puipit in spreading the Faith—

The Malaya Catholic Leader* By By By By By By

Pope Benedict XV.

reading Malaya's Catholic Newt telling your friends about us placing a regular order patronising our advertisers sending any suggestions writing for us, if you have something new to say.

Mala;, OFFICIAL 24 p a g e s

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10 c e n t s .

S I N G A P O R E , S A T U R D A Y , 21st D E C E M B E R , 1935.

No. 51.

Special Gbristmae Bumber. jfrom Zhc Editor's H)esk H Cbat With ®ur TReabers.

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Catholic p a p e r s , t h e r e f o r e , h a v e a g r e a t a n d useful mission, a n d it

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Who wish to be in a position to look forward to leisured ease in their later years.

a t t a c k s on C h r i s t i a n beliefs, a hardly concealed hostility t o t h e Catholic C h u r c h , m i s r e p r e s e n t a tions of Catholic affairs a n d g r o - | tesque stories about t h e clergy and t h e n u n s which can do a lot of | h a r m b y t h e vicious t w i s t i n g of t h e f a c t s on which t h e y a r e found- I ed. " E v e n a s e r m o n or a d d r e s s , " | w r i t e s W . R. I n g e , " i n t e n d e d for 1 s t u d e n t s is likely t o a p p e a r in t h e daily p r e s s , s t r a n g e l y d i s t o r t e d I and a b s u r d l y divided b y s t a r i n g | headlines, r e p r e s e n t i n g possibly t h e | theology of t h e sub-editor, b u t n o t | t h a t of t h e w r i t e r . "

W I T H this Christmas Number, t h e Malaya Catholic L e a d e r closes its-first y e a r ' s publication. T h o u g h faced, a t its very beginn i n g , w i t h difficulties on which we deem it inexpedient t o lay s t r e s s , a s t h e y w e r e p r o m p t l y handled it c a m e o u t from t h i s crisis none t h e w o r s e for it. Our dear Malaya Catholic L e a d e r is still, according t o t h e will of o u r Lord B i s h o p w h e n h e launched it, t h e O F F I C I A L O R G A N O F CATHOLIC A C T I O N in t h i s diocese of Malacca. W e m u s t acknowledge t h a t a notable p a r t of i t s success is due t o t h e u n t i r i n g a n d whole-hearted s u p p o r t of t h e v a r i o u s P r e s s Sect i o n s , in i t s diffusion a m o n g t h e

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GL GRIJGHT AND JJJNRSJTWITA $ W GEAR, tfl follow. Catholic population of M a l a y a . T h a t t h e i r w o r k h a s not a l w a y s proved t o b e a n e a s y a n d p l e a s a n t one, w e k n o w only too well. I n fact, too m a n y , still, a r e t h e C a t h o lics w h o t u r n a deaf e a r t o t h e p r e s s i n g a d m o n i t i o n s of t h e Popes on t h e necessity of .a Catholic P r e s s for Catholics. I t is w i t h t h i s indifference a n d a p a t h y , w h i c h cannot be accounted for, t h a t o u r courageous P r e s s Sections h a v e , even now, t o cope w i t h in some parishes. In t h i s a g e of Materialism, w h e n so m u c h l i t e r a t u r e is t a i n t e d w i t h p a g a n i s m , w h e n even t h e b e s t p a p e r s a r e f a r f r o m being c h a m p ions of religion, Catholics need some m e a n s t o r e m i n d t h e m of a s u p e r n a t u r a l life, a n d t o encourage t h e m t o live t h i s life by k e e p i n g loyal t o God a n d H i s C h u r c h . T h e r e a r e also, now and t h e n in t h e press, open and insidious

is q u i t e n a t u r a l t h a t t h e P o p e j | should t a k e a n i n t e r e s t in t h e i r welfare and e x h o r t Catholics t o loyally s u p p o r t t h e m . Not only t h a t , Catholic n e w s p a p e r s , again, a r e educative a n d instructive as they keep their r e a d e r s a b r e a s t of all Catholic m o v e m e n t s of importance. Such a r e , in a few w o r d s , t h e 'raisons d ' e t r e " of t h e Malaya Catholic L e a d e r . W e t e n d e r our most h e a r t y t h a n k s t o t h e Members of o u r I P r e s s Sections, c o n t r i b u t o r s , a d j v c r t i s e r s a n d r e a d e r s for t h e i r I devoted s u p p o r t d u r i n g t h i s first | year. On all a n d everyone we call t h e b l e s s i n g of t h e Divine I n f a n t and of H i s M o t h e r Mary. R. Cardon, Miss. A p . E d . of t h e M.C.L.

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2

M A L A Y A C A T H O L I C L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 21st D E C E M B E R , 1935.

PRESS GLEANINGS By Air Mail T h e P o s i t i o n In G e r m a n y . on t h e flimsiest a n d most ridi[j G e r m a n affairs are c a u s i n g culous c h a r g e s . T h e cases of a n x i e t y in t h e Vatican, w h i c h is which we h e a r a r e h a r d l y a perf a r b e t t e r i n f o r m e d about t h e a c t - c e n t a g e of t h o s e t h a t occur. ual p r o g r e s s of events t h a n t h e J u s t a s a f r u i t e r e r p u t s h i s best press. When, at the instigation apples a t t h e t o p of t h e barrel, so of von P a p e n , t h e C h u r c h a u t h o r t h e N a z i s proclaim f a r and wide i t i e s a g r e e d on t h e t e r m s of a cont h e a r r e s t s of t h o s e bishops, c o r d a t it w a s in t h e founded h o p e p r i e s t s a n d n u n s a g a i n s t whom t h a t t h e s u r r e n d e r of m a n y splent h e y can m a n a g e to t r u m p up some did Catholic o r g a n i s a t i o n s ; would kind of a c h a r g e , especially in conbe t h e lesser of t w o evils. nexion w i t h t h e complicated curVon P a p e n , w h o is now r o u n d l y rency l a w s ; b u t those cases which accused of b e i n g t h e J u d a s of t h e a r e s h e e r persecution a r e not piece in A u s t r i a in a n d G e r m a n y , r e p o r t e d . s e e m s really t o h a v e been a r a n k T h e concentration camp, with i t s outsider t o t h e c h a r m e d N a z i circle b a r b a r o u s cruelty, is sound-proof. from the beginning. however, is as T h e c o n c o r d a t h a s n e v e r been W h i s p e r i n g , i m p l e m e n t e d , a n d i t s e x i s t e n c e in j effective a s shouting, and in t h e fieri is b e c o m i n g a s e m b a r r a s s i n g j end m o r e dangerous t o t h e t y r a n t . t o t h e C h u r c h a s t o t h e Nazi Berlin is full of whispers a t preP a r t y ; b u t t h e Church will a l m o s t sent. * * * * certainly leave it to t h e N a z i s t o A n o t h e r Crisis T h r e a t e n s Spain. denounce it. T h e y a r e r e l u c t a n t t o do t h a t , If Spain r e v e r t s t o monarchism because i t will be as good a s p r o - t h e c h a n g e back will be due t o claiming t h e second kulturkampf t h e q u a l i t y of h e r Republicans. t o t h e world, w h e r e a s , a t p r e s e n t , A z a n a ' s g o v e r n m e n t was stupid, t h e y hope t o achieve t h e downfall cruel, u n j u s t , and a long list of of t h e C h u r c h in secret. scandals, s u m m e d u p in t h e p h r a s e T h e i r control of n e w s is n o t so "mud, blood a n d t e a r s . " w a t e r t i g h t t h o u g h , a s t h e y imL e r r o u x ' s government, which agine. followed it, w a s crushed by ugly * * * * e x p o s u r e s of bribery and corrupT h e R e a l S t a t e Of T h i n g s . tion. T h e Straperlo affair h a s T h u s it is k n o w n t h a t t h e n u m - h a r d l y ceased to r e v e r b e r a t e when b e r s killed in t h e clean-up exceeded a second g r a v e accusation, of a b y t h o u s a n d s t h e n u m b e r s official- similar kind, is m a d e . ly a d m i t t e d . T h e affair w a s a This time the denunciation veritable blood-bath, w o r t h y of comes f r o m Don Antonio Nombela, Nero at his worst. I t is a l s o k n o w n t h a t a n o t h e r a f o r m e r Inspector-General for t h e He accuses Seiior p u r g e is g o i n g on a t p r e s e n t , a n d Colonies. t h a t p r i e s t s a n d p r o m i n e n t C a t h o - L e r r o u x ' s Cabinet of a conspiracy lics a r e b e i n g a r r e s t e d wholesale, to d e f r a u d t h e S t a t e of 3,500,000 p e s e t a s (about £100,000) by t h e p a y m e n t of undue navigation p r e m i u m s t o Senor T a y a , a shipowner of Barcelona. Sefior Nombela a s s e r t s t h a t he f r u s t r a t e d t h e conspiracy, and was victimised for doing h i s d u t y . He w a s dismissed from h i s post, and is a n x i o u s t o vindicate his character. A committee of Deputies is i n v e s t i g a t i n g t h e charge, which is denied b y t h e accused, and t h e pot looks like boiling over again. * * * * P h a r i s a i c Scandal. W e keep receiving l e t t e r s from non-Catholics unknown t o us, and n o t r e a d e r s of T h e Catholic T i m e s , who a r e shocked a t t h e wickedness of Italians who fight for t h e i r country, of Italian priests PILES CURED, NO OPERATION, s e r v i n g a s chaplains in Abyssinia, BLOOD STOPPED WITHIN 24 and of I t a l i a n bishops who give HOURS BY THE FIRST APPLICATION. MAJOON-E-PILES : — The gold t o t h e i r country's w a r funds. most wonderful medicine to stop all W e a s k t h e m all t o g r a s p one troubles of piles — passing of blood, simple fact, namely, t h a t Italians severe pain, irritation, and all other troubles of moving of bowels, e t c , a r e convinced t h a t t h e i r cause is etc., and new or 50 years chronic pilej u s t . T h e i r conviction is no whit sufferers can be used without restricless t h a n our own assurance in tion of diet. A u g u s t , 1914. Price per- bottle $25.00 for order Knowledge of t h i s fact, not with cash (postage free) and $1.00 extra for C.O.D. Full directions with acquiescence in it a s a t r u e verdict, medicines, the Physician, U. M. is all t h a t we ask. Granted it, HALL, No. 721, North Bridge Road, does it not necessarily follow t h a t Singapore. t h e r e is no cause for scandal in IMPORTANT NOTE: -All male a n y of t h e actions of which our and female sufferings of diabetis, bright diseases, albumeneria, asthma c o r r e s p o n d e n t s complain ? new or chronic, kidney troubles, gout, T h e Italian a r m e d forces and rheumatism, successfully treated. civilian population a r e not going CoiGkit personally or send enquiries by post stating your age, cause about shamefaced a n d humiliated, of the origin of the disease, the but r a t h e r a r e t h e y full of deep symptoms and the duration of sufferr e s e n t m e n t a t t h e a r b i t r a r y way ings with 50 cent-stamps for reply in which we have acted. to:— T A B I B M. I. JOHARI, T h e y feel t h a t t h e y a r e being The Physician, of the U. M. HALL, wrongly t r e a t e d , and chiefly by us, No. 721, North Bridge Rd., S'pore. and t h e y wonder w h y we a r e not Consulting Hours 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in sackcloth and a s h e s . v

illO.""

Laval's D a n g e r o u s Position. So f a r M. Laval h a s survived t h e a t t a c k s on him, b u t his position is f a r from secure. N o one can fail t o marvel a t t h e skill w i t h which h e m a i n t a i n s h i s precarious balance, not only a m i d t h e p a r t i e s [ which d i s t r a c t F r a n c e politically, b u t also on t h e seesaw of i n t e r national affairs. T h e S t r e s a a g r e e m e n t h a s comm i t t e d h i m t o friendship w i t h Mussolini, embodied in t h e Rome Pact, b u t E n g l a n d ' s a t t i t u d e t o w a r d s t h e Italo-Ethiopian d i s p u t e h a s lifted t h e o t h e r end of t h e plank, and M. Laval h a s h a d his work cut o u t t o keep h i s balance and his head. How can h e m a i n t a i n loyalty t o Italy and E n g l a n d a t t h e p r e s e n t j u n c t u r e ? Much a s F r a n c e values t h e security of h e r Alpine f r o n t i e r s she dare not m a k e a n alliance w i t h Italy and R u s s i a t h e m a i n plank of h e r s e c u r i t y platform. She dreads a n Anglo-German a g r e e m e n t which would leave h e r out, and yet s h e is b a r r e d b y h e r Russian a g r e e m e n t from e n t e r i n g an Anglo-French-German entente which would g u a r a n t e e peace in t h e West. H e r a n x i e t y over security led h e r into a false move w i t h Russia, for G e r m a n y h a s designs on t h e Ukraine.

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T H E •I E X T W A T C H

If s not only a matter of taste To be a perfect timepiece, a watch has to be beautiful and accurate. Now, everyone can say whether a watch is to one's liking or not, but it is difficult to estimate the quality. Only experts can judge the finish and precision of a mechanism as delicate as that of a watch. There remains for those who love accuracy a means of eliminating disappointment-choose a VULCAIN watch, acknowledged the best by thousands of people all over the world. With a VULCAIN you have the satisfaction of knowing that you possess a timepiece of unequalled accuracy and refined beauty.

DRINK

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J a p a n Moves A g a i n . E v e r y t i m e t h i s c o u n t r y is p r e occupied, J a p a n m a k e s a n o t h e r move to a g g r a n d i s e herself. H e r first steps in M a n c h u k u o coincided with t h e " i n s u r r e c t i o n " in o u r navy a t Invergordon, a n d every subsequent s t e p h a s been a s carefully timed. T h e Italo-Ethiopian dispute h a s been m a d e t h e occasion for a furt h e r p e n e t r a t i o n i n t o China, u n d e r cover of a spurious a u t o n o m y movement subsidised from Tokyo. T h e Chinese g o v e r n m e n t pleads in vain for t h e s a m e m e a s u r e s t o b e taken against Japan as against Italy. V e r y soon t h e whole of N o r t h e r n China will be a reserved m a r k e t for t h e J a p a n e s e , a n d t h e L a n c a shire cotton t r a d e will a p p r e c i a t e quickest w h a t t h a t m e a n s . Sooner or later we m u s t t a k e notice of Japan's furtive movements, or pack up in t h a t p a r t of t h e world.

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The trouble is that* America is a p a t h e t i c . She seems q u i t e willing to clear o u t of C h i n a lock, stock and barrel, w h e r e a s a common policy between America a n d ourselves would have prevented J a p a n ' s invasion of M a n c h u k u o a n d all t h a t h a s followed it. (Catholic Times, 6th Dec.)

WISDOM. T h o m a s a Kempis, on pin-pricks:—

avoiding

"That man has great tranquility of h e a r t who n e i t h e r cares for praises n o r dispraises. H e will easily be content, and in peace* whose conscience is clean. Thou a r t not m o r e holy if thou a r t praised, n o r a n y t h i n g t h e worse if thou a r t dispraised. What thou a r t , t h a t t h o u a r t ; nor c a n s t t h o u be said t o be g r e a t e r t h a n God sees t h e e to be. If t h o u considerest well w h a t t h o u a r t w i t h i n thyself, thou wilt not care w h a t men s a v of t h e e . "

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d e a t h of t h e King's sister, P r i n c e s s Victoria, h a s cast a gloom over all r a n k s of Society h e r e in London. T h e n e w s t h a t t h e princess w a s gravely ill reached H i s M a j e s t y a t a time w h e n all t h e a r r a n g e m e n t s h a d been m a d e for t h e S t a t e opening of P a r l i a m e n t . Needless to say, s t e p s w e r e a t once t a k e n t o stop e v e r y t h i n g in t h e n a t u r e of royal p a g e a n t r y ; t h e K i n g , it w a s clear, could not, a t so anxious a moment, open P a r liament in p e r s o n . A n x i e t y deepened a s t h e h o u r s went b y , and when t h e t i m e came for t h e reading of t h e Speech f r o m the T h r o n e , an office performed b y t h e Lord Chancellor, it was known t h a t t h e princess w a s dead. T h e C o u r t h a s gone into m o u r n i n g , a n d various e n g a g e m e n t s b y m e m b e r s of t h e Royal F a m i l y h a v e been cancelled.

CORRESPONDENT)

t h e p a s t few y e a r s considerable p r o g r e s s h a s been m a d e : t h e Lady Chapel, in p a r t i c u l a r , glows with gold a n d colour.

A

P r i n c e s s Victoria was a quiet, u n a s s u m i n g lady jwho, in r e c e n t y e a r s , m a d e few public a p p e a r ances. H e r life from girlhood, in fact, w a s spent, for t h e m o s t p a r t , in domestic r a t h e r t h a n public surroundings. For years she was t h e c o n s t a n t companion of h e r m o t h e r , t h e late Queen A l e x a n d r a , w h o m she t e n d e d in old a g e w i t h edifying devotion. But s h e often accompanied t h a t queen on charit a b l e and o t h e r visits, a n d s h e h a d m a n y friends. H e r l a s t illn e s s came v e r y suddenly. London had hardly time to take in t h e n e w s of h e r serious condition bef o r e tidings c a m e t h r o u g h of h e r d e a t h . His M a j e s t y will h a v e t h e s y m p a t h y of t h e e n t i r e B r i t i s h Commonwealth in this bereavem e n t to t h e Royal House. *

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A M A T T E R O F MOSAIC. TytUCH i n t e r e s t , a n d a good deal of n e w s p a p e r discussion, h a s been a r o u s e d by t h e a n n o u n c e m e n t t h a t t h e A r c h b i s h o p of W e s t m i n s t e r , D r . Hinsley, Tias closed down a t a n y r a t e for t h e t i m e being, t h e mosaic work, which h a s been going on now for several y e a r s , for t h e decoration of W e s t m i n s t e r Cathedral. In t h e l a t e Cardinal Bourne's t i m e t h a t w o r k was steadily proceeding, a n d H i s E m i n e n c e m a d e it understood t h a t so long a s t h e r e w e r e funds available for t h e purpose t h e r e should be mosaic w o r k e r s cons t a n t l y engaged. T h e c h a r a c t e r of t h e designs for t h e decoration of t h e Cathedral w a s n a t u r a l l y a m a t t e r upon which opinions would differ. Several critics expressed t h e m s e l v e s a g a i n s t w h a t w a s being done, and recently a n u m b e r of a r t - w o r k e r s , s o m e of t h e m Catholics a n d o t h e r s not, drew up and sent t o t h e Archbishop a j o i n t recommendation t h a t t h e r e should be m o r e consult a t i o n on t h e m a t t e r . H i s Grace h a s accepted t h e suggestion to t h e e x t e n t of suspending t h e work, and it is t h o u g h t t h a t a c o m m i t t e e of experts m a y be formed to go into t h e whole m a t t e r . Meanwhile, t h e ventilation of t h e subject in t h e P r e s s h a s s e n t a g r e a t m a n y more p e r s o n s to W e s t m i n s t e r to inspect t h e work which h a s a l r e a d y been done. In

THE*TEUTONIC INVASION. T^HE coming of ten t h o u s a n d y o u n g G e r m a n s t o London as spectators of a n international football m a t c h does not seem, on a first h e a r i n g , to be a m a t t e r with much b e a r i n g upon religion. All t h e same, it had a b e a r i n g in this sense, t h a t m a n y of t h e s e visitors were Catholics, a n d a fairly large n u m b e r of t h e m embraced t h e brief o p p o r t u n i t y , while t h e y were s i g h t s e e i n g , t o see s o m e t h i n g of London's chief Catholic Churches. T h e r e w a s much whispered German h e a r d in W e s t m i n s t e r Cathedral, in t h e Oratory, and im other churches. This Teutonic invasion, a g a i n s t which t h e C o m m u n i s t s tried to foment an opposition, h a s passed off, v e r y well. T h e G e r m a n s were an a d m i r a b l y disciplined c o m p a n y ; they w e r e well received, and t h e y went back w i t h pleasant impressions of t h e i r visit, except for t h e t h o u g h t t h a t t h e i r t e a m failed to win t h e g a m e . E n g l a n d beat G e r m a n y by t h r e e goals to nil. B u t it w a s a good, clean, wellf o u g h t g a m e , in which each side was pleased by t h e conduct of t h e other. In every respect t h e event h a s been a h u g e success.

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A GREAT TEACHING

a c r o s s

(B> O u r London

t h e

s e a

Correspondent.)

| y | ANY A HUNDRED LEAGUES OF LAND AND SEA, £

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*

ORDER.

t * O U R h u n d r e d y e a r s ago, St. A n g e l a Merici founded t h e religious sisterhood now widelyfamed a s t h e Ursulines. The c e n t e n a r y of t h i s g r e a t t e a c h i n g order h a s j u s t been celebrated in E n g l a n d w i t h g r e a t rejoicing. The chief t h a n k s g i v i n g functions were held a t F o r e s t Gate, on London's E s s e x border, from which house

SEEMING HALF-WORLD, SUNDERING

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t h e n u n s have opened p r i m a r y a n d secondary schools elsewhere besides conducting a n i m p o r t a n t educational centre u n d e r t h e i r own roof. F r o m Ireland, also, t h e r e is news of big Ursuline celebrations for t h e a n n i v e r s a r y . *

*

*

A D R I A N S T O K E S , R.A. F A M O U S Catholic a r t i s t h a s j u s t died: Mr. Charles Adr i a n Stokes, R.A., one of t h e best known landscape p a i n t e r s in t h e c o u n t r y and a f a m i l i a r exhibitor a t t h e Royal A c a d e m y . Had h e lived until next y e a r h e could t h e n .'have kept the golden jubilee of t h e first appearance of his work on t h e Academy's walls, for h i s

first picture t h e r e w a s accepted in 1876. Mr. Stokes h a d a jealous r e g a r d for A r t ; so m u c h so t h a t a t an Academy b a n q u e t a t which t h e Prince of Wales w a s p r e s e n t , and d u r i n g a n a d d r e s s by Mr. R a m s a y Mac Donald, he rebuked t h e speaker for not a d d r e s s i n g himself to t h e subject of t h e pictures. Although Mr. Stokes came in for a good deal of criticism on account of t h i s impet u o u s action, t h e r e w e r e a large n u m b e r of art-lovers w h o a g r e e d w i t h him a n d c o n g r a t u l a t e d h i m . Two of A d r i a n Stokes' p i c t u r e s h a v e been b o u g h t for t h e N a t i o n a l collections u n d e r t h e t e r m s of t h e C h a n t r e y bequest. (Continued

on page 4 )


4

M A L A Y A CATHOLIC LEADER, S A T U R D A Y , 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

G enera I

Jottings

of

the

RELICS OF T H E CRIB IN ROME. O n e of t h e g r e a t e s t t r e a s u r e s of t h e g r e a t R o m a n Basilica of S a n t a M a r i a M a g g i o r e a r e some b o a r d s w h i c h a r e said t o be p o r t i o n s of t h e crib, o r m a n a g e r , in w h i c h O u r L o r d w a s l a i d — i n ' f a c t t h e basilica w a s a t o n e t i m e called " B e a t a M a r i a ad P r e s e p e " o r " S t . M a r y cf t h e C r i b . " E v e r y y e a r on C h r i s t m a s E v e t h i s relic, enclosed in a n u r n - l i k e c a s k e t of rock c r y s t a l , w i t h a t i n y figure of t h e I n f a n t C h r i s t in s i l v e r r e c u m b e n t on t h e t o p of t h e casket, is b r o u g h t in procession f r o m t h e s a c r i s t y t o t h e H i g h A l t a r , on w h i c h it is placed H e r e i t r e m a i n s for a few h o u r s w h i l e t h e faithful flock to see and venerate it. L a t e r it is a g a i n b o r n e in procession t h r o u g h t h e spacious c h u r c h , h i s E m i n e n c e t h e C a r d i n a l A r c h p r i e s t of t h e Basilica, a c c o m p a n y i n g i t back t o t h e s a c r i s t y , w h e r e it is a g a i n placed.

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T h e r e is a q u a i n t c u s t o m observ e d in Spain, c o m m e m o r a t i n g t h e w a n d e r i n g s of t h e Blessed V i r g i n and St. Joseph on Christmas Eve. G r o u p s of children c a r r y i n g s t a t u e s of M a r y a n d J o s e p h followed b y a m i x e d crowd all b e a r i n g t a p e r s go r o u n d k n o c k i n g a t doors a s k i n g for admission. No resp o n s e is g i v e n t o t h e i r appeal a n d t h e y continue from h o u s e t o h o u s e , w h e r e t h e s a m e scenes e n s u e . T h e y a t l e n g t h come t o t h e c h u r c h , where their summons are immed i a t e l y a n s w e r e d by a voice w i t h i n e n q u i r i n g : " W h o is t h e r e ? " T h e s p o k e s m a n r e p l i e s : " I t is M a r y , t h e Queen of H e a v e n , w h o b e g s a place t o lay h e r h e a d ; t h e n i g h t is d a r k a n d cold, a n d s h e is a w a n The d e r e r from f a r Galilee." d o o r s of t h e C h u r c h a r e t h e n t h r o w n open a n d t h e procession e n t e r s to be led t o a side a l t a r p r e p a r e d t o r e p r e s e n t a stable w i t h a m a n g e r dimly lighted b y a single l a n t e r n . H e r e all kneel a n d recite t h e l a s t p r a y e r s of a prescribed l i t a n y . A s t h e final p e t i t i o n dies a w a y , a little b o y w i t h w i n g s fast e n e d t o h i s shoulders and in hi§ a r m s an image representing the H o l y Child, r u s h e s in and l a y s his t r e a s u r e in t h e crib. T h e t a p e r s a r e t h e n lighted, a n d carols of welcome t o t h e world's R e d e e m e r a r e sung.

FOR

M^eek

PERFECT SNAPSHOTS

BROADCASTING STATION FOR SINGAPORE. In a b o u t six m o n t h s ' t i m e , it a p pears, The Malayan Broadcasting Coporation L t d . will h a v e completed t h e i r h e a d q u a r t e r s and 28° She b r o a d c a s t i n g s t a t i o n in T h o m p s o n R o a d . A n e x p e r t of t h e S t a n d a r d Telephone Co. L t d . w h o a r e t o equip t h e new s t a t i o n helped t o choose t h e site a n d a B.B.C. official is t o b e t h e general m a n a g e r , l t h a s been decided a t first t o instal a m e d i u m - w a v e t r a n s m i t t e r of a d e q u a t e power t h a t would be Obtainable from w i t h i n t h e r e a c h of inexpensive s e t s in S o u t h e r n M a l a y a . I t is proposed l a t e r t o provide for t h e F.M.S. a n d P e n a n g e i t h e r by t h e installation of a s h o r t - w a v e t r a n s m i t t e r of good power, o r of small medium-wave transmitters at s u i t a b l e c e n t r e s o p e r a t i n g simult a n e o u s l y w i t h t h e t r a n s m i t t e r in Singapore. ON WINGS FROM ALBION. A h i g h - p o w e r receiving s t a t i o n (Continued from page 3.) will also be erected i n Singapore, so t h a t w h e n t h e conditions a r e T E N T H O U S A N D I N R E T R E A T . A C O A L STRIKiE? favourable, B.B.C. a n d o t h e r E u O ; t h e h e a d i n g t o t h i s p a r a g r a p h f\N t h e t h r e s h o l d of w i n t e r , an ropean short-wave stations may does n o t relate t o s o m e militaanxious s i t u a t i o n h a s deveb e r e l a y e d on t h e m e d i u m - w a v e r y m o v e m e n t t o t h e r e a r . I t points loped in t h e B r i t i s h coalfields. transmitter. to s o m e t h i n g f a r higher—the T h e l a t e s t s t a g e in t h e d i s p u t e ben e a r e r approach t o God b y ten t w e e n m i n e r s a n d o w n e r s on t h e t h o u s a n d Scottish Catholic youths, w a g e question is t h a t t h e owners T H E WORD CHRISTMAS. wftp h a v e been h o l d i n g in Glasgow, a week's r e t r e a t on t h e s t a n d firmly a g a i n s t t h e claim T h e m o d e r n w o r d " Christ- | g r a n d scale. In a d d i t i o n t o this advanced for a n i n c r e a s e of t w o m a s " is t a k e n f r o m t h e Old a r m y of youths, t h e devotions shillings a day. T h e m e n t h r e a t e n E n g l i s h " C h r i s t e s m e s s e , " Chrih a v e been participated in by fif- a s t r i k e t o enforce t h e i r claim. If st's Mass. The modern Dutch teen h u n d r e d m e m b e r s of t h e t h a t s t r i k e should unhappily come word "Kirst-misse" shows a Society of St. Vincent d e Paul, about, m a n y t h o u s a n d s of C a t h o similar meaning. who h a v e h a d a n independent lics will be affected directly, and t h r e e d a y s ' r e t r e a t in t h e city and still m o r e will suffer indirectly. district. W h e n one Catholic dioT h e m e n would s e e m to h a v e REMAINS OF A N ANCIENT cese c a n organize i t s m e n and j u s t i c e on t h e i r side. I n t h e W e s t CHURCH DISCOVERED IN y o u t h s for a proclamation of faith R i d i n g of Y o r k s h i r e , w h e r e t h e PARIS. Bind p i e t y t o such .an e x t e n t as Catholic B i s h o p of L e e d s h a s a t h i s , outsiders get stome idea of g r e a t m a n y of h i s flock in t h e colWhile c o n s t r u c t i n g s u b t e r r a n e a n t h e C h u r c h ' s influence, spiritually, liery districts, h i s l o r d s h i p knows s h e l t e r s in t h e city of P a r i s , a s a n in G r e a t B r i t a i n as a whole. When t h a t in v e r y m a n y cases t h e m i n a n t i c i p a t o r y m e a s u r e of s a f e t y in t h i n g s a r e done n o w a d a y s , they t h e e v e n t of aerial a t t a c k s , ex- a r e done in a big w a y . F o r in- e r s a r e not receiving a living c a v a t o r s x^ame upon v e r y thick a n d stance, in another of t h e Scottish w a g e . D r . Cowgill h a s j u s t m a d e s t r o n g walls and a t o m b contain- dioceses, S t . A n d r e w s a n d Edin- a speech in w h i c h h e h a s pleaded ing bones. A r c h a e o l o g i s t s be- b u r g h , Catholic t e a c h e r s t h o u g h t eloquently for j u s t i c e , declaring lieve t h e walls t o be r e m a i n s of a n t h e y would like to f o r m a Catho- t h a t he, for one, would gladly pay ancient c h u r c h d a t i n g from t h e lic T e a c h e r s ' Guild. T h e y conven- a b i t m o r e for h i s coal if it would fifth c e n t u r y . T h e excavations ed a m e e t i n g for t h e purpose. m e a n a living w a g e for t h e coalw e r e u n d e r t h e P r e f e c t u r e of P o - Five h u n d r e d t e a c h e r s t u r n e d up g e t t e r s . O t h e r s of t h e Bishops, lice, a n d it is known t h a t t h i s w a s also, h a v e spoken o u t in a similar for it. t h e s i t e of a chapel dedicated to strain. St. J o h n t h e B a p t i s t w h i c h w a s re* * * * T H E FOURTH INDIAN placed a b o u t t h e y e a r 800 b y a GOOD N E W S . P I L G R I M A G E P L A N N E D FOR l a r g e r edifice dedicated to t h e T i H R E E - H A L F P E N C E n ounce, NEXT SPRING. same saint. b y air-mail, f r o m London to Malaya . T h a t h a p p y d a y is not C a l c u t t a . — T h e F o u r t h Indian "PEACE CANDLE." P i l g r i m a g e t o t h e Holy L a n d and y e t ; b u t t i m e soon p a s s e s , a n d a n TO B U R N 100 Y E A R S . s h r i n e s in E u r o p e is planned to a n n o u n c e m e n t j u s t m a d e holds out t a k e place from May 20 t o J u l y 5, t h e promise of s u c h a n a r r a n g e Mr. T h o m a s 0 ' S h a n g h n e s s y , a n 1936. F a t h e r A. L e Tellier, S.J., m e n t b y 1937. I n r e s p e c t of A m e r i c a n a r t i s t a n d designer of t h e successful organizer of t h e easier, a n d m a t e r i a l l y fuller, comc h u r c h windows, h a s p r e s e n t e d a f o r m e r pilgrimages, is planning candle designed t o b u r n for 100 t h e i t i n e r a r y and m a k i n g t h e t r a - munications, t h a t y e a r , t h e r e f o r e , y e a r s , in t h e cause of world peace. vel r e s e r v a t i o n s . A n announce- is one t o be hailed f o r a f u r t h e r I t h a s been Dedicated a t R o s a r y link of E m p i r e w h i c h will b r i n g m e n t of t h e pilgrimage published College, R i v e r F o r e s t , Chicago. h e r e s a y s t h a t it will be held poor people i n t o line w i t h oppor"provided w a r is over a n d travel- t u n i t i e s enjoyed a t p r e s e n t only (Fides). b y t h e well-to-do. BLESSED EDMUND A R R O W - ling is s a f e . "

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Xmas Short Story THE WEEPING

ON THE

( W R I T T E N FOR T H E M.CX.—By

2 i s t DECEMBER, 1935.

THE CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPAEDIC DICTIONARY

GRAVE

IN ONE

CD.)

do act like a fool sometimes, t h a t H a d you passed t h e house you h e does, does h e n o t c o m r a d e s ? So would h a v e done so n o t w i t h o u t e m i t t i n g a s h u d d e r . I t was t h e m a n y , people a-going t e r m a s s w i ' T h e d w a r f leered oldest h o u s e conceivable; dark a s f a t p u r s e s . " once again a n d c o n c e n t r a t e d his E r e b u s ; t h e e m b o d i m e n t of everyt h i n g t h a t w a s g r o t e s q u e , uncan- eyes upon t h e countenance of Dick. But t h e leader seemed not ny, repulsive a n d weird. So s u g t o h e a r it, o r if h e h e a r d i t h e gestive of an abode such a s S a t a n pretended t h a t h e did n o t . H e rehimself would h a v e delighted in mained silent—brow p u c k e r e d — i n h a b i t i n g . T h e v e r y wind t h a t swayed t h e t r e e - t o p s so majestic- gazing almost indifferently, o u t inally, blew t h r o u g h t h i s said house t o t h e n i g h t . " A wolf t h a t is leader no longer dismally. I t b a n g e d t h e windows, soon finds o u t h i s m i s t a k e . H e is m a d e t h e d o o r s c r e a k horribly, a n d simply g a v e o n e t h e creeps. s e t upon b y t h e r e s t of h i s pack. A n d s t r a n g e y a r n s — b o r d e r i n g on T h i n k it over Mr. Dick." T h e t h e s u p e r n a t u r a l — w e r e a t t a c h e d d w a r f ceased s p e a k i n g a n d leered t o t h i s dilapidated h o u s e . One old y e t again. M r . Dick's e y e s fairly w o m a n h a d proclaimed solemnly blazed w i t h a n g e r . " W e can do t h a t s h e h a d s e e n " t h e m e y e s ; t h e devil's w o r k every n i g h t ex'orrible e y e s t h e y w e r e — g l a r i n g cept t h i s one. M a r k m e . I forbid a n d g l a r i n g a t y e till y e r go all a n y of my m e n t o thieve t o - n i g h t . c r e e p y over." A n d h a d gone so f a r C h r i s t m a s is C h r i s t m a s a n d let as t o a d d t o h e r L i t a n y of t h e S a i n t s t h e people a t t e n d t h e M i d n i g h t Understand?" " O Lor* deliver m e from t h e m M a s s unmolested. e y e s . " D a m e R u m o u r t h r e w cold T h e dwarf nodded his h e a d leerw a t e r upon all w h o suggested t h e ingly, but m a d e no a t t e m p t t o h o u s e a s a h a b i t a t i o n . T h e land- speak. " G o ! " said Dick commandingly, lord finally gave u p all hope of h i s h o u s e e v e r o b t a i n i n g t e n a n t s , — " G o ! " he motioned t h e m off w i t h a s a r e s u l t of w h i c h it w a s left t o a wave of h i s h a n d s . ' T h e m e e t i n g is ended,—no t h i e v i n g t o - n i g h t i t s own h o r r o r s a n d r u i n . mind." B u t t h e h o u s e w a s inhabited— T h e y o u n g m e n slunk o u t ina n d b y t e n a n t s a s repulsive as t h e dwelling itself. U n k n o w n and in t o t h e n i g h t quietly, only t h e s e c r e t t h e y held t h e i r clandestine d w a r f h a v i n g courage e n o u g h t o n o c t u r n a l m e e t i n g s alone. I s a y c a s t a l a s t defiant look a t Mr. " t h e y " because t h e r e w e r e five of Dick prior t o h i s d e p a r t u r e . B u t t h e m . T h e r e w a s M r . R u n a w a y — t o t h i s Mr. Dick paid n o h e e d ; h e so called because h e w a s t h e first w a s listening i n t e n t l y t o t h e pealt o a t t a c k a n d t h e first to r u n i n g of t h e Church-bells—recalling irrevocable past a w a y w h e n h i s side w a s losing p e r h a p s , t h e g r o u n d ; t h e r e w a s Dick t h e h a n d - w h e n he w a s a boy of good and s o m e s t a n d t h e fairest,—blue-eyed decent morals. H e smiled a l m o s t b i t t e r l y " N o and flaxen-haired—but the most m o r e Dick t h e good b u t d a n g e r o u s of t h e m a l l ; t h e r e w a s Dick awoke from his light Adonis—but w h a t an ironical n a m e f o r h i m ! H e w a s more of sleep to h e a r a perfect Babel a n A e s o p ; a n ugly, deformed of noises which h e instinctively from misshapen dwarf whose visage k n e w to come not f a r w h e r e he w a s . Then h i g h and w a s a l w a y s a h i d e o u s leer. J a c k i e a n d S a n d y b r o u g h t u p t h e n u m b e r above t h e r e s t b u t still m e a n stentot o five—these l a s t t w o , speaking ingless he h e a r d t h e rian voice of Adonis t h e dwarf. H e little b u t doing m u c h . T h e s e five w e r e s e t t i n g u p a guessed not w i t h o u t s h r e w d n e s s " R e i g n of T e r r o r " round a n d t h a t his m e n were u p t o t h e i r a b o u t t h e h o u s e in which t h e y tricks. H e r u s h e d out a n d a p proached t h e voices in a s quick secretly lived, t o a radius of a b o u t five miles. T h e y caused old t i m e as w a s possible. H e found ladies t o fly i n t o h y s t e r i c s , y o u n g h e had guessed correctly. T h e y a n d old m e n t h e loss of t h e i r were s u r r o u n d i n g someone and money, s w a g g e r i n g gentlemen a with a threatening atttitude. "Fools! Get a w a y will y o u , " h e s m a s h e d new h a t or w h a t w a s w o r s e a d a m a g e of t h e i r olfac- yelled almost shrilly. T h e r e w a s t o r y o r g a n s , D a m e R u m o u r r e a r e d no need to r e p e a t his c r y . H i s her head whenever the subject m e n had a l r e a d y t a k e n t o t h e i r w a s G h o s t s o r Thieves—and I ' m heels. glad t o s a y — k e p t t h e police w h o " A r e you h u r t l a d y ? " h e asked h a d r e m a i n e d d o r m a n t for t h e t h e would-be victim of h i s m e n . p a s t t w o y e a r s — v e r y busy. B u t T h e old lady, c a s t a genial look in t h e s e five w e r e v e r i t a b l e eels t h a t his direction. "Oh n o ! y o u n g m a n . evaded t h e h a n d s of t h e law a n d Oh n o ! b u t I w a s awfully afraid of continued t h e i r rebellious course t h a t dwarfed figure. H o w horrible u n i m p e d e d — o n e n o t t o be follow- h e looked." T h e old d a m e s h u d e d b y would-be g a l l a n t young m e n . dered. " B u t you came j u s t in t h e On t h i s d a r k December n i g h t — nick of t i m e . " t h e h o u s e w a s ten-fold horrible b y She shuddered a t t h e t h o u g h t of r e a s o n of t h e f a c t — t h e secret five w h a t m i g h t h a v e been. "You a r e held one of t h e i r nocturnal m e e t - an angel a n d you do look o n e . " ings. There was an atmosphere Dick smiled bitterly. " A n a n of discontent a n d all seemed t o g e l ? " he t h o u g h t "If t h e old woc e n t r e upon t h e i r ringleader. m a n only k n e w . " " I w a s a-going t e r s a y t h a t t h i s 'It's b e g i n n i n g t o snow," said n i g h t is 'onderful. W h a t say y e r t h e lady. " S o it i s " replied Dick. Adonis?" "And I m u s t h u r r y o r else I'll be Adonis only leered back a t t h e late for t h e Midnight M a s s . " She s p e a k e r m o s t h o r r i b l y . Mr. R u n - suited actions t o h e r words, casta w a y ignored t h e leer and conti- , ing a look of t h a n k s a t h e r y o u n g nued s p e a k i n g : — " a n d ter t h i n k | rescuer, t h a t m a d e Dick w i s h he t h a t a m o s t 'wonderful opportu- i was out-of s i g h t . n i t y is t e r be missed. Our leader

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A n d t h e n >he old lady slipped and fell t o t h e g r o u n d . H a d it n o t been for t h e soft snow, perh a p s h e r fall would have been disastrous. T h i s fall a t t r a c t e d Dick a n d h e h u r r i e d forward t o help h e r . "This s n o w is very slipp e r y y o u n g man. " S h e beamed a smile on h i m . " C o m e ! " said Dick, " s u c h a s you a r e n o t fit J o t r a v e l alone on such a n i g h t a s t h i s . Allow m e t o help you. " He offered t h e old lady h i s a r m and t h e t w o hobbled t h e i r w a y slowly t o the Church. I t w a s Dick's design t o leave t h e old lady a t t h e door and t h e n m a k e a w a y . B u t t h i s was not t o be. T h e snow b e g a n t o fall heavily, a n d h e decided t o w a i t . Ensconced behind a pillar he peered f r o m t h i s place of espial a t t h e crowds t h a t t h r o n g e d into t h e church despite t h e heavy snowfall. H e could see t h e priest come out t o s a y Mass, a n d t h e people follow t h e sacrifice fervently. B u t h e stifled t h e conscience t h a t u r g e d h i m t o g o in. H e felt u n w o r t h y . A n d t h e n Dick found himself listening to Novello's A d e s t e Fideles. I t was s u n g by a boy, a n d it b r o u g h t t h e t e a r s t o his e y e s . He r e m e m bered t h e p a s t w h e n h e had been t h a t v e r y boy, singing t h e self-same song from h i s i n m o s t h e a r t . H e r e m e m b e r e d how a y o u n g m a n h a d told h i m t h a t h e h a d made t h e m o s t f e r v e n t Communion because of h i s singing. Dick listened w i t h t e a r s in his eyes. T h e boy s a n g on, n o t knowing w h a t effect h i s song w a s producing. " V e n i t e a d o r a m u s . Venite adoramus. Venite a d o r e m u s Domin u m . " and Dick found himself I moving forward like one in a j dream. He slid quietly i n t o I Church, buried h i s head in h i s I h a n d s , and almost sobbed h i s

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h e a r t o u t . H e sobbed for his p a s t , sobbed f o r h i s evil deeds, sobbed f o r t h e wicked* life h e h a d led. F a t h e r McGregor approached h i m a n d touched h i m g e n t l y . " L i k e t o m a k e y o u r confession, y o u n g gent l e m a n , " h e w h i s p e r e d . Dick nodded a n d h a d soon m a d e a clean b r e a s t of e v e r y t h i n g . H e came o u t w i t h a clean s h e e t . H e felt it in his very h e a r t and was happy. W h e n F a t h e r McGregor glanced a t him again he saw a radiant young man absorbed in his T h a n k s g i v i n g . A n d Dick p r a y e d on, for himself a n d f o r his f r i e n d s " W h a t do y e r t h i n k " said M r . R u n a w a y , " w h a t do y e r t h i n k I've seen. This h e r e Mr. Dick's g o n e t e r Church. A y t u r n e d goodygoody-like. N e v e r seen such a l i g h t n i n g conversion. A n d I've a feeling he'll be on t e r double-cross u s . T h a t he c e r t a i n l y will do. He'll tell t h e police t h a t I k n o w . " " N o t Dick" said t h e l e e r i n g Adonis, "you m a y depend u p o n h i m . A n d d o n ' t you f e a r ; i t ' s only his sentiments getting the b e t t e r of h i m . B a h ! hypocritical s e n t i m e n t I call i t . " T h e o t h e r s said n o t h i n g . " A n d I'll prove it t o y o u all. I'll t h r e a t e n h i m w i t h t h i s d a g g e r t o be a t u r n c o a t . " L o r * " said M r . R u n a w a y , " a n d if h e does n o t ? I f e a r m u r d e r will come on' of i t . " " N e v e r f e a r " said t h e dwarf, "Fll only t h r e a t h e n h i m , see. I love h i m t o o m u c h t o kill h i m . B u t I like t o s h o w you t h a t i t ' s all s e n t i m e n t . " H a ! H a ! laughed M r R u n a w a y , " q u i t e a goo' j o k e , a n d w o r t h y of t h e 'ead of a dwarf. " V e r y w o r t h y " chorused t h e other two. "We'll m e e t h i m a s h e comes out of C h u r c h , " continued t h e leering deformity. " ' u r r y u p " yelled M r . (Continued on page 8)


6

MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

S A T U R D A Y , 21st DECEMBER,

1935.

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CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 21st DECEMBER, 1935,

FR. E. LELIEVRE AND THE LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR. themselves, opened t h e i r r a n k s t o let t h e S i s t e r s p a s s , and t h e soldiers said t o o n e a n o t h e r : " L e t u s allow t h e m to p a s s a n d give t h e m (DRAWN FROM T H E EDITION WRITTEN BY T H E place, poor little t h i n g s . " A t t h i s t i m e , F r . Lelievre w r i t e s B E N E D I C T I N E S OF T E I G H M O U T H . ) from A m e r i c a : " I h a v e j u s t con(EIGHTH INSTALMENT) verted a Prussian and am preparT H E L I T T L E SISTERS DURING t h e m . W h e n t h e b o m b a r d m e n t i n g a G e r m a n from Suabia for became m o r e voilent it w a s touch- B a p t i s m . A r e not t h e s e our b r e T H E W A R OF 1870. ing t o h e a r t h e old people s a y w i t h t h r e n , after all . . . a n d shall we refuse t h e m t h e S a c r a m e n t s ? " A L T H O U G H F r . Lelievre w a s in a simplicity full of f a i t h : T h e l e t t e r s t h a t h e received the United States during the "Good S t . J o s e p h ! You a r e on from t h e Mother-house, La T o u r eventful y e a r of t h e F r a n c o - P r u s - t h e r o o f ; t u r n away t h e shells." St. Joseph s h o w e d h i m a s t a t e of sian w a r , h e w a s not so f a r a w a y H u n d r e d s of these shells passed b e w i l d e r m e n t ; t h e novices d i s p e r s a s to be o u t of h e a r i n g a n d s y m - over t h e h o u s e ; the i n h a b i t a n t s of ed, works suspended, and a few p a t h y w i t h t h e sad a n d exciting t h a t q u a r t e r had all fled—the home p o s t u l a n t s only left t o w a n d e r n e w s t h a t r e a c h e d h i m f r o m t h e was t h e only house occupied. The a b o u t in t h a t v a s t building; t h e :seat of w a r . Besides h i s own wounded soldiers w e r e deeply movdormitories p r e p a r e d for t h e r e m a i l s , t h e .old m e n in t h e S i s t e r s ' ed b y t h e visible m a r k s of divine ception of w o u n d e d soldiers, a n d h o u s e s a l w a y s came h o m e from protection. "How f o r t u n a t e we a r e t e n Little S i s t e r s p r a y i n g t h e t h e i r m o n t h l y d a y out, w i t h t h e i r to be h e r e , " t h e y would say, "God whole n i g h t before t h e Blessed p o c k e t s full of n e w s p a p e r s , a n d lit- p r o t e c t s u s miraculously." S a c r a m e n t . A n d h i s anxieties w e r e t l e else t h a n t h e w a r w a s talked T h e S i s t e r s c h a r g e d w i t h beg- g r e a t a t being unable t o h a v e a n y of. g i n g w e r e unswerving in t h e i r de- n e w s from S t r a s b o u r g w h i c h w a s F r o m t h e A n n a l s of t h e L i t t l e votedness, and went a b o u t courage- in a s t a t e of siege a n d bombarded. F a m i l y w e g a t h e r a c c o u n t s of ously in t h e religious h a b i t even " W h a t would I n o t p a y , " h e w r i t e s , s o m e of t h e d a n g e r s to w h i c h t h e i r d u r i n g t h e Commune, p r e p a r e d to "for a line f r o m S t r a s b o u r g t o tell h o u s e s w e r e exposed d u r i n g w a r suffer imprisonment a n d even m e w h e t h e r o u r L i t t l e S i s t e r s t i m e , a n d t h e blessings f r o m hea- d e a t h in t h e i r w o r k of Charity. t h e r e h a v e s u r v i v e d t h e b o m b s , v e n w h i c h t h e y e x p e r i e n c e d ; t h e s e One d a y , May 12th, t h e y did not w h e t h e r our h o u s e still e x i s t s , or m u s t h a v e m a d e t h e f a t h e r l y h e a r t r e t u r n t o t h e i r house in t h e Rue is in a s h e s ? " B u t it w a s P a r i s o f F r . Lelievre b e a t h a r d a n d f a s t . Picpus. T h e Good M o t h e r became a n d t h e houses of t h e Little S i s t e r s W h e n t h e w a r broke out, it w a s v e r y a n x i o u s and in t h e evening t h e r e t h a t w e i g h e d m o s t h e a v i l y ^decided in t h e council of t h e Con- she s e n t word to t w o friends who on F r . Lelievre's mind. H e re-, g r e g a t i o n t h a t a few b e d s should set off on t h e s e a r c h a f t e r t h e membered h i s own f o r m e r life in be established a s ambulance for m i s s i n g L i t t l e Sisters w h o , a t long t h a t g a y city, a n d h e w r o t e sadly wounded soldiers in all t h e houses last t h e y found, h a d been a r r e s t e d e n o u g h : "Only to t h i n k how our L i t t l e in t h e invaded t e r r i t o r i e s . Several for b r e a k i n g t h e law. T h e two t h o u s a n d s w e r e t h u s succoured. In friends w e n t to w o r k in such a S i s t e r s and t h e i r old people t h e r e o n e h o u s e alone 230 w e r e cared way t h a t t h e Sisters w e r e releas- m u s t be suffering. How can t h e y f o r ; in a n o t h e r 163 fever-stricken ed, b u t t h e y themselves w e r e kept live? N o hotels, n o lodging h o u s e s , a n d wounded w e r e received. T h e as h o s t a g e s for f o r t y - e i g h t h o u r s . n o m a r k e t s . W h o m h a s God dep u b l i c b e c a m e i n t e r e s t e d in t h e s e \ T h e y w e r e very p r o u d of h a v i n g p u t e d t o p r e v e n t t h e m all f r o m bes m a l l a m b u l a n c e s ; it w a s a t i m e of been allowed to suffer in t h e cause i n g s t a r v e d ? " A n d a f t e r h i s r e t u r n t o F r a n c e , in t h e following sacrifice, b u t n o w h e r e did t h e of t h e s e r v a n t s of t h e poor. S i s t e r s lack w h a t w a s absolutely In t h e h o m e in t h e R u e Philippe year, one d a y , in September, 1875, n e c e s s a r y a n d t h e y h a d n o com* de G i r a r d t h i n g s w e n t m u c h fur- all t h e Little S i s t e r s from Geneva p l a i n t t o m a k e of e i t h e r a r m y . t h e r . On S a t u r d a y , t h e E v e of a r r i v e d a t t h e Mother-house, h a v Two incidents will show t h e kind P e n t e c o s t , t h e Good M o t h e r was ing been t u r n e d o u t by P r o t e s t a n t They brought with f e e l i n g s h o w n t o t h e L i t t l e Sisters informed t h a t early n e x t m o r n i n g radicalism. i n t h i s n e w a n d t r y i n g field of t h e S i s t e r s would be t a k e n t o be t h e m two t h i r d s of t h e i r old peoc h a r i t y . A t Orleans t h e house executed a t t h e Val-de-Grace with ple w h o w e r e distributed a m o n g c o u n t e d 160 old people and 52 a number^ of Sisters of C h a r i t y . t h e houses in F r a n c e . " W e do not w o u n d e d , a n d f o r two m o n t h s t h e She did not tell t h e Community, y e t know," w r i t e s F a t h e r Lelievre, m u n i c i p a l a u t h o r i t i e s allowed t h e m b u t felt t h a t , h u m a n l y speaking, " w h a t is t o become of o u r s in "the l e a v i n g s of t h e s l a u g h t e r - t h e r e w a s no escape. S h e p u t all S t r a s b o u r g . B u t you know our h o u s e s , so t h a t t h e y w e r e nev^? h e r t r u s t in Providence, and when L i t t l e S i s t e r s ' c h a r a c t e r . If t h e y h a d a d r a w n sword h a n g i n g over .short of m e a t . A t R e i m s , t h e questioned, she only a n s w e r e d : C o m m a n d e r of t h e P r u s s i a n a r m y " P r a y m u c h and t r u s t , in God. t h e i r heads, t h e y would s u p w i t h g a v e t h e m a safe-conduct allowing All h o p e is not lost. Confidence, equally good appetite, k n o w i n g t h e S i s t e r s t o g o with t h e i r collect- no m a t t e r w h a t h a p p e n s . " A n d t h e t h a t t h e s w o r d depended only on i n g v a n . On one occasion t h e offi- L i t t l e S i s t e r s said t o one a n o t h e r : t h e good will of t h e i r God." T h e work continues in E n g l a n d . c e r in c h a r g e of t h e provisions p u t " T h i n g s m u s t b e serious t h i s In t h e w o r s t of circumstances, in a whole s h e e p . time." F o r t h e Good Mother, t h a t night F r . Lelievre h a d t h e gift of In 1870, t h e Little S i s t e r s h a d five h o u s e s in P a r i s , a n d a t t h e w a s one of agony a n d constant buoyancy t h a t enabled h i m to Towards m o r n i n g loud, crack a little j o k e and c a u s e a v e r y b e g i n n i n g of t h e hostilities p r a y e r . r e l a t e d knocks Were h e a r d on smile . . . I t w a s always s o ; and t h e Good Mother-General h a d s a i d : " I f y o u h a v e b u t one piece of t h e hall door, and s h e felt sure t h e n , as t o h i s calculations, it w a s b r e a d , s h a r e it w i t h t h e wounded t h a t t h e fatal hour h a d come. B u t t r u e , as h a d been said of h i m " F r . soldiers/' The t w o a s s i s t a n t it w a s a d e t a c h m e n t of t h e Ver- E r n e s t h a s a peculiar kind of a r i p r i e s t s in P a r i s a t t h a t t i m e h a d sailles a r m y b r i n g i n g t w o wound- t h m e t i c by w h i c h he does h i s acg r e a t scope f o r c h a r i t y , a n d exer- ed soldiers to t h e Hospital. The counts, and t h e y always come out cised it b y b r a v i n g all d a n g e r s and C o m m u n i s t s had fled, a n d a t las* r i g h t in t h e e n d ; we common fearlessly b r i n g i n g t h e aid of reli- t h e l i b e r a t i n g a r m y w a s in posses- m o r t a l s can only look and a d m i r e . " sion of t h e q u a r t e r . T h e n t h e Yes, b u t in h i s calculation, h e algion to t h e Communities. w a y s had t h e infinite and unfailing Good M o t h e r told t h e S i s t e r s of T h e h o u s e in t h e r u e S t . J a c q u e s \ B a n k of Divine Providence t o supt h e i m m i n e n t d a n g e r which had -was situated between t h e two firing Some a m o n g s t ply his needs, a n d in t h a t B a n k he lines a n d w a s m o s t exposed t o t h e t h r e a t e n e d them. t h e m felt regret on h e a r i n g how h a d unfailing t r u s t . Not t h a t he fire of t h e P r u s s i a n eannon. T h e ever seriously contemplated be•days f r o m t h e 5 t h of J a n u a r y to t h e n e a r t h e y had been t o t h e m a r coming an^ i n m a t e of any d e b t o r ' s t y r ' s palm and crown, b u t it was 2 8 t h , 1871, w e r e t e r r i b l e . T h e Sisprison, b u t t h e suggestion was only for a moment a n d t h e t h o u g h t t e r s would h a v e liked t o send t h e i r s u r e t o b r i n g o u t well-filled p u r s e s old people for s a f e t y t o t h e i r house quickly followed: " W h a t would a n d secure g e n e r o u s alms. in a p a r t of t h e city t h a t w a s not h a v e become of o u r old people?" T h e fact w a s now p a t e n t t h a t b o m b a r d e d ; b u t t h e y refused to and s e n t t h e m back t o t h e i r work w h e n he r e t u r n e d from A m e r i c a w i t h cheerful courage. s t i r : " N o , no, we will not leave A t Rennes, t h e revolutionists, his h e a l t h w a s seriously underyou. If i t is God's Will t h a t we should be s t r u c k by a shell, it will h a v i n g driven o u t t h e cloistered mined, a n d a y e a r w a s t o elapse be able t o find us, no m a t t e r w h e r e r e l i g i o u s from t h e i r Convents, before h e could g a t h e r s t r e n g t h to the Little S i s t e r s ' cross t h e C h a n n e l and visit h i s bewe g o ; and, besides, we a r e quite s u r r o u n d e d h o u s e a n d forbade a n y o n e t o touch loved f o u n d a t i o n s in t h e United s u r e n o t h i n g will h a p p e n to u s in t h i s h o u s e w h i c h is protected by i t : " T h e s e belong t o u s , " said t h e Kingdom. E v e n t h e n , only a few t h e good God." E v e r y n i g h t , be- m e n of t h e people, " w e love t h e m d a y s a f t e r h e s e t foot in London fore g o i n g t o bed t h e poor old a n d acknowledge t h e good t h e y do h e had a bad fall on t h e slippery pavement of W e s t m i n s t e r Bridge, p e o p l e p r e p a r e d for d e a t h and, t o o u r poor." caused b y h i s old and worn shoes, T h e Sisters continued t o go o u t a b a n d o n i n g t h e m s e l v e s t o t h e care T h i s fall of Providence, t h e y t r i e d t o sleep. a n d m a k e appeals t o public chari- full of h e a v y nails. A l i t t l e s t a t u e of St. J o s e p h was t y . A regiment, t h r o u g h which obliged h i m t o a week's delay, b u t placed on t h e roof, t h a t t h e i r pow- t h e y h a d to p a s s w i t h a load of he spent t h e t i m e in diligently e r f u l P r o t e c t o r m i g h t preserve wood which t h e y v:ere c a r r y i n g w r i t i n g l e t t e r s t o beg f o r a l m s

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BEGINNINGS.

7

FAR EASTERN MUSIC SCHOOL 1-A, Kirk Terrace (Off Dhoby G h a u t ) SINGAPORE. T h e only a n d oldest i n s t i t u t i o n of i t s kind in S i n g a p o r e w i t h up-to-date equipment. Had gained a series of successes in t h e T r i n i t y College E x a m i n a tions in t h e p a s t . N o a g e r e s triction. W r i t e for p a r t i c u l a r s . M. A N C I A N O , Principal. from F r a n c e , and succeeded so well t h a t h e w a s able t o build wash-houses for t h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s a t Portobello Road a n d P e t e r house, a s well a s bread-pantries for both houses, w h i c h w e r e m u c h needed. A s soon a s he could walk we find him a t M a n c h e s t e r p r e a c h i n g a r e - ' t r e a t t o t h e Sisters. Leeds and Liverpool w e r e his n e x t visits, a n d e v e r y w h e r e h e was e n c h a n t e d by t h e v i r t u e s of t h e S i s t e r s , t h e p i e t y of t h e old folk, and t h e g e n e r o s i t y of t h e i r benefactors, often very poor t h e m s e l v e s . F r o m a l e t t e r w r i t t e n b y F r . Lelievre from N e w castle t h e following example i s taken: " I n a poor village t h e b e g g i n g Sisters presented themselves a t t h e door of a little c o t t a g e w h e r e t h e y found a y o u n g w o m a n h a r d a t work, scrubbing t h e floor. She h a d h e r little baby tied on to h e r back b y a shawl. Seven o t h e r children w e r e s h e l t e r i n g in corn e r s , t o leave t h e floor free for t h e i r m o t h e r , and she w a s s p y i n g : "Children, you w o n ' t h a v e a n y t h i n g t o e a t till y o u r f a t h e r comes home, a n d h e m u s t h a v e a clean place t o s i t down in, so t h a t h e w o n ' t g o t o t h e public h o u s e . " T h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s w e r e a t t h e door a n d s a w a n d h e a r d all t h i s . T h e woman t u r n e d r o u n d a n d s a w them, and with a good-natured face s h e c r i e d : " C o m e in, S i s t e r s , come in, you b r i n g good l u c k ! " A s s h e said t h i s she d r e w out h e r handkerchief and u n t y i n g one corn e r s h e took o u t a sixpence a n d pressed t h e S i s t e r s t o accept i t . s a y i n g : T t ' s all I h a v e , b u t I could not u s e it for a n y t h i n g b e t t e r . " "Just then the husband came in and he, too, g a v e t h e S i s t e r s a pleasant 'God-day.' T h e y w e r e goi n g a w a y when t h e w o m a n called o u t : " N o , no, w a i t ! M y h u s b a n d will give you s o m e t h i n g , t o o ! H e is v e r y kind-hearted, a n d it is S a t u r d a y , and h e h a s g o t h i s w a g e s ! " T h e m o n e y w a s counted a n d w h a t w a s needed for t h e w e e k w a s reckoned up, a n d j u s t s i x pence w a s over, t h a t w a s t h e cost of t h e m a n ' s tobacco. Would it b e possible t o do w i t h o u t t o b a c c o ? The m a n hesitated, b u t h i s wife insisted, a n d did i t so well t h a t t h e sixpence passed f r o m t h e t a b l e w h e r e it w a s lying i n t o t h e L i t t l e Sisters' tiny leather purse. "These had j u s t taken leave, and g o t t o t h e door w h e n a sailor a r r i v e d ^ t a k i n g t h e place echo w i t h his loud ' H u r r a h ; i t ' s m e ! ' a n d h e threw his arms round the man's neck: " ' I t ' s m e ! Tve j u s t landed f r o m A m e r i c a , and h e r e ' s t h e p r o o f ! A b i g l o t of tobacco f r o m H a v a n n a h t h a t T v e b r o u g h t expressly for you. Look, t h e r e ' s e n o u g h t o k e e p you g o i n g for t h r e e m o n t h s — e v e n if you smoke t h e whole d a y . " " T h e L i t t l e S i s t e r s , h a r d l y able t o believe t h e i r eyes and t h e i r e a r s , g a v e t h a n k s t o God, a n d went their way." ( T o be continued.)


8

M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y ,

21st DECEMBER, 1935.

Xmas Story (Continued

from

page

5.)

Runaway executing a j i g in his excitement. W h e n Dick came out of Church, glad of heart and ready to reform h i s fellow^comrades, h e w a s confronted by t h e four, w h o glared a t h i m with e y e s t h a t boded no good. "Hullo comrades/' he hailed t h e m cheerily, Tve come t o tell you t h a t I've reformed. That the life we-re "Reform will y e r ? " said Mr. Runa w a y , following in t h e w a k e of the dwarf as t h e latter advanced slowl y forward. "Reform will y e r ? " said Mr. Runaway again ready tc do t h e bolt as three feet more separated him from Dick, "Yes I've reformed pals," came t h e cheery answer. T h e dwarf glanced up a t Dick, h i s dagger pointing upwards in a threatening attitude. "Give up reform or die like a dog." T h e words were uttered slowly and distinctly in a menaci n g voice. "I choose t h e latter" said Dick boldly. Mr. Runaway, w h o had quietly slipped behind Dick as he had more opportunities of "making a d a s h f o r it" w h e n occasion propped up, knocked Dick on the shoulder and said "Reform will y e r ? " and t h e n made off as f a s t as h i s little legs could carry him. The s h o v e of Mr. Runaway w a s pure t h o u g h t l e s s n e s s ; t h e snow-covered ground w a s slippery, and t h e d w a r f w a s facing h i m w i t h knife pointed upwards. The shove t h o u g h without force w a s sufficient t o m a k e Dick lose h i s balance, and h e slipped and pitched-forward. F o r a moment there w a s silence. A n d t h e n "Good God! I've murdered him. I never m e a n t it— really—I never meant it." T h e cry w a s like t h a t of one in despair, of a soul lost forever in t h e depths of Acheron, of a fool, of a reprobate convinced t h a t he i s lost t o the Great Mercy of God. A n d Dick lay a s h e had fallen t h e knife still in h i s breast—his rich young blood oozing out and staining t h e white snow around a Vermillion red. It w a s F a t h e r McGregor w h o found h i m thus—dying slowly, but h i s face radiant w i t h happiness. "Tell—him—(the voice was weak and faltering) t h a t he is innocent. Tell—Adonis—the dwarf t h a t i t w a s an accident. I'll remember h i m — a hand w a s raised t o t h e heavens and sank lifelessly down w i t h a dull thud. Dick had g o n e t o h i s peace a t last. T w o weeks after t h e aforesaid incident, F a t h e r McGregor received a sick-call at about one o'clock in t h e early morning. "An old lady dying, Father," said a young little boy clad in an overcoat from bead t o foot, and y e t shivering for all he w a s worth. "It's m y gran'-mother. So 'tis," said t h e little boy. "All right little man. We'll go." And Father McGregor carried the boy in his powerful arms, and bade him show h i m the direction which t h e latter did m o s t cleverly for one of his age. The danger w a s not so bad a s h e had anticipated and Father McGregor consoling the woman t h a t he would come w h e n day dawned, hurried back homewards. B u t Father McGregor determined to take a short cut — and t h i s led him through t h e local cemetry. Sinister stories had been attached to t h e cemetry, and F a t h e r McGregor let it be said, w a s a little curious. T h e very trees around seemed to

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have fantastic shapes, suggestive of leering ghosts, waving massive heads, which brought a smile to the priest's lips. And then Father McGregor heard a sob which made him miss a heart-beat. It wailed dismally, monotonously, raised itself almost to a shrill, and abruptly ended. Father McGregor stopped walking and listened intently. T h e r e was an eerie silence save for t h e gentle rustling of the trees a s a sharp wind pierced the treetops. A n d then the sob—but more distinct this time. It came from yonder grave. Father McGregor w a s sure of it. Devil or no devil h e would go and discover the nature and cause of the cry. He gritted his teeth (priests like all human beings are susceptible to t h e fear of the preternatural) and advanced forward. A strange s i g h t met his e y e s ; a sight that would have impressed the bravest of m e n with a little fear. A little lantern lay by t h e side of a grave and it shone upon a grotesque, in-

human figure that lay sobbing up- "Don't take me devil. O Don't. on the grave—huddled in a shape- N o t yet. N o t yet. L e t me repent." less heap. The figure w a s con"Child! I'm no devil. I'm human." vulsed with sobs, which sent a Father McGregor made as if to tremor through its whole body; advance. The dwarf shrank back and then there broke out through in great terror. "Don't! he the night air, in inarticulate tones, a strange jumble of words, from screamed. Don't come near me. I will not have it. I will not," he t h e shapeless huddled form. sobbed out tearfully, tearing away "Mr. Dick, Mr. Dick, I've killed at his matted hair, and lifting a you. Oh! Heavens! I've killed you. Yes. A h ! had I known, Had frightened face to t h e priest, pityI known " The voice trailed off ful but looking g h a s t l y lit up by t h e wan rays of t h e little lantern. meaninglessly and ended in broken sobs as of a man in despair. And "Don't take me, devil, O h ! Don't" ( h i s voice had sunk t o mere sobs). then again, Mr. Dick, Mr. Dick— (each word punctuated by dismal There was a loud, shrill scream, and the dwarf pitched forward on sobs). t o his face. F a t h e r McGregor Father McGregor gazed pityingly at the tearful dwarf. He ap- rushed forward and felt about the proached t h e recumbent form, ana d w a r f s heart. "No Adonis still lived, poor fellow". He could feel whispered ever so softly. Adonis! It is I, do not fear. I'm t h e heart-beat so s u g g e s t i v e of an utterly exhausted animal. Father human as you are. The deformed figure started. McGregor lifted the dwarf as easily He gazed at Father McGregor as if he had been a babe, and diswith dilated eyes. For a moment appeared in the dark shadows of the eyes of the two met. And then t h e night. the dwarf screamed like one mad. (Continued on page 19)


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC LEADER, S A T U R D A Y ,

^emor^'s

<&ift is an HEnduring Christmas

S t r i c t ! ? for tbose wbo bope to be olb one 6a? ( B Y GEORGE B A R N A R D FOR N.C.W.C.) One day you will be old. N o t necessarily, of course. There i s still a certain amount of road mortality, despite "safety weeks" and all t h e devices to make us cautious: there are still those little weaknesses, inherent in human nature, which defeat t h e expectation-of-life tables of the insurance actuaries. Nevertheless, in the ordinary way you will one day be old. When you are really old you will have little active life. You might potter about t h e golf course or t h e garden in t h e summer, or sit by t h e radiator in t h e winter and think of t h e cozy firesides of your youth. And in t h a t day (which is not an evil day, because you will be so much nearer t o your eternal reward) you will live on the memories of t h e past. Two important t h o u g h t s follow. F i r s t : while you are y o u n g and active, or a t a n y rate mobile, you should pack into life all t h e pleasurable experiences you can gather: experiences that will be pleasurable also in retrospect. Second: you should fix t h e m firmly in your mind.

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9

21st DECEMBER, 1935.

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STORE OF MEMORIES. In this w a y you will have a store of memories t h a t will Be better than wine t o you w h e n your limbs are weak and t h e world of your daily experience becomes smaller. I am not old: well not what I would call old. B u t I know what it will be like when I cannot travel, and meet people, and do things. Because once I w a s in a war. And in a war, w h e n routine c u t s off all

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the ordinary t h i n g s of normal life, there are long hours, and often long days, in which one can keep one's sanity only by living again t h e memories of t h e past. War is boring. Of course battles a i e not boring (except sometimes in the sense of perforation), but a long war is not all battles. The opportunities for following one's own bent are so restricted t h a t one might as well be within t h e four walls of a prison cell. Often in t h e t h e n desolate valley of t h e Somme, when there w a s nothing t o do, nothing t o read, not much to eat, I would find m y paradise without any of the t h i n g s Omar Khayyam thought requisite tea pleasurable moment. I had no book, no j u g of wine, most certainly no Thou: and only t h e blasted trunk of a tree t o support m y back in the cheerless scene. B u t I had my paradise. And it w a s memory. I had t h e memories of old school chums, of lazy days on t h e river, memories of beautiful gardens, of stately churches, of busy streets, of e x quisite pageantry. And sometimes t h e sweetest memories were t h e vaguest. A s soon as I tried t o develop a fleeting memory it had gone, like a snow-flake falling on fire. When I tried to fill in t h e lines of a half-remembered f a c e it vanished like a shadow. It w a s like trying to remember a perfume. * * * * * CHRISTMAS STOCK-TAKING. A s t h e years g o by the mind becomes less impressionable. A simple impression that would carve itself deeply on the mind of a child will make but little mark upon t h e mind of a man. The cleaner t h e slate of your mind, t h e more clear-cut is the memory of an experience. Aunt Jane might remember to her dying day the thrill of a visit to a flower show (and talk about i t ) : because in Aunt Jane's serene life that w a s by way of being an Event. B u t Aunt Jane lived in different d a y s . Nowadays life is one excitement after another, even to people w h o live in villages. My fear is t h a t unless I fix t h e pleasurable moments that crowd into a weekly round of excitement, t h e y will have vanished when, later on, I sit back and seek solace in m y memories. There w a s a time when m y Christmas stock-taking was of a different order. I used t o look up t h e bank balance (which sometimes turned out to be on t h e right side), and I would count up how much I had worked off t h e mortgage. I would reckon h o w much I had added to the material comfort of m y home. Then I would count t h e year a good one, or not, a s the case might be. But t h a t sort of stock-taking brings no real comfort. A m I happier if I earn more and spend more? I doubt it. There were good days in our boyhood, weren't there? And it wasn't the money we spent t h a t gave us the happiness.

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So now m y Christmas stocktaking takes no account of money. I try t o steal an hour or two t o meditate upon the joys of t h e year, t o recapture them and fix them firmly in the Bank of t h e Mind: for there my store will lie when I am old.

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T H E GIFT OF MEMORY. My children are around me now. It is commonplace now to come home and stir them all up together ill the bath, so t o speak, to answer all their funny questions, and take them endless drinks of water. And that leads to another thought. These daily experiences that end in laughter and sometimes in tears a r e , s o . m u c h part of the routine one is apt t o regard them as burdensome. They keep me away from my books, for instance. The books will last. There will be long years (I hope) in which t o read books when t h e wheels of life turn more slowly. But these days in which my children are young will never come again. I know that in the days t o come I would willingly give a year or two of life to s e e again those baby smiles; to feel again those little arms. N o money could bring them back. But memory will. There are other things I shall remember this year (if you will pardon t h i s public self-examination). I have met people who have given me joy. All sorts of people. People who are famous and people of whom no one has ever heard. I am thinking of many of t h e m now that I am taking my annual inventory. And by thinking of them again I am impressing t h e m more surely on m y mind. It is like inking in a pencil tracing. Memories of the places I have seen this year come back to me. For m e it has been a good year in travel. I s a w for the first time

SHANGHAI.

the great Rock of Gibraltar. I took a drive around t h e sun-baked island of Malta. I s a w t h e British Fleet leave Valletta one sunny morning for t h e east. I saw Italian troops leaving Naples for Eritrea, and I thought then, and shall always think, of t h e little white cottages that are already saddened by t h e loss of sons wh« went out singing to war. VISIT TO P A P A L VILLA. I sailed into the old Papal port of Civita Vecchia for t h e first time, and t h a t will taer s o m e t h i n g to gladden m e when I a m old. I saw Pope Pius X I in h i s summer palace at Castelgandolfo, and T remember t h e v i e w f r o m t h e palace across t h e blue waters of Lake Albano. I remember t h e w i n e w e drank under the orange trees in Albano: I remember t h e green phosphorescence in t h e Bay of V i g o a s we went to our gleaming ship from the shore a t night. I remember the drive up the dizzy mountain road out of Barcelona that took me t o t h e famous old shrine of Our Lady of Montserrat: a road t h a t medieval Saints had trodden. I remember t h e journey to t h e even older and more famous shrine of Santiago di Compostela, and t h e almost dread with which I s a w t h e great thurible then swinging over the heads of t h e hypnotized crowd. This year I have read books that gave me joy. T h e s e I can come back t o again if God spares m e my sight. B u t I m u s t remember them. Hundreds of happy thoughts come back t o me tonight when I am gathering t h e harvest of the year. When I a m old I shall not be lonely if I h a v e m y memories.


-rf77

Our

MALAYA CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY, 21st DECEMBER, 1935. :

Short

Story

A C A L L F R O M T H E CRIB B Y MARIE The sweet bells of t h e little village church r a n g out joyously in t h e clear and frosty air of t h i s happy Christmas merning. T h e y were familiar sounds t o the t w o young people w h o were hastening t o early M a s s in answer to their summons. These two w e r e t h e only figures m sight and their firm footsteps sounded crisp upon t h e snowcoverecj country lane. I s n ' t it pretty!" said the girl, shaking back t h e curls from her sweet face. H e r brown eyes were sparkling and her cheeks were a soft pink, aglow w i t h t h e flush of perfect health. N o less attractive w a s t h e tall y o u n g stalwart at her side, obviously h e r brother from t h e resemblance. "Yes," h e replied in answer t o her exclamation, "there must have been a pretty h e a v y fall of snow during the night." "I do love t h e snow," went on t h e girl, "somehow Christmas doesn't seem t h e same without it." Together t h e y tramped t h e winding^tene t h a t led to t h e quaint I t f l e church. Dick and Nellie were eighteen :years old and inseparable companions. A l w a y s , since their earliest years, t h e y had been close friends. ^Tragedy, however, had already overtaken their young Eves for their m o t h e r had died in giving t h e m birth, and their father, Colonel Graham, had been killed in the Great War. B u t t h e orphans had not been left unprovided. Their father had left money for their education and keep, in care e f an uncle a n d . aunt who had undertaken t o look after them. B o t h Diek and h i s sister had been happy living w i t h their cousins— hut naturally t h e y had sought each ethers company. N o w t h e y were Bearing their destination. "Oh! Dick, I feel s u c h a hypocrite !" Nellie w a s saying, "I've bought cards and presents for everyone but s o m e h o w I don't seem t o h a v e anything t o offer Our Lord to-day—I can hardly realize t h a t it's Christmas again s o soon, I've been so busy. I m e a n t t o make a novena t o offer in preparation but somehow I haven't done so." "Well," replied her brother," n o w t h a t I come t o think of it I g u e s s I'm no better t h a n you." B o t h were silent for a while, t h e n : "Dick," said Nellie suddenly, "I w a n t you t o s a y a prayer for m y intention—when you're h i g h up on t h e altar steps. Will you promise

meV

"Sure I will," replied her brot h e r affectionately, "and mind you don't forget t o p u t in a word for toe too, please!" "Oh, do you doubt i t ? " she answered. B y this t i m e t h e y had reached t h e porch and entered the church along with a group of others. Dick swept off his cap, and after t h e y had taken holy water he escorted Nellie to t^beir seat where he left her, a s h e w a s g o i n g t o serve on t h e altar. Inside t h e little church was well filled w i t h devout worshippers— simple * country-folk mostly, and t h e choir w a s s i n g i n g a joyous Christmas h y m n .

STRAIN-

BURCHALL

Presently t h e little procession appeared making its way to the High Altar; t h e tall young clerk bearing t h e missal followed by the stately old priest, whose snowy locks looked whiter than ever this Christmas morning, while t h e light streaming through the eastern windows made his pale features seem almost ethereal as he slowly ascended t h e altar steps. Nellie's gaze wandered from her study of t h e venerable old priest to the brother w h o preceded him t o the altar. How she loved to see him serving Mass—always so reverent and devout; who could imagine what a mischievous wretch t h i s idolized brother of hers could be when he chose? Now his dark head was bowed—they were saying the Confiteor. Nellie felt she w a s allowing herself to be distracted:—"mea culpa" she murmured and hastily sought the pages of her prayer-book. The Holy Sacrifice proceeded w i t h due solemnity and at length it was over. Dick, once more divested of his cassock and cotta, joined h i s sister again in the church. Both had received the Lord of heaven and earth into their pure hearts in Holy Communion, and so t h e y lingered at t h e crib to make thanksgiving. After a while they rose and leaving t h e little church set out for home. Many were the cheery greetings exchanged with friends t h e y met on the way, and not a few appraising glances were cast in Nellie's direction by the eligible young gentlemen of the village. But even if she noticed them she heeded not, her mind w a s occupied with thoughts far different. Meanwhile her brother chatted gaily on a hundred and one topics. "My! but Tm frightfully hungry," he said, "I do hope Aunt Mary has got in a huge store of provisions. D'you know Nell, I don't believe you're listening to one half I'm saying." "Oh, pardon Dick," she said. "There! I knew you weren't," exclaimed t h e boy as he glanced at Nellie's face. He noticed that t h e eyes under the long, dark lashes were dewy and far away. "What's the matter old girl." h e asked in surprise. "Surely you're not unhappy on t h i s day of days. Say!" he drew her arm affectionately through h i s own, "tell me what's happened t o you." "Nothing dear, I'm very happy really," said t h e girl, "please don't trouble about me." "Oh but tell me," he begged, something h a s happened I know. W h y ! you're crying Nell!" She smiled and squeezed his arm. "It's nothing really—just a secret." "A secret! Oh you never have secrets from m e Nell,—I've simply g o t t o know." "Very well, then," she answered slowly, "I'll tell you, but no one else must know just yet. Promise me?" • "Righto! I promise—fire away," said Dick. "Dick," she began shyly, "d'you remember t h e novena to Saint Francis Xavier w e made together last March?"

SUN-IMMERSIONF R I C T I O N .. play

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"Yes, well?" said the boy. "I—I got the idea that p'raps I—ought—to be a n u n ! " "Nellie, oh never!" her brother exclaimed in dismay. 'T didn't like the idea at all I can tell you," she went on, "but the thought came, and it—sort of stuck. I tried hard t o fight it and I almost thought it had g o n e ; but at Mass t h i s morning I hadn't anything a t all t o offer Our Lord, and suddenly I knew H e wanted me— like t h a t ! " She stopped speaking but her brother w a s silent; h i s young brow wrinkled in deep thought. Internally he was struggling with conflicting emotions. A t last, after a long pause, he said very quietly: "Well dearest are you sure? Have you quite made up your mind?" "Y—es," she answered slowly, and Dick knew she meant it. Once Nellie made up her mind about a thing like this she would never waver or go back on her decision. No; if she felt she was doing right she would not count the cost*. To t h e boy, however, the thought of parting with his oriif sister was the cruellest thing in the world, still h e felt he must not make it harder for her. T o Nellie herself the thought was no less painful. "You know dear," she was saying, "it will be a terrible wrench to leave you all. Auntie and Uncle and our cousins, and oh Dick! most of all you!" She clung to his arm. "Do you know," replied her brother, "you are the dearest thing on earth to me." "Oh Dick!" she gave a little sob. j "Yes, you are m y nearest relation y o u know, we've always been so close." They were silent again, only t h e crunch, crunch of their footsteps was heard on the crisp snow. A little robin perched on some railings close by carolled forth his greetings to them. Dick's spirits revived a little. Perhaps it would never happen. Surely Our Lord would know just w h a t she meant to him. Perhaps H e only wanted her consent to do H i s will and then

NEW

£- C?. L T ? Warin

CABINET

Studies

FOR

SPAIN.

Catholics excluded from Cortes. Madrid, 1 4 / 1 2 . Following a number of unsuccessful attempts b y other leaders, t h e ex-liberal Portela Valladares, who was a nonmember of the Cortes, has formed a Cabinet including t h e ex-Premier Chapaprieta a s Finance Minister but excluding t h e Catholics which are the strongest party in the Cortes.—Reuter. LAST ITALIAN MISSIONARIES L E A V E ABYSSINIA. Djibouti, 1 4 / 1 2 . The last Italians to leave Abyssinia have arrived namely, Monsignor Santa, head of t h e Catholic Mission in Addis Ababa and three other Italian missionaries w h o claimed t o be Vatican citizens not Italian.— Reuter. GIL ROBLES OPPOSES N E W CABINET. Madrid, 1 4 / 1 2 . Gil Robles, the Catholic Fascist leader is actively opposing the n e w cabinet and has ordered all municipal officials affiliated to t h e Catholic Party to resign their posts.—Reuter. t h e idea might be withdrawn. Perhaps he, Dick, w a s being selfish —but she was speaking: "Dick, I've j u s t remembered that it's Christmas morning and I'm still wondering what is in t h e mysterious parcel you gave me. Of course I've not had a chance to peep at it y e t , but I think I can guess." Playfully she pinched his cheek. "Youll never guess w h a t I've got for you." "I say, let's hurry before they eat all the breakfast," cried Dick, "and look there's the postman. Let's meet him and see if he's got anything for u s . " They seized hands and ran. Their eyes were bright and their happy laughter echoed through t h e lane. Soon t h e y overtook the heavily laden postman and relieved him of some of his many parcels. "Thank you sir, and a Merry Christmas t o you," he called, pocketing Dick's generous tip.


Christmas pessa^e of Ibis Xorfcsbip JSisbOp Of |fHaaiCCa j

11

M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

TZhc

CHRISTMAS IN THE MIDDLE AGES

JN

TO O U R BELOVED CHILDREN I N CHRIST T H E CATHOLICS OF T H E DIOCESE OF MALACCA. A year ago the first n u m b e r year is beyond all o u r expectao f the M A L A Y A C A T H O L I C tions. P r o m p t obedience to the L E A D E R c o n v e y e d to y o u our word o f O u r H o l y Father has first Christmas message and bless- obtained the blessing o f God i n g and, at the same time, our upon our c o m m o n efforts. O u r appeal to Catholic A c t i o n and members have multiplied; our Lay Apostolate. Catholic population has increased There is n o d u t y more urgent b y 7,000 this year. T h e number t h a n the d u t y o f giving thanks; o f baptisms, 8,239, has exceeded so w e thank y o u w i t h all our all figures o f the past years. O u r heart for the unanimous and e n - Churches are thronged w i t h dethusiastic response that has a n - v o u t worshippers. T h e Sacraswered our call f r o m all parts of ments are frequented b y every grade o f the flock. Churches, the diocese. It gives us great joy and satis- schools, religious and charitable f a c t i o n to record briefly the institutions abound. h a p p y results of our c o m m o n efW e must beware, however, lest forts achieved during this year. w e be deluded b y this very sucFirst of all our Catholic paper cess. It is n o t for us, laity or is t o be congratulated on its v i c - clergy, to think: A l l goes well, torious struggle against the diffi- w e m a y n o w take our ease. culties of its infancy. T h e s u c W e m a y not take o u r ease. A cess o f its first year's existence is sacred trust has been c o m m i t t e d a pledge of its progress and pros- t o us. W e must take care n o t t o perity in the future. It will live betray it. Conscious o f our digas a messenger of T r u t h and nity as members of the O n e T r u e L i g h t for all m e n of' goodwill i n Church, of the O n l y Church Malaya. In its columns, w e e k established b y Christ, w e must after week, will be recorded all strive t o be w o r t h y o f that digCatholic events, our projects and nity b y the goodness o f our lives. undertakings, o u r successes and Moreover, w e should be u n reverses, o u r joys and troubles. grateful children o f a loving I t will always encourage us t o Father, did w e n o t desire and stand up against the evil powers endeavour t o give effect t o that o f this world; it will invite us t o desire o f sharing w i t h others the fight for Christ and t o spread H i s sublime privilege he has bestowed K i n g d o m in all parts of Malaya. o n us. O u r mission is that w h i c h W e , also, greatly rejoice in the Christ gave t o the Apostles and c o m i n g to Singapore of t w o n e w their subjects: the conservation religious Orders: the R e d e m p t o J and the propagation o f the Faith. rist Fathers and the Little Sisters In this our dear c o u n t r y of o f the Poor. Malaya, m u c h has been done by T h e Redemptorist Fathers are our predecessors and forefathers already well k n o w n to you. T h e in the Faith; yet v e r y m u c h respecial work of retreats and m i s mains to be done in order t o build sions which they are g o i n g to u p here the Church established by carry on permanently will be a Christ. great source of graces and blesT h e doctrines w e have to offer sings. our non-Christian brethren are In the columns of the Malaya logical and reasonable; they Catholic Leader, y o u have learnt are n o t man-made theories b u t t h e wonderful history of the the teachings of the D i v i n e Little Sisters o f the Poor. Their Master. w o r k is the practice of the most W e can assert this unhesitatperfect Christian charity. To ingly, fearlessy, because of our feed, to clothe, and to attend t o knowledge that error is impossible all the needs o f the old destitute in the teachings of the Catholic people, such is their daily o c c u Church on account of the pation. Their temporary Poor guidance guaranteed b y Christ to H o m e is already too small for the the Apostles on w h o m H e f o u n d m a n y applicants w h o wish t o ed H i s Church, and t o their suce n t e r under their hospitable roof. cessors. T h e public of Singapore has alT h e means at o u r disposal to ready appreciated their sublime accomplish the work of converspirit of self-denial and sacrifice sion a m o n g our brethren are those w h i c h inspires the Little Sisters, that have served so well in the and they have already a n u m b e r past. o f generous friends to help them. For the laity: prayer, good e x J o y fills our heart to-day b e cause we see the Catholic A c t i o n ample and active participation in w e l l organized in our diocese. the Catholic A c t i o n , constantly T h e good w o r k done during the imploring God's grace and living

Mediaeval times, as old records show, Christmas was a season of great joyance in England and Scotland. The festive spirit set in on December 16. with the ceremonial singing of t h e antipfyon " O Sapientia," and by t h e festival of St. Thomas, held on t h e 21st, as it is to-day, all the household's plans to celebrate Christ's birth were completed. Archbishop Wickwane, for his Christmas at Southwell Abbey in Yorkshire in 1279, gave detailed instructions four weeks beforehand that geese, chickens, and other kinds of poultry be provided for the brethren's repasts during t h e season of Christmas. Though constantly reminded by the religious services of the great feast approaching, there were also hints of good cheer and of certain dispensations from t h e monastic rule, such as that granted by Pope Alexander IV. to t h e monks of the Abbey of Kelso, permitting them to wear caps to shield their tonsured heads, because t h e coldness by day and night brought much grievous sickness among them. Nor were the lay folk forgotten. On St. Stephen's day, when the tenants of the great religious establishments were wont t o bring their presents of young pigs and poultry, honey, mead, etc., they w e r e assembled—as at Thurgarton Priory, Nottinghamshire, and other monastic houses—for a bounteous feast in the refectory. To those who could not come in person gifts of viands were sent — a manchet, or white loaf, too often their only white bread in all t h e year—also a flagon or jar of w h a t was in the cellarer's care. Christmastide w a s formerly the season for the payment of certain rents to monasteries—payments in kind, not in money or service, —deer and other g a m e of a signo-

b y Faith, being guided b y the teachings o f the C h u r c h , not b y the maxims of the world. For the clergy: the closest possible imitation of our splendid predecessors in the sacred Ministry. T h e y laboured indefatigably, endured hardship and practised self-denial. Like them, w e m u s t work and pray. The C h u r c h is God's. God has called us to be H i s instruments in its administration. Therefore consstantly must w e implore H i s guidance as w i t h o u t H i m w e can d o nothing. Y o u r vocation is sublime, dear Catholic Brethren, for " y o u are a chosen generation, a kingly priesthood, a h o l y nation, a purchased people that y o u m a y declare H i s virtues W h o hath called y o u out o f darkness into H i s marvellous light." ( I Peter, 11,7). M a y the D i v i n e I n f a n t Jesus fill y o u r hearts w i t h peace and j o y during the holy Festival of Christmas and 'bestow upon all y o u r Christian homes H i s choicest blessings. t A. D E V A L S , D . D .

Bishop of Malacca.

rial lord, the merchant's ginger and cloves and like spices, and the peasant's half-pound of beeswax and a large basketful of e g g s . The mediaeval buttery at Christmas time was amply stored, as the surrounding poor and needy knew t o their great joy, for generous was the distribution of good cheer to them. In England, ever since t h e days of the Saxons, Christmas h a s been the season of benevolence; and in Mediaeval times there w a s them much commingling of rich and poor. The lord and his family made merry with their {tenants and changed places with their servants at table. Feuds were forgotten and disputes ignored, while the Yule logs blazed; and t h e poor had food such as they but seldom tasted. In all thin, the Mediaeval Christmas showed a vivid and splendid example of what too many moderns- forget—Christ's humility and love of t h e poor.

H. M. de Seuza & Co. Auctioneers, Appraisers, Insurance A g e n t s . Brokers. E s t a t e A g e n t s Receivers, E t c No. 27, Church Street, Malacca* Telephone No* 178. Telegrams: " Herman Desooza." Agencies:— Sun Life of Canada. The North British & Mercantile Assurance Co., Ltd. T h e Guardian Assurance Co., Ltd. The Alliance Assurance Co., Ltd. T h e Ocean, Accident and Guarantee Corporation. Senang Hati E s t a t e . H o Seng Giap E s t a t e . N e w Selandar Syndicate.

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Ail correspondence and literary contributions should be addressed to The Managing Editor, Rev. IL Cordon, 73, Bras Basab Road Singapore. Tel. 7376, Singapore.

^Ral*ga CatJurltr

Xmbz*

Saturday, 21st December, 1935.

CHRISTMAS MUSINGS. W i t h the c y n i c i s m of m o d e r n days t e n d i n g t o deride old c u s t o m s , beliefs and traditions, very f e w ancient festivals have survived t h e test of t i m e . T h o u g h m e n m a y scoff at s e n t i m e n t and sneer at romanticism, there is still one feast w h i c h even the m o s t daring h o l d . i n a k i n d o f impulsive reverence. T h i s is Christmas. L e t t h a n rant o f t h e foHy of i t ; l e t t h e m Jeer at t h e fuss that is m a d e over i t ; b u t they, i n spite o f their seeming bravado, d o feel t h e same silent impulse w h i c h m a d e t h e magi f o l l o w the trail o f t h e star i n the ages past. Christmas is essentially the festival o f the h o m e , and t h e h o m e instinct lives i n e v e n t h e rudest and crudest o f souls. T r y h o w e v e r y o u m a y t o escape f r o m t h e lure and the thrall o f it, and y o u will find t h a t the desire persists all t h e m o r e i n y o u . The soul t h a t languishes amidst the t u r m o i l s o f Kfe longs u n r e m i t t . i n g l y f o r a place t o lay d o w n its cares a n d woes, a n d imbibe t h e p e a c e a n d serenity w h i c h the Babe o f Bethlehem had brought long ages ago. T h e h u m b l e s t o r y o f B e t h l e h e m , the story, o f o u r Salv a t i o n f r o m .a*.Stable, has been recounted for well-nigh t w o mill e n n i u m s , and i t is as ever n e w n o w as i t ever w a s t h e n . The b i r t h o f G o d - m a n wiH never b e lost i n the mists o f a f a d i n g m e m o r y , as the ephemeral romances w e have read, because the e v e n t is a n i m m o r t a l o n e . T h e sweetest h o m e the w o r l d has ever k n o w n w a s a stable, a stable w h e r e t w o looked d o w n f o n d l y u p o n a baby's golden head. O u t s i d e was t h e s n o w c o l d and w h i t e w i t h the bleak w i n d w h i n i n g , inside was t h e n u m b i n g gloom of a wintry day; but happiness nestled there, radiant and l o v e l y , while the t o r c h o f love shone w i t h a brilliance t h a t has n e v e r since been d i m m e d . The trinity that made a perfect home t h a t n i g h t in B e t h l e h e m is the t r i n i t y t h a t makes a p e r f e c t h o m e to-day. A l l t h r o u g h o u t the ages the s t o r y o f Christmas has k e p t its

CATHOLIC LEADER, S A T U R D A Y ,

c h a r m because it is a simple story of service and giving. Its simplic i t y is all the more attractive because it centres round a human, everyday, c o m m o n - p l a c e , incid e n t o f a m a n , a w o m a n and a child. T h e most cheerful aspect o f Christmas is its element of selfless service. G i v e t o others as graciously as y o u can, and happiness will come t o nestle on your o w n doorstep. T e a c h the children t o be generous too. N o m a t ter h o w y o u n g they are they can give a little. Show them the significance of the message of their Baby-King. Gather all the family around the Yuletide board, and for the time being forget the outside world. Let n o t h i n g that is u g l y or unpleasant m a r the charity o f y o u r heart; shut o u t everything that savours o f hatred or malice. Christmas

DIVINE REJECTED

BODYGUARD

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TO SING AND

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OF

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(N.CW.C.) FATHER URBAN ADELMAN,

t i m e should n o t be defiled by a n y t h i n g t h a t is n o t c o m e l y or lovely. E v e n die thoughts of the p r o digal o r profligate whose finer feelings have been numbed b y vice and depravity, whose very nature has been soured and w a r p ed b y wayward living will t u r n homewards o n Christmas D a y , and h e will feel poignandy the loneliness of loss, if he cannot ret u r n t o the family hearth on this j o y f u l day. H e will think o f the days o f his childhood, the happy, carefree days, w h e n all life was a great adventure, and Christmas D a y the most delightful in all the year. C a n ' w e a l t h and p o w e r bring happiness t o a heart i n w h i c h t h e home instinct has been

PAPER T O

READ—THE

thwarted success?

in

the

ness and activity of youth. This of course would depend on the support and care bestowed on it by its supporters. But w e would rather see it die of old age, than from any premature causes. So our prayer is "From a sudden and unprovided death: O Lord deliver us." A paper to read. W E were quite struck with some™ t h i n g that caught our eye in one of the Catholic weeklies some time back, especially a s it is quite in keeping with, and also expressly s t a t e s the object of our little paper. "The technique of modern journalism" w e read, "involves the production of a paper t o look a t / not a paper to read. W e might go even further, and s a y a paper to fiddle with."—"Well we have no intention of producing a paper to be fiddled w i t h " — T h e craze for speed is slowly taking its grip on this age of ours, and the danger lies in being dominated by that craze in everything concerning our daily life, regardless of the nature of t h e object which it seeks to dominate ^discriminatingly. We require something spectacular to concentrate our attention on any object. The daily paper momentarily holds our attention. Perhaps a striking advertisement catches our e y e ; or m a y be it is a picture. W e read a masterfully displayed headline, and the short resume below it s a v e s us the trouble of going through t h e whole page of an article or report. We fiddle with it a little longer and we h a v e read our paper. Nor can the reader be blamed too much for this, for if he attempted sitting down t o read t h e paper, he would in all probability find nothing in it worth reading. T h e paper had been produced with t h e object of being successfully fiddled with. Our object is to supply a paper to read, and to publish matter that would demand djome co-opteration and attention on t h e part of our readers. It will be t h e i r part to meet us half-way, and t o read us. That is the effort t h a t w e ask our readers to make.

*

O.M.CAP.

struggle

IN

FURNACE.

Our first Anniversary. T'HIS is our anniversary number. Our little baby has come safely through its first year. It has left off screaching and howling because of internal and external disorders t h a t are the almost invariable lot of infants. But t h e fostering of t h i s child by t h e Catholic population of Malaya is about to produce its effects, and the child of their adoption is beginning to make not unsuccessful attempts at smiling. It is already trying to toddle about on its own, and w e fondly cherish t h e hope of seeing it running about with head erect, in all t h e liveli-

FISTS LIKE ROSEBUDS

THOUGHT

HE DID THAT THINK

THE

HE WHOSE

GRIPPING

ANNIVERSARY—A

POPE A N D CIVILTA C A T T O L I C A — A S G O L D

ARMS IN A LOVE-RUSE

CLOSED

REALLY

FIRST

IN A WAYSIDE

LAY,

HIS TINY

OUR

DECEPTION

THE BABY KING

HIS UMP

NOTES A N D COMMENTS

BY SOME, NEGLECTED

SAVE A TWIN

21st DECEMBER, 1935.

*

*

*

The Pope and Civilta Cattolica.—

for

Y o u r h o m e m a y be a poor place, b u t if it is lighted b y the candle of love o n Christmas D a y i t will k n o w all the joy t h a t once glorified the stable o f Bethlehem. H e r e are some things y o u cannot measure i n terms of g o l d : the firelight o n a woman's hair, the happiness in a man's eyes, the music in the voice of a child. Peace will be w i t h y o u if y o u possess these things. T h e star of happiness will shine above your home, and o n this memorable day y o u will k n o w that joy t h a t c a n n o t be expressed in words, or translated i n t o earthly terms of this world below.

O E V E R A L newspapers in Great Britain, it appears, have been attributing t o the Holy See, on the strength of a leading article in t h e Civilta Cattolica t h e view that Italy should be g i v e n a mandate over Ethiopia. S o m e weeks ago t h e " S t r a i t s Times " published a cable from t h e ' A n e t a N e w s S e r v i c e ' relating to this question. The Italian paper Civilta Cattolica contained an article asking t h e League t o grant Italy her claims in Abyssinia. But as t h e " English Catholic Herald points out " It may or may not be the Pope's view t h a t such a mandate is desirable in order to avoid any extension of t h e present localised hostilities. B u t the point is t h a t the Civilta Cattolica is not as t h e s e news-paper*- implied, an official organ of the P ^ l y S e e ; the Vatican's official o*"~*n is t h e Osservatore Romano 99

(Continued

on


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC LEADER, SATURDAY, 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

CHRISTMAS. o

T H R E E F O L D ASPECT OF THE FESTIVAL.

GOSPEL

13

DIOCESE

OF

MALACCA-

Calendar for the week.

for

T H E FOURTH S U N D A Y IN

ADVENT. Some years ago there w a s pub(Luke, III, 1-6) lished a cartoon of Christmas in three pictures. Each picture reTN t h e fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate presented an idea of the day a s rebeing governor of Judea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, garded by each of three classes. and Philip his brother tetrarch of Iturea and the country of TraThe first picture depicted a chonitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilina, under the high-priests merchant standing at the door of Annas and Caiphas; the word of t h e Lord came to John the son of his store and smugly rubbing his Zachary in t h e desert. And he came into all t h e country about the hands at t h e sight of his numerous Jordan, preaching the baptism of penance for the remission of s i n s ; -customers. This is the COMMERas it is written in the book of t h e sayings of Isaias the prophet: A CIAL Christmas. For t h e mervoice of one crying in the wilderness: prepare y e t h e way of the chant, Christmas is simply t h e cliLord, make h i s paths straight. Every valley shall be filled; and m a x of a busy selling season. To every mountain and hill shall be brought low: t h e crooked shall be h i m it means bigger business and made straight, and the rough w a y s plain: and all flesh shall see the more profits. salvation of God. The second picture portrayed COMMENTARY. t h e living-room of an average home. In a corner stood a ChristA s t h e festival of the Birth of prayer." St. Paul speaks about m a s tree. On the floor two childOur Lord draws nearer, the Church the works of day and the works ren were playing with their toys. feels that the work of preparation of night, and he s a y s : ' l e t us not Around the centre table w a s a must be more pressing and more sleep as others do, but let us watch .group of happy grown-ups. This is active. We are close within reach and be sober." St. John in the t h e SOCIAL Christmas—a time of t h e great e v e n t ; it is even at our Apocalypse s a y s just *the same f o r t h e giving and receiving of door. And are we prepared? thing to t h e Bishop of Sardis. .gifts, t h e exchange of merry greet- jl Three complete weeks out of four The Church and Watching. i n g s and good wishes, the re-union i have gone by, and all ought to have The Church never forgets t h e o f hearts that love one another;— been weeks of preparation. This office which is thus entrusted t o i t is a jolly day for t h e children. Sunday the summons is once more her both by Jesus Christ and the given: "prepare t h e way of t h e Apostles, and this is the office of The third picture showed a Lord. the Watchman. The Church cerstable. The radiant Infant lay in B y assigning not one simple tainly has proved to us during all t h e manger. On either side of vigil, as she does with some of her this season that she understands Him were the Virgin Mother and festivals, but by fixing four weeks the duty of watching, and that St. Joseph kneeling in adoration. of vigils, the Church has spoken she faithfully practises it. And This is t h e RELIGIOUS Christher mind upon the necessity of a from what she does, and w h a t she anas, pre-eminently a religious patient and well-studied prepara- says, we m a y be able to arrive at F e a s t on which is commemorated tion. The duties which especially a clear and practical understanding t h e glad tidings of God's gift of belong t o vigils have been prescrib- of the task, which is always, but l i i s Only Begotten Son. ed and commanded. now with exceptional earnestness, We Catholics do not envy the The Duty of Watching. imposed upon us. The soul that .merchant his commercial ChristIt is impossible for us, upon does not watch sleeps indeed and m a s . We rather pity him if the reflection, not to be struck by t h e is not prepared to face the eternal jgreat day means nothing more to importance which t h e sacred Scrip- destiny. The soul that watches, l i m than an increase in business. tures attach t o t h e duty of watch- knows and remembers its end; -And it is only proper that all ing. Our Blessed Lord makes t h i s that God has made it for Himself, ^should have their social Christmas duty the moral of several of H i s that He will one day judge it, and w h e r e i n t h e y rejoice and are glad. parables.. At one time He speaks that its position in eternity deB u t for us Catholics, Christmas abcut servants under orders t o pends upon t h e result of that m e a n s more than business and sowait up for their master, until he judgment: that the commandc i a l gaity. F o r us it has a signifireturns home at some uncertain ments of God must be obeyed, bec a n c e which it cannot have for ime of the night. It may be cause by t h e m we are to prove our o t h e r s w h o believe in Christ's early, or it m a y be late; but a t fidelity: t h a t prayer must be !Name. To us it is not merely a whatever hour it is to be, they are practised, a s an essential condicommemoration but an actuality. to be ready. A t another time it is I t is not only the anniversary of a the question of being upon guard tion for gaining Grace t o keep unique event, but it is also the H against a thief, and the same bles- these commandments: t h a t t h e sing is pronounced upon the ser- Sacraments must be frequented as •emphatic statement of an everyvant who is t h e n watching. Then being the ordinary channels of d a y fact—the fact of Christ's there is the parable of the Ten Vir- grace: that faith, hope and charity abiding presence with us. gins, divided into two classes of are not speculative, but m o s t For us Jesus Christ is not a mewise and foolish. They are alike practical and necessary virtues, inm o r y but a living reality. When in every respect, except that t h e volving very important d u t i e s : H e came on earth H e came to stay. wise ones showed their prudence in that active charity to others is a O n our altars H e is as truly present being on their guard against being prominent feature in the Christian a s He w a s in the manger at Bethsurprised by t h e arrival of t h e law, and will enter greatly into l e h e m . "God With U s " is the bridegroom; while the foolish ones, t h e evidence to be brought for or meaning of Christmas. "God through their want of foresight, against us after our death: that W i t h U s " is t h e meaning of the were unprepared a t the moment it must be upon its guard a g a i n s t B l e s s e d Sacrament. when h e did arrive. In conse- enemies w h o are ever seeking its In its deepest significance, then quence they were not admitted t o ruin: and m u s t not only begin and Christmas Day is not confined to go on with a life of fidelity, but the marriage feast. December 2 5 ; for every day must persevere in such a course The Apostles and Watching. throughout the year we have with even to t h e end. He is keen and The apostles w h o were so well u s a Saviour Who is Christ the alive and awake to his own spiritinstructed in t h e spirit of our Lord. ual interests: and at whatever Lord, set great store by this duty hour death m a y come upon him, NOTES A N D COMMENTS of watching. St. Peter, rememberhe will not be seized upon in an ing the words addressed to him(Continued from page 12) unguarded hour, but will be ready §j self, delivers the same admonition " The w a y that certain newswhen the sound is heard: Behold, _ to others, when he associates papers presented this story is still the Bridegroom cometh; g o forth §j prayer and watching, when h e more inexcusable in t h a t the s a y s : "Be prudent and watch in t o meet Him. editors of the Civilta Cattolica pointed out that t h e article in question w a s not to be construed as conveying the opinion of the on earth. " The Blood of Martyrs Robert d' Harcourt in V Echo Pope." is t h e seed of Christians." It is de Paris points out the effects of principle in present-day also the purifying fire that burns this A s gold in t h e furnace:— T T has always been the opinion of away t h e dross, and helps to direct Germany. " It is not in the * the Fathers of the Church, that t h e minds of the followers of muzzled press that the Catholic Persecution, though it may for a Christ t o higher ideals and raise mind of Germany must be sought t i m e seem to decimate the follow- them t.> higher spheres. Opposi- to-day" he says " b u t in the e r s of Christ, yet is rather a tion be it remembered, tends to silence of prayer. Never h a s t h e heart of Germany turned to the means of furthering God's kingdom increase resistance.

December 22, S U N D A Y — 4 t h Sunday in Advent. Mass and V e s pers of t h e Sunday. December 23, Monday—Of t h e Feria. December 24, Tuesday—Vigil of the Nativity of Our Lord. F a s t and Abstinence. December 25, W e d n e s d a y — CHRISTMAS DAY, T h e Nativity of Our Lord. Day of Obligation. 3 Masses and Vespers of the Feast. December 26, Thursday — S t . Stephen, 1st Martyr. From t h i s day t h e Solemnity of Marriages is permitted. December 27, Friday—St. John, the Apostle and Evangelist. December 28, Saturday—The H o l y Innocents. Blessing of Children after Mass.

DIOCESE OF MACAO. CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH. Calendar for the week. D e c 22, S U N D A Y — F o u r t h Sunday of Advent. Purple v e s t ments. Semi-double. Proper of the Mass in t h e "Small Missal" p. 65. Second and third collects as on the first Sunday of Advent. Vespers of t h e Sunday a t 5 p.m. Meeting of t h e 3rd and 4 t h Degrees of t h e Sodality of Our Lady of F a t i m a at 4 pan. Dec. 23, Monday—Of t h e feria. Simple. Dec. 24, Tuesday—Of t h e feria. X m a s Eve. Fast and Abstinence. Matins at 11.15 p.m. t o be followed by Midnight Mass. Dec. 25, Wednesday — Christmas Day. White Vestments. Double of t h e first class with octave. Solemn H i g h Mass a t 8, t o be followed by Benediction of t h e Blessed Sacrament. Proper of the Mass p. 67. Dec. 26, Thursday — St. Stephen first Martyr. Double 2nd cl. with octave. Dec. 27, Friday—St. John, Apost. and Evang. double 2nd cl. w i t h oct. Abstinence. Evening service at 5.30. Dec. 28, Saturday—Holy Innocents' Day. Double 2nd cl. w i t h octave. Mass and Benediction of Babies at 7 a.m.. In t h e evening: X m a s Treat for children a t 5.30. utmost spiritual heights with such fire and strength as n o w . . . " In the past, German Catholicism counted on those t w o great enemies of the interior life—facility a n d over-organization. It knew too little opposition; it was too comfortable. W e are able t o recall that ingenious organization The Catholic Centre P a r t y / which held the key-position in Germanpolitics. Catholicism had too easily found material power a t i t s service. But t h e appearance of a political power t h a t h a s launched an attack on t h e very values w h i c h were its pride, and to which p e r haps it w a s over-attached, daily tends t o make German Catholicism recover a strength and liberty which had been growing anaemic. " I t is gaining in quality w h a t i t is losing in quantity. B y oppressing it, Hitler is purifying it. B y its fetters it is set free. Persecution has always been t h e b e s t stepping-stone to prayer." 4


MALAYA CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY,21st DECEMBER, 1935.

'Silent Night' Music Mystery Of Father Catholics Of ShangEsteban Communist hai Give $5,216 Written On Captive, Finally For The Missions. Xmas Eve 1818. Cleared Up

( \ N E of t h e m o s t i n t e r e s t i n g Wuhu, Anhwei. s t o r i e s connected w i t h C h r i s t A C C O R D I N G t o new information m a s is t h e account of h o w t h e s e c u r e d a t K o y u a n , Kiangsi, ** Silent world famous hymn, Communist stronghold N i g h t , Holy N i g h t , " c a m e t o be f o r m e r w h e r e t h e Rev. T h o m a s E s t e b a n , written. T h i s beautiful h y m n w a s com- S J . , of t h i s vicariate, w a s held posed in Obendorf, A u s t r i a . T h e captive f o r a long t i m e , it Esteban d a t e , a u t h o r i t i e s tell u s , w a s is now clear F a t h e r succumbed t o ill t r e a t m e n t and C h r i s t m a s E v e , 1818. T h e w o r d s a r e a p o e m of which t h e p a s t o r of o t h e r h a r d s h i p s a r o u n d C h r i s t m a s t h e tocal c h u r c h is said t o h a v e t i m e , 1933. H i s r e m a i n s h a v e been been t h e a u t h o r . W i s h i n g t o h a v e identified w i t h o u t a d o u b t a n d h a v e been b r o u g h t h e r e for burial, j p n e w h y m n w i t h which t o welnearly 4 y e a r s after h i s c a p t u r e . come t h e C h r i s t Child to t h e world on C h r i s t m a s , t h e p a s t o r , t h e T h o u g h it h a s long been p r e s u m s t o r y s a y s , called upon h i s friend, ed t h a t F a t h e r E s t e b a n w a s dead, F r a n z G r u b e r , w h o w a s o r g a n i s t a t definite information w a s lacking t h e c h u r c h , t o s e t his poem t o a n d h i s f a t e remained s h r o u d e d in m u s i c . G r u b e r s e t to w o r k on m y s t e r y . H e w a s last h e a r d from C h r i s t m a s E v e , a n d completed t h e in t h e s p r i n g of 1933, w h e n h e m u s i c in t i m e t o h a v e it s u n g in w r o t e : " I a m content t o b e capthe church that night. tive a n d t o suffer for J e s u s C h r i s t , T h e s t o r y of h o w t h i s beautiful t o b e a r I m p r i s o n m e n t w h i c h will h y m n first c a m e t o t h e a t t e n t i o n end w h e n God wills, e i t h e r in liof t h e o u t s i d e world is also inte- b e r t y t h a t I m a y work a g a i n in H i s r e s t i n g . T h e o r g a n in t h e c h u r c h s e i v k e , o r in d e a t h f o r J e s u s h a d b r o k e n down a n d a r e p a i r m a n C h r i s t . I a m well. T h a n k you c a m e t o Obendorf t o fix it. H e for t h e c a n s of milk. I h a v e sent w a s w o r k i n g on t h e o r g a n on I t h e m t o t h e hospital of t h e Reds, C h r i s t m a s E v e , a n d h e a r d t h e ! t h a t I m a y r e t u r n c h a r i t y for t h e i r - h y m n "Silent N i g h t , Holy N i g h t " j h a t r e d . " being rehearsed. Struck with the On October 22, F a t h e r F e r n a n b e a u t y of t h e h y m n he c a r r i e d it h o m e w i t h him, a n d soon a f t e r - dez a n d Eguizabal, of t h e W u h u w a r d s it s p r e a d t o o t h e r p a r t s of Mission, s e t o u t for K o y u a n , which E u r o p e a n d t h e n t o t h e world. w i t h t h e a i d of Bishop M i s n e r of Yukiang and two Vincentian Fa(N.C.W.C) t h e r s t h e y succeeded in r e a c h i n g . F R E N C H P L A C E SHOES B E - T h e i r i n v e s t i g a t i o n s w e r e crowned with success. Following t h e indiFORE F I R E I N S T E A D OF cations of t h e very m a n w h o h a d HANGING STOCKINGS. I n some places, p a r t i c u l a r l y in buried F a t h e r E s t e b a n , t h e y disn o r t h e r n F r a n c e , it is t h e c u s t o m covered a n d identified h i s r e m a i n s t o place shoes before t h e fire on w i t h o u t difficulty, N o v e m b e r 8. C h r i s t m a s E v e i n s t e a d of h a n g i n g T h e y escorted t h e m t o W u h u s t o c k i n g s f r o m t h e c h i m n e y m a n - w h e r e , upon t h e i r a r r i v a l , a T e D e u m w a s chanted. T h e following tle. T h i s p r a c t i c e , it is said, derives day, a f t e r solemn R e q u i e m Mass, f r o m t h e legend t h a t long, long t h e precious relics w e r e t r a n s p o r t . a g o a penniless child, d e s i r i n g t o ed t o t h e c o m m u n i t y c e m e t e r y for g i v e s o m e gift t o t h e C h r i s t Child, final i n t e r m e n t . p a r t e d w i t h h i s wooden shoes, A fitting epitaph for t h i s g r e a t placing t h e m beside t h e m a n g e r h e a r t e d S p a n i s h m i s s i o n a r y would w h i c h h i s p a r e n t s h a d set u p . T h e n e x t m o r n i n g t h e shoes w e r e still be t h e concluding s e n t e n c e of h i s t h e r e beside t h e figure of t h e last l e t t e r , penned a f t e r t w o y e a r s C h r i s t Child, a n d w h a t w a s m o r e of r i g o r o u s c a p t i v i t y : " I f t h e y ( t h e C o m m u n i s t s ) b u t k n e w how t h e y w e r e filled w i t h golden coins. m u c h I love t h e m a n d all t h e <N.C.W.C.) Chinese." (Lumen) v

HOSPITAL FOR CHILDREN EXP A N D S UNDER DIRECTION OF NATIVE SISTERS. Hong K o n g . — T h e Chinese Sist e r s of t h e P r e c i o u s Blood conduct a C h i l d r e n ' s H o s p i t a l a n d Clinic a t S h a m s h u i p o , w h e r e t h e i r devotion t o ailing a n d suffering childhood is g r e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d . A t t h e openi n g of a r e c e n t B a z a a r organized in benefit of t h e Hospital, i t w a s pointed o u t t h a t t h e n u m b e r of o u t - p a t i e n t s h a d a l m o s t doubled during t h e last y e a r and t h a t t h e i n - p a t i e n t s h a d increased b y 30 p e r cent a n i n c r e a s e m a d e possible b y t h e self-sacrifice of t h e S i s t e r s w h o g a v e u p p a r t of t h e i r a l r e a d y r e s t r i c t e d living q u a r t e r s . A s t h e p r e s e n t space is increasi n g l y i n a d e q u a t e , it is t h e intent i o n of t h e board of t r u s t e e s t o b e g i n t h e erection of a n e w hospit a l j u s t a s soon a s half t h e estim a t e d cost h a s been secured. T h i s l e a v e s 5,000 t o b e collected before a s t a r t is m a d e . T h e G o v e r n m e n t h a s offered a s i t e free a n d t h e p l a n s f o r t h e n e w building h a v e also been provided g r a t i s by t h e architect, Mr. J. Mbraes. [Lumen-Rock.]

A CATHOLIC C L U B F O R CHINESE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS. Peking.—Catholic s t u d e n t s in C h i n a a t t e n d i n g non-Catholic univ e r s i t i e s will b e invited t o join a n association now being f o r m e d b y a g r o u p of s t u d e n t s a t Peking. A c t i n g on t h e advice of Rev. Dr. P a u l Y u P i n , National D i r e c t o r of t h e Chinese B r a n c h of Catholic Action, w h o told t h e m t h a t t h e y should b a n d t o g e t h e r for t h e i r common spiritual a n d intellectual benefit, t h e young m e n decided t o s t a r t t h e society f o r s t u d e n t s of t h e i r own faith a t t e n d i n g nonCatholic i n s t i t u t i o n s , ft will be called t h e Yang-Chi-yuan Association in m e m o r y of a well-known Catholic of t h a t n a m e w h o w a s an official in t h e court of t h e late Mings. ( F i d e s ) .

Shanghai. A S U M of 5,216 dollars for foreign missions was collected in S h a n g h a i on Mission Sunday, October 20. The gifts came from t h e Chinese p a r i s h e s of S t . P e t e r a n d St. J o s e p h a n d from t h e international congregation a t t h e C h u r c h of t h e Sacred H e a r t . T h i s success of Mission S u n d a y in S h a n g h a i is owing m a i n l y t o t h e a c t i v i t y of t h e Catholic y o u n g men a n d women of t h e city. (Fides). NATIVE PRIESTS OF KENYA T A K E OVER A N O T H E R PARISH. N y e r i (Kenya Colony, E a s t Africa,)—The parish of Baricio, in t h e V i c a r i a t e of N y e r i , will hencef o r t h be under t h e direction of t h e Rev. Benedict Kegoso, a n a t i v e of K e n y a . Till now h e h a s been cur a t e a t Kerogoia w h e r e a n o t h e r N a t i v e priest, R a t h e r Camisassa, is p a r i s h priest.

F a t h e r Kegoso is a m e m b e r of t h e K e n y a N a t i v e Council a n d h e h a s been largely responsible for t h e legislation w h i c h r e s t r i c t s t h e production of tembo, a n a t i v e wine m a d e from s u g a r cane t o which m o s t of t h e disorders in t h e dist r i c t can be traced a n d which h a s been t h e remote cause of several m u r d e r s . H e h a s also obtained c e r t a i n legislation r e g a r d i n g t h e d r e s s of Native g i r l s . ( F i d e s ) . B I S H O P S O F K O R E A HONOURE D BY T H E G O V E R N M E N T GENERAL. Seoul ( K o r e a ) . — T h e t h r e e Catholic Bishops of K o r e a h a v e r e - j ceived Honour Scrolls and Silver j C u p s from t h e Government-Gene- j r a l in recognition of t h e contribu- j t i o n m a d e by t h e Catholic C h u r c h j t o t h e culture of t h e c o u n t r y and j t o t h e maintenance of order. T h e I h o n o u r s were conferred d u r i n g t h e r e c e n t celebration in Seoul commemorating the 25th anniversary of t h e installation of t h e Government-General. Bishop Adrien L a r r i b e a u , of t h e P a r i s Missionaries, Vicar Apostolic of Taiku, and Bishop Boniface S a u e r , of t h e Benedictines of S t . Ottilien, Vicar Apostolic of Wons a n , w e r e given places of honour w i t h t h e a u t h o r i t i e s a t t h e jubilee j ceremonies.

Your need is Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. When you are run-down don't play a waiting game expecting things to right themselves, that very rarely happens and usually symptoms become worse until you break down entirely. When you find yourself losing interest in things about you, when concentration becomes an effort, and you are disinclined, for work or play, when appetite is fickle and even slight exertion leaves you breathless, then is the time to look to the condition of your blood, for such troubles are the direct result of an impoverished state of the blood. To regain health and strength your blood must be built up in quality and quantity, and for this purpose there is nothing better than Dr. Williams' Pink Pills.

STATUE O F BL. VIRGIN IS CROWNED IN F R A N C E ; Card. V e r d i e r Officiates. . . P a r i s . — T h e s t a t u e of t h e B l e s s ed Virgin, " P r o t e c t r e s s of theSouls in P u r g a t o r y , " w h i c h s t a n d s on t h e m a i n a l t a r of t h e basilica of Chapelle-Montligeon, h a s been crowned w i t h impressive c e r e m o nies. In t h e absence of His Eminence* E u g e n i o Cardinal Pacelli, p r o t e c t o r of t h e E x p i a t o r y Society f o r t h e Relief of Souls in P u r g a t o r y , . who could n o t m a k e t h e j o u r n e y from Rome a t t h i s t i m e , H i s E m i nence J e a n Cardinal Verdier,. A r c h b i s h o p of P a r i s , w a s delegated by t h e Holy F a t h e r t o proceed* w i t h t h e coronation. Chapelle-Montligeon is a little village in t h e Diocese of Seez and: t h e centre of a devotion w h i c h h a s spread t h r o u g h o u t t h e world. T h i s pious work f o r t h e Poor Souls w a s commenced a half c e n t u r y a g o by t h e pastor of t h e village. ChapelleMontligeon n o w h a s a v e r y b e a u t i ful a n d l a r g e basilica of ogivaF style. Despite t h e very inclement w e a t h e r , w h i c h caused CardinaF Verdier to r e m a r k : " T h e h e a v e n s weep because of t h e a b s e n c e o f Cardinal Pacelli," t e n B i s h o p s , 15(* p r i e s t s and m o r e t h a n 15,000 pilg r i m s , including t h e f o r m e r P r e sident of France, Alexandre Millerand, w e r e p r e s e n t . Also p r e s e n t was Dom E t c h e v e r r y , A b bot General of t h e Benedictines o f Subiaco, I t a l y . (N.C.W.C).

T h e missions of K o r e a received j a f u r t h e r m a r k of appreciation d u r i n g t h e visit of t h e Apostolic Delegate. His Excellency Archb i s h o p Paul Marella w a s received w i t h honours by t h e m i l i t a r y a n d civil authorities in all p a r t s of t h e c o u n t r y , and t h e K o r e a n Railways provided accommodations w i t h o u t SON O F L O P A - H O N G A W A R D E D GOLD CROSS F O R P I L G R I c h a r g e for all h i s j o u r n e y s . MAGE SERVICE. S h a n g h a i . — M r . F r a n c i s Lo Y i n FRANCISCANS IN CHINA. keng, second son of M r . Lo P a H a n k o w ( C h i n a ) . — T h r e e Chi- hong, N a t i o n a l P r e s i d e n t of C a t h o n e s e Franciscan clerics w e r e raised lic Action, h a s received a d e c o r a t o t h e subdiaconate September 15 tion from t h e Special C o m m i t t e e b y Bishop E u g e n e Massi, O.F.M., of t h e Holy Y e a r . T h i s consists V i c a r Apostolic of H a n k o w . Five of a Gold Cross of t h e Second O r y o u n g Chinese F r a n c i s c a n s re- d e r and is p r e s e n t e d t o Mr. Lo in ceived minor o r d e r s a t t h e same recognition of his services in cond u c t i n g a g r o u p of p i l g r i m s from ceremony. A few days before t h i s ordina- China on a visit t o t h e Holy See d u r i n g t h e Holy Y e a r m a r k i n g t h e EX-BISHOP OF SAPPA. t i o n four Chinese y o u n g m e n were 19th C e n t e n a r y of t h e R e d e m p t i o n . Rome.—The Most Rev. Joseph clothed in t h e F r a n c i s c a n habit Gjonali, w h o resigned recently a s b y t h e Religious Superior of F r a n - Unlike o r d i n a r y decorations, t h i s Cross m a y b e worn in p r e s e n c e of Bishop of Sappa, Albania, h a s been | ciscans in t h e V i c a r i a t e of Hant h e Holy F a t h e r . t r a n s f e r r e d t o t h e T i t u l a r See of kow, t h r e e o t h e r s m a d e t h e i r Only a certificate of t h e decoraResaina. (Decree of t h e Sacred simple vows, and a n o t h e r m a d e h i s tion h a s t h u s f a r been receivedCongregation of P r o p a g a n d a Fide, solemn religious profession. T h e Cross itself will a r r i v e in t h e October 30, 1935). ( F i d e s ) . (Fides) near future. (Lumen).

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15

Xauab anb tbc Worlo Xau^be witb JJou XMAS

QUIPS

AND

AUNTY DOLEFUL'S VISIT. H o w do you do, Cornelia? Cornelia? I h e a r d you w e r e sick, a n d I stepped i n t o cheer you up a little. My f r i e n d s often say, " I t ' s such a <comfort to see you, A u n t y Doleful. Y o u have such a flow of conversat i o n , and a r e so lively." Besides, I said to myself, a s I c a m e up t h e . s t a i r s , " P e r h a p s it's t h e last t i m e I'll ever see Cornelia J a n e alive."

CRACKERS

WIT AND

SPARKS FROM T H E YULE LOG. The following notice appeared in a bookseller's window in Scotl a n d : " B u y y o u r C h r i s t m a s Gift Books now—so t h a t you m a y read t h e m before p o s t i n g . "

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"How m u c h a r e t h e t u r k e y s ? " " T w o a n d six a pound, m a d a m . " "Did you raise t h e m y o u r s e l f ? " "Oh, y e s ; t h e y w e r e t w o and twopence y e s t e r d a y . "

You don't m e a n t o die yet, e h ? Well, now, how do you k n o w ? Y o u c a n ' t tell. You t h i n k you a r e • * * * .getting b e t t e r ; but t h e r e was poor M r s . J o n e s s i t t i n g up, a n d " T h a t y o u n g m a n s t a y e d very e v e r y one s a y i n g how s m a r t s h e late a g a i n , E d i t h . " w a s , and all of a sudden s h e w a s "Yes, p a p a ; I w a s s h o w i n g him t a k e n with s p a s m s in t h e h e a r t , m y C h r i s t m a s picture p o s t c a r d s . " a n d w e n t off like a flash. B u t "Well, t h e n e x t t i m e h e w a n t s you m u s t b e careful, a n d not g e t t o s t a y late, show h i m some of ^anxious or excited. Keep q u i t e m y electric light bills." calm, and don't fret a b o u t a n y S h e : " W h e r e did you g e t t h a t t h i n g . Of course, t h i n g s c a n ' t go u m b r e l l a ? " o n j e s t as if you w e r e d o w n - s t a i r s ; H e : " I t w a s a C h r i s t m a s box i a n d I wondered w hether you knew from m y s i s t e r . " y o u r little Billy w a s sailing a b o u t S h e : "You told m e you h a d n ' t i n a t u b on t h e mill-pond, a n d t h a t any s i s t e r s . " ; y o u r little S a m m y w a s l e t t i n g H e : " I know, but t h a t ' s w h a t ' s y o u r little J i m m y down from t h e ! e n g r a v e d on t h e h a n d l e . " "veranda roof in a clothes-basket. * * * * "Do you believe h i s t o r y r e p e a t s Gracious g o o d n e s s ! w h a t ' s t h e "the m a t t e r ? I g u e s s Providence'll itself, s i r ? " asked a n anxious i:ake care of 'em. Don't look so. w a i t e r of a c u s t o m e r w h o w a s You t h o u g h t Bridget w a s w a t c h - about t o leave. "I certainly do," replied t h e i n g t h e m ? Well, no, s h e isn't. I T s a w h e r t a l k i n g t o a m a n a t t h e j diner. "Well, a g e n t l e m a n w h o w a s / g a t e . He looked to m e like a "burglar. N o doubt s h e let h i m j h e r e y e s t e r d a y gave m e a shilling t a k e t h e impression of t h e door- j t i p for C h r i s t m a s , " said t h e w a i t e r . "Oh, well," responded t h e cus' k e y in wax, a n d t h e n he'll get in j a n d m u r d e r you all. T h e r e w a s a j tomer, b u t t o n i n g u p h i s coat, f a m i l y a t Kobble Hill all killed j " p e r h a p s h e will be in a g a i n l a s t week for fifty dollars. N o w , t o - d a y ! " <ion't fidget s o ; it will b e bad for FUN FOR THE FEAST. ' t h e baby. The c a p t a i n of a well-known P o o r little d e a r ! How s i n g u l a r i t is, t o be s u r e , t h a t you can't tell football club h a d a t u r k e y p r e s e n t - w h e t h e r a child is blind, or deaf ed to h i m a s a C h r i s t m a s gift by •and dumb, or a cripple a t t h a t t h e m e m b e r s of t h e t e a m . On ^age. I t m i g h t be all a n d you'd going t o t h e b a g in w h i c h h e h a d deposited t h e t u r k e y , h e found n e v e r know it. Most of t h e m t h a t h a v e t h e i r t h a t " t h e bird had flown." H e ^senses m a k e bad use of t h e m , suspected t h r e e jovial a c q u a i n t a n t h o u g h ; t h a t o u g h t t o be y o u r ces, and, on a s k i n g one of t h e m , tcomfort, if it does t u r n out t o received t h e reply," " I t w a s only l i a v e a n y t h i n g dreadful t h e m a t t e r a l a r k . " " L a r k be b o t h e r e d ! " "with it. A n d m o r e d o n ' t live a cried t h e c a p t a i n ; " i t weighed y e a r . I s a w a b a b y ' s funeral t w e n t y p o u n d s . " <down t h e s t r e e t a s I c a m e along. * • * * H o w is Mr. Kobble? Well, b u t T h e s t i n g y y o u n g m a n apf i n d s it w a r m in town, e h ? Well, I should t h i n k he would. T h e y proached h i s adored one. "Did a r e dropping down by h u n d r e d s you receive m a n y C h r i s t m a s cards, i:here w i t h sun-stroke. You m u s t Miss B r o w n ? " h e asked, by w a y of "Oh, yes! And p r e p a r e y o u r mind t o h a v e h i m a beginning. b r o u g h t h o m e a n y day. A n y h o w , t h e r e w a s o n e — u n s i g n e d — t h a t I a t r i p on t h e s e railroad t r a i n s is t h o u g h t particularly d a i n t y and I'm sure it c a m e from j u s t r i s k i n g y o u r life every t i m e a r t i s t i c . " I n d e e d ! " exclaimed t h e y o u t a k e one. Back a n d f o r t h y o u ! " *very day a s he is, it's j u s t delighted gentleman. " A n d w h a t m a k e s you imagine s o ? " " W h y , " trifling with danger. replied t h e maiden, sweetly, "beD e a r ! d e a r ! now to t h i n k w h a t cause I s e n t it t o you last C h r i s t d r e a d f u l t h i n g s h a n g o v e r us all m a s ! " t h e time! Dear! dear! * * * * Scarlet fever h a s broken out in A LAUGHABLE INCIDENT. t h e village, Cornelia. L i t t l e I s a a c A popular general was once asked P o t t e r h a s it, and I s a w y o u r what little incident he had laughed at J i m m y p l a y i n g w i t h h i m l a s t most "Well," he said, "I don't know; but I always laugh when I think of the Saturday. Irishman and the army mule. I was ridWell, I m u s t be going now. ing down the line one day when I saw an I ' v e g o t a n o t h e r sick friend, and 1 Irishman mounted on a mule, which was s h a n ' t t h i n k m y d u t y done unless kicking its legs rather freely. The mule I c h e e r h e r up a little before I finally got its hoof caught in the stirrup, «leep. Good-bye. How pale you when in his excitement the Irishman relook, Cornelia. I don't believe you marked, "Well, begorrah, if you're goin' to get on 111 get off." h a v e a good doctor. Do send him * * * * a w a y and t r y some one else. You THE SCOTSMAN'S DEFINITION. d o n ' t look so well a s you did w h e n A Scotsman thus defines metaphysics: I c a m e in. B u t if a n y t h i n g —"When a mon wha' kens naeth'g about "happens, send for me a t once. If anv subject takes a subject thai nae 1 c a n ' t do a n y t h i n g else, I can n*>n kens anything about and explains jcheer you u p a little. it to anither mon still more ignorant than himself, that's metaphysics." M a r / Kyle Dallas T

(

W A S N T HERE LAST WEEK. The angler had braved the discomforts of the rainy season and arrived at a village for a week's recreation. Emerging on the first morning for a day's sport he came to a wide stretch of water, which seemed full of possibilities, so there encamped himself and began his vigil. Shortly afterwards a yokel strolled up and stood, hands in pockets, gazing at the fisherman. Almost an hour had passed without the slightest sign of a bite, when the fisherman turned in exasperation to his audience and exclaimed, "Aren't there any fish in this pond?" "I doan't know," returned the worthy. "The pond wasn't here last week." * * * * HIS PREFERENCE. Wife—"Don't you think this is a -iuck of a hat dear?" Husband—"Yes, but I prefer a ouck with a smaller bill."

HUMOUR

For over a quarter century! GOLD LEAF TEA has been recognised as symbolic of the utmost in skill in Blending, honour and integrity in the packing of Fragrant and Inimitable Tea. Of all dealers throughout Malaya,

A REAL SAILOR. Some years ago a rather well-dressed man asked at the booking office at the town station, Portsmouth, for a seaman's return to London, but the clerk refused to give him one, saying that such tickets were only issued to sailors, Agents: and that he did not believe the applicant was one. 12—A, Robinson Road, "But I am a sailor," said the man. SINGAPORE. "But how am I to know that?" responded the clerk. "Well," said the would-be passenger, 'shiver my timbers, but you're a rum HELP .WANTED. sort of craft. Now, you wiry-whiskered Little Betty, aged nine, knelt down by son of a sea-cook, if you feel my starboard boom running foul of your steam- : her bed and prepared to say her ing lights you'll heave in your jaw ! prayers. tackle a bit." "Please, God, make Rome the capital "Give him a ticket," said the station I of Turkey," she said. master, who had overheard the conHer mother, who was standing over versation; "he's a sailor." her, gasped.

F. A . BARTHOLOMEUSZ LTD.,

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"Darling," she exclaimed, "Whatever NO GENTLEMAN. do you mean by that?" Betty rose to When the train rolled into the station her feet. a t Knoxville an old darkey bore down "Well, mummie," she said, "that is upon it, balancing upon his fingers' tips what I put in my examination paper a tray neatly covered with napkins. to-day." "Got anything to . eat, Rastus?" * * • * * queried a passenger on the platform. "Yes, sah, captain, anything you ONE OF THEM. want," replied the darkey, as he reThe collector approached a parishioner moved the napkins, exposing t o view a and held out the box. variety of sandwiches, with their crusts "1 never give to missions," whispered trimmed off, a large plate of fried the parishioner. chicken and some carefully selected "Then take something out of the box, apples and pears. sir." whispered the collector; "the money "Why, where did you get such fine ! is for the heathen!" fruit?" "Up to Jones'. Dey have nice fruit j HIS DOUBT. in dere orchard." "And who made these sandwiches?" "People who drink too much coffee," "Me ole woman. She's a good cook." said the teacher, "get what is known as "Where did you g e t that chicken?" Coffee-Heart And men who smoke "Say, boss, yoh from the norf—ain't too much get Tobacco-Heart." youth?" A mischievous boy stood up and "Why do you a s k ? " asked, "Well sir, if a boy eats a lot of "Why, no southern gen'eman would Sweets, will he get a Sweet-heart?" ask a pooh ole niggah whar he got his * * * • • chickens from." THE VOLCANO. * * * * * "The house shook," said Brown describing an earthquake he had exPREPARED! Mary—"Jphn, why do you wear such perienced abroad. "Cups and saucers a shabby coat when you want *o ask flew all over the place and—." father for my hand?" "Great Scot!" exclaimed Jones. "That John—"Mary, darling, I once had a reminds me—I quite forgot to post my suit ruined in an affair of this sort." wife's letters."

VICTORIA

CONFECTIONERY,

71, Victoria Street, Singapore. X'MAS CRACKERS CHOCOLATES. Etc.,

Just Unpacked

Etc.

Prices Moderate.

ALL KINDS OF CAKES FOR CHRISTMAS A N D N E W

YEAR

C A N BE MADE T O ORDER.

Proprietor: Joseph Chong Sin Tong.

Thone

7843.


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY, 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

16

DIONNE QUINTUPLETS' XMAS TREAT s.

Dr.

Dafoe "Santa

/A.

-i

4

Will Play Claus"

(By K a t h l e e n P o w e r ) T h e D i o n n e Quintuplets, cloist e r e d in t h e i r p r i v a t e h o s p i t a l a t Callender in cold Northern O n t a r i o , a r e t o h a v e a S a n t a Claus of t h e i r own. H e i s t o b e D r . A . R. Dafoe, t h e genial p h y s i c i a n w h o leaped i n t o i n t e r n a t i o n a l f a m e b y k e e p i n g t h e babies alive a n d w h o , a l t h o u g h h e is n o t a Catholic, b a p t i z e d t h e m on t h e d a y of t h e i r b i r t h — M a y 28, 1934. D r . Dafoe h a s n ' t announced t h i s himself, b e c a u s e t h e d o c t o r — n e v e r w h a t one m i g h t call loquacious— h a s refused s t e a d f a s t l y t o d a t e t o d i s c u s s h i s p a i n s . B u t t h e f a c t is t h a t h e did p l a y S a n t a Claus t o t h e internationally-famous babies l a s t y e a r , a n d associates a t t h e h o s p i t a l s a y y o u can be c e r t a i n h e will do so a g a i n . T h e r e will b e a definitely C a t h o lic n o t e t o t h e observance of C h r i s t m a s a t t h e Dafoe H o s p i t a l , residence of t h e Dionne Q u i n t u p l e t s . T h e b a b i e s will be only 19 m o n t h s old on December 28, b u t a s early as last November t h e y w e r e going d o w n on t h e i r k n e e s a n d m a k i n g t h e S i g n of t h e C r o s s e a c h n i g h t before going t o bed. I t h a s a l r e a d y been decided t h a t a C h r i s t m a s C r i b , w i t h a figure of t h e I n f a n t J e s u s lying in a m a n g e r , will b e s e t u p in t h e h o s p i t a l ~for - t h e Q u i n t u p l e t s . T h e y will h a v e a m p l e o p p o r t u n i t y t o inspect t h e Crib, too, f o r t h e y will all be w a l k i n g nicely b y t h a t time, t h e i r n u r s e s a s s e r t . Miss Cecile Lamoureux, t h e head nurse, and Miss Yvonne Leroux, an assistant, a r e Catholics.

to see t h e i m a g e of t h e I n f a n t J e s u s l y i n g in t h e m a n g e r . B u t D r . Dafoe h a s said " N o " q u i t e definitely a n d for v a r i o u s r e a s o n s . A l t h o u g h t h e s i s t e r s exhibit e v e r y appearance of h e a l t h a n d s t r e n g t h , t h e y m u s t receive special c a r e for a long t i m e t o come, a n d t h e four-mile j o u r n e y from t h e hospital to t h e village church, over a rough r o a d w h i c h b y C h r i s t m a s will probably be covered w i t h several feet of snow, would b e a perilous one for t h e m . F A M I L Y TO V I S I T

HOSPITAL.

So, according t o t h e p r e s e n t plans, M r . a n d M r s . Oliva Dionne a n d t h e five elder children will a t t e n d M i d n i g h t Mass w i t h t h e i r n e i g h b o u r s in t h e p a r i s h c h u r c h , and t h e r e all will join in p r a y e r s for t h e well-being of Yvonne, Cecile, M a r i e , Emelie a n d A n n e t t e . L a t e r o n C h r i s t m a s Day, t h e e n t i r e Dionne family will g a t h e r a t t h e hospital, t h e rigorous w i n t e r of t h a t section k e e p i n g a w a y m a n y of t h e q u a r t e r of a million v i s i t o r s w h o j o u r n e y e d t h e r e t o see t h e babies t h i s s u m m e r . P r e s e n t s will be e x c h a n g e d . Only seven m o n t h s old l a s t C h r i s t m a s , t h e little girls took t h e g r e a t f e a s t of C h r i s t m a s , i n a routine s o r t of way. T h e r e w a s a t r e e in t h e hospital, c u t in t h e woods a n d erected with g r e a t c a r e by t h e i r f a t h e r . I t w a s gaily decorated b y t h e n u r s e s . On C h r i s t mas afternoon Mr. a n d M r s . Dionne s p e n t t w o h o u r s a t t h e hospital unpacking t h e m a n y g i f t s which h a d a r r i v e d for t h e f a m o u s babies.

C A N N O T GO T O C H U R C H . B u t , on t h e whole, C h r i s t m a s While t h e Quintuplets were m a y n o t p r o v e t o be v e r y m u c h different f r o m a n y o t h e r d a y i n t r e a t e d m o s t handsomely in t h e t h e lives of t h e five babies. T h e r e w a y of p r e s e n t s from m a n y p a r t s u n d o u b t e d l y will b e t o y s a p l e n t y of t h e world, t h e elder Dionnes f r o m m a n y p a r t s of t h e world. w e r e n o t f o r g o t t e n and t h e d a y in T h e r e w e r e l a s t y e a r . B u f t h e n , t h e little f a r m h o u s e w a s a j o y o u s t h e little D i o n n e s i s t e r s h a v e play- one, w i t h l o t s of good t h i n g s t o t h i n g s g a l o r e e v e r y d a y of t h e eat. A m o n g t h e gifts received b y year;, t h a n k s t o t h e g e n e r o s i t y of t h e babies w a s a poem w r i t t e n b y Mary F. Mclntyre, of t h e people of Canada, t h e U n i t e d M r s . States and other countries. B u t Dalhousie L a k e , Ont., w h o , a t 101, D r . Dafoe s a y s definitely t h a t t h e is one of t h e oldest women in S h e also s e n t each of Q u i n t u p l e t s will n o t l e a v e t h e C a n a d a . t h e b a b i e s a p a i r of m i t t e n s s h e h o s p i t a l for a long t i m e y e t t o h a d k n i t t e d herself. come. I n t h e little s e t t e l m e n t of P L A Y E D O N L Y W I T H R A T T L E S Corbeil, w h e r e t h e p a r e n t s a n d T h e d a y following C h r i s t m a s five b r o t h e r s a n d s i s t e r s of t h e D a y w a s a notable one a t t h e Q u i n t u p l e t s live, t h e r e w a s a be- Dafoe hospital, t h e e n t i r e Dionne lief t h a t p e r h a p s t h e f a m o u s family g a t h e r i n g t h e r e for dinner, babies would soon be allowed t o with t h e five elder children g e t t i n g leave t h e h o s p i t a l , p e r h a p s t o b e a good view of t h e i r f a m o u s t a k e n t o t h e p a r i s h c h u r c h w h e r e , s i s t e r s a t play with t h e i r r a t t l e s , for a long t i m e a f t e r t h e i r b i r t h , t h e o n l y t o y s a m o n g t h e m a n y t h e t h e n p a r i s h priest, t h e Rev. t h e y received t h a t t h e y could play Daniel R o u t h i e r , offered M a s s with. daily for t h e m and t h e villagers joined in special p r a y e r s a f t e r A t t h a t dinner, Dr. Dafoe, h o s t M a s s each S u n d a y t h a t t h e babies a n d p l a y i n g t h e role S a n t a Claus m i g h t live. A t t h e p a r i s h c h u r c h , t o t h e b r o t h e r s and s i s t e r s of his w h i c h is dedicated t o t h e Sacred little p a t i e n t s , said t h a t when t h e H e a r t a n d w h e r e t h e Rev. E . T. babies w e r e b o r a seven m o n t h s McNally is n o w pastor, t h e v o u n g - before, h e n e v e r expected t h e y s t e r s would be able t o see t h e would all spend C h r i s t m a s toC h r i s t m a s C r i b and, like all C a t h o - g e t h e r . " N o w , " h e added, " I hope lic m o t h e r s , M r s . Elzira Dionne i they will celebrate m a n y m o r e . " would b e h a p p y t o t a k e h e r babies (N.C.W.C.)

URING ILLNESS AND CONVALESCENCE T

HE accumulated experience of over half a century shows Horlick's to be an ideal diet during illness and convalescence Horlick's is made from fresh full-cream cow's milk combined .with the nutritive extracts of wheat and malted barley. It contains no starch, and a certain proportion of its protein is available for direct assimilation. Its ease of digestion and assimilation, and its ready utilization in the body have been proved by actual physiological experiments. Horlick's is pleasing to the palate, appetizing, refreshing and sustaining. It is easily prepared, and is especially useful where frequent, small, light, easily digested meals are indicated. Ordinarily, Horlick's requires mixing with water only; it is, however, an excellent medium for the addition of milk, cream; eggs or similar articles to the dietary.

"OA THE ORIGINAL MALTED MILK Available Everywhere

W H A T CHRISTMAS MEANS TO US T h e s p i r i t of C h r i s t m a s is t h e lent rich m a n rejoices to-day. H i s spirit of j o y . Of all t h e festival soul expands a n d is enlarged u n d e r days in t h e y e a r C h r i s t m a s is al- t h e genial influence of h e a v e n that w a y s t h e b r i g h t e s t a n d m o s t glad- born c h a r i t y . H e enjoys some. T h o u g h t h e r e b e cold in s w e e t e s t and m o s t rational pleat h e a i r a n d frost a n d snow under s u r e of c o n t r i b u t i n g by his b o u n t y our feet, t h e r e is a l w a y s w a r m t o t h e h a p p i n e s s of others. A n d s u n s h i n e in our h e a r t s . Christ- h e is r e w a r d e d f o r his g e n e r o s i t y m a s is a world-wide festivity in ' b y t h e p r a y e r s a n d g r a t i t u d e o f which e v e r y C h r i s t i a n nation of recipients of h i s favours. And the e a r t h participates. Though t h u s is e s t a b l i s h e d a happy u n a n n o u n c e d by civic proclama- i n t e r c h a n g e of goods between t h e tions, i t is f o r g o t t e n b y no one. rich and t h e poor. I t is e a g e r l y expected b y a l l ; it is T h e pilgrim a n d w a n d e r e r i s h e a r t i l y enjoyed while it lasts, a n d gladdened t o - d a y , t h o u g h f a r a w a y leaves a f t e r it sweet religious m e - from t h e p a r e n t a l roof. He m e d i mories. I t r e t u r n s e v e r y y e a r a s t a t e s on t h e s c e n e s of his childf r e s h a n d f r a g r a n t a s t h e new- hood a n d r e v i s i t s t h e sacred s h r i b o r n flowers of s p r i n g . n e s of his y o u t h . C h r i s t m a s is a l w a y s popular. J o y e n t e r s t h e family circle t o " E v e r a n c i e n t a n d ever new," d a y — t h e d a y of family r e u n i o n . t i m e w r i t e s no w r i n k l e s on t h e T h e sons a n d b r o t h e r s , scattered heavenly b r o w of t h i s a n n u a l visi- f a r and wide, a r e eager t o meet tor. a g a i n in t h e i r childhood's h o m e T h e y o u n g will rejoice to-day. j a n d t o renew t h e cherished affecI t is p r e e m i n e n t l y t h e feast of I t i o n s of early d a y s . They love t o childhood. They welcome t h e d a y h e a r t h e i r f a t h e r ' s and m o t h e r ' s w i t h gleesome h e a r t s . T h e y see a n d sister's voices and to p a r t a k e in t h e i r m o t h e r ' s face a b r i g h t e r w i t h t h e m of t h e family meal and s m i l e ; a n d t h e i r m o t h e r ' s embrace t o r e l a t e t h e i r v a r i e d struggles in seems t o t h e m m o r e t e n d e r t h a n t h e t u m u l t u o u s s e a of life; a n d usual. t h e y r e t u r n t o t h e i r respective To-day t h e aged people grow p u r s u i t s r e f r e s h e d and fortified by y o u n g a g a i n and s h a r e in t h e in- t h e e n d e a r i n g m e m o r i e s of domesnocent s p o r t s and m i r t h of t h e lit- t i c t i e s . " tle ones. T h e s p i r i t of C h r i s t m a s quickens t h e m w i t h new life, gives MANGER REPRODUCTIONS t h e m f o r e t a s t e of t h e perennial IN FRANCE ELABORATE. y o u t h reserved for t h e m h e r e T h e p r a c t i c e of s e t t i n g u p after. of the T h e poor m a n also rejoices t o - m a n g e r s — r e p r o d u c t i o n s Bethlehem s c e n e — h a s reached exday, and w h y n o t ? Of all days in t h e y e a r , does h e not feel t h i s t r a o r d i n a r y p r o p o r t i o n s in southm o r n i n g t h e dignity of his Chris- e r n F r a n c e , w h e r e t h e custom is tian equality as h e e n t e r s t h e said to have b e e n introduced from House of God? Does h e not rea- I t a l y d u r i n g t h e t i m e t h e Popes lise t h a t , a s t h e h u m b l e s h e p h e r d s were a t A v i g n o n . E x t r e m e c a r e goes into t h e prewere a s welcome t o t h e Crib of Bethlehem as w e r e t h e Princes of p a r a t i o n of t h e m a n g e r s , a n d t h e E a s t , so is h e n o t a s welcome often families will give t h e i r m o s t as t h e rich m a n to kneel before t h e precious belongings t o aid in t h e A l t a r and t o p a r t a k e of t h e B a n - decoration of t h e crib. quet of t h e L o r d ? " T h e benevo(N.C.W.O


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY,

Young People's Page AT THE CRIB By M a r y P r e n d e r g a s t . J O H N Devine leant wearily a g a i n s t t h e m a n t e l in t h e little d r a w i n g room. He h a d j u s t entered t h e house a n d h a d not yet removed h i s overcoat. Several parcels lay a t h i s feet on t h e h e a r t h r u g j u s t a s h e h a d dropped t h e m . M a r i a , a middle-aged domestic, c a m e in p r e s e n t l y w i t h f r e s h coal and glanced s h a r p l y a t him. " I s t h e boy asleep, M a r i a ? " he asked, in a listless tone. " O h yes, sir, long ago, s i r , " and s h e p e r m i t t e d a t i n g e of r e p r o a c h t o creep into h e r voice. " I t does not m a t t e r , " h e s a i d ; a n d h e spoke a s one relieved from a d u t y . A f t e r a p a u s e h e added. "Call m e for e a r l y Mass, M a r i a . " " Y e s , sir," in a . glad, cheerful voice, " a n d y o u r supper is in t h e d i n n i n g room now." H e followed, still listlessly, to t h e d i n i n g room, a n d seated himself a t t h e well-supplied t a b l e . He felt dull, i n e r t , passively resentful a g a i n s t f a t e ; it w a s t h e mood in w h i c h h e h a d come back f r o m his wife's funeral t h r e e m o n t h s ago. B e wondered stupidly a s h e looked a t h e r e m p t y c h a i r h o w it w a s t h a t h e did not m i s s h e r more. To-night h e h a d gone t o Confession, p a r t l y because it w a s C h r i s t m a s E v e , and old h a b i t s a r e s t r o n g for good or evil; b u t t h e r e w a s no resignation i n h i s h e a r t . W h y could t h e y not b e left alone t o t h e i r h a p p i n e s s ? A y e a r a g o t o - n i g h t and s h e had s a t t h e r e w i t h t h e boy on h e r knee s i n g i n g from a h e a r t full of joy. A n d t h e n lulled b y t h e h e a t t h e boy h a d dropped asleep m u t t e r i n g drowsily h i s d e t e r m i n a t i o n t o wait u p f o r S a n t a Claus. H e r e m e m b e r e d h o w t o g e t h e r t h e y h a d placed t h e child in h i s c o t ; a n d h e h a d helped h e r t o fix t h e little Crib sc t h a t t h e sight* of t h e I n f a n t Saviour would be t h e first t h i n g to g r e e t t h e w a k i n g eyes of t h e i r son on C h r i s t m a s Morn. " W e m u s t t e a c h h i m t h e lesson of t h e C r i b , " s h e h a d said. " B u t h e will understand it better next year." S o ! t h i s w a s n e x t year, a n d God h a d t a k e n h e r a w a y from t h e two w h o w a n t e d her. T h e lesson of t h e C r i b ! h e did n o t know i t ; h e did n o t w a n t , a n y h o w , t o t e a c h it t o h i s son. H e would be kind to t h e child, b u t h e could not c a r e as h e h a d c a r e d ; h i s h e a r t w a s froz e n ; t h e r e w a s n o m e a n i n g in life since M a r y died. H e a t e a n d drank, b u t did n o t feel c o m f o r t e d ; t h e n w e n t u p s t a i r s . T h e boy l a y asleep w i t h one a r m r o u n d a little top r a b b i t ; it h a d been one of Santa Claus' g i f t s a y e a r a g o . " P e r h a p s , " his m o t h e r h a d said " S a n t a would b r i n g a rocking h o r s e next time." T h e rocking-horse was standing on t h e h e a r t h r u g now, w i t h many a n o t h e r t h i n g t o delight t h e h e a r t of a boy of s i x ; b u t t h e r e w a s m Crib. T h e little figures were packed in a bq£ in M a r y ' s ^trunk. J o h n hesit a t e d a moment* t h e n w e n t t o t h e c o r n e r w h e r e it stood and unlocked it. Dear, i n t i m a t e t h i n g s were h e r e t h a t h e could not give a w a y : b i t s of lace t h a t s h e had prized, a little work-box t h a t h e h a d given h e r long ago, some unfinished needlework, t h a t s e n t a dull pang t h r o u g h h i s h e a r t . Then a jewelbox w i t h a few t r i n k e t s , in it was t h e bracelet h e h a d given h e r on l a s t C h r i s t m a s n i g h t . He rememb e r e d how a l t e r n a t e l y s h e looked pleased a t h i s kindness a n d fretted at his extravagance.

H e lifted t h e lid of a b a t t e r e d money-box. How scarce, how pitifully few, h a d been t h e coins t h a t it h a d e v e r contained. To-night he could stuff it t o overflowing a n d not feel t h e cost. But w h a t use w a s a position t h a t b r o u g h t only w e a l t h ? B i t t e r sorr o w rose in his h e a r t a n d keep r e s e n t m e n t swept a w a y t h e dull a n g u i s h of t h e p a s t m o n t h s . W h y h a d God n o t t a k e n t h e boy a n d left M a r y ? H e could h a v e s p a r e d t h e child. H e lifted out a t l e n g t h t h e box in w h i c h s h e h a d placed carefully t h e little figures, a n d took t h e m o u t one b y one, h i s b i t t e r n e s s g r o w i n g a n d swelling t h e while. B u t h e w e n t on w i t h h i s work. Let t h e boy t a k e w h a t delight or comf o r t h e m i g h t in t h e Crib. He lifted t h e s t a t u e s f r o m t h e little a l t a r , c a s t i n g a reflecting glance as he did so a t t h e p i c t u r e of t h e M a d o n n a a n d Child t h a t h u n g above it. T h e n h e w e n t d o w n s t a i r s t o t h e k i t c h e n and surprised M a r i a in t e a r s . " S t r a w , is i t ? " she asked. " W h a t k i n d of s t r a w ? " h a s t i l y turnjrig a w a y a n d wiping h e r eyes. ' T o r t h e C r i b , " h e said. S h e g o t some in which t h e t o y s h a d been packed a n d g a v e it to him. " T h a n k God and H i s holy Mot h e r t h i s blessed n i g h t , " s h e said, " t h a t he's wakening up again. S u r e , I k n e w t h e m i s s u s would be p r a y i n ' f o r h i m , " a n d h e r t e a r s fell again. T h e Crib w a s a r r a n g e d w i t h t h e little l i g h t s glowing in f r o n t , a n d J o h n ' s lips w e r e set t i g h t . I n his h a n d h e held a folded slip of p a p e r y e t unopened. I t h a d fallen o u t of t h e b o x . W i t h a h a n d t h a t shook h e unfolded it. " S a y 'God's will b e done' t o n i g h t , J o h n , " it r a n , " H e k n o w s best always." T h a t w a s all. T h e w o r d s danced u p a n d down a s h e r e a d . H e looked a t t h e Crib, a n d t h e figures w e r e b l u r r e d ; h e glanced unseeingly a t t h e Madonna. T h e b a n d of b i t t e r n e s s t h a t h a d held h i s grief in check b u r s t . H e flung himself on h i s k n e e s beside h i s boy's cot. " G o d ' s will b e d o n e , " h e said, " n o w a n d for e v e r m o r e . B u t oh, Mary! Mary! Mary!" H e opened h i s eyes. T h e r e w a s a feeling of peace a t h i s h e a r t . M a r y h a d come t o h i m ; h e r sweet w o m a n l y p r e s e n c e h a d soothed and c h e e r e d h i m a s it h a d done m a n y a t i m e before. He f e a r e d almost to s t i r , f o r t h e touch of h e r hand w a s on h i s h a i r , still in l i g h t familiar c a r e s s . S u d d e n l y t h e boy s a t u p and dooked a r o u n d h i m piteously. The l a m p w a s still b u r n i n g b r i g h t l y , b u t t h e fire h a d died t o a s h e s . T h e childish eyes s o u g h t e v e r y cornef of t h e room. " M a m m y ! M a m m y ! " h e called, softly. J o h n s t a r t e d up, wide a w a k e now. "Hush, Dermot, hush," he said brokenly, clasping t h e little h a n d t h a t h e h a d held t h r o u g h t h e n i g h t . " M a m m y cannot come." " M a m m y c a n , " said t h e boy positively. " S a n t a Claus did b r i n g h e r 'cos I a s k e d h i m . " " S h e is u p in h e a v e n , " J o h n said. " S h e will come for D e r m o t and d a d d y some d a y . " " B u t I want her now—now," sobbed t h e child. " S h e w a s in h e r e w i t h you, s i t t i n ' t h e r e , " pointi n g t o t h e chair.

21st DECEMBER, 1935.

17

JOKES o —

FORGOTTEN. "I've forgotten what I came ior," said the little lad in the grocer's rhop. The grocer tried to help. "Was it chese, bacon, butter, margarine, lard, tea, coffee, cocoa, sugar, jam biscuits, fruit, baking powder, ,«oap, raisins, currants, semolina, spice, marmalade, tapioca, thyme?" "I remember now," interrupted the, little lad. "Mummie wants o kiit»w if you can tell her the right time?" COMPACT. Prospective Tenant—"But you advertised a bed-sitting room." Landlord—"Yes, that's right." Prospective Tenant-^"I see the bed, but where's the sitting-room?" Landlord—"On the bed." f

THE TROUBLE. Auntie pushed the cake towards her small nephew—"Won't you have another slice, dear?" she asked. "No, thank you very much/' said the boy slowly. "What is the matter, Tommy'" his sister inquired. "You seem to be suffering from loss of appetite." "It isn't l o s s of appetite," he replied. "What I'm suffering from is politeness." QUADRUPEDS. The class was all attention. "Npw, Johnny Smith, what is a quadruped?" asked the teacher. "A quadruped is anything with four legs," said Johnnie. "Yes," now give me an example?" "An elephant," said Johnnie. "Now can you give me another example?" said the teacher. "A feather bed, sir," said Johnnie.

So, t h e boy h a d dreamed, too. J o h n stroked the curls with a new t e n d e r n e s s and, w r a p p i n g u p t h e child, w a r m l y lifted h i m in h i s arms. H e showed t h e r o c k i n g h o r s e , a n d N o a h ' s a r k , a n d t h e woolly s h e e p , b u i f t h e child w a s comforted only for a m o m e n t . " W a n t t o show t h e m t o m a m m y , " h e said. " B r i n g m e t o m a m my." "Bring me to m a m m y . " John s a t down in his w i f e ' s chair, a n d held t h e boy close, close to h i m . B r i n g h i m t o m a m m y ! t h a t would b e h i s life's work, a n d h e p r a y e d God t o bless it. "I'll tell D e r m o t a s t o r y , " h e said, a n d h e t u r n e d t h e child a r o u n d so t h a t h e could see t h e C r i b . T h e n in low t o n e s h e told t h e s t o r y of t h e little Child, W h o w a s b o r n in p o v e r t y , a n d of t h e M o t h e r , w h o had n a u g h t of t h e world's w e a l t h t o give h i m . Dermot w a s naturally a generous child. ' T i l give Him m y c o a t , " he said, " a n d — a n d — t h i n g s t o play w i t h ] ; b u t h e ' s too small y e t . He's little — l i t t l e like t h e b a b y t h a t c a m e f r o m h e a v e n and b r o u g h t a w a y m y mammy." H o w t h e s h a r p g r i e f pierced a s if a k n i f e were t u r n i n g in h i s h e a r t ! B u t t h e boy m u s t be comforted. " S o n , " h e said, slowly, " H e h a s n o need of such g i f t s n o w ; b u t we'll find o u t t o g e t h e r poor children w h o w a n t food a n d clothes a n d t o y s , a n d we'll m a k e t h e m h a p p y . A n d t h e n H e will b e g l a d . "

"Every child needs milk every day."

MILKMAID MILK " B u t I w a n t — I w a n t , daddy, t o give H i m s o m e t h i n g for His o w n Self." J o h n p a u s e d w i t h a lump in h i s t h r o a t . How y o u n g a n d soft a n d frail t h e boy w a s t o l e a r n r e n u n ciation. T h e n h e said tensely. "Shall we g i v e H i m — m a m m y ? " T h e s t o r m of sobs broke o u t a f r e s h , and t h e little curly h e a d w a s t u r n e d a w a y from t h e C r i b a n d hidden o n h i s f a t h e r ' s shoulder. " O h — no — no — n o , " c a m e in broken gasps, "not my m a m m y — n o t mine. H e h a s His own Mammy." " B u t , He w a n t s n o t h i n g else— from us." J o h n w a i t e d f o r t h e s t o r m of sobs t o subside, p r a y i n g inwardly f o r t h e boy a s h e h a d n e v e r p r a y e d f o r himself. A t l a s t D e r m o t lifted a little swollen face a n d t u r n e d it t o t h e c r i b ; b u t h e clutched t i g h t l y still a t his f a t h e r ' s coat. " B a b y J e s u s , " said t h e childish voice, " 'Cos Y o u w a n t m y m a m m y — Y o u can h a v e h e r — f o r — f o r — " t h e r e w a s a sob b u t it w e n t b r a v e ly—"for a loan." F a t h e r a n d son s a t motionless. T h e boy fell asleep a t length, a n d p e r h a p s d r e a m t a g a i n of his m o ther. John stayed awake, ponderi n g . Life t o o k on n e w m e a n i n g for h i m in h i s silent vigil b e f o r e t h e Crib. J o y h a d come a n d g o n e , a n d sorrow h a d come a n d h e could not but think w h a t it m e a n t ; but h e accepted hia cross resignedly, even cheerfully. H e would m e e t M a r y some d a y — b u t h e did n o t w i s h it t o b e soon. H e w a n t e d t o do so much in t h i s world first. T h a n k God f o r t h e w e a l t h t h a t m e a n t power t o do good. Then there was t h e boy—above and beyond all t h e boy. T h e boy w i t h a m a n ' s life s t r e t c h i n g broad a n d long before t h e little feet. B u t h i s m o t h e r in heaven^would guide h i m , b e t t e r p e r h a p s t h a n s h e could on earth. God k n o w s b e s t a l w a y s . H e k n e l t before t h e crib and p r a y ed. " T h y will be done on e a r t h , a s it is in H e a v e n . " (The Tabernacle)

A box ot MARGO SOAP IS AN

IDEAL CHRISTMAS OBTAINABLE

GIFT IN THE EVERYWHERE

TROPICS.

Another inexpensive but attractive GIFT suggestion i s a

CALCHEMICO CASKET a dainty satin-lined casket containing one M A R G O SOAP, one NEEM Tooth Paste, one bottle SILTRES (Shampoo) and one phial Perfume at $1.00 only. (Postage extra). Limited numbers available—order now.

The Calcutta Chemical Co., Ltd., N o . 8, Raffles Chambers, S'pore.


18

MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

21st D E C E M R E R

1935.

Christmas Greetings to Our patrons. & CO.

BOOK SELLERS

ft

STORE

MENG CHIANG

UNDERTAKERS

258, 260

River Valley Road,

484,

North Bridge Road, SINGAPORE.

SINGAPORE. Telephone

6811.

Telephone:

UNITED PROVISIONS STORES

PROVISION STORE Orchard

Telephon:

STORE

4401.

COLD 245,

Music, Gramophone Record Stores

STORAGE

Orchard

Road,

SINGAPORE.

North Bridge Road, SINGAPORE. Telephone: 4348.

Telephone: 7003.

CAFE DE LUXE

ALL

Road,

High grade English Leather

First

Class

under

SINGAPORE.

KINDS

Restaurant

New Styles Perfect Fittings.

European

Moderate Prices.

Management in the heart of the

OF

94 & 98, Middle Road,

shopping district

PROVISIONS

SINGAPORE. 25,

P A U L & CO.,

High Street,

Telephone: 6011. 241,

Orchard

Road,

SINGAPORE.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

DO

NOT TO

Selegie

HENG

PROVISION

THE VIENNA MUSIC HOUSE 336,

KH00N

MODERN SHOES CO.

YONG HENG & CO.

241,

4680.

LIM

58, High Street, SINGAPORE.

PRINTERS.

SINGAPORE & BRANCHES.

PROVISION

254,

GULABRAFS SILK

PETER CHONG & CO.,

LEE KHENG HUAT

Telephone: 4594.

Road,

YOUR

FORGET

D. T. UM & CO., 353,

North Bridge Road,

'JAVA

TELL

PRODUCE'

FRIENDS. SINGAPORE.

SINGAPORE. Telephone: 4681. •

PARLI

QflN fflN CHAN KEE SHOEMAKERS

SWEETS

524,

North Bridge Road, SINGAPORE.

&

CANDIES River

Valley

Road,

51—53,

Victoria

CHOP

LEE KHENG HONG

Street,

PROVISION

SINGAPORE.

STORE

-

U N I O N SHOE STORE.

SINGAPORE.

Telephone: 6811.

HOCK MEIN & CO.

350—352, North Bridge Road, SINGAPORE.

VICTORIA CONFECTIONERY & STORE Victoria Street, SINGAPORE.

16,

South

Canal

Road,

SINGAPORE.

Telephone:

6665.


tfALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y ,

Xmas Short Story (Continued from page 8) Dr. Oldham—a hoary-headed experienced doctor c a m e o u t from t h e r o o m . " H o w ' s A d o n i s ? " asked F a t h e r McGregor. " I ' m afraid F a t h e r t h e poor fellow s t a n d s no chance a t all. T o o e x h a u s t e d t o pull t h r o u g h . A n d if h e d i d " " W h a t ! " i n t e r r u p t e d F a t h e r McGregor. "He'll b e m a d — s t a r k m a d . A s it is h i s m i n d is f a r gone." "You seem to think that t h e r e ' s no chance of r e c o v e r y ? " T h e d o c t o r shook his head sadly. " P o o r fellow", h e exclaimed. "Can I see h i m ? asked F a t h e r M c G r e g o r ; " P e r h a p s I m i g h t be able t o do something." T h e doctor s h r u g g e d h i s should e r s . "Well t h e r e ' s no h a r m b u t h e w o n ' t know you. His m i n d is a b l a n k . H e s p e a k s s t r a n g e l y too. " N o t h i n g like h a v i n g a t r y " smiled F a t h e r McGregor, a n d he entered t h e r o o m closing t h e door behind him. T h e n e i g h b o u r i n g clock s t r u c k t w o . T h e cloak of n i g h t h a d n o t been lifted y e t . " H u l l o A d o n i s " a n d F a t h e r Mc G r e g o r smiled. T h e d w a r f s t a r e d a t h i m , a n idiotic leer s p r e a d i n g his whole countenance. "Know Mr. D i c k ? " T h e d w a r f s t a r t e d " F ve killed h i m . Killed l y m . " h e m o a n e d in a weak e n e r v a t e d voice. F a t h e r McGregor a p p r o a c h e d forw a r d a n d whispered i n t o his ear. "You h a v e n ' t . You h a v e n ' t . " For t h e fraction of a second t h e e y e s of t h e d w a r f lighted u p only t o sink a g a i n i n t o a dull despair. B u t F a t h e r McGregor seized his opport u n i t y . "You h a v e n ' t killed him, A d o n i s . I t w a s a n accident. Mr. Dick told it t o m e himself. Axx a c c i d e n t — a n accident." The d w a r f gazed a t F a t h e r McGregor. H i s senses seemed t o h a v e come back, a n d t h e good p r i e s t heaved a sigh of relief a s t h e d w a r f pointed t o himself a n d weakly exclaimed " I ' m innocent ?" "Yes! You a r e . " A n d F a t h e r M c G r e g o r smiled, " a n d God is m e r ciful too, ever merciful." " B u t not to m e , f a t h e r , not t o me. I'm damned." "Hush! H u s h ! soothed F a t h e r McGregor. " L i s t e n ! " continued t h e dwarf. " H u s h ! " said F a t h e r McG r e g o r you m u s t n o t speak. I t will m a k e you worse. " I will tell all everything" s c r e a m e d t h e dwarf, his m o u t h foaming with rage. Wait a minute then. F a t h e r McGregor left a n d consulted Dr. Oldham.. "You'll h a v e t o h u m o u r h i m " w a s all h e said, " b u t do yotfr b e s t t o c h a n g e t h e subject." B u t do w h a t h e did F a t h e r McG r e g o r found t h a t t h e d w a r f w a s a d a m a n t on his telling his s t o r y . A n d so F a t h e r M c G r e g o r listened t o t h e s t o r y as told b y t h e dwarf. — a s t o r y i n t e r v e n e d b y sobs a n d m o a n s , and cries of despair. " I w a s y o u n g ' and g o o d — O h ! so good — b u t I h a t e d t h i s . H e indicated his deformed and misshapen body. A n d m a m a told m e t h a t God w a s good a n d s e n t no evil t o H i s children. A n d H e s e n t m e t h i s . Once m o r e he indicated h i s h u n c h - b a c k e d f o r m . " God k n o w s w h a t is good for y o u " broke in t h e p r i e s t gently. T h e dwarf contin u e d , " I w a s seized w i t h envy. A n d I longed f o r s t r e n g t h a n d beauty. And one n i g h t a b o u t t h r e e I got out of bed cold a n d trembling. T h e devil whispered s o m e t h i n g . It m u s t h a v e been t h e devil. A n d I a g r e e d . I a g r e e d . " A convulsion siezed t h e dwarf and h e v o m i t e d blood. H e waved t h e p r i e s t ' s helpful h a n d s and continued, " I took a small w a t c h clambered down t h e ivy, w e n t t o

t h e church, scaled t h e rain-pipes w i t h m y h a n d s , a n d approched t h e altar. I a mere creature—a mere w o r m — d a r e d defy t h e A l m i g h t y . | T h e dwarf smiled bitterly, coughed o u t blood once a g a i n a n d contin u e d : — I laid myself—prostrate before t h e A l t a r — a n d I p r a y e d — thus—defiantly. Cure m e in half a n h o u r — o r — ( a sob b r o k e from t h e d w a r f ) — I go to t h e devil. I knew H e w a s t h e r e — t h e devils were there—and I waited—hopefully defiantly. " H e r e d r i n k some w a t e r " said F a t h e r McGregor, proffering a glass to t h e d w a r f who gluped t h e contents eagerly a n d continued. " F i v e m i n u t e s p a s s e d — n o cure I was restless. Ten—Twenty— Twenty-five minutes passed—I felt m y body t r e m b l e — m y brow broke into b e a d s of p e r s p i r a t i o n — a n d I w a s still t h e s a m e — a h u n c h back—but I did not give u p . — I still waited hopefully—the c h u r c h clock struck the half-hour H a ! H a ! t h e d w a r f a l m o s t leaped t o his feet.—I cursed G o d — F a t h e r , I cursed H i m — a n d I h e a r d t h e devils l a u g h — t h e v e r y devils— and I knew I w a s a r e p r o b a t e — damned a l r e a d y upon e a r t h — t o be damned e t e r n a l l y in Hell. T h e dwarf e x h a u s t e d l a y back, his m o u t h f o a m i n g w h i t e while F a t h e r McGregor did h i s b e s t t o sooth him. " Child! God i s m e r c i ful. T h e good God is merciful. Magdalene yfas possessed b y seven devils and s h e r e t u r n e d t o H i m . " " W h a t did you s a y ? " a s k e d t h e dwarf in a w e a k voice. "Tell m e " h e spfebed a n d F a t h e r M c G r e g o r told h i m of M a r y M a g d a l e n e of how h e r sins h a d been f o r g i v e n h e r because s h e h a d loved m u c h . T h e d w a r f lay back p o n d e r i n g on t h e s e w o r d s , and F a t h e r McGregor too w a i t e d , his h a n d s fingering his b e a d s . And t h e n t h e dwarf sobbed like a child. It b r o u g h t D r . Oldham into t h e room w i t h a smile on h i s face. " T h o s e t e a r s will d o h i m a lot of good, k e e p it u p . " A n d h e went out a g a i n hopefully. "Child," said F a t h e r M c G r e g o r soothingly, " m a k e y o u r peace w i t h God. I'll listen to your confession. One sin you've confessed a l r e a d y . T h a t you've c u r s e d God. B u t y o u ' ve repented a n d God is merciful. Now t h e o t h e r s . " T h e d w a r f w e p t tearfully. " O h ! F a t h e r , " said t h e dwarf after h e h a d m a d e h i s peace w i t h his Saviour, " t h a t first sin w a s t h e one t h a t m a d e m e keep a w a y from Confession for m a n y a year." "All's well t h a t ends w e l l " said F a t h e r McGregor with a smile. H e called in Doctor Oldham. The l a t t e r proposed t h a t t h e v i a t i c u m should be given t h e d w a r f and t h e n took t h e priest a p a r t a n d whispered t o h i m . " F a t h e r h e m a y look well b u t h e is not. H e is sick — e x h a u s t e d — d r a i n e d of all s t r e n g t h . H e will die—I k n o w it— notice his b r e a t h i n g — i r r e g u l a r and heavy. T h i s half-hour will perh a p s be t h e m o s t critical." " And a f t e r t h a t ? " asked F a t h e r McGregor. " W e m i g h t hope—He'll pull t h r o u g h if h e survives,—but I still feel t h e r e is v e r y little chance unless a miracle h a p p e n s . " "I'll p r a y " said F a t h e r McGregor. "I'll p r a y for h i m t o live. " A n d if h e l i v e s ? " a s k e d t h e doctor. " H e will be m y s a c r i s t a n ! Poor b o y ! " said F a t h e r McGregor " a n d I'll cherish all t h e devotion possible to m a k e his last y e a r s a h a p p y one," Dr. Oldham nodded. "Leave m e alone t h e n . I'll do all I can." F a t h e r McGregor nodded, a n d going o u t of t h e room s a t a t

21st D E C E M R E R 1935.

19

Christmas Greetings Our Patrons DO

YOUR XMAS SHOPPING at

LIM WAH SOON

To

Our Household and Kitchen 'Requisites will bring delight t o every Home. HOON

SECK

TRADING

CO.

('Phone 3858)

1, Raffles Place, Singapore.

General Provision Merchants 74 & 75, Rochore Road, SINGAPORE.

THE CITY PRESS

Ship-Chandlers, Estate and Mine Suppliers, Sail-Makers, Manufacturers' Agents and General Merchants.

BRANCH OFFICE:—

64, Jalan Ibrahim, JohoreBahru.

Pay us a visit—No obligation. GENERAL PRINTERS, STATIONERS, BOOK-BINDERS, ACCOUNT BOOK AND RUBBER STAMP MAKERS.

116,

Bencoolen Street, SINGAPORE.

M MOHAMED IBRAHIM. EXPORTER, IMPORTER, GENERAL MERCHANT AND COMMISSION AGENT. WHOLESALE A N D RETAIL.

SUN

AH

PHOTOGRAPHERS Developing and Printing Photos Enlargement, No. 225, Selegie Road, SINGAPORE.

CHOP LENG

SENG

General Provision Merchants Nos. 85 & 86, Rochore Road, SINGAPORE. Telephone: 6351.

94,

NOOR

Xmas Parties are cordially invited to call on us. An excellent photo is assured.

No.

130, Selegie Road, SINGAPORE.

his desk,—praying. T h e clock struck t h e q u a r t e r h o u r — a n d t h e needle shifted swiftly to t h e halfpast. A d i s t a n t clock s t r u c k halfp a s t - t h r e e . F a t h e r McGregor p r a y ed t h e m o r e fervently. His t i m e piece too soon struck t h e half-hour, and F a t h e r McGregor p r a y e d a s he never h a d p r a y e d before. The door opened and Dr. Oldham poked out his hoary-head. " H o w ' s t h e b o y " a s k e d F a t h e r McGregor almost hoarsely. " H e ' s beyond all h u m a n a i d . " said t h e doctor sadly. "Passed away j u s t a little while a g o — a t half-past-three—his last words were " J e s u s — I love You." F a t h e r McGregor swallowed a l u m p in his t h r o a t . "God's will be done, Blessed be t h e N a m e of the L o r d . " " A m e n " said t h e doctor fervently. T h e End.

CO.

Christmas gifts on lowest prices, Watch Dealers, Jewellers, Diamond, Gold & Silver Smiths, Clock and Watch Repairers, Electric Plates and Engravers.

Works Guaranteed Stockists of all kinds of Watches, Etc. 102, North Bridge Road, SINGAPORE.

T H Y E C H I A N G & CO., LTD. 100,

H. SUDA PHOTO STUDIO

North Bridge Road, SINGAPORE.

North Bridge Road, Telephone: 3043.

Ladies and Gent's Outfitting. W e wish all o a r Customers.

MERRY

CHRISTMAS.

TOKYODO TAKE I

TAILOR.

DRESS MAKER Up-To-Date Style for LADIES, GENTLEMEN A N D CHILDREN.

No. 70, Bras Basah Road, SINGAPORE.

P H I L P & CO. MERCHANT

TAILOR.

Telephone: 4581. No. 53, Selegie Road, SINGAPORE, S.S.


20

^

L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y / 2 f s t DECEMBER, 1$35.

Woman's Page CHRISTMAS I N THE H O M E IS YOUR HOME READY FOR THfi INFANT KING?

C

HRISTMAS time in every Christian family is a time of every real happiness, a great deal of which i s due t o the drawing together of t h e various scattered members of t h e family, somewhat a s t h e y drew together the first Christmas night following t h e edict of Caesar. But, now it is t h e law of love, whereas then it w a s the iron law o f Rome's policy. It was God's love for man that drew H i m t o earth, t o t h e cold stalls. There w e find our God— our Saviour, a Babe shivering in t h e night, surrounded by Virgin Motherhood and t h e chaste Joseph, t h e humble shepherds and t h e 'wise kings. N o n e s o poor as t h e shepherds whom H e enriches with H i s smiling blessing, none greater of earth t h a n t h e kings w h o delight t o offer H i m their gifts. Between t h e s e e x t r e m e s of lowliness and grandeur w e find our place and visit t h e Babe of Bethlehem t o watch Him, study Him, know H i m — t h e n t o love H i m a s H e longs t o b e l o v e d . Each Christmastide t h e Babe of Bethlehem seems new, different from what H e w a s to us t h e year before. D o e s H e change, or do w e change? W e , creatures of a day change w i t h t h e fleeting hours. H o w will t h e Babe in the Crib seem t o us this y e a r — h o w will H e appear t o us as w e finger and ponder at the stable? Centuries a g o St. Bernard g a v e u s t h e a n s w e r t o t h i s question:— " The Infancy of Christ affords no consolation t o t h e talkative; t h e tears of Christ are no comfort to g i p g l e r s ; t h e swaddling clothes are no solace t o t h e g a u d y ; t h e stable and manger are no comfort t o those w h o love t h e first seats in t h e Synagogue," St. Bernard's words still ring true. W e cannot appreciate Christmas and the unchanging Babe of Bethlehem in our hearts are full of trifles, great or small. Insincerity, disloyalty, dishonesty, unkindness, impurity, self-seeking, worldlihess, injustice, despair, all these obscure the vision, clog t h e heart and shut out t h e Babe of Bethlehem from our homes. If t h e heart is emptied of those and other vices, t h e pure serene atmosphere of t h e Crib will enter it and t h e n truly will there be " P e a c e on earth." Peace is only for m e n of goodwill. And men who refuse t o harbour Christ cannot in a n y sense be called men of goodwill. It would be interesting to speculate where Christ, if H e could be born to-day, would receive an enthusiastic welcome. Surely in m y home, you will answer. Wait a while, you do not persecute Christ, it is true, but t h e n neither did t h e J e w s of Bethlehem. Simply " t h e r e w a s no room for Him." A combination of social, economic and political conditions brought it about t h a t there was no room for Christ, and Mary and Joseph were j turned a w a y from every door. If Mary and Joseph came seeking for a place t o lay t h e Christ-Child today, would you receive t h e m ? Is

your Home ready for t h e Infant King? King not merely of our hearts and homes and private life, but of every aspect of our human activity. He has an indisputable right t o t h e first fruits of all our energy, both public and private. Let us make room for Christ in our hearts this Christmas; let us not yield to that inferiority complex from which so m a n y weekkneed Catholics suffer. When w e gather around t h e Crib with our little ones, let us assure its tiny Occupant that we want Him—that we have room for Him in our hearts

HO!

HOLY

Every child needs milk every day"

"MILKMAID" MILK

BABE

(A.Christmas Song) Specially written for the Malaya Catholic Leader BY D . E. T. J A Y A K O D D Y When angel throngs, with rapture sang, In Bethlehem, glad news of love. Thro* Syrian hills, when echoes rang, And tidings bright came from above. They sang of Thee Oh! Holy Babe! They sang of Thee When shepherds heard, with trembling awe, A Child was in a manger born. And wond'rous signs above they saw, One cold and gloomy winter s morn. 9

They heard of Thee Oh! Holy Babe! They sang of Thee When sages came, from climes afar, With gifts of gold, for Thee to seek. Led by a bright and shining star. Unto Thy stable bed so meek. They sought for Thee Oh! Holy Babe! They sought for Thee

HI

When kings in adoration knelt, Beside Thy manger bare and cold. And radiance from Thy face they felt, So richer far than wealth untold. They knelt to Thee Oh! Holy Babe! They knelt to Thee When mankind prays on bended knee, This festive day, in church or home, When children sing in happy glee, With love for Thee and Thee alone. They pray to Thee Oh! Holy Babe! ^ They pray to Thee When to Thy home in heav n above, 'Midst angel choirs and saints we send. Our hearts this day on wings of love, For Thee to keep—with Thine to blend. y

We send to Thee Oh! Holy Babe! We send to Thee

and h o m e s , t h a t we accept H i s Code a n d will do o u r b e s t t o vindic a t e H i s claims and s t a n d by H i s cause. T h e more widespread t h a t goodwill, t h e more peace t h e r e will be on e a r t h , and t h e a n g e l s ' m e s sage will not be t h e ironic mockery t h a t m e n make of it. T h e C h r i s t m a s bells will soon

FRASER _ NEAVE'S GRAPE FRUIT SODA r i n g out once more t h e i r " g o o d tidings of g r e a t j o y , " b r i n g i n g t h e sweet old m e s s a g e of love a n d h o p e a n d peace to t h e faithful of M a l a y a . May i t s influence abide in all h o m e s and families, n o t only d u r i n g t h e jChristmastide itself, b u t t h r o u g h lout all t h e y e a r .

WHAT IT SHOULD BE. "I am sorry, madam," said the cher, firmly, "but I can't give you ther credit. Your bill is bigger than it should be." "Yes, I know that," said the coldly; if yV>u will make it out for it should be I'll pay it."

butfurnow lady what


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC LEADER, SATURDAY,

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SPORTS

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SELANGOR A N D MALACCA GIRLS DRAW. Selangor a n d Malacca g i r l s m e t a t Hockey a t K u a l a L u m p u r last week-end a n d s h a r e d t h e goals. P l a y w a s g e n e r a l l y in f a v o u r of Selangor b u t t h e y missed m a n y scoring c h a n c e s . Miss V. Mowe in t h e v i s i t o r s ' goal w a s v e r y safe. Miss A . R o d r i g u e s and M i s s 0 . Rodrigues w e r e p r o m i n e n t for Malacca. M r s . Dorall scored for t h e h o m e s t e r s a n d Miss O. Rodrig u e s for t h e v i s i t o r s .

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C A T H O L I C S I N T H E SINGAPORE TEAM. Singapore's Hockey side t h i s week t o m e e t Selangor a n d P e r a k respectively includes 0 . A e r i a in goal, N. Sullivan and A . M. Valberg as forwards. Selangor b e a t s N e g r i . M a r t i n of t h e Selangor Hockey Side scored all 3 goals for h i s S t a t e a g a i n s t N e g r i Sembilan last S a t u r day. He played v e r y well and s n a p p e d u p h i s chances splendidly.

PORT

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(By O u r C o r r e s p o n d e n t ) .

HOCKEY.

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NOTES

CATHOLICS IN THE LIMELIGHT

Jg

21st DECEMBER, 1935.

T u c k e y in t h e Doubles when t h e Davis Cup came t o E n g l a n d this year.

CRICKET.

C A T H O L I C C R I C K E T E R S FOR SOUTH AFRICAN TEST. T h r e e Catholic cricketers, J. Foley a n d Heaney of t h e T r a n s vaal, a n d J . McNally of Griqualand W e s t h a v e been i n s t r u c t e d t o hold t h e m s e l v e s in readiness for possible inclusion in t h e S o u t h African t e s t t e a m t o meet t h e A u s t r a l i a n s . McNally h a s already played in T e s t Cricket. T h e following old boys of Catholic schools in South Africa h a v e played for South Africa in t h e p a s t few y e a r s : M. J . Susskind, R. H . Catterall, G. B i s s e t t , N . Quinn, J . A. Christy, and McNally. A U S T R A L I A N S I N SOUTH AFRICA. McCabe's Brilliant C e n t u r y . I n t h e F i r s t Test M a t c h between S o u t h Africa and A u s t r a l i a a t D u r b a n , S.A., Stanley McCabe, t h e Catholic Vice Captain of t h e visiting t e a m , scored a brilliant 149 r u n s . T h e South Africans were all out for 248 while t h e A u s t r a lians m a d e 280 for 4.

S t . J o s e p h ' s Ground B e i n g Re-turfed. T h e football ground of St. J o s e p h ' s I n s t i t u t i o n , Singapore, is b e i n g t h o r o u g h l y re-turfed. I t is hoped t h a t n e x t season t h e field will b e quite r e a d y for use. In t h e p a s t S t . J o s e p h ' s h a s been a splendid football n u r s e r y and countless p a s t pupils h a v e played for Sing a p o r e , Selangor, Malacca, N e g r i Sembilan, P e n a n g , Hongkong, Batavia, Semarang, and Sourabaya.

SOUTH AFRICAN TEST STARS. B a l a s k a s , who had a b i g h a n d in S. A f r i c a ' s Test win over E n g land t h i s year, is a n old pupil of t h e C h r i s t i a n B r o t h e r s ' College, Kimberley. Viljoen is also a S p r i n g b o k t e s t player a n d a Christ i a n B r o t h e r s ' old boy. Balaskas is carefully w a t c h i n g two spin bowlers in his Alma M a t e r .

E n g l i s h D a v i s Cup T e a m . G. P . H u g h e s , t h e only Catholic m e m b e r of t h e successful E n g l i s h Davis Cup T e a m is r a n k e d a s t h i r d b e s t singles p l a y e r in G r e a t Brit a i n after P e r r y and Austin. Hughes successfully partnered

McAvoy outpoints McCoy. J a c k McAvoy, B r i t i s h Middlew e i g h t Champion, outpointed t h e F r e n c h Canadian Al McCoy in a 10 r o u n d fight at Madison Square G a r d e n a n d is now headed for a World Championship m a t c h .

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BOXING.

J O E E A G L E TO M E E T MARQUEZ. J o e E a g l e one of t h e leading f e a t h e r w e i g h t s in t h e Orient is in Singapore h a v i n g arrived from Manila on Monday. He is scheduled to meet V e n t u r a Marquez t h e popular Mexican. E a g l e a p p e a r s to have g o t t h e b e t t e r of V e n t u r a in two of t h e i r several e n c o u n t e r s in t h e p a s t . T h e l a t t e r h a s no opponent in Malaya w h o can s t r e t c h h i m a n d so E a g l e h a s been brought.

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B R A D D O C K TO M E E T J O E LOUIS. J a m e s J . Braddock, World's Champion Boxer, who is a C a t h o -

lic, is q u i t e prepared t o defend his title, a g a i n s t J o e Louis, t h e challenger. Braddock's m a n a g e r denies t h a t Braddock h a s been S h a r k e y ' s s p a r r i n g p a r t n e r or t h a t S h a r k e y knocked h i m down w i t h padded gloves. *

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JACK P E T E R S E N IN FOR HEAVYWEIGHT TITLE. J a c k P e t e r s e n , B r i t i s h heavyw e i g h t b o x i n g champion, will m e e t Len H a r v e y t h i s m o n t h for t h e title. T h i s will be t h e i r t h i r d contest. H a r v e y won t h e first t i m e on p o i n t s a b o u t 2 y e a r s a g o . In t h e following J u n e H a r v e y r e t i r e d in t h e 2nd round following a c u t eye. I

GIAN SINGH'S. . for your X'mas Gifts. Loads Silks, mery, Dolls,

of X'mas gifts for all including Necklaces, Handkerchiefs, PerfuCameras, Tennis Rackets, Watches, Tops, Crackers, X'mas Trees, etc.

All at reduced prices.

GIAN SINGH & CO., SHOE CO., LTD.

SINGAPORE

4, Battery Road, Singapore.


M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

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A R O U N D T H E PARISHES SINGAPORE,

PENANG

SINGAPORE

o SINGAPORE CATHOLIC CLUB. Christmas Entertainment for Children on Monday, 30th December, 1935. The Annual Christmas Entertainment for Children will take place on Monday, 30th December, 1935. The Entertainment will consist of a Talkie Show arranged by Messrs. Boon Seng & Co., Ltd. The Entertainment will be held at the Victoria Theatre, followed by the usual distribution of toys (for children up to 10 years of age) and by games at the Victoria Memorial Hall. The Entertainment will commence at 6.30 p.m., doors open at 6 for admission to the Theatre. The seats in the Theatre are reserved for the children, whose tickets will bear the Theatre seat-numbers. Members are therefore advised to s e n d their application as early as possible, as non-members also make application for tickets for children. Dancing at the Victoria Memorial Hall at about 9.30 p.m., doors open for admission at 9. Admission of children to the Theatre and of adults to the Victoria Memorial Hall will be by ticket only. Members' children will be given free tickets on the application of their parents or guardians, who, however, must be subscribers. Other children may obtain tickets at a dollar each. Tickets will be issued from Tuesday, 10th December to Sunday, 29th December inclusive. As part of the proceeds will be donated to the Fund for the children supported by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, (Cathedral of the "Good Shepherd"), members are kindly asked to subscribe with their usual generosity. A s the Entertainment is intended strictly for children, adults are asked to overlook shortcomings with regard to accommodation, etc. Non-members may obtain tickets from the President, (the Reverend Father Maury), at the Parochial House or from the Honorary Secretary, Singapore Catholic Club. Price of tickets for a Gentleman is $2 and $1 for a Lady. No tickets will be sold a t the door. Only subscribers will be entitled to tickets for the Entertainment. W. MOSBERGEN,, Honorary Secretary, Singapore Catholic Club. * * » * t

REV. FR. LEE. Rev. F a t h e r Lee, V i c a r of t h e C h u r c h of St. T h e r e s a , K a m p o n g B a h r u , S i n g a p o r e , who w a s r e c e n t l y t a k e n ill a n d a d m i t t e d t o h o s p i t a l while on a visit t o Malacca, h a s r e t u r n e d t o h i s p a r i s h . H i s condition, t h o u g h improved, does n o t permit him to resume his duties actively. W e hope, however, t h a t h e will b e sufficiently r e s t o r e d in h e a l t h in t h e n e a r f u t u r e .

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PENANG, KUALA LUMPUR, KLANG, TAIPING.

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C H U R C H O F OUR L A D Y LOURDES.

OF

Baptisms. N o v e m b e r 24th—Lily, b o r n on 14th N o v e m b e r 1935, d a u g h t e r of Simon F e r n a n d e z and P a u l v F e r nandez. God-parents: J. A. Gomez a n d Veronica Gomez. December 10th—Vincent, born on 2 9 t h N o v e m b e r , son of A. A n t h o n y a n d M a r y Rose. Godp a r e n t s : Mr. a n d M r s . A. L. S. Nathan.

o CONVENT PRIZE DISTRIBUTION. Delightful Concert B y Pupils. T h e P e n a n g Convent held its a n n u a l Prize d i s t r i b u t i o n and concert on W e d n e s d a y evening December 4, before a l a r g e g a t h e r ing. T h e concert proved a s usual a g r e a t success w i t h a p r o g r a m m e of t h i r t e e n i t e m s , chief a m o n g which w a s a play " T h e M a k i n g of C h r i s t m a s " s t a g e d by t h e pupils of S t a n d a r d I I I a n d t h e singing of t h e C h r i s t m a s h y m n s 'Silent N i g h t , Holy N i g h t ' , a n d the -'Adeste Fideles', b r o u g h t t h e comi n g feast before t h e m i n d s of t h e , audience. T h e r e w e r e good disp l a y s of physical drill and some fine recitations. T h e domestic Science class s t a g e d a short sketch "Consultation B u r e a u for Babies". The teachers gave a fine exhibition of polka a n d folk dances a n d t h e finale w a s a song " L e P a r d o n B r e t o n " by girls of t h e h i g h e r classes. T h e n followed t h e distribution of certificates following which Rev. F r . Souhait t h a n k e d t h o s e present for t h e i r k i n d a t t e n d a n c e . Miss L i m P h a i k Gan a n expupil of t h e convent, it w a s announced, obtained honours in Mediaeval a n d A n c i e n t H i s t o r y in which subject s h e is specialising a s a n u n d e r - g r a d u a t e in the faculty of law a t Girton College, Cambridge. * * * * * ST. X A V I E R ' S INSTITUTION SUCCESSFUL VARIETY DISPLAY. Rev. B r o . J a m e s O.B.E. opened t h e v a r i e t y display held, in t h e School hall, on t h e 5 t h a n d 6 t h inst., organized b y t h e p a s t pupils of S t . X a v i e r ' s I n s t i t u t i o n . Rev. B r o . P a u l in h i s opening speech said t h a t t h e exhibition w a s t h e first of i t s k i n d in Malaya a n d suggested t h e slogan "Buy f r o m t h e Old B o y s " which would help t o m a i n t a i n t h e Xavierian " E s p r i t de C o r p s " . Rev. Bro. J a m e s in h i s r e p l y endorsed Rev. Bro. Paul's encouragement to p a t r o n i s e Old B o y ' s S h o p s . Rev. B r o . Paul specially called t h e a t t e n t i o n of t h e visitors t o t h e stall w h e r e t w o cycles were offered f o r a guessing competition a t t h e e x t r a o r d i n a r i l y low price of five c e n t s a- t r y , a price with which not even t h e J a p a n e s e could hope t o compete. Besides t h i s t h e r e w a s a 'Lucky Dip' stall. On T h u r s d a y e v e n i n g t h e boys of t h e School gave a drill display while t h e School o r c h e s t r a rendered choice selections.

KUALA LUMPUR BAPTISM. December 4 t h . — A g n e s M a r g a r e t M a r y Luis, born on T h u r s d a v , 28th November, 1935, d a u g h t e r of Mr. and M r s . S. P . Luis. Godp a r e n t s : A. Victor Mariadoss and Regina Mariadoss. lency Bishop Devals a m o n g t h e m . Much credit m u s t be given to t h e t e i c h e r s w h o h a d spared no pains t o m a k e t h e e v e n t a success.

KEDAH,

KEDAH.

o CHRISTMAS MASS. T h e r e will be Midnight Mass a t Alor S t a r and Sungei P a t a n i on C h r i s t m a s E v e . T h e Rev. F a t h e r Lobez of t h e College General, P e n a n g , will say Mass at Alor S t a r , and the Rev. F a t h e r Bonamy will say Mass a t Sungei P a t a n i . F a t h e r Bonamy will also say Mass a t Kulim on C h r i s t m a s morning. * * * « EXHIBITION AND CONCERT AT FATHER BARRE'S C O N V E N T SCHOOL, SUNGEI PATANI. H i s Excellency Bishop Devals Present. F a t h e r B a r r e ' s Convent School a t Sungei P a t a n i provided an E x h i bition and Concert t o t h e p a r e n t s of t h e pupils, w h i c h a s expected p r o v e d - a g r e a t success. Though t h e clouds h u n g low, it was not u n t i l t h e show w a s over t h a t t h e r a i n started i t s shower. P a r e n t s of t h e pupils and wellw i s h e r s of t h e I n s t i t u t i o n poured i n t o t h e premises in numbers p r e cisely after 4 P.M. and were conveyed to t h e Hall w h e r e a good a m o u n t of a r t a n d hand-work were displayed to prove t h e efficiency of t h e pupils in t h a t sphere. A t 5 P.M. Rev. Mother St. Tarcisfus accompanied by Madam St. Cesaire and Madam St. J e r o m e arrived a n d were i n t r o duced t o all t h e p a r e n t s of t h e pupils by Mrs. H e n d r i c k s t h e Chief of t h e Staff of t h e Convent. A t 5-15 P.M. His Excellency Bishop Devals arrived accompanied by Rev. F a t h e r M. B o n a m y who along w i t h all those w h o h a d responded t o t h e call of t h e d a y were conveyed t o t h e Main Hall where t h e pupils and t e a c h e r s h a d prepared a p r o g r a m m e consisting of 15 i t e m s of songs, recitations and d r a m a in w h i c h t h e pupils revealed as much of t a l e n t s as t h e t e a c h e r s , t h o u g h t h e t w o i t e m s consisting of t h e d r a m a and a s o n g acted and s u n g by t h e t e a c h e r s revealed h i g h e r efficiency. A t t h e conclusion His Excellency Bishop Devals a d d r e s s e d the pupils appreciating t h e i r t a l e n t s a n d in giving credit t o t h e i r performance which was t h e m a i n feature of t h e evening told t h e pupils t h a t t h e real credit is n o t in w h a t they h a v e done b u t in w h a t t h e y are about t o do in t h e f u t u r e and advised t h e m t h a t if t h e y maintain t h e s t a n d a r d of efficiency t h a t t h e y h a d already shown, t h e y will not only be the p r i d e of t h e i r I n s t i t u tion b u t also t h e pride of t h e i r p a r e n t s who h a d helped t h e i r career, and be a credit t o t h e country. Then turning to the p a r e n t s , well-wishers and the musicians of t h e Sun Min Su Union who h a d contributed for t h e success of t h e evening His Lordship thanked t h e m for t h e i r presence and a s s u r e d t h e m of a good f u t u r e of t h e I n s t i t u t i o n if t h e y would maintain t h e i r i n t e r e s t s unceasingly a s t h e y had done in t h e past. I t will be i n t e r e s t i n g to know t h a t it is t h r e e y e a r s since t h e Conv e n t was established and t h i s w a s t h e first occasion when the pupils, t h e i r p a r e n t s a n d well-wishers h a d t h e honour of h a v i n g His Excel(Continued

at foot of Col. 2)

KLANG

o XMAS TREE. A n X m a s T r e e will be held a t t h e Parochial H o u s e of t h e Church of Our L a d y of L o u r d e s , Klang, on Sunday, 22nd December, 1935. a t 4.30 p.m. w h e n it is expected to e n t e r t a i n a b o u t 150 children of the Congregation. *

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TRANSFERS. Messrs. A . S e q u e r a h and P . M. Naden w h o w e r e a t t a c h e d to the District Hospital, K l a n g , left the District for t h e S t a t e s of P a h a n g and Negri Sembilan respectively on t h e 15th D e c e m b e r on transfer. Mr. N . F r a n c i s , t h e Hon. Secret a r y of t h e Catholic Action Society, Klang. h a s left for Ceylon on a Holiday.

TAlPtNG.

o C O N V E N T E X H I B I T I O N OF HANDWORK. A n exhibition of t h e needlework, d r a w i n g , a n d handwork as well as a C h a r i t y Sale w a s held in the T a i p i n g Convent on 6th and 7th December. A m o n g t h e i n n u m e r a b l e exhibits were several skilfully executed d r a w i n g s , — f r e e h a n d , model, design, not e x c l u d i n g geographical anc^ a n a t o m i c a l s u b j e c t s . L a r g e c r o w d s of p a r e n t s , benefactors, a n d well-wishers of t h e school t u r n e d out t o inspect the various e x h i b i t s , a n d t h e y could not b u t be filled w i t h admiration for t h e good w o r k t h a t is being done by t h e good S i s t e r s and their assistant teachers. T h e e x a m i n e r of t h e needlework Section—the S u p e r i o r of t h e Prim a r y D e p a r t m e n t , K i n g Edward VII School, w a s pleased with t h e h a n d w o r k in t h e classes. Offered for sale to t h e public were c h i l d r e n ' s dresses and artificial flowers m a d e b y t h e orphans, and calendars made by the pupils. T h e s e a r t i c l e s found many ready p u r c h a s e r s .

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A CORRECTION. SYLVIA MAY (not MARY as was published in our issue of Nov. 30), daughter of Winifrid Terese AugustinRead (Nee ESTROP) and Emile JosephAugustin-Read, was born on 16th Nov. and baptised on 23rd Nov. 1935. TAIPING CONVENT Madam St. Gertrude Felix who went to the "Mother House" in Paris in the early part of 1934 to complete her training and to make her final profession, returned to the Taiping Convent on 25th November. 1935. She received a warm welcome from both staff and pupils. She looks well and quite fit and ready for tutorial work; ami will be attached to the School Staff again from 1st January, 1936.

RENE ULLMANN for JEWELLERY of every description and THE B E S T WATCHES RENE ULLMANN Raffles Place,—Singapore.


MALAYA CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y , 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

23

TRIFLES THAT DO GRAVE HARM C A R D I N A L By t h e Rev, Dr. Arendzen. W H A T a p i t y t h a t bad,people a r e often s u c h c h a r m i n g c h a r a c t e r s and good people such c u r m u d g e o n s ! Everybody h a s h e a r d t h i s complaint and m u s t acknowledge t h a t t h a t t h e r e is some t r u t h in it. Bad people a r e often p l e a s a n t and jovial, good h u m o u r e d and considerate, courteous a n d u p t o a point even unselfish. I t is not difficult t o u n d e r s t a n d . I n t h i s life no one is absolutely bad, t h e r e a r e a l w a y s s o m e r e d e e m i n g points and m a n is a p t t o show his a t t r a c tive side to his neighbour a s long as t h i s does not i n t e r f e r e w i t h h i s main p u r s u i t s . A sinner, a s long as h e is n o t t h w a r t e d in h i s sin, can afford t o be amiable. T h i s need not be r a n k hypocrisy or a n a t t e m p t to hide his wickedn e s s ; it m a y be n a t u r a l k i n d n e s s , a wish t o avoid b o t h e r and it often is a conscious or half-conscious a t t e m p t of s o o t h i n g his conscience, or even a m u t e plea for p a r d o n , offering God a c t s of v i r t u e in one direction, while sinning a g a i n s t H i m in a n o t h e r . It seems a t first m o r e difficult t o u n d e r s t a n d w h y good people, t h o r o u g h l y good people, a r e so often lacking in those c h a r m i n g t r a i t s of c h a r a c t e r which e n d e a r a m a n t o t h e circle in which h e lives. H e r e is a good Catholic, faithful and r e g u l a r in all his religious duties, f r e q u e n t a t p r a y e r , M a s s and t h e Sacraments, chaste, and modest in w o r d and deed, absolutely h o n e s t a n d t r u s t w o r t h y , generous t o t h e poor a n d active in m a n y good w o r k s , b u t h e is gruff and h a r s h , m e a n and p e t t y in trifles, t o u c h y , spiteful and envious, a n d h e m a k e s h i s household unh a p p y b y h i s fits of t e m p e r , faultfinding a n d s a r c a s t i c r e m a r k s . , How is it t h a t so m u c h goodness can be p a i r e d w i t h so m u c h " n a s t i n e s s " ? H o w can a good m a n be t h e cause of so m u c h dissension, so m a n y q u a r r e l s a n d h e a r t b u r n ings, so m u c h h a t r e d a n d d e t e s t a t i o n ? F a m i l i e s e s t r a n g e d , homes broken up, g r e a t undertakings ruined, all because of t h e m a n ' s , or w o m a n ' s , impossible c h a r a c t e r ! T h e p e r s o n m a y be in o t h e r r e s pects t h o r o u g h l y virtuous, b u t t h e r e h a s been no heed t a k e n of S t . P a u l ' s a d m o n i t i o n : " w i t h all humility a n d mildness, w i t h p a t i ence s u p p o r t i n g one a n o t h e r in c h a r i t y , careful to keep t h e u n i t y

of t h e s p i r i t in t h e bond of peace." No heed h a s been paid t o C h r i s t ' s g r e a t injunction t h e evening before H e died: " A new c o m m a n d m e n t I give u n t o y o u : t h a t ye love one another." Such a person seems to r e g a r d t h i s c o m m a n d m e n t a s of m i n o r importance compared w i t h t h a t of justice, p i e t y o r purity, a s o r t of subsidiary refinement of holiness, no doubt, b u t not indispensable, t h e s u b s t a n c e of h u m a n goodness being a t t a i n a b l e by being j u s t , pious a n d c h a s t e . Or if s u c h a person would theoretically acknowledge t h a t c h a r i t y is essential and necessary, he would plead t h a t bad t e m p e r , h a r s h words, unsociability, envious r e m a r k s , pettiness, rudeness, a n d so on, a r e only small peccadilloes t h a t do not m a t t e r overmuch, t h a t his h e a r t is all r i g h t a n d t h a t he never would do anyone a serious h a r m . In t h i s h e is profoundly m i s t a k e n . T h e h a r m done by a n overbearing, a g g r e s s i v e or m e a n a n d envious c h a r a c t e r is incalculable. It b r e a k s t h e bond of peace. I t becomes t h e c u r s e of a home. Possibly each individual act of impatience, aggression or m e a n n e s s m a y be c o n s t r u e d into a venial sin only, b u t t h e cummulative effect on t h e life of our fellowmen is unbearable, a n d m a n m a y become gravely culpable if by incessant pinpricks h e drives his n e i g h b o u r t o revolt. T h e r e a r e m a n y w a y s of doing grievous h a r m t o a n o t h e r person besides bludgeoning h i m to d e a t h w i t h a club. A n a g g i n g , back-biting, jealous w o m a n m a y be a s a p e r s e c u t i n g demon t o t h e m e m b e r s of h e r family a n d yet t h i n k herself r i g h t e o u s . A bullying, b r a g g i n g , ill-temper- j ed, sarcastic m a n m a y , by his vicious t o n g u e , be t h e scourge of his neighbourhood and t h e t y r a n t of his household and y e t t h i n k himself m o s t u p r i g h t a n d religious. W h e t h e r we be men or women we a r e all t e m p t e d t o excuse ourselves b y s a y i n g t h a t each breach of c h a r i t y , considered by itself, is b u t a trifling m a t t e r , forg e t t i n g t h a t if we a r e unpleasant from M o n d a y t o Sunday our companions m a y be unable to face anot h e r week in our society. T h e bond of peace is m u c h m o r e frequently a n d more disastrously destroyed b y incessant so-called trifles t h a n b y conspicuous crimes, j A n a s t y c h a r a c t e r is now a n d t h e n

TO OUR C O R R E S P O N D E N T S .

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MANNING ON THE NEWSPAPER VOICE

Coleridge said that "a picture is something between a thought and a thing. It is not a thought, because it is visible to the eye. It is not a thing, because, beyond a combination of lines, lights and colours, it has no existence." So we may say that a newspaper is something between a voice and a book. It is not a voice, because it speaks inaudibly. tft is not a book, because it is a mere sheet or leaf, which is scattered broadcast every day, or once a week. He that writes a book studies long, and weighs, and writes and re-writes, and lays up his work till the whole is finished. He prints it, and is a successful author if he sells a thousand copies. Many buy and do not read; many read half and never finish; many read and do not understand. The sphere of a book is small; and its fate is the^helf, dust, and oblivion. But a newspaper is like a knock at the door morning by morning, or Saturday by Saturday. It is so short that even the idle will read it, and so plain that even the simple can understand. It speaks to thousands at once. Mere curiosity will make men read, and mere dullness will make them talk of what they have read in their newspaper. It thinks for them, and they repiioduce it in their talk at breakfast, and dinner and supper. It becomes a voice, and speaks wide. There is no more prompt, direct, intelligible and certain way of | speaking to men in this nineteenth century than by a newspaper. Books move slowly in a narrow circle; voices are heard only in a church or in a lecture-room; but a newspaper speaks everywhere, whithersoever it floats by sea or flies by post. "The thing becomes a trumpet." SENTENCE SERMONS. There is no short cut to happiness. Virtue is not a matter of vocabulary. Nothing succeeds where the soul fails. A little silence may save a lot of sorrow. With God life and love are synonymous. A sharp man always cuts his own fingers. Repentance cannot tear up the roots of the past. No man reaches the stage of triumph but by the steps of trial. The man who takes life as a dose always finds it a bitter one. A man makes no particular progress by patting himself on the back. Virtue may be its own reward, but it is not its own advertising agent. Some men expect to acquire all their good habits in their second childhood.

TO IMITATE

CHRIST.

To w h a t e v e r land we m a y h e long, b y b i r t h or race, we a r e all one in C h r i s t ; all destined t o imm o r t a l i t y , all p a r t a k e r s , intended by Our Blessed Redeemer t o p r o fess His F a i t h , and to m a k e uses of His S a c r a m e n t s . To save souls is to i m i t a t e C h r i s t ; to b r i n g souls to H i m is t h e s w e e t e s t offering we can m a k e H i m . To d r a w men to real and practical belief in t h e Incarnation, in t h e E u c h a r i s t i c Presence, in t h e beneficent gifts of t h e priesthood, and in t h e intercessory office of C h r i s t ' s M o t h e r and His saints, is w o r t h all our efforts and all our sacrifices. W h a t a field is t h e r e lying a r o u n d us, stretching f a r on every side, for t h e zeal a n d t h e m i s s i o n a r y spirit of Catholics.

a s g r e a t a nuisance a s t h e n a u g h t i e s t sinner. L e t us good Catholics then mind t h e s e supposedly little t h i n g s , lest we b r i n g God's religion into disrep u t e a n d give onlookers the chance to mock. Let us beware lest with all our piety we become b r e a k e r s of t h e bond of peace and f o r g e t t h a t we have one Lord, one f a i t h , one b a p t i s m , one God and F a t h e r of all.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (Catholic

Times).

THE REHABILITATION OF THE DONKEY. M. Henri C^upin, writing on the intelligence of domestic animals, says that after the dog, the ass is the most intelligent of domestic animals; and the proof of this is that his confidence in the judgment of his master is very limited. The ass is supperior to the horse in that he is capable of associating two ideas, comparing alternatives, and deciding which is best for himself. He is even capable of showing his appreciation of music. An ass of Chartres was in the habit of paying visits to the Chateau of Guerville whenever music was going on. The lady who owned the chateau had an excellent voice, and whenever she began to sing, the ass used to approach the windows and listen with sustained attention. One day he even burst into the room in order to show his appreciation. The pig is another maligned animal, in as much as he is, when possible, one of the cleanest of animals. The pig will deliberately make his bed, fetching straw'from outside his sty when possible. Pigs have been seen shaking apple trees in order to bring down fruit. Compared with the ass and the pig, the cow is a stupid beast, though bulls have on occasion been seen simulating death. Sheep are also among the non-intelligents, but like most stupid things they are susceptible of vanity. However, even the sheep ir. some things excels his owner, for while human beings prefer to fight their quarrels rather than arbitrate, an intelligent ram often prevents fighting among the other members of the flock, assuming, in M. Coupin's words, "the efficacions role of arbitrator, which he fulfilled, to the great jov of the flock." HOW TO READ A BOOK. Lord Macaulay, in recalling some ins t a n c e s of his childhood, said: When a boy I began to read very earnestly, but at the fpot of every page I read I stopped and obliged myself to give an account of what I had read on that page. At first I had to read it three or four times before I got my mind firmly fixed. But I compelled myself to comply with the plan, until now, after I have read a book through once, I can almost recite it from the beginning to the end.

POPE PIUS XL (Continued

from page 24)

Many t i m e s h e h a s evinced a seemingly s u p e r n a t u r a l j u d g m e n t in selecting t h e m o m e n t t o speak. T h u s he h a s m e t m a n y s e r i o u s problems before t h e world a t l a r g e , and was able even to see t h e i r p r e sence clearly. H e analysed t h e deepe r spiritual e l e m e n t s in a period often chaotic, a n d pointed o u t t h e fundamental causes of t h e d e p r e s sion. Likewise, h e was t h e first world figure t o sound a m o r e o p t i mistic note a s t h e world b e g a n t o e m e r g e f r o m t h e d e p t h s of t h e depression. A s t r i k i n g instance c a m e a t C h r i s t m a s t i m e in 1933. H i s Holiness was considering t h e proclamation of a n e x t r a o r d i n a r y Holy Year of Jubilee c o m m e m o r a t i n g t h e N i n e t e e n t h C e n t e n a r y of t h e pessimistic predictions, a n d m a n y declared t h a t t h e world crisis would condemn such a p r o j e c t t o failure or a t b e s t to only p a r t i a l success. N e v e r t h e l e s s , P i u s XI calmly proclaimed t h e e x t r a o r d i n a r y Holy Y e a r , a n d it developed into a d i s t i n c t a n d r e m a r k a b l e success, s o m u c h so t h a t it seemed fitting to e x t e n d it, w h i c h H i s Holiness did. This is only a brief s u m m a r y of events m a r k i n g t h e Pontificate of Pope Pius X I . C e r t a i n it is t h a t without hesitation the historian s e t t i n g down t h e complete account m u s t c h a r a c t e r i s e t h e reign a s one of t h e m o s t fruitful and glorious in t h e e n t i r e h i s t o r y of t h e Church.


OFFICIAL 24 Pages.

ORGAN

OF

CATHOLIC

ACTION

PUBLISHED WEEKLY. 10 Cents.

M A L A Y A CATHOLIC LEADER, S A T U R D A Y , 21st DECEMBER, 1 9 3 5 .

No. 51.

HIS H O L I N E S S

POPE

PIUS

XI.

SOME OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS IN HIS PONTIFICATE. < EXCERPTS FROM THE BIOGRAPHY IN THE N . C W . O

H i s Holiness Pope Pius X I , t w o hundred and sixty-first successor t o St. Peter, w h o s e Pontificate h a s embraced one of t h e moat t r y i n g periods in the world's history i s entitled to be ranked a s t h e g r e a t e s t world figure of h i s time and one of t h e great men of all t i m e . Had he accomplished but one of t h e half-dozen or more outstandi n g things for w h i c h his Pontificate is noted, i t would have been sufficient to make his occupancy of t h e Chair of P e t e r distinguished i n t h e history of e v e n so commanding a force a s t h e Papacy. Taken together, t h e s e accomplishm e n t s constitute a reign t h e brilliancy of w h i c h will undoubtedly place it in t h e forefront of h i s torical accounts of t h e period. Remarkable Series of ~ Accomplishments. Had Pius X I , for example, effected only t h e settlement of t h e 6G-year-old " R o m a n Question" w i t h all its potentialities for international difficulties, t h u s becoming t h e ffrst Pope i n more t h a n half a century t o s e t foot outside t h e Vatican, h i s would h a v e been a Pontificate o f extraordinary success. Had h e but w r i t t e n h i s brilliant Encyclicals—dealing a s t h e y do w i t h t h e fundamentals of such profound subjects a s Christian Marriage, Christian Education, Capital and Labour, and Christian U n i t y , and t r e a t i n g of a score of special devotions and objectives of God's Church—his f a m e would h a v e been enduring. Had he done n o t h i n g more t h a n g i v e marvellously successful guidance t o t h e Church through an unparalleled period of world crisis and stress, inspiring a n impressive growth in fervour and prestige a s well as numbers despite t h e severe s t handicaps, h i s work would h a v e been outstanding. Had he done n o m o r e than merit s o completely t h e title " P o p e of t h e Missions," through his tremendous spread of t h e Faith, h i s reign would h a v e been illustrious. Had his f a m e rested entirely on the fact that h e inscribed a n unprecedented number of names on the rolls of t h e Saints and t h e Blessed, it would h a v e been secure. Had h e accomplished no more than t o extend s o admirably t h e diplomatic relations of t h e Holy See, greatly enhancing t h e prest i g e of the Vatican and its world

influence for good among t h e nations, t h i s alone would have compelled t h e admiration of t h e world. Had h e only sponsored perhaps the most significant religious movement of a century—Catholic Action, with i t s tremendous world potentialities—he would g o down through t h e centuries a s one of t h e great Pontiffs of aH time. E v e n his vigorous modernizing of t h e ancient Vatican, calling t o t h e aid of religion t h e great new marvels of Science and among other t h i n g s enabling all t h e worki for t h e first t i m e to hear t h e voice o f t h e Pope directly by radio, would g i v e him eminence among t h e long l i s t of Popes. Advanced Interest of Church. But Pope Pius, ascending t o t h e Pap^l throne late in life and beginning his great work when 65 years of age, accomplished all these t h i n g s , and many more. A m a n of profound culture a s well a s t h e deepest faith and holiness, a renowend student, a friend of science, possessed of amazingly detailed and varied information and of astonishing vision, Pope Pius h a s advanced t h e interests o f t h e Church in a score o f directions. And all t h i s despite t h e f a c t t h a t h i s Pontificate has seen cruel and persistent persecution of the Church in a number of quarters, notably Russia, Mexico, Spain and Germany, and has embraced an era of wracking depression throughout t h e world, w i t h accompanying unrest and fundamental change. Causes for deep sorrow have constantly stood in sharp contrast with occasions for real joy. Governments rose and fell, revolutionary principles were put into practice, t h e world struggled and and groaned, cries of desperation and despair rent t h e air. Over and above all this shone the figure of Pius XI, vigorous in insisting upon t h e rights of God and H i s Church, but serene, kindly, fatherly. H i s Holiness has, in his leadership, fittingly depended upon reiteration of the ancient truths t a u g h t b y the Church. He has, however, at all t i m e s been alert to apply these t o t h e vexing modern situations and conditions a s they arose in a tempestuous era. H e has been, moreover, notably vigorous in this. (Continued

A

-

J.J-

jite cox OF

THIS

GENERATION

Marvellous evening!... Yes, good going too .. • Cigarette ? • • . Thanks, but why the cork tip ? . . . Obvious reasons, Child . • • Well, what are they, then ? . . . Carerras — ihe Craven "A" people — declared war on throat irritation .. • and?... sent the bogey skidding, without, I might add, interfering with the innocent pleasure you and I, and everyone, get from good tobacco.

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on page 23)

by Rev. Fr. Cardon and Printed by Lithographers Limited, 37/38, Wallich Street, Singapore, S.S.


?

"THE

PONTIFF

OF T H E

CATHOLIC

T H E P O W E R A N D I N F L U E N C E O F T H E C A T H O L I C PRESS ACTIVITY

IN ITS FAVOUR

PRESS

AND

CATHOLIC

ARE SO G R E A T T H A T E V E N SEEMINGLY

ACTION"

INSIGNIFICANT

IS O F G R E A T I M P O R T A N C E . A N Y T H I N G Y O U D O F O R T H E C A T H O L I C PRESS I W I L L CONSIDER D O N E FOR ME PERSONALLY.


II

MALAYA

XMAS

CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY.

PICTORIAL CATHOLIC

21st

DECEMBER^).

SUPPLEMENT

ACTION

GROUPS.

Catholic Actionists, Cathedral of the Good Shepherd, Singapore.

Catholic Actionists, Church of St. John, Kuala Lumpur.


MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY, 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

XMAS

PICTORIAL CATHOLIC

SUPPLEMENT

ACTION

GROUPS.

Catholic Actionists, Church of the Sacred Heart, Singapore.

Catholic Actionists, Church of St. Michael, Ipoh. Catholic Actionists, Church of Our Lady of Sorrows, Penang.

Catholic Actionists, Church of St. Anne, Bukit Mertajam.

/

Ill


IV

MALAYA

XMAS

PICTORIAL

CATHOLIC

ACTION

SUPPLEMENT GROUPS.

Catholic Actionists, Church of SS. Peter and Paul, Singapore.

Catholic Actionists, Church of Cur Lady of the Sacred Heart, Taiping.

Catholic Actionists, Church of the Holy Name of Mary, Matang Tinggi.

Catholic Actionists, Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Machang Buboh.


MALAYA CATHOLIC LEADER, SATURDAY, 21st DECEMBER,

XMAS

PICTORIAL

CATHOLIC

1935.

SUPPLEMENT

ACTION

GROUPS.

Catholic Actionists, Church of St. Anthony, Kuala Lumpur.


VI

XMAS

PICTORIAL

CATHOLIC

ACTION

SUPPLEMENT GROUPS.

Catholic Actionists, Church of the Visitation, Seremban.


MALAYA CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY, 21st DECEMBER, 1935.

XMAS

PICTORIAL

CATHOLIC

ACTION

SUPPLEMENT GROUPS.

Catholic Actionists, Church of Our Lady of Lourdes, Ipoh.

Catholic Actionists, Church of St. Francis Xavier, Penang.


MALAYA CATHOLIC L E A D E R , SATURDAY, 2 1 1

VIII

Xmas

3 S S J ^ . - * S ^ ^

DECEMBER.

1935.

Pictorial Supplement,

T H E STAFF OF T H E

"MALAYA C A T H O L I C

LEADER

f Y T f T T T t t T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T f

T T T T 4r

t T T T T T T T T T

T i n y T o t s in a China Mission C e n t r e A p p a r e n t l y A w a i t i n g t h e a r r i v a l of S a n t a Claus w i t h h i s b a g of

gifts

V V


DECEMBER 21, 1935, VOL 01, N0 51