JANUARY 05, 1935, VOL 01, N0 01

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20 Pages.

S A T U R D A Y , J A N U A R Y 5, 1935.

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MORE C H U R C H E S CLOSED & C L E R G Y E X P E L L E D I N MEXICO

NEW ONSLAUGHT ON CHURCH IN MEXICO. DEPUTIES DEMAND THAT ALL BISHOPS BE EXPELLED. A new onslaught on the Church is in full swing in Mexico. The first news o% its preparation was conveyed to readers in England by a dispatch from the New York correspondent of The Txmes\ The Mexican Chamber of Deputies has unanimously approved a plan of action designed to put an end to the influence of the Roman Catholic Church in Mexico. The plan, which has yet to be submitted to President Rodriguez, calls for the immediate expulsion from the country of all Catholic Archbishops and Bishops a s being enemies to the Revolution; the immediate suppression of the newspapers La Prensa, El Homdre Libre, La Palabra, El Omega, to be followed at an early date by that of the important dailies Excelsior and El Universal; the formation of armed ''assault groups" of peasants and workmen "to contest the aggression of student and Catholic elements"; the purging of Government offices of all employees who are not sympathisers with the Revolution; the appointment of a committee to examine the revolutionary antecedents of such employees; and the exclusion from Government employment of Knights of Columbus, Sisters of Mary, and members of other similar organisations.

T H E A R C H B I S H O P O F MEXICO CITY O N T R I A L . ^MrORFTHURCHES CLOSED: FEWER PRIESTS TO MINISTER. iBy NCWC News Service) Mexico City.—The situation of the Church in Mexico becomes increasingly ^rave. The Archbishop of Mexico City, Mgr. Diaz, has been charged with violating the law by officiating at a religious ceremony in the town of Iztapalapa without authorisation. Police went to Ids residence to arrest him, but the Archbishop had secured an 'injunction preventing it. Four churches and two chapels in the •capital of the state of Colima have been closed by order of the civil authorities. The priests of these churches have been ordered not to exercise their ministry and the 25,000 Catholics of the city have now only two priests to minister to them. In the State of Coahuila only nine prrests are allowed to officiate—one for 'every 48,491 inhabitants. In the State of Hidalgo the number of priests is 14, <one for every 50,000 people. JEWS PROTEST. New Britain, Con., U.S.A.—The national convention of <he Jewish War Veterans adopted a resolution protesting against the persecution of Catholics in the various countries and extending sympathy to those who are being persecuted. :

S E M I N A R Y IS C L O S E D : BISHOP E X P E L L E D .

CITIZENS DEMONSTRATE IN PROTEST. A

NEW INCIDENTS IN MEXICAN PERSECUTION. (By NCWC News Service) Mexico City.—The Catholic Seminary of Puebla is to be closed by the Mexican Government, and there are rumours that other seminaries also will be closed. Mgr. Ignacio Placencia y Moreira, Bishop of Zacatecas, has been expelled from his diocese by the civil authorities and has taken refuge in the capital, where it is assumed that he will be allowed to remain. Every priest has been expelled from the city and diocese of Zacatecas. In the city of Colima, capital of that State, not a child has attended the official schools since September 15, and parents art? adamant in their determination to continue the school strike until the Government withdraws its anti-Constitutional decree implanting socialist education in the schools before Article 3 of the Constitution has been amended. At Monterey, following a strike called by university students and disturbances in the streets when socialism was implanted in the State University, a large group of parents went to the Governor's residence to protest against socialist educatioa.

WEARING OP MOURNING PROHIBITED. Mexico City.—In an editorial headed " Mourning in Tabasco," Excelsior redicu!es the latest decree signed by Governor Garrido Canabal which prohibits the wearing of mourning in Tabasco on the grounds that it is "a public manifectation of religion." Aside from the fact that such a law is an infringement upon individual liberty, Excelsior reminds its readers that the wearing of mourning is a human manifestation and one that is observed by the most savage people. "The Tabascan Governor acts in a capricious and tyrannical manner," the daily states.—NCWC.

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(By NCWC News Service) Mexico City.—All local authorities in the State of Sinaloa have received telegraphic instructions from the Governor, Manuel Paez, ordering the immediate closure of every church. When the people learned trat the churches were to be closed, in all sections —in cities, towns and the smallest villages—citizens organised demonstrations of protest against this order which is in violation of the State law, which authorises 45 priests to officiate in that State, and provides for services in a like number of churches, definitely specified by the law. The police are carrying out the Governor's orders and, naturally, several clashes have occurred between the officers and the people. SUNDAY TREK TO MASS Crowds of Catholics who live in the city of Colima, where the only two churches in which services were permitted by law have been closed and the priests expelled, journey daily to Tonila, Jalisco, to fulfil their religious duties. On Sundays or days of special devotions, there are caravans of men, women and children of every walk of life leaving Colima for Tonila. Some Sundays more than 3,000 residents of Colima attend Mass at Tonila. Word has come from Oaxaca, capital of that State, that the Most Rev. Jose Othon Nunez y Zarate, Archbishop of Antequera (Oaxaca), has been forced to leave the State and is on his way to Mexico City. He~was the only Catholic— clergyman authorised to functiin in that city so the Catholics of Oaxaca are now bereft of religious consolation. NIGHT RAID ON* SEMINARYY. The Most Rev. NiYcYolYas Corona, Bishop of Papantla, in the State of Vera Cruz, who has been residing at Teziutlan, capital of Puebla, has been ordered by the Governor of Puebla to get out of the State within 72 hours on the charge that he. has violated some technically of the Law on Religious Worship. The authorities of the city of Durango, State of Durango, went to extremes in closing the " Seminary." Students were flung into the streets at 11 o'clock at night The majority had no place to go as their homes were some distance from the city and they had no means of transportation. Residents of Durango, however, were more considerate than the authorities and took the young men into their homes.

The pretext for the seizure of the church was that Fr. Torres had criticised the Government in a sermon. The black CHURCH DESECRATED. and red emblem of the National RevoluAt Mexicali in the territory of Lower tionary Party has been tacked ti the California. Fr. Jose Torres has been crucifix and pictures of President Rodriguez and of Governor Augustino forced to flee across the border! into the Clachea replace those of the Saints. The United States, and. the National Revolupews have been torn from their accus- tionary Party has established headtomed places and re-arranged in a quarters in the church where he was pastor. manner more, in keeping with a club.

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MALAYA

ROME NEWS. POPE CONFERS HIGHEST O R D E R O N P R E S I D E N T OF ARGEiVillNA. R e w a r d for Public W o r k and Participation in C o n g r e s s (from the "Universe" Correspondent) Rome, Saturday. The highest Papal decoration, the Supreme Order of Christ, has been conferred by the Holy Fatner upon General Justo, President of Argentina, as a sign of the Sovereign Pontiffs supreme satisfaction at the merits of General Justo as a Catholic statesman and his admirable participation in the International Eucharistic Congress at Buenos Aires. The decoration will be formally bestowed on the President by the Papal Nuncio in Buenos Aires, Archbishop Ccrtesi. The King of Italy and the Prince of Piedmont are among the very few members of this Papal order. Cardinal Sincero's Second New Office Cardinal Sincero, Secretary of the Oriental Congregation, has been nominated President of the Pontifical Commission for the. Interpretation of the Codex of Canon Law. As the Holy Father called Cardinal Sincero to succeed the late Cardinal Gasparri as head of the Commission for the Codification of thgJftr '*!?** Cjaaoa T ^ » - ^ r - n o ^ T r " has called him to fill yet another of the posts left vacant by the death of the great Cardinal-canonist Cardinal Sincero is one of the leading canonists in Curia. He worked with Cardinal Gasparri all through the codification of the Canon Law and ever since its publication he has been the principal member of the Commission for its .authentic interpretation. 1

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CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

Papai Audiences

Newly Canonised Saint Honoured

Fr. Vincent McCormack, S.J., rector oi the Gregorian university, has completely recovered irom nis recent serious iiiness and was received in private audience by the Holy father. Others received in private audience during this week were Cardinal Mmorreti, Archbishop oi Genoa, Cardinal Nasaiii Rocca. Archbishop oi Boiogna, and Archbishop Testa, Apostolic delegate for Egypt and Palestine, who leaves Rome very shortly to^' Jerusalem. . The Holy Father* has also received several groups of newly ordained priests from various colleges; among them were the Major Seminary of Rome, the North American College, and the Portuguese College. Among the Portuguese students were five Goans, an African from Mozambique, and two from the Island of Madeira.

At the Capuchin church in Via Veneto, known to visitors for its famous bonedecorated cemetery, a solemn triduum has just been held in honour of St. Conrad of Parzham, the Capuchin laybrother who was canonised last WhitSunday. The church was beautifully decorated ,f or the occasion and was filled to its u t m o s t capacity, especially at the evening ceremonies. The preachers were Archbiship Salotti, Archbishop Rosa of Perugia, and, on the closing evening, Cardinal Pacelli. At the Masses and Benedictions, Cardinal Granito Pignatelli di Belmonte, Cardinal Laurenti, Cardinal Verde and Cardinal Marchetti Selvaggiani assisted in t h e celebrations.

" Osservatore's" Congress Book

CARDINAL SILVER

1935.

»

MUNDELEIN'S JUBILEE.

A few weeks ago, in Chicago, His The Osservatore Romano is issuing in Eminence Cardinal Mundelein celebrated book form all the vivid accounts of the the twenty-fifth anniversary of- his recent International Eucharistic Con- episcopal consecration. The religious giess that were published in its columns rejoicings, which had their centre at the from the departure of the Papal Mission Cathedral of the Holy Name, were a t from Rome until its return, and will tended by a concourse of many hundreds err elude w i t h . the famous interview of priests recalling the scene in the which Cardinal Pacelli, the Papal same place at the great gathering for Legate, gave to the Osservatore Romano the Intertionai Eucharistic Congress in on his return. The booklet will be 1926. The xnoment_JUu^tr^^ illustrated and will be on sale at the ^cxDJn^a^^ying'^n^tograph is when His end of this month. Count deJla-JPerreT Eminence, attended by an escort of Editor of the Oss£^rWre Romano, has honour of Papal Knights and other high js&z&en a "preface for the book. officials, gave his blessing during the progress outside the Cathedral. As at Death of Count V. Sacconi the Eucharistic Congress, amplifiers, it Count Vincenzo Sacconi, one of the will be noticed, have been erected to principal ecclesiastical lawyers in Rome, convey the service to the crowds who har, died after a very brief illness, aged could not find place in the church itself. 71. He was a sin of Count Antonio The silver jubilee was of the Cardinal's Sacconi, who was Under-Secretary for elevation, in 1909, as titular Bishop of Finance in the Government of Pope Pius Loryma and Auxiliary for Brooklyn. IX. Count Vincenzo was noted for his Hh' translation to Chicago took place in eloquence and he was prominent in 1915, and ten years ago he was raised many charitable works in Rome.—R.I.P. to the Sacred College. T

5th,

ITALY OUR

LADY

OF

LORETO

PATRONESS OF AVIATORS. Festival at Loreto For the feast of the Translation of the Holy House of Loreto, Archbishop Borgonsiini Duca, Nuncia in Italy, went t 3 Loreto and presided at the ceremonies. A few months ago the sanctuary of Loreto passed to the Holy See as a part of its extraterritorial dominion. Soldiers of the Italian Air Force took part in the procession of the statue of our Lady of Loreto, Patroness of Aviator?.

ENGLAND SAINTS—OLD AND NEW. Converts to Catholicism from Protestantism often remark on the absence of representations of the Saints of the Old Testament from modernly built Catholic Churches in England and Wales. But an explanation for this has lately been brought to light by an entry found in a Puritain's Diary of the year 1643 published recently in a book of Miscellanea as follows:— Ofley, Feb. 27. A Deputy brake down 50 superstitious Pictures; a Cross on the Chancel, 2 Brass Inscriptions; and Moses with a Rod, and Aaron with his Mitre, taken down; and 20 Cherubims to be broke down, etc., etc. Clare, Jan. 6. We brake down 1,000 pictures superstitious; I brake down 200; 3 of God the Father, and 3 of Christ and the Holy Lamb, and 3 of the Holy Ghost like a Dove with Wings; and the 12 Apostles were carved in Wood, on top of the Roof, which we gave orders to be taken down; and the Sun and Moon in the East Window, by the King's Arms, to* be taken down.


MA&AYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

On XiPinss from .Albion (From Our Special SALVE! From London to Singapore, Greeting! To Catholic journalists in Great Britain it will be both an interest and a pleasure to see, in one course, the first number - of the Malaya Catholic Leader, if only on the broad ground that every newcomer to the Church's forces in the realm of periodicals in a strengthening influence against what is in places a very dangerous and evil tide. Therefore the in s i words of this letter must be words of welcome for the new paper—words also of praise for the enterprise which is to give Catholic readers in the East a newspaper worthy of the high end in view. The world is shrinking, in the sense that inter-communication between countries widely separated by Natures physical boundaries is now but a matter of moments when the electric spark is brought into service. And even where the more leisurely process of letterwriting and mail delivery are invoked, the winged couriers of the air have to a great extent diminished the sense of distance by annihilating so much of time. It will be the aim of this weekly correspondence from London, then, to relate, simply and briefly, something of the Church's doing, or the doings of her sons and daughters, in England, Wales and Scotland, in such wise that Great Britain and Malaya may share in knowledge which can serve a purpose helpful to both.

Correspondennt)

be recorded, swiftly and definitely, that once again His Eminence has profited in health from the prayers o* his people. A DEATH IN THE EPISCOPATE. December has brought with it the loss of the oldest member of the English Hierarchy, the Right Rev. Dr. Hugh Singleton, Bishop of Shrewsbury. Upwards of eighty-three years of age, his lordship had been for a long time in feeble health, with the diocesan workin the hands of his Coadjutor, Bishop Moriarty; but until three years ago Dr. Singleton was able single-handed to attend to the affairs of his see, a territory embracing two extensive counties, Cheshire and Shropshire. The Bishop died at Birkenhead, where he was born and had long resided. Dr. Ambrose Mcriarty succeeds as Bishop of Shrewshurry. His lordship went to Shrewsbury forty years ago, and has since then spent his life almost entirely in the diocesan city- He was raised to the episcopate in January, 1932, as titular Bishop of Miietopolis.

WALSINGHAM. There was a time in England when the fame of the shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham—a reproduction of the Holy House—drew pilgrims from all parts to that hallowed spot; and it is not impossible that such pilgrims steps will be an increasing feature in the future. Last year's pilgrimage to the little "Slipper Chapel" at Houghton le Dale has been SHORTENING THE LINKS. followed by the announcement that the Pleasurable excitement has been caused Bishop of Northampton, Dr. Lawrence in business circles here in England by Youens, has acquired a. large house in the announcement made in the House of Walsingham itself, and that a resident Commons as to the projected extension priest is to take up his quarters in the of air communications within the Com- town. The house, it is stated, has an monwealth of Australia. Singapore is interesting neighbour; for it stands in directly and beneficially concerned; the Friday Market, next door to the inn because, apart from a very considerable at which Queen Philippa of Hainault, further reduction in the cost of maiL, the wife of Edward the Third, used to transit, the proposals include the likeU*=- stay. The devotion to Our Lady of hood of four air services weekly from Walsingham is being restored, by the Great Britain. Thus Catholics in Malaya^ Bishop's request, in many places. At will be in still closer touch with the Nottingham^ for -example, the cathedral Church's life over here. The time-factor, city of another diocese, a shrine was too, is to be brought into further subblessed on the Sunday before Christmas. jection. It is expected that Singapore The Nottingham shrine has been set-up . will be reached, with mails, in four days. by Canon Maurice Parmenties, who led The magic carpet is becoming every the Nottingham party at/ the great year, less an unattainable picture from Walsingham pilgrimage last August. the realm of romance, and more and SIR JOSEPH NUNAN. more the symbol of reality! The new Sir Joseph Nunan, ICC, who has just scheme, however, will take some time to died in a London Hospital at a little achieve its full operation. Two years more than sixty years of age, remains is mentioned as the period needed. a distinguished worker. Ireland was his CARDINAL BOURNE. native country, his place of education, In Westminster Cathedral there lies and the field of his early labours at the body of one of the English Martyrs, Irish Bar. England was his home in Blessed John Southworth. Bofore that his latter years, when the English Bar hallowed relic, as these words are being gave him practice and he resided in written, there are kneeling a number of the neighbourhood of London. But in n>en, women and children, supplicating between these two periods in his life, the martyr in a special cause: that by the Sir Joseph Nunan put in the most intercession of his prayers Blessed John important years of his* career in British Southworth may obtain restored health Central Afrira and British Guiana. He for the beloved Archbishop, His Eminence was a Judge of the Central African Cardinal Bourne. It is now two years High Court, and of the East African since the Cardinal was stricken, while Appeal Court, for several years in the m Rome, by the illness which since then early part of the century. In British has so sadly sapped his strength and Guiana he filled the post of Solicitorcurtailed his movements. There have General from 1906 until 1912; this was ween periods during the two years when followed by the higher office of AttorneyHis Eminence was distinctly and notably General. better; and this was particularly the case After-war problems, following the after a novena, some months ago, to close of the Great War in 1918, found Blessed John Southworth. By request Sir Joseph Nunan's gifts in requisition the Vicar-General, the Right Rev. on several commissions, most important isnop Butt, Catholics inthe/Archdiocese of all,; the Reparations Commission held aro now engagipg^ in £nothe* novena to 0 Vienna in 1920-21, at which he was Blessed Martyr, for the same irtten- the British representative. His work in ' be a happiness if it can this and other ways was recognised, in 1 0 n

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JANUARY

5th,

1935.

FOURTH CENTENARY OF THE 1924, by Knighthood; Ireland, too, had DISSOLUTION, honoured her distinguished son, by On November 3, 1534, was passed the making him an honorary Doctor of Laws (Dublin). Interest in his own land Act of Suppremacy, which proclaimed showed itself, in Sir Joseph's case, by Henry VIII as head of the Church in a history of an eventful period: Ireland England. On November 3—4, 1934, as from Cromwell to Anne was perhaps his an act of reparation to God for the nabest-known piece of published writing. tional apostacy, the Blessed Sacrament was exposed to the Veneration of the MILL HILL ON THE AETHER. Catholic listeners—in periodically faithful and for the offering of united catered for in the Sunday broadcast and continuous prayer in all the churches programmes, are to hear next Sunday of the diocese of Liverpool for the evening a relay that should be much to canonisation of Blessed Thomas More their liking, since it will include a sermon and Blessed John Fisher, put to death by an interesting man delivered for the old Faith four hundred years in an interesting place. St. Joseph's ago. Blessed More died for the Faith, Foreign Missionary College at Mill Hill, not for a point of order that <x>uld be whence the Bishop of Lamus, the Right dissociated from the Faiths. The vital Rev. Dr. Myers, is to be heard, is the importance of this point is well illusgreat training ground for the missionary trated by a detached and non-Catholic apostolate which was established by authority of high repute, Professor A. F . Cardinal Vaughan when he was a young Pollard, in his opening talk in the B.B.C. series entitled "The Heritage of the priest even then on fire with zeal for Reformation." He says that a "fundathe conversion of rural peoples. It mental issue" was involved; namely, was to Mill Hill that the Cardinal re"was the Church of England part and tired, in broken health, to die; and his parcel of the Catholic Church or an inbody lies in the little cemetery within dependent self-governing Church? the College grounds. The King's Book, issued in 1543, Bishop Myers is one of Cardinal attempted a compromise. It contemBourne's Auxiliaries in the Archdiocese plated an ^Anglo-Catholic Church, a of Westminster. Until his consecration, Franco-Catholic Church (or Gallican a few years ago, his work lay at St. Church), a Spanish-Catholic Church, and Edmund's College, where he had ruled so forth; and it declares, 'as they be as President since 1918. Among his distant in places, so they have distinct many duties Dr. Myers finds time of ministers and divers heads on earth labour in Catholic journalism, as joint yet be all these holy Churches but one editor of the Clergy Review. holy-^. Church Catholic' Holy Mother MONSIGUOR O'DOHERTY. Church was transfigured into a Holy Although the late Right Rev. Dr. Denis Alliance, a band of brothers, a union or O'Doherty, rector of the English College league of churches, each with its own at Salamanca, had given his talents head, but all bound together by a comchiefly to Ireland and to Spain, he was mon religious faith—just as the league widely known and esteemed also in of Nations, with separate national England, where he had many admirers, governments, is supposed to be bound not only for his scholarly personality but together in a 'federation of the world' by likewise for the writings, in learned a covenant professing a common belief Catholic reviews, by which he has a in certain political principles." But, literary monument. Dr. O'Doherty's tersely summing up the whole matter, death is a loss in particular to the this is what Professor Pollard tells us: votaries of Church Music, a subject to "This scheme," he says, "of 'one Holy which the late rector and devoted close Church Catholic with divers heads on study since his student days. He was earth' was of the earth, earthly; it was noted for application to music while at in effect not a solution, but a dissolution." Maynooth and afterwards at Ratisbon, " N O BIGOT." and when a Commission of Church Music As an introduction to a news report, was set up for the Province of Connaught filling two columns of the Morecombe he became its first honorary secretary. and Heysham Visitor of October 10, 1934, A NOTABLE CONVERT the following more than lives up to tradiIt is announced that Alicia Adelaide tion in rural England: Needham, the distinguished composer, "Although he kept giving assurances has been received into the Church by that he was ' not a bigot,' that he was Dom Aelred Waterhouse, O.S.B., of St. ' a charitable man,' and that he was Augustine's Abbey, Ramsgate. Mrs. ' not antagonistic,' the secretary of the Needham is a lady who has to her credit National Free Church Council, Rev. S. W. many hundreds of Irish songs, hymns, Hughes, D.D., made a venomous attack and other compositions. Her musical on the Roman Catholic Church when he honoured also ia. Wales, addressed the office of President f the NorecamC % \ auspices C UndI National Eisteddfot, or bardic at the West End

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•• ARCHBISHOP FORESEES A NEW CAMPAIGN FOR THE SCHOOLS. Children being forced to go to Non-Catholic Schools. A new campaign to obtain educational rights Is hinted at by the Archbishop of Cardiff in his Advent letter. " Our poor people," writes Archbishop Mcstyn, "have drained their pockets in order to erect school buildings for their children, but lately it has happened that where Catholic parents asked for permission to build a school, and where the~e were a sufficient number of Catholic children to fill such a school, permission ha? been re'used and the children have been forced to attend a non-Catholic school, "In some instaaces-ftermigs-ion has,jtee^ granted to build a school for juniors, that is, children up to 11 years of age,

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" ~ •• • or for seniors, that is, for children over the age of 11 years. Permission to build an all-age school is refused and we are told that those children who cannot attend our Catholic school on account of age, must attend the nearest local authority school. 'This is a matter that we cannot pass over in silence, and unless the Board of Education is prepared to treat us justly the Catholics of the whole country will have to consult together as to the best means to adopt to insist upon our rights being recognised. "This is a matter for Catholic Action, buc before resorting to moral force let us have recourse t$£$>**a^er that God may mofqpfhe iearts^of those in authority to treat us justly with regard to> oui schools."

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MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R , S A T U R D A Y ,

YOUNG

JANUARY

5th,

1935.

PEOPLES PAGE

Welcome to the Three Kings: Children! Boys and Girls:—Wise men went from the East to Jernsalam ninteen hundred and thirty-five years ago*. They went there to worship the Virgin's Son. Today the journey might be done in two days by aeroplane; but it took the Wise Men all of two years to go there by caravan, journeying through deserts and passing over mountains almost impassable. And when they got there they found the young Child with Mary His Mother, and fell down and worshipped Him; and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto Him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh. This is the event which we commemorate in the Mystery of the Magi coming to Bethlehem on the twelfth-day after Christmas. And it is a great mystery. For the Magi were the first-fruits of that Gentile Church of which we are the ingathering. To us the voice of the Apostles, to them a star, proclaiming, as a voice from heaven, the advent of a Saviour. While He lay in the manger, He drew to Himself wise men from the East. While He was unknown in the stable, He was recognised in the firmament of the heavens by means of a star. And, through being thus recognised in the heayens, he made Himself known in the stable. So this Twelfth-Day is called in the Greek language 'Epiphaneia," which is, being interpreted, Manifestation/* Wherein is manifested both the greatness and the lowliness of Him, Whose greatness was attested in the stars of heaven, and Who, being sought on earth, is found so lowly that there is no room for Him in the inn. But that is not all the mystery. Though he is found in fashion as a little Child wrapped in swaddling-clothes, He is the object at once of worship to the wise men and of terror to the godless. For Herod feared when he heard from the wise men of Him whom they sought and of whose birth they knew by the witness of a star. How fearful, then, will be the judgment seat of him, Who, even as a Suckling, struck terror into the hearts and minds of haughty kings? And how much wiser is the thought of those who seek Christ like the wise men, to worship Him, than the thought of those who seek Him, like Herod, to dethrone and to slay Him,, to put Him to that same death, which He came to suffer willingly for their salvation at the hands of His enemies, that death which, by His very death, He has trodden down and turned to victory! 1

When Herod knew of the birth of our King, he betook himself to his cunning wiles, and, lest he should be deprived of an earthly kingdom, he desired the wise men to search diligently for the young Child, and, when they had found Him, to bring word to him again. He said: 'in order that he also might come and worship the Child/ But really he meant that, when he had found Him he might put Him to death. But see how puny, of how light weight is the malice of men, even of great men, when it is tried against the counsel of God. It is written: "There is no wisdom, nor understanding, nor counsel, against the Lord." So the star still led on the wise men after they had left the city of Jerusalem, and they found the new-born King, and presented unto Him gifts. Then they were warned in a dream that they should not return to Herod. And ;

thus it came to pass that, when Herod sought JESUS, he could not find Him— even so is it at all times with hypocrites, they make pretence to seek the Lord to worship Him, and they find Him not. Now it is well to know the meanings of the gifts offered by the wise men to JESUS. Gold is the fitting gift to a King. Frankincense is offered in sacrifice to God. Myrrh is used to embalm the bodies of the dead. By these gifts, therefore, the wise men set forth three things concerning Him unto Whom they offered them: by the gold, that He was King; by the frankincense, that He wan God; by the myrrh, that He was to die. But there are in this world some heretics who believe JESUS to be God, but confess not His Kingly dominion over all things; these offer Him frankincense, but refuse Him gold. There are some others who admit that He is King, but deny that He is God; these present unto Him gold, but will not give Him frankincense. There are yet other heretics who profess that Christ is both God and King, but not that He took on a dying nature; these offer Him gold and frankincense, but not myrrh for His Divine Manhood. Let, us, then, dear Boys and Girls, present gold unto the new-born Lord, acknowledging His universal Kingship; let us offer unto Him frankincense, confessing that He Who hath been made manifest to us in time, is God before ever time was or existed; and, lastly, let us give unto Him myrrh, believing that He, who cannot suffer as touching His Godhead, was made capable of death as touching His Manhood, that manhood which he shareth with each one of us. There is yet another thing worth knowing, especially by those who live in the East. It was the opinion of a certain branch of Manichaean heretics called Priscillianists, who troubled Spain in the fourth century A.D., that every man born is bora under the influence of a star; and to confirm this notion they bring forward the instance of the star of Bethlehem, which appeared when the Lord was born; and they call this star His star, meaning thereby that it is the star ruling His fate or destiny. But listen to the words of the Gospel concerning this star, they are: "It went before, till it stood over where the young Child was." From this we see that it was not the young Child who followed the star, but the star which followed the young Child, as if to show that the young Child ruled the star, instead of the star ruling Him. Also let us hear 0 1 this subject the exhortation of the learned Pope St. Gregory the Great, who is one of the four great doctors of the Church, and who ruled the Universal Church for fourteen years till his death in 604 A D . He says: "But I pray that the hearts of the faithful may ever be free from the thought that anything ruleth their destiny. In this world there is but One Who ruleth the destiny of man, even He who made man; neither was man made for the stars, but the stars for man; and if we say that they rule his destiny, we set them above him for whose service they were made." And now let me conclude with two hymns'from the Roman Breviary, which sum up all that I have told you in the foregoing. The first is of unknown origin. The second is by Aurelins Prudentius Clemens and translated by the Rev. E. Caswall.

FIRST HYMN. Bright as a fiery beacon gleams The guiding star, whose mystic beams Shone o'er the crib where, veiled' in clay, The new born King of Glory lay. When to the manger came the three, They fell in worship on tho knee. Then to the King their gifts unfold, The myrrh, the frankincense, and ?:old. JESU, Whom now the Gentiles see, Father and Spirit, One and Three, To Thee, one God, be glory given, By men on earth, by Saints in heaven. JESU, by Gentiles now adored, With Father and with Holy Ghost, To Thee be praise, as God and Lord, On earth as 'mid the. Angelic host. SECOND HYMN. BETHLEHEM! of noblest cities, None can once with thee compare; Thou alone the Lord of heaven, Didst for us Incarnate bear.. Fairer than the sun at morning, Was the star that told His birth; To the lands their God announcing, Hid beneath a form of earth. By its lambent beauty guided, See, the Eastern Kings appear; See them bend, their gifts to offer,— Gifts of incense, gold, and myrrh. Offerings of mystic meaning!— Incense doth the God disclose; Gold a Royal Child proclaimeth; Myrrh a future tomb foreshows. Holy JESU, in Thy brightness To the Gentile world displayed! With the Father and the Spirit, Endless praise to thee be paid. Wishing you now, dear Boys and Girls, not only all the happiness that you could wish yourselves, but also all the happiness and blessings that the Holy Infant Jesus intends to shower upon you during the whole year 1935. Believe me, Yours devotedly, UNCLE

LAURENCE.

All young people need milk every day:

for preference

"MILKMAID MILK.

If

GOD—CREATION—AND US. By AGNES MOTT. The most finely balanced of all God's creatures is man. He is able to stand upright, to sit, to lie, to kneel and t o crouch. He is able to walk backwards, forwards, and sideways to every point of the compass. He is able to hop or stand on one leg. He can walk, run, leap, dance, jump, take short or long strides, balance on his toes, swing himself by his arms and climb a height. He can crawl or creep like an insect, turn a somersault like a porpoise, spin 'round like a teetotum and stand on his> head! He can swim like a frog and float on his back. He can dive like a diving bird into the waves and come up again to the surface. He can roll over on the ground like a rolling-pin and wriggle like a worm. He can balance alternately on his feet and hands, turning Katherine wheels! He can bend himself from the waist like the blade of a penknife, bring his legs together like a p a i r of seissors, or his hands together like a pair of pincers. Almost the only thing man cannot do is to fly with his body. But he can climb up and down a ladder, or up and down a rope hung in mid-air from a fixed point. With the aid of a rope he can climb steep mountains and precipices, and with the aid of an axe he can ascend slippery ice slopes. He can cross deep gorges suspended to a rope held taut between, two points. If skilled at balancing, he can walk a tightrope. He can walk across a pole or plank in order to cross a stream. He can wade or ford a river. He can skate on ice or toboggan or ski in the snow. H e can carry heavy burdens whilst walking, either on his head, his shoulders, his back or his hip. He can pull or push a weight along the ground. He can draw or push a vehicle such as a sledge, handcart or wheelbarrow. He can work a treadmill with his feet, or press out the wine in the winepress. In sport he becomes specially adept at balancing the muscles of the body and using hands, eyes and feet in unison. In olden times the Greeks were great athletes, and took a special pride inwrestling, running and throwing the quoit or dise. St. Paul, in writing to the Greeks at Corinth, upheld the disciplining of the body. He said: " I therefore so run, not as at an uncertainty; I so fight not as one beating the air: But I chastise my body and bring it into subjection: lest perhaps when I havepreached to others I myself should* become a castaway" (I Cor. ix. 26).

Vocabulary.—Suspend: To hang from something above. From Lat. sus, above and pendere, to hang. Athlete: One who performs physical exercise. From Gr. athlein, to contend; root athlon, a prize. Discipline: Training of the physicalmental °and moral powers. From Lat. discipline, instruction; root discere, to learn. Subjection: Under the power of another. From Lat. sub, under; jacere, to* throw or cast; to cast under. What does a meditation on the powers of the human creature help us to understand? What would you say to this: "Man obtains all his powers from nature**?

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MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

J The Strange Escape of the King's Jester: Solution. By Henry Ernest Although the King's jester promised that he would "thereafter make the manner thereof plain to all," there is no record of his having ever done so. I will therefore submit to the reader my own views as to the probable solutions to the mysteries involved. THE MYSTERIOUS ROPE. When the jester "divided his rope in half," it does not follow that he cut it into two parts, each half the original length of the rope. No doubt he simply untwisted the strands, and so divided it into two ropes, each of the original length, but onehalf the thickness. He would thus be able to tie the two together and make a rope nearly twice the original length, with which it is quite conceivable that he made good his escape from the dungeon. THE UNDERGROUND MAZE. How did the jester find his way out of the maze in the dark ? • He had simply to grope his way to a wall and then keep on walking without once removing his left hand (or right hand) from the wall. Starting from A, the dotted line will make the route clear when he goes to the left. If the reader tries the route to the right in the same way he will be equally successful; in fact, the two routes unite and cover every part of the walls of t h e . maze except those two detached parts on the left hand side—one piece like a U, and the other like a distorted* E. This rule will apply to the majority of mazes and puzzle gardens;

fjijj^^^^^a^y^ but if the centre were enclosed by an isolated wall in the form of a split ring, the jester would simply have gone round and round this ring. THE SECRET LOCK. This puzzle entailed the finding of an English word of three letters, each letter being found on a different dial. Now, there is no English word composed of consonents alone, and the only vowel appearing any where on the dials is Y. So English word begins with Y and has the two other letters consonents, and all tl«o words of three lettersending in Y (with two consonents) either begin with an S or have H. L. or R as their second letter. But these four consonents do not appear. Therefore Y must occur in the middle, and the only word that I can find is "PYX/* and there can be no doubt that this was the word. At any rate, it solves our puzzle. CROSSING THE MOAT. No doubt some of my readers will smile at the statement that a man in a boat on smooth water can pull himself across with the tiller rope. But it is a *act! If the jester had fastened the end °* the rope to the stem of the boat and

Dudeney.

then, while standing in the bows, had given a series of violent jerks, the boat would have been put to practical test, and it is said that a speed of three miles an hour may be attained. THE ROYAL GARDENS. This puzzle must have struck many readers as being absolutely impossible. The jester said: "I had, of a truth, entered every one of the sixteen gardens once, and never more than once." If we follow the route shown in the accompanying diagram, we find that there is no difficulty in once entering all the gardens but one before reaching the last garden containing the exit B. The difficulty is to get into the garden with a star, because if we leave the B garden we are compelled to enter it a second time before escaping, and no garden may be entered twice. The trick consists in the fact that you may enter that starred garden without necessarily leaving the other. If, when the jester got to the

B

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SATURDAY,

JANUARY

A

5th,

1935.

CHALLENGE.

Short stories, anecdotes, and riddles are periodical world t o u r i s t s . T h e y come and go, and t h e y come again, a t f a i r l y regular intervals. N o w it happens, inevitably, t h a t in the s a m e city and district t h e s a m e story g e t s repeated over and over again, in p a s s i n g . T h e only offence t h a t one can commit in t h i s connection is t o repeat t h e s a m e s t o r y twice t o t h e s a m e listener. T h u s I admit no offence if I tell in t h e s e columns w h a t others e l s e w h e r e have told before m e , but if a n y reader can convict m e of repeating myself in a short s t o r y , anecdote or conundrum any t i m e w i t h i n a thousand and one d a y s , on each separate occasion t h e informant w h o s e pointer is t h e first t o be opened at t h i s office will be awarded $ 5 ; all t h e names of t h o s e w h o s e envelopes are opened subsequently will receive honourable m e n t i o n . — E d i t o r , M.C.L.

A great editor's small daughter, returning from Sunday school one afternoon with an illustrated text in her hand, was asked by her father what she had in her hand. "Oh," said the child, "it's only an ad. abcut heaven." *

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Teacher: "Every day we breathe oxygen. What do we breathe at night?" Pupil: "Nitrogen." * * * * * Bobby did not seem to be paying much attention to the lesson, so his teacher thought to test him. "Now, Bobby Jones!" she cried, "where are elephants found?" "Well, miss," said Bobby, "they are so big they aren't very often lost." £ * * * *,. .* Teacher: "Why is our language called tho mother tongue?" Scholar: "Because father never gets a chance to use it." * if. * * # Daughter: "If I pass the elementary examination, I'm going to study biology, psychology, and physiology." Father: "Urn—that is all very well, but I recommend you not to neglect washology, cookology, and sewology."

* * * * * gateway where the dotted line makes a Mother: "What are you crying for?" sharp bend, his intention had been to Johnny: "Father caught his finger in hide in the starred garden, but after he the door." had put one foot through the doorway, —Mothers—^Most people would laugh at upon the star, he discovered it was a that." false alarm and withdrew, he could say: Johnny: "That's what I did." "I entered the starred garden, because * * * * * I put my foot and part of my body in An inspector, examining a class in it; and I did not enter the other garden religious knowledge, asked the following twice, because after once going in I question of a little girl, intending it for never left it until I made my exit at B." a catch: "What was the difference between This is the only answer possible, and it Noah's Ark and Joan of Arc?" was doubtless that which the jester inHe was was not a little surprised when tended. the child, answering, said:

"Xoah's Ark was made of wood, and Jean of Arc was maid of Orleans." * * * * * Freddy: "Dad, what's a family tie?'* Dad: "Mine. Everytime I want it, ore of you boys is wearing it. * * * * * Tom: 'Father, are politics plural?" Father: "No, there isn't anything more singular in the world than politics. * * * * * Teacher: "We borrowed our numerals from the Arabs, our calendar from the Romans, and our banking from the Italians. Can anyone think of any other examples." Charlie: "Our lawnmower from the ^Smiths, our sewing machine from the Jones, and a pair of steps from Miss Evans." * * * * * The keeper had caught a boy having a dip in the lake. "Can't you read the* notice, 'No swimming allowed'? he asked sternly." "That's all right," said the boy, "I car.'t swim." * * * * * Mother: "And what did you do with the sixpence I gave you for taking your medicine?" Small Son: "I bought three-pennorth of sweets and gave Tom the other threepence for taking the medicine for me." (

The raw police constable paraded before his officer and requested a change of beat. On being asked the reason, he said: "W ell, sir, my beat is in Wheat Street where the corn exchange is, and on market days all the farmers meet there and talk so much about corn—corn—corn —that my feet get sore listening to 'em, sir!" r

BRIDGING THE DITCH. The solution to this puzzle is best explained by illustration. If he had placed the eight planks, in the manner shown, across the angle of the ditch, he would have been able to cross without much trouble. The King's jester might thus have well overcome all his difficulties and got safely away, as he has told us that he succeeded in doing.

*

t o NOW *

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MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

1935.

Progress of Human Thought

' EXTREME UNCTION PERMISSIBLE BEFORE CRITICAL OPERATIONS.' Term " Last Secraments" a Misnomer.

'THOU SHALT NOT KILL!'

44

Says the law of God But Lords to be asked to allow Doctors to kill Patients Yet Doctors make mistakes: and cures for diseases may be found Incurable" not a term for the True Doctor. D r . T h o m a s Colvin, K.S.G., o n e of t h e m o s t d i s t i n g u i s h e d medical m e n i n G r e a t B r i t a i n — a triple goldmedallist i n medicine and s u r g e r y , w h o once s a v e d G l a s g o w f r o m t h e bubonic p l a g u e — i n a s p e e c h on S u n d a y October 2 1 , 1 9 3 4 , tackled t h e q u e s t i o n of e u t h n a s i a , n a m e l y , t h e p u t t i n g o u t o f e x i s t e n c e , e i t h e r b y d r u g s or t h e l e t h a l chamber, of all t h o s e suffering f r o m "incurable" d i s e a s e s or w h o a r e old a n d feeble and a b u r d e n t o t h e S t a t e . ——-——— 1 '

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D r . Colvin dealt w i t h t h e question l a r g e l y f r o m t h e material point of v i e w , and one o f h i s m a i n p o i n t s w a s t h a t t h e r e i s n o certainly t h a t d i s e a s e s n o w regarded a s incurable will a l w a y s r e m a i n s o . I n s t e a d of killing p a t i e n t s , h e s a i d , doctors should resort t o medical r e s e a r c h , s e e k i n g c u r e s for t h e m * Medical science had m a d e a l m o s t miraculous progress i n t h e past 100 y e a r s , s a v i n g millions of l i v e s .

F u r t h e r , D r . Colvin pointed out t h e l e g a l p o w e r t o kill could lead t o m a n y a b u s e s . F o r example, unwanted w i v e s could be killed for a " c o n s i d e r a t i o n " paid t o t h e doctor. Dr. Colvin, addressing the Glasgow Catholic Transport Guild, said: "It has been stated publicly that Dr. Millard, of Tjeicester Jias drafted, with legal assistance, a Bill to give doctors the legal right to kill patients whom they consider are suffering from incurable diseases. T

"Dr. Millard states that he will not have his Bill brought before the House of Commons, for he knows t h a t Members would not support it, so he pays a back handed compliment to the House of Lords by stating that he will endeavour to get the Members of t h a t House to pass his Bill "What is an incurable disease? "My old teacher, who was one of the most scientific physicians that Scotland ever produced, always tilted a t the term incurable as applied to disease. No such term, he said, should be in the vocabulary of the true physician or surgeon. If a disease baffled the doctor's effort to cure it, his bounden duty was medical research. PROFESSIONAL BANKRUPTCY? "No later than last week, at a conference of mental specialists in Glasgow, the chairman of the Board of Control said that it was medical research that kept the soul of the doctor alive. He could have added that without medical research the doctor would be on a level of the charlatan who dispensed coloured water for -medicine. "One cannot help asking: is the killing of an incurable patient not a clear admission t h a t the medical and surgical profession are bankrupt in the cure of disease? 9

DANGER OF ABUSE. "Let us think of the wonderful, almost "And would the legal power to kill miraculous progress that medical science has made during the past 100 years with not lead to many abuses? "Doctors are only human, and human the saving of millions of people who, if it had not been for the discovery of nature never changes. The lust of gold, aseptic surgery, would certainly have the lust of flesh, and the lust of power died. No surgeon, before the days of as strong to-day as they have been for aseptic surgery, would have dared to thousands of years. remove an appendix or dp'any operation "If a man was tired of his ^ wife whatever on the abdomen, and the because she was too old and too obese, patient was allowed to die. and he longed for one who was younger and slimmer, could he not get his medical "INCURABLE'*—NOW CURED. "These cases were called by the sur- friend to do the deed for a consideration? geons of the day incurable,' yet how "Or, if we wished to get rid of a rich curable they are to-day. relative from whom we had great ex'Then who is to decide whether a pectations, would it not be possible to case is incurable and the doomed get our medical friend to term the simple patient shall die? Is medical and diseases from which the relative suffered surgical diagnosis infallible? Have incurable'? relations of patients not sometimes been told by the doctor t h a t the "Are we justified on moral or ethical patient was certain to die yet the grounds in killing a poor patient, whose patient recovered and lived to an old suffering should appeal to the highest and age? noblest instincts of human nature? Is "In regard to painful diseases we have life not the most sacred and the most a host of excellent anodynes that relieve fundamental of all the inherent rights of pain and give excellent results." a human being?

Addressing a meeting of the Midland Catholic Medical Society in Birmingham recently Fr. W. Woodlocks, S J . , expressed the opinion that anyone who has to undergo a major operation has a right to receive Extreme Unction and Holy Viaticum. Speaking of the Catholic doctor's duty to the gravely sick patient, Fr. Woodlock alluded to the duty of charity to the soul of his patient, which requires him to let either the patient or his relatives or the priest know when there is danger of death, so that a Catholic may receive the Sacrament of Extreme Unction in good time, when he is in a condition to receive its full benefit by conscious preparation for its graces. "It is a misfortune that the misnomer 'Last Sacraments' is generally applied to Extreme Unction and Holy Viaticum," declared Fr. Woodlock. "Often the relatives regard the calling in of the priest as a preliminary to selecting an undertaker. Yet all the prayers of the Sacrament of Extreme Unction are for, first, the forgiveness of sins committed through the various senses, and secondly, but at greater length, prayers for the restoration of the sick man to health. "It is wrong to postpone the Sacraments till, humanly speaking, there is little or no chance' of recovery and .almost a miracle is required for recovery." PATIENTS NOT FRIGHTENED. Fr. Woodlock said he has never found that a patient is frightened by the suggestion-of - Extreme Unction after he had pointed to the fact that, the prayers of the ritual are for the restoration of the sick man to health and that the surgeon and doctor would be helped and guided as an answer to the Church's prayers. Also,, he had often found that the privilege of receiving Holy Communion "non-fasting," per modum Viatici, during illness after Extreme Unction, made patients eager to be anointed. JUNGLE LAW. "Would it not be putting back the hands of the clock of civilisation and a reversal to the law of the jungle, with nature red in tooth and claw? "And is it not the greatest and noblest tradition of their profession for the physician and surgeon to spend laborious nights and days in alleviating human suffering and in seeking to cure, and not kill, his patients?" CHRISTIAN EUGENISTS. Dr. Colvin declared that Catholics are as anxious as the Eugenist for the creation of a race of healthy, virile citizens, provided always that that objective is gained by moral and not by immoral means. Every Catholic wishes to bring into this world children who are sound in mind and body; so they are all, so far as race culture is concerned, Eugenists, but Christian Eugenists.

DOCTORS SHOULD NOT BE TYRANNY OF MIGHT. ALLOWED TO KILL. "Would euthanasia not be a triumph Dr. Colvin said that the laity do not of might over right and the tyranny fully realise the implicit, even colossal, of the strong over the weak and faith they put in their medical advisers. feeble? Would it not deaden and They not only entrust trem with their destroy the finest and noblest feelings own lives but also.with the honour of in man—pity an compassion for pain their wives and daughters. and suffering? The "Refutations" of an Adventist "Would a patient who was ill have "Would it not reduce man to even a trust in a doctor whom he knew had the lower level than the brute—for the brute Professor, promised in our Notes and legal right to send him to a sleep from will often sacrifice its life in defence of Comments, are held over for lack of space in this issue—Ed., M.C.L. which he would never awaken? its young?


MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

1934 IN RETROSPECT

The Holy Year of Jubilee Commemorating the 19hundredth Year of Man's Redemption. A t w e l v e m o n t h which h a s been i n i t s course, t h e crown and c l i m a x of t h e H o l y Year, would b y t h a t f a c t alone standout, for Catholics, a s a period memorable and full of graces. T h e spiritual privileges w h i c h took m a n y t h o u s a n d s of p i l g r i m s t o t h e E t e r n a l City, f r o m every part of Christendom, up till t h e g r e a t closing f u n c t i o n s in April last, are now b e i n g enjoyed, b y f a v o u r of t h e H o l y F a t h e r , t h r o u g h o u t t h e Catholic W o r l d ; but it w a s R o m e w h i c h focussed, during t h e earlier m o n t h s of 1934, t h e i n t e r e s t of t h e Jubilee proclaimed in t h e preceding y e a r . T h a t Jubilee, it is n o t too m u c h t o s a y , attracted world-wide interest, n o t alone a m o n g t h e faithful but also b y t h e voices and p e n s of a g r e a t m a n y non-Catholics.

CANONISATIONS. Rome witnessed also, during the past year, the canonization of several Servants of God whose elevation to the Church's altars brought particular joy to indidvidual religious orders. St. John Bosco, founder of the Salesians; St. Conrad of Parzham, the holy Capuchin lay-brother whose life gave such a wonderful example benign patience; St. Louise de Marillac, in whom the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul honour their co-foundTess—these are three outstanding names. The beatification of another trio, the South American martyrs, was a cause of rejoicing in Latin America.

while the revolutionary rising in Spain was accompanied in some centres, particularly at Oviedo, the "martyr city," by terible crimes against priests, students, and religious, with profanation ard other outrages. Anxiety for the freedom of the Church was produced in Germany, by State tendencies against which the Catholic episcopate protested in the famous outspoken joint pastoral issued from Fulda. In France the assasination of the Yugoslavian Sovereign, and in Belgium the tragic death of the heroic King Albert, were other events bringing sorrows to the Holy Father's heart. GENEVA. At Geneva the year closed better than it began, by the agreement which has ended, as all hope, the tension between Hungary and Yugoslavia. But until that piece of good work put the League of Nations in a brighter light, there was a feeling among the peoples that the cause of International Peace, the very reason for the League's existence, was not making headway. Catholics had special ground for concern by the decision to admit anti-God Russia to a place at the tables. The debate preceding that decision was noteworthy, on the side of protest and religious assertion, by M. Motta's fine speech on behalf of Switzerland, an utterance which earned for that stateman a message of appreciation from the Sovereign Pontiff.

T H E A P P E A L COURT. The Sovereign Pontiff's departure for a much needed change at Castelgrandolfo, after the fatigues of the Holy Year, Drought home to the Roman people, as nothing previously had done, the significance of the Lateran Treaty. Never before since 1870, except for brief visists of inspection in recent times, had the Pope been absent from the Vatican. The stay of some weeks' duration at the Papal Villa demonstrated that the long period of seclusion which began in the time of Pio Nono was now indeed at an end; and the Hcly Father benefited from Castelgandolfo's country air. But His Holiness was saddened,shorty afterwards, by the death of one of the chief makers of the P E A C E PILGRIMAGE A N D Treaty, Cardinal Pietro Gasparri. To EUCHARISTIC CONGRESS. great sanctity that prelate united the But if the past year brought the gift of high statesmanship; and his Church cause for such- sadness and work in the years when he filled the anxiety in some lands, there were in office of Cardinal Secretary of State will other countries events productive of jubibe remembered, by historians, as having lation and thankfulness to! God. Though helped to write an important chapter International Peace, it was jfelt, was being into the story of the Church's life of brought hardly if at all nearer by the action in modern times. During 1934 speech-makers at Geneva, that holy the Sacred College suffered also other cause was appreciably helped by a higher bereavements: Cardinal Ehrle, and apostolate—the unforgettable Pilgrimage Cardinal Mori, are names to recall in of Peace, at Lourdes, undertaken by connection. ex-combatants from both sides in the World War. Readers of the Leader will A SORRY WORLD. already have had the scenes during that Looking out upon world conditions, wonderful week brought vividly before the Vicar of Christ found much for them. Lourdes presented the spectacle sadness and concern in several countries. of a multitude of ex-soldiers at prayer The anti-God wave in Russia was no cor a common end—Peace. Similarly at new phenomenon in 1934, but merely Buenos Aires, at the Church's mightiest continued the hatred of religion which organized demonstration of faith and Soviet teaching and policy had long piety during the year, world-peace was since proclaimed. A newer manifesta- an intention on the lips of one million tion of the same spirit was presented or more Catholics who took part in the by the intensified persecution in Mexico; great International Eucharistic Congress.

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

7

1935.

Before 1934 closed, another Eucharistic Congress, the Catholic contribution to the celebrations for the centenary of the State of Victoria and the city of Melbourne, united half a million of the faithful in a series of magnificent acts and functions under the Southern Cross. GREAT BRITAIN. In Great Britain the past year was one of continuous progress and activity, clouded only by the protracted ill-health of Cardinal Bourne, which remains a source of anxiety. On June 11th His Eminence completed the fiftieth year of his priesthood; he was able to receive personally the felicitations of many of his flock and to participate in the jubilee celebrations. But in the latter part of the year there was a return of disquieting symptoms, and the Cardinal was required by his physician to refrain from exertion of any kind. Otherwise His Eminence would have presided in person at a great demonstration held in London, in November, to celebrate the golden jubilee of the Catholic Truth Society. That anniversary brought congratulations, from coworkers in many lands, to the officials of what is now almost a world-wide literary apostolate. WALSINGHAM. Earlier in the year, however, in August, the Cardinal was able to participate in an event to which the Catholics of the country had been looking forward for many months previously. This was the National Pilgrimage to Walsingham, an occasion re-calling, in its numbers and impressiveness, the pre-reformation pilgrimages to the famous shrine. In the Walsingham district which was one of England's most hallowed spots in the Ages of Faith the old " Slipper Chapel" is in Catholic hands, and it was there that the pilgrimage' last August hac its centre. The event was commented upon and extensively illustrated, in a sympathetic spirit by the newspaper press throughout the land. Another piJgrimage noteworthy by its attendant circumstances, though not held in 1934 for the first time, was the pilgrimage of the Knights of St. Columba to Canterbury; for there, amidst every sign of public respect, the Blessed Sacrament was borne ceremonically through the streets of England's ancient religious Metropolis. LIVERPOOL CATHEDRAL. Among other events to be noted in the twelve months' record, the following may here be recalled. The past year saw the actual begining of building operations for the great Metropolitan Cathedral at Liverpool, on a site whereat 40,000 Catholics gathered for the Corpus Christi celebration. It witnessed also, in Wales the opening of a Catholic Church at St. David's—the penetration of the Faith into the heart, almost, of the ancient Menevia. Wales, in fact, was prominent in Catholic activities during the year. From Cardiff, where the Archbishop, the Most Rev. Dr. Francis Mostyn, attended his golden jubilee on September 14, there was launched a Clean Film campaign which spread rapidly through the country and gave well-deserved concern to the promoters and exhibitors of undesirable screen pictures. A Board of Catholic Action was set on foot, by the Archl^shop, to ensure the success of the campaign. In this* and in other ways the call for Catholic Action was pressed home, in 1934, by the Hierarchy of England and Wales, who made Catholic Action the subject of a joint pastoral at Whitsum tide.

BEREAVEMENTS. The more notable personalities lost to the Church in England by death during the twelve months included His Grace the Most Rev. John Mo Intyre, formerly Archbishop of Birmingham a noted biblical scholar; the Bishop of Shrewsbury, the Right Rev. Dr. Singleton, whose death is referred to by the Leader's London correspondent; Father Bede Jarreatt, O.P., the dominkan expiovincial, whose fame as a preacher had extended to practically all Englishspeaking lands; and Fattier Edmund Lester, S.J., widely renowned by the great spiriutal crusade of his foundation, the Knights, Handmaids, and Pages of the Blessed Sacrament. CATHOLIC G A I N S . Statistics published at the end of the year show that in Great Britain the Church continues to go steadily from strength to strength.. In Ireland and Wales there are to-day just upon five thousand priests, and more than 2,300 Catholic churches and chapels. Upwards of 1,900 Catholic schools are educating 462,000 children—a striking contrast to the rapidly dwindling number of Anglican and other non-Catholic denominational schools in the country. And on an average about 12,200 converts make their submission and are received into the Church every year in the English and Welsh dioceses. IRELAND. A final glance takes us across the sea to Ireland, there to note, as one of the outstanding Catholic events of the year, the splendidly successful conference of the Catholic Truth Society of Ireland, which went last year, for the first time, to Belfast, the Northern capital. Throughout the country, there was the utmost; gratification among the people at the honour Conferred upon the Irish Primate, His Eminence Cardinal Mac Rory, by his appointment as the Holy Father's Legate at the Eucharistic Congress at Melbourne.

MANY CONVERT JEWS DRIVEN TO^ ENGLAND BY PERSECUTION GUILD OF ISRAEL DOING ITS BEST TO HELP THEM Many of the Jews who have found refuge in England from contemporary foreign persecution are converts to the Catholic Church. Examples of the distress of these convert Jews were given on Monday at the annual meeting of the Catholic Guild of Israel. Fr. John Wolfs, N.D.S., read the annual report, which said the increase of anti-Semitic persecution in several countries in the past year demonstrated the opportuneness and even urgency of the Catholic Guild of Israel. " It must be urged t h a t co-operation with the Catholic Council for International Relations, on the part if influential Catholics, is a great need in the present crisis, when many Jewish converts to the Catholic Church are taking refuge in this country from persecution," stated the report. Mr. Philip Fowke, hon. secretary of the C.C.I.R., said the convert Jews driven from Germany included a chief editor of a prominent newspaper, a lady professor and a great number of qualified physicians. 7


8

Woman's Page U n i t e d S t a t e s Menaced by t h e Decline In Size of F a m i l i e s . W a r n i n g Given at M e e t i n g of Catholic W o m e n . (By NCWC News Service) Washington A grave warning to the United States regarding tflfe likelihood of a decreasing population was given by Dr. O. E. Baker, senior economist of the Department of Agriculture, in an address to the delegates who assembled here for the annual convention of the National Council of Catholic Women. The Apostolic Delegate to the U.S.A., Archbishop Cicognani, and many other prelates attended the Convention. Dr. Baker declared that " if we are to escape the doom of modern civilisation, we must awake to the responsibility of having larger families, of creating home life on a larger scale than we know it now. TOWNS' BAD EFFECT ** In 1923, with heavy immigration, the United States had a net increase of two million in population. Now, with decreased immigration and fewer births, it would appear that in 10 years the births will balance the deaths. " If we go on as we have, we will have so large a proportion of old people that industry will suffer, and unemployment, instead of decreasing, will increase because of the number of old people unable to work." Dr. Baker associated the declining birth-rate with the movement of people from the farms to the city. " On the farm," he said, the wife and children are an economic asset, while in urban industrial life a family is regarded an economic liability rather than an asset " " N E W D E A L " FOR SCHOOLS Another striking speech was made by Mgr. Noll, Bishop of Fort Wayne. * Our political leaders tell us," said Bishop Noll, " that they are waging war against the depression, against the old industrial system, against crime. Then why does it never occur to them to improve and strengthen the official public training schools of youth by forming the consciences of the future citizens in accordance with Gods moral law, as the best prevention of crime." Questioning why a " New Deal" should not be applied to the schools as to everything else, the Bishop pointed to the civil government's penalising Catholics by demanding that they carry a double, sometimes triple, burden of school taxation. " I t is probably the only instance," he said, " in which the State returns to us evil for good bestowed. If the United States crime bill is $15,000,000,000 annually, and it could be reduced materially by getting religion into the child's life, would it not be real business economy to recognise at least on an equal basis the schools which actually instil religious and moral principles?" SOCIAL INJUSTICE Treating of social injustice in the United States, Bishop Noll asserted that the wealth and land of the nation are too unevenly divided to warrant general ccntentment. u

9

(Continued Xdbody can fill your place—and, of course, you can fill no-one else's, either." There was a little silence, while Teresa was thinking over her Father's words. And then she looked up with a smile. Tfcatfs lovely," she said, "It makes

WAS JOAN

OF ARC

MARTYRED?

Q. What foundation is there for the legend, periodically resurected in France, that Joan of Arc was not burned at the stake, but was married several years after her alleged martyrdom? A. " Five years after the martyrdom of Joan, the amazing rumour spread through France that "the Maid had appeared in the flesh in Lorraine. As a matter of fact a young girl presented herself to some lords at St. Privat near Metz, in May, 1436, alleging that she was Joan of Arc, that she had escaped from her Rouen prison and that the English to cover their discomfiture had burned another woman in her stead. Her resemblance to the Saint was so striking that it is said to have deceived even her own brothers Pierre and John de Lys. The reaction in the country can be better imagined than portrayed, consternation giving way to jubilation. Feasted by the people, the adventuress, for no other word describes this imposter, rapidly became the protegee of the most powerful Seigneurs, among whom can be cited the Duchess of Luxembourg and the Duke Ulrich of Wurtembourg, and she married a lord of Lorraine, Robert des Armoises. " Equipped by her protectors with ail the panoply of war, Jeanne des Armoises, to give her her married name, who was an excellent horsewoman, took part in the Rhine skirmishes of the Treves Electorate Disputes. Her sole reward was a threat of excommunication by the Archbishop of Cologne. " Tradition affirms that she then found her way to Rome and obtained from Pope Eugene IV a command in the Papal army then at war with the Duchy of Milan. History does not credit her valiance in these combats with any feat that might embellish its pages. " Subsequently she is alleged to have directed her energies in guerilla warfare against the English, to have, received a naval fleet from the King of Spain and then to have been given command of the troops of Gilles de Rais, who had been Joan of Arc's lieutenant. " Her brilliance however reached its apogee in July of 1439 when, ten years after the deliverance of Orleans and eight years after the burning at the stake, she was acclaimed by the people of Orleans as their saviour. " Controversy as to the identity of this adventuress has never waxed very keenly among historians, who are, and have been, practically unanimous that the only link connecting her with the Saint was her remarkable resemblance to Joan of Arc, which for her own ends she exploited to the full. At all events there is evidence to show that eventually, in private audience, she was compelled by adroit questioning to confess to the impersonation of which she had been guilty; she was condemned by the Parliament of Paris to public exposure, a notice being placed over her head describing her imposture." It may be added that this is the substance of the matter made capital of by Anatole France in his Jeanne d'Arc.

JELOUSY OF THE FIRST-BORN H O W IT A L L H A P P E N E D TOWARDS THE AFTER-BORN, An item in the " New York S u n " Teresa was jelous for the first time describes the horrible consequences of a in her life, Until she was seven years slight accident suffered by Mrs. Smith old she had been the only child, and now while frying potatoes: she had a little baby brother. Everyone Mrs. Smith was frying potatoes for was very excited and happy about the supper when a drop of hot grease fell new baby. People said "What a pretty on her hand. It hurt so that she called Baby," and "Isn't he like his F a t h e r ? " Dr. Jones. After applying medicine and But Teresa only thought how pink and a bandage, he remarked that he was ugly he was. And how everyone seemed glad that it was only a small burn, beto forget her and think only of him. cause hot grease can do lots of damage. "Horrid pink thing," muttered Teresa He said he had seen industrial, accidents with a sniff. "Can't think what they see with it, and you wouldn't believe how in him, anyway. And Mother doesn't bad they were. want any more, either. And Father's Mr. Smith told Mr. Brown about it on hardly looked at me since that—that the train to the city the next morning. lump came." A big tear ran down Mi. Brown saw Mr. Thompson at lunch Teresa's cheek, quivered a moment on anc passed the news on, saying that the tin of her chin and then toppled off. Mrs. Smith had been burned by boiling At that moment Father came into the grease and that the doctor said she had room, and looked at his small daughter the most dangerous kind of burn he in amazement. "Teresa, my dear," said knew, a kind that sometimes cripples Father, as he knelt on the floor and put people. his arm round her. "What's the matOn his arrival home Mr. Thompson ter? Has anyone been hurting you?" tele Mrs. Thompson how poor Mrs. Now Teresa had not meant to tell Smith had been dangerously burned, and anyone how she felt. She had said to that the doctor didn't know if she would herself: "I won't say a word. I won't regain the use of her hand. let them know how they're hurting me." At the bridge club meeting the next But somehow, with Father there beside her, his arm round her waist, and that afternoon Mrs. Thompson told Mrs. kind expression in his eyes—well, Teresa West, Mrs. South and Mrs. East about just couldn't help it. She hid her face the horrible accident, saying that Mrs. on her Father's shoulders, and the tears Smith probably would be in the hospital positively tumbled over themselves as for weeks, and that it was doubtful that they came pouring out. "It's—it's Baby," she ever would be able to use her hands she whispered. "Till he came, Mother again. The whole pot of grease had and you loved me so much, and you upset over them, she said; the left hand called me your 'little chum,' and now was burned worst. Mrs. West encountered Mrs. Johnson you don't want me any more." Father's arm closed tighter round her. the next day and said she understood "I was afraid of this," he said, quietly. that the doctors were doing everything "Now try and stop crying, and listen to they could to save Mrs. Smith's right me, dear." He stopped for a moment arm, although, of course, the left was until Teresa's sobs grew less, and then gone. Mrs. Johnson told Mr. Johnson, having wiped her eyes with his big with some slight embellishment, and the hankie, he went on. "Mother and I love next time he went on the road and got you every bit as much as ever we did," to Toledo he imparted the sad news to said Father, "and if you had a dozen Mr. Stewart, who had known the Smiths brothers and sisters we should still love when they all lived in Three Oaks, Michigan. you just the same. Mrs. Stewart, duly informed, wrote to "Don't you see, dear," Daddy went on, "that you each have your own place in Mrs. Smith's sister Mrs. Murphy, comour hearts, and nobody can take away miserating with her on the fact that your own place from you. It is not a her poor, dear sister was a cripple for they matter of loving one more than the life, and saying she did hope other. You each have your own niche, wouldn't have to amputate the right and nobody else would do in that niche. arm, too. Mrs. Smith was thoroughly surprised "Think of Almighty God, as the great Father of the world. Think of the when she was interrupted, in the act of millions and millions of people. He has frying potatoes (Mr. Smith is mighty created. But every one of them has his fond of fried potatoes), by the arrival own particular niche. Nobody else can of a special delivery letter from Sister give God just exactly the love and wor- Mary, who wanted to know why the ship that you can. And so it is with awful news had been hid from her, and all of us. And so, in a much, much offered to take the children into her lesser way it is with earthly parents. home and bring them up like her own. v

Mothers should remember that growing

children need milk-every

day:

for preference

from Col. 3) everyone so important, doesn't it? Ill remember that—always." And she did. Teresa is known among her friends as being the girl who is never jealous. The result in that she is immensely popular, and as happy as the day is long.

MILKMAID MILK

i


i

MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

1935.

EDUCATION NOTES. CATHOLIC

EDUCATION

VICTORY I N ONTARIO.

Landslide A t Election. 85 PER CENT. M A JOB IT Y, NOW 17 PER CENT. MINORITY.

in Ontario, handed over to the Catholic laity the job of influencing the Government. Two years ago was formed the ORANGE CAMPAIGN PROVES A Catholic Taxpayers' Association. EighFIASCO teen months ago it sent a deputation to the Ontario Government, presenting the (By Henry Somerville) " c a s e " for remedial legislation in Toronto, Ontario. favour of Catholic schools. The GovernA glorious victory for Catholics, who ment in power had an enormous majority had campaigned on behalf of their —85 seats out of 100. It promised to schools, was the result of the recent consider the " case " and give an answer election to the Provincial Legislature. thereto. The Catholic Taxaypers' AssoSince the beginnings of the public ciation proceeded methodically with its educational system in Ontario nearly a work of educating the people, nonecntury ago . Catholics have had the Catholic as well as Catholics, in the right to H. separate -schools." The merits of the Catholic claims. Catholic ratepayers of the prescribed THE POLITICAL FIGHT areas have elected a Separate School The Government maintained an ambiBoard while the other people have elect- guous attitude until the very day the ed the Public School Board. Legislature was dissolved on Holy The Separate School Board has built Thursday last. It then said it would the Catholic schools and administered submit questions on Catholic claims to them in accordance with the regulations the Privy Council in London. This was of the Department of Education. The the merest political side-stepping. The school rates paid by Catholics have been Privy Council can only declare what is allotted to the Separate School Board. the existing law; it cannot provide the We have had, in effect, two sets of public new legislation which Catholics require. .schools, Catholic and Prostestant. The question now was what action GRIEVANCES Catholics would take in view of the So far, so good. But Catholics have impending election. Party politics, in serious grievances. For one thing, it Ontario are fierce. The spoils system has been ruled that Separate schools flourishes and makes partisanship more may only be elementary schools, not rancorous. There are as many difficulsecondary. Therefore Catholics, when ties in Ontario as in any other part of they have secondary schools, pay for the world in getting Catholics united "them entirely out of their own pockets politically. while paying taxes at the same time for Moreover there was one great diffithe undenominational public secondary culty peculiar to Ontario. This province schools. *is traditionally supposed to be another Another grievance is that through a Ulster, profoundly anti-Catholic. It was <defeet in the law Separate Schools do not the tradition of the Catholic minority get anything approaching a fair share that it must never do anything that •of rates paid by joint stock companies would give an excuse for the raising of and other corporations on their property. Protestant cries. The Orange Lodges There are parts of Ontario where the are numerous and active and are only children are nearly all Catholics, where too anxious for an opportunity of makIn this situation there practically all the labour employed is ing mischief. Catholic, yet all the school taxes paid were not wanting counsellors who would "by the joint stock companies of the dis- not have Catholics take any aggressive trict go to non-Catholic schools because action in the election. the companies are not in a position to The leader of the Catholic Taxpayers' state the proportion of Catholics among Association, Mr. Martin Quinn, took their shareholders. another view. He sent a letter to all Ontario is a province where there is the parish chairmen urging that Catholic an immense amount of "public owner- votes should be cast against the Governship," what in England would be called ment. What everybody feared then municipalisation and nationalisation. happened. The Orange Press got hold Hailways, tramways, electricity under- of the letter and published it in facsitakings, etc.,pay all their schools rates mile and the cry went forth that a to the Public Schools, not a penny to Catholic plot had been discovered. The the Separate Schools. Yet Catholics supreme issue of the election, it was are one-fifth the population of Ontario; alleged, was now whether the Catholic their schools should accordingly get one- minority by its organisation was to be fifth of the school taxes paid by these permitted to make and unmake Governments? ""publicly-owned" enterprises. WORK OF CATHOLIC PRESS 20 YEARS' CAMPAIGN The appeal to bigotry received no resFor more than 20 years Cathol cs have The Government Press as a T)een pacifically seeking to have their ponse. grievances redressed. The growth of whole refused to follow the Orange lead jcint stock companies and other corpo- though the Premier himself did so. 1 Tations was at such a pace that as much do not know why Ontario Protestantism Catholic money w a s going to Public did not blaze up, but one theory, which Schools as w a s paid to Separate Schools. is as good as any other, is that the Though the system in Ontario is so dif- Ontario Protestant is not the bigot that ferent from that of England the result the Catholic traditionally believed him "has been the s a m e : Catholics carry a to be. Mention must also be made of the double school burden; they have to pay for non-Catholic schools as well as their Catholic Press. It had educated Catholics in the school question, it had shaken own. The Catholic spokesman to successive them from apathy, roused them from Governments was Archbishop McNeil, despair, and given them a definite lead o: Toronto, who died as recently as May for election day. One Ontario Catholic 25, He was as great a man as any in paper devoted the whole of its front . Canada and enjoyed the admiration of page on the eve of the election to the non-Catholics to an extraordinary de- school question and without any qualifigree. But after 20 years of peaceful cation urged Catholics to vote against effort he had to confess he " got now- the Government that had refused to here." He then, with the other Bishops meet their just demands. # ;

HEALTH F O O D

For

health,

sleep

and

bright

awakening

Cadbury's

IBOIUIRRJ-WllYA "Its

better

for

you MAAS—1A.


MALAYA

10

S a t u r d a y , January 5 t h , 1935.

YOUTH: OUR HOPE. T h e r e w a s room in t h e stable at B e t h l e h e m for t h e W i s e Men and f o r t h e simple S h e p h e r d s ; for those of g r e a t intellect a n d for t h e humble folk a s well. T h e r e is room, likewise, in t h e Catholic Church for t h o s e w h o h a v e Godg i v e n intellectual brilliancy and for t h o s e w h o s e r e a s o n i n g L g e n t l y guided b y beautiful F a i t h . B u t t h e r e is no room in t h e Catholic Church for t h o s e w h o "think t h a t t h e y think." N o w t h e r e is a group of Catholic parents w h o may r i g h t l y and directly be charged w i t h t h a t form of r e a s o n i n g described a s " t h i n k i n g t h a t t h e y think." T h e y are of t h a t class of m e n w h o s e thinking i s m o s t l y done for t h e m — t h a t class t h a t comprises t h e v a s t m a j o r i t y of t h e ethnologically related. F o r i t is a fact t h a t m o s t m e n are born c o n f o r m i s t s , and t h a t m o s t o f their t h i n k i n g is done b y accepting ready-made d o g m a s . A goods o u n d i n g assumption, lustily handed out b y a single loud-speaker is c o m m o n l y and forever repeated by t h e r e s t of t h e race. The individual dissident who t h i n k s for h i m s e l f is as rare a s t h e solitary Greek w h o voted a g a i n s t t h e j u s t A r i s t i d e s for n o otherr' reason t h a n t h e nausea he felt a t h e a r i n g e v e r y h u m a n parrot i n A t h e n s repeat t h e p h r a s e "Arisides t h e Just." Much m a g i c i s in t h e spoken w o r d ; y e s , and if i t i s a false w o r d it i s black m a g i c Parrot-cries a r e not seldom false, and t h e more f r e q u e n t their utterance and the m o r e general their acceptance b y t h o s e w h o " t h i n k t h a t t h e y think," t h e f a r t h e r t h e y depart, a s a rule, f r o m w h a t is true a n d t h e more t h e y mislead m a n k i n d t o h i s everlasting harm. #

T h e modern superstition is t h a t y o u t h i s t h e t i m e of r a d i c a l i s m — radicalism in religion, in social consciousness, in e t h i c s and in w h a t not e l s e — a n d t h a t a g e i s t h e h a y d a y of t h e hidebound in all such t h i n g s : t h e reactionary and t h e s t a n d p a t t e r in all s u c h fields. T o doubt t h i s is a h e r e s y — h e r e s y t o day b e i n g quite a different t h i n g from w h a t it w a s in t h e g r e a t e s t century of Christendom, the t h i r t e e n t h . It is h e r e s y n o w t o doubt t h a t y o u t h — e a g e r , enthusiastic, flame-eyed youth—turns naturally to subversive doctrines and, w i t h lambent piercing e y e s , sees in t h o s e doctrines t h e one t h i n g t h a t t h e y lack—truth. It is h e r e s y to doubt t h a t crabbed old a g e "whose heart i s t r y a s s u m mer's dust," a s naturally t u r n s its d i m m e d e y e s t o t h e r e a r — t h e rear or w h a t is behind b e i n g regarded a s necessarily false. Therefore, in opposing t h i s black m a g i c of t h e f a l s e word, it is n e c e s s a r y to g e t our p o s t u l a t e s r i g h t at t h e v e r y b e g i n n i n g . A n d , firstly, childhood i s t h e t i m e of rigid adherence to t h e s t r a i g h t line of u t t e r orthodoxy. Secondly, in y o u t h , in v o i i n e manhood a n d y o u n g w o m a n h o o d , t h e r e i s still no a t t r a c t i o n towards r a d i c a l i s m or s k e p t i c i s m ; t h e r e is :

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY, JANUARY

5th,

1935.

THE NEW AGE.

do no wrong. T h e King n e v e r dies. A n d in t h e s a m e w a y t h e " W e are too y o u n g at present Papacy is e n d o w e d with its triple t o be an A g e at all." T h i s is; how crown of S u p r e m a c y , Infallibility F a t h e r Edmond L e s t e r , S.J., w h o and Perpetuity. h a s j u s t died before reaching his T h i s e x p r e s s e s t h e F a i t h of t h e s e v e n t i e t h y e a r , contrasts the present with t h e Victorian A g e , in Confraternity of U n i t y to which a last contribution to Stella Maris, very large n u m b e r s of Anglican Clergymen belong. The Rev. and he continues a s f o l l o w s : W e are only ungracefully c u t t i n g Preacher c o n t i n u e s : T h e C r o w n - o f Infallibility is our teeth. W e m u s t remember inherent in t h e promise t h a t t h e flower of our y o u n g manhood fell Church shall not err, for t h e t h a t we are p o s t war, and t h a t t h e Holy Ghost shall lead it into all in t h e war. T h e y o u t h of to-day truth. w e r e born i n t o t h e necessary c h a o s T h e e n d o w m e n t s of t h e body t h a t follows such a catastrophe. are also t h e prerogatives of t h e T i m e only can help us to recover head. our balance. • B u t St. P e t e r w a s singled out W e •have t o w e i g h up and estiby Our Lord for a special prerom a t e t h e i m m e d i a t e past w i t h t h e g a t i v e : "I h a v e prayed for t h e e i m m e d i a t e p r e s e n t ; to re-cultivate t h a t t h y f a i t h fail n o t ; and when all t h a t w a s admirable *n t h e t h o u art c o n v e r t e d , s t r e n g t h e n Victorian d a y s , adding our own . t h y brethren." excellence. Over and above t h e A s with S t . P e t e r , so w i t h his g a l a x y of g e n i u s in t h e nineteenth successors, f a i t h will not fail. century of Victoria t h e r e w a s t h e B y t h e divine a s s i s t a n c e of inB u t a s for t h e child, t h e child g e n i u s of culture, d i g n i t y and fallibility t h e Pope s t r e n g t h e n s h e w s more rigidly t o t h e line, he gracefulness. A l t h o u g h possibly a t h e Church. follows more blindly t h e standard little too prim, t h e ladies of t h e N o other b i s h o p is infallible, set, moire blindly t h a n h e ever will period reminded one of S h a k e s no local h i e r a r c h y ; nor y e t t h e agairir B u t as a child he likes t o pear's Sylvia. whole episcopate throughout t h e learn a n e w g a m e . A t e i g h t e e n or Who is Sylvia? What is she world without i t s head. Such is. so h i s mind expands and he still That all our swains commend her? t h e w i t n e s s o f t h e Councils. likes a n e w g a m e , b u t n o w it i s a Holy, fair and wise is she, (Reunion, July, 1 9 3 4 ) . This g a m e played by t h e brain rather The heavens such grace did lend her s h o w s how. f a r t h e Oxford M o v e t h a n by t h e hands a n d feet. A s a That she might admired be. m e n t has moved.. child h e had little preference for Is. she kind as she is fair? T h e Rev. A;* EL Baverstock, d e s w h a t t h e g a m e w a s s o long a s it For beauty lives with kindness; cribing an " A n g l i c a n " P i l g r i m a g e w a s a g a m e and i t w a s n e w ; and Love doth to her eyes repair to Rome, s a y s of t h e P i l g r i m s : n o w t h a t he is p l a y i n g it with his To help him in his blindness; I believe w e all felt alike. mind t h e s a m e -rule holds. If he And, being help'd, inhabits there. R o m e , to t h e Catholic Christian were born into a world of pure Then to Sylvia, let us sing, is Home. T h e severance of t h e radicalism, and, a t e i g h t e e n or That Sylvia is excelling; t i e s which bound Rome and E n g thereabouts, he w e r e t o hear for She excels each mortal thing land t o g e t h e r w a s a lass indeed, t h e first t i m e t h e confoundingly Upon the dull earth dwelling, t o g e t h e r w a s a loss indeed. n e w doctrine of c o n s e r v a t i s m , he To her let us garlands bring. R o m e has l a m e n t e d t h e loss o f would accept the n e w g a m e and W e look to t h e ladies of our d a y s England. E n g l a n d is learning, play it j u s t as hard. A n d here, —maidens and matrons—so to and will learn increasingly, t o by t h e w a y , is t h e j u s t explanation unite our m o r e a t h l e t i c freedom lament h e r separation from of the Oxford undergraduate w i t h t h e g r a c e of p a s t d a y s t h a t R o m e . May t h e great Pope w h o "revolt" a g a i n s t w a r , t h e reports all our s w a i n s m a y commend her. n o w sits in S t . Peter's Chair of w h i c h in t h e n e w s p a p e r s mislead M a y t h e h e a v e n s of to-day such succeed in accomplishing h i s m a n y into t h i n k i n g , n o t so v e r y g r a c e lend h e r t h a t s h e m a y d e s i r e to b r i n g u s all t o g e t h e r long ago, t h a t E n g l a n d had already admired be. W e believe t h a t t h e in Christ. (Christus Rex " g o n e t o pot." T h e f a c t is t h a t present A g e will be an A g e of Christmas, 1 9 3 3 ) . radicalism is g e t t i n g so v e r y F a i t h and spiritual Renaissance. T h i s Post Victorian A g e will, w e popular t h a t t h e n e x t generation U n f o r t u n a t e l y , m a n y g r e a t m e n believe, have m a n y t h i n g s quite m a y b e born into j u s t t h a t kind T h e Great H o u s e of a world t h a t will c a u s e t h e n e w - in t h e Victorian A g e were sadly unexpected. T h a t holder will d r a w from His store comers t o horrify t h e i r p a r e n t s — materialistic and agnostic. t h e radical y o u t h of t o - d a y — b y is 2k t h i n g of t h e past. People to- N o v a et V e t a r a — n o t N e w Lamps t r u m p e t i n g such n e w and horrid d a y are not a n x i o u s t o hear w h a t for Old, but l a m p s new and lamps novelties a s m o n o g a m y , t h e sanc- you don't believe, but w h a t y o u do. old. W e believe t h a t the hope of t i t y of t h e family, a large and It is true t h a t e v e n t h i s re- t h e A g e is w i t h our youth of both g e n e r o u s measure of social justice, awakening b e g a n in t h e d a y s of s e x e s . A n unexampled wave of m o n e t a r y return for thrift, and Victoria in t h e Oxford Movement, spiritual e n t h u s i a s m has p a s s e d , perhaps even religious f a i t h ; it w h i c h meant t h e return to Catholic and is passing, o v e r our y o u n g m e n . m a y even be so d a m n a b l y adven- ideals. The Oxford Movement is It w a s not so in the days of turous in n e w and untrodden p a t h s still m o v i n g in t h e * present A n g l o - Victoria. W h o e v e r , in his wildest a s t o repudiate t h o s e s t a n d b y s of Catholic Movement, t h e cream of dreams, could h a v e foreseen the t h e conservatism of our day w h i c h w h i c h is t h e Confraternity of v a s t tide of v o c a t i o n s ? Seminaries: flaunt under n a m e s of " b i r t h U n i t y . The work of t h i s now and N o v i t i a t e s are overflowing, control," "companionate marriage," widespread Comfraternity i s to Osterley is packed out, a n d y e t w e "sterilization of t h e moron," "liv- eliminate e v e r y doctrinal error in get on an a v e r a g e three letters a i n g your o w n life," and, last but not t h e Church of England and to day from fine y o u n g men w h o s e least, Governmental seizure of n e g a t i v e each one of t h e T h i r t y - one a i m is t h e Priesthood. There earned individual income. It m a y nine Articles. The following will is an ever-increasing waiting list. e v e n be expected t o tear them, in certainly i n t e r e s t and a s t o n i s h With all this t h e r e are still thout h e final analysis, t h e banner under m a n y of our readers who are not sands of places in England with no w h i c h a blktant a t h e i s m has all too aware of w h a t is g o i n g on. In a church and n o priest. There are long m a s k e d itself, t h e banner w i t h remarkable sermon on "The Triple large tracts of country in which There t h e s t r a n g e device "One religion is C r o w n / ' by t h e Rev. W. B. Mono- the Church is not known. a? good as another." Fantastic as ham, B.D., Rector of St. Swithin's. are thousands and thousands of Catholics who must such a supposition m a y seem to- Worcester, t h e preacher, a f t e r scattered The need of day, " 'tis histhry," a s Mr. Dooley speaking of Our Divine Lord's necessarily drift. priests is dailv g r o w i n g more and philosophically explained to the Kingship, s a y s : more. We still h a v e this England modernist H e n n e s s y : each generaThe D i v i n e S o v e r e i g n t y is of ours as t h e g r e a t e s t Foreign tion, like t h e A t h e n i a n s , seeks ever reflected in t h e h u m a n i n s t i t u - Mission with f o r t y millions to for some new thing*. tion of K i n g s h i p . T h u s , in t h e bring into t h e Church. Convert E n g l i s h c o n s t i t u t i o n of royalty, England and t h e w a r for Christ is t h e r e are t h r e e m a x i m s . T h e won. K i n g is j u p r e m e . T h e K i n g can

only an attraction t o w h a t Kipling calls " s o m e t h i n g n e w and never heard before." If t h a t s o m e t h i n g happens t o be c o n s e r v a t i v e or e v e n hidebound and reactionary it is a s eagerly a c c e p t e d — a t least for t h e time b e i n g — a s any of t h e innovatory doctrines of t o - d a y . Thirdly, and incredible as it m a y s e e m to the m a n y at t h e p r e s e n t time, j u s t t h a t is g o i n g to happen in t h e n e x t generation that has happened before in t h e world's h i s t o r y : y o u t h will act according t o form, a s j u s t n o w described under " s e c o n d l y . " F o u r t h l y , a s regards t h e real radical, a g e of y e a r s m a k e s no difference to h i s radicalism except to e x t e n t it. T h e ideal, t h e incorrigible, the unconvertible radical is a l w a y s a n old man or w o m a n . A n d w i t h increase of a g e their radicalism spreads, and it spreads in directions e v e n t h e y t h e m s e l v e s never d r e a m e d of w h e n t h e y began t o be radical.

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MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

1935.

Notes & Comments. I HOW T H E P O P E G R E E T E D T H E DEATH OF CARDINAL BOURNE

CARDINAL

ON

HIS

JUBILEE •

DAY.

A great Churchman has gone to his Monday, J u n e 11, 1934. reward. When he was first raised to the Episcopate he was greeted by Cardinal HOLY FATHER'S LETTER TO THE- CARDINAL Vaughn, with whom he was to be most closely associated till he succeeded the \ To Our Beloved Son, Francis Bourne^ Cardinal Priest of the Holy Roman latter as Cardinal Archbishop of WestChurch of the Title of St. Pudentiana, Archbishop of Westminster. minster, London, in the following letter: POPE PIUS XL "April 17th, 1896. My Dear Lord Bishop-elect,—Now that I have certain information of your appointment as Coadjutor with right of succession to the See of Southwark, I hasten to offer you every best wish, that God may use you as His instrument to do great things for His glory, both in raising the spirit and life of the priesthood, and in winning souls to salvation. I heartily welcome you among our number.—Your faithful and devoted Herbert Cardinal Vaughn." And a year later, when Mgr. Bourne hac' succeeded to the See of Southwark, the Cardinal wrote: "Once more welcome. 'He who has begun a good work in you will perfect it to the day of Jesus C h r i s t / " The "good work" that both these great seivants of God had pre-eminently in mind was the better education of the future English clergy. This is well brought out in a letter which Father Bourne, as he then was, addressed to Cardinal Vaughn three years earlier. It is not without interest to English Catholics everywhere to recall that letter; and those of them who can cast their minds back in retrospect some thirty to fcrty years, and who know in what high esteem the Catholic Episcopate and Clergy are held to-day by all classes in England, will know how well, under God, premise has been brought to fruition in the Archiepiscopate of the late Cardinal Bourne.—R.I.P.

Our Beloved Son, Health and the | Apostolic Benediction! It is with great joy that We have just i learned that you are soon to celegrate + 50th anniversary of yiur ordination to t t h e priesthood; because the commemora7 tion of this happy event provides Us with £ a most suitable opportunity of declaring once again Our love and esteem for you, and of associating Ourself paternally with the happiness which you and yours so justly experience on this occasion. * * * * * I Numerous and outstanding are the I services which you have rendered to both 7 Church and State. From the moment | when you first entered the divine • ministry, you have spared neither trouble I nor labour in fulfilling the sublime duties ^of the priesthood for the profit and I edification of souls, especially when in 7 your early years you were entrusted • with tre charge of a diocesan seminary, • and subsequently with the, episcopal I office.

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• j£>ut ammg your many and varied • activities on behalf of souls, there is one I which merits special praise; We refer to t t h e zeal and the energy with which you • have ever promoted the sound educatiin • of the young, and particularly of those • destined for the priesthoid. It must, 1 indeed, be a great consolation to| you, to I reflect that you have devited nearly the f whole of your life to this work of educat i o n . The good education of the young THE CLOVEN HOOF IN MEXICO. • is the certain hope of better time to Icome; it is also the zealous pastor's The evident anti-Catholic bias in 7 crown of delight and happy reward. Reuters second-class news service to Malaya, which has appeared recently without comment in our local Press, has deeply pained and shocked every Catholic bright as the sun, terrible as an army reader who is well acquainted by other set in array? " reading with the real nature of the antiWell may Calles fear. For the God campaign that has been carried on in Mexico with relentless intensity mothers of Mexico refuse to send their during the past seventeen years nearly. ccildren to the Socialistic and anti-God Calles, who dictates the policy of the schools set up by the Calles—Obregon Revolutionary junta, first assured him- Revolutionary [substitute for "Governself of the support of the Army. Next ment." And so, fearing, Calles has rehe appealed to Labour by promising course to the last desparate device of the more than economic principles could politically bankrupt: namely, the engiguarantee. Then he called for the sup- neering of a fake "Catholic Plot" to port of the farmers on an agrarian policy overthrow the Republic. that makes the "American" reform proMothers of Mexico! we look forward gramme look pale and anaemic in com- to hailing your speedy victory, and we parison. Finally, having thus assured shall beseige heaven with prayer that himself of the subjection of all active your victory may be complete when it opposition, by means of Utopian pro- comes. mises to the masses, he jumped to the limit of domination, but in a sphere CALLES' VICTORIES! where he knew that he could be opposed only by passive resistence: he said Since the active persecution of the "We must enter into and take pos- Church in Mexico was initiated by Calles session of the minds of the children, and Obregon all churches and private the minds of youth." religious schools have been closed in But in that ultimate campaign he finds seven States, from several the Bishops himself face to face with the forces of and most of the priests have been banishthe Universal Church, the Catholic Faith, ed and in many cases the unhappy people and that masterpiece of God's creation are bereft of all religious ministrations, depicted in the first and last Books of even at the hour of death. Priests and Divine Revelation: Genesis, and the nuns and lay men and women have been Apocalypse of the Beloved Disciple, John: killed, wounded or imprisoned in scores Calles finds himself face to face with the and thousands have been driven into exile Mother and the Child— with their clergy or have sought safety in the mountains and jungles where they "Who is she that cometh forth as the morning rising, fair as the moon, drag on a pitiable existence.

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W ith good reason, therefore, do the 1 clergy and the faithful, as well as the || civic authorities, in that noble arch- jj diocese which you have now governed <• for si many years, regarded you with a • unique veneration and affection. And I We have no doubt that the coming f celegration of your jubilee will be • marked with very special demonstrations • of gratitude and devotion. • 7

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We, who have ever felt for you, Our • beloved Son, a deep and paternal affec- I tion, do most sincerely congratulate you j upon the years of a life spent so holily and so fruitfully; and We trust that, fully restored to health, you may yet live long and flourish, surrounded as with a crown by those for whom you have done so much. * * * * * • And that this happy event may be 7 attended with still greater profit to the • souls of the people, We joyfully permit • that after the celebration of Mass o n I that solemn occasion, you give the Bless- t ing in Our name to all present, granting 7 them a Plenary Pardon, to be gained • on the usual condition. And meanwhile, • as a pledge of heavenly blessings, and I in sign of Our special charity. We grant t most lovingly in the Lord, to you, Our • beloved Son, to your Bishops Auxiliary, • and to all the clergy and the faithful t committed to your care, the Apostilic I Benediction. f Given at St. Peter's, on the 8th day of June, the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in the year 1934, the 13th of Our Pontificate. PIUS, P. P. XI. |

FEELING IN U.S.A. Catholic feeling in the United States has, naturally, been deeply moved by the evil news from across the Rio Grande, and at a meeting in Washington on Saturday, three Cardinals, nine Archbishops and 66 Bishops entered a strong protest against the tyrannical conduct of the Mexican Government. Signs are not wanting that uneasiness as to the security of their grip on power is affecting the Revolutionary Party leaders. Every action that helps to further loosen that grip will be a blow for freedom for the souls of the people of Mexico. TRUTH vs. ERROR. A series of prophetic lectures was delivered in George Town, Penang, by an American Professor during AprilJune, 1933. There were ten lectures in all and they were fully reproduced in the Straits Echo at the time. The first lecture was delivered at the Town Hall at a largely attended public meeting presided over by a notability in the world of George Town. The lecturer, in the course of his flights into prophecy, did not succeed in avoiding controversial points of dogma, and his incursions into the field of historical truth were either childish or pathetically ignorant. In order to refute the dogmatic and historical untruths propounded in the lectures it

DOCTORS OR—CHARLATANS? "Is it not the greatest and noblest traditions of their profession for the physician and surgeon to spend laborious nights and days in alleviating humaa suffering and in seeking to cure, and not to kill, his patients?'' This is the question that was put by Dr. Thoma* Colvin, K.S.G., one of the most distinguished medical men in Great Britain, in an address recently to the Glasgow Catholic Transport Guild. The occasion was the discussion of the statement just made public that one Dr. Millard, of Leicester, had drafted a Bill t# give doctors the legal right to kill patient* whom they consider are suffering from "incurable diseases. Dr. Colvin left his hearers in no doubt upon the subject, he said that such a law, if passed, would mean the end of all medical research, yet it was medical research that kept the soul of the doctor alive, and without medical research the doctor would be reduced to the level of the chorlatan wh« dispenses coloured water for medicine. A full account of Dr. Colvin's lecture wifi be found on another page of this Issue. DOG'S PARADISE.

Every town in Malaya has its dog'* paradise, and in some districts the whole town is given over to the dogs. GreateT Singapore is not yet so densely populated as to constitute a single connected area from the point of view of dogs, thus it cannot yet come under the "howl of a single dog, like an united choru* under the single baton of a Meecham. But, speaking of the metropolis, there is one area that any conductor m i envy from the point of view of a co^ tinuous cacophony of sound, and thar area is Cairn Hill, Emerald Hill, anfi Oxley Rise. In this area, the nightly ululations, of the growing population of canine substitutes for children is something to wonder at. This area, shoull furnish a record bag within the next few weeks, when licensing time comes roung again. Would-be sleeeprs at nighty whose avocations during the day do not permit of their wasting the saved daylight in somnolence, should prepare a great reception for the dog shooter. "He should be regarded as Singapore's mosfr prized artist during January. w

PUCK AND THE PRINTER. The editor asked the foreman why o* page seventeen of the Christmas Number, and above the eighteenth line from the bottom of column two, the compositor took out thirteen lines of type and stuffed them in five lines higher up in column one? But the foreman retorted that in every first print in English in the tropics the spirit of Shakespear had to be placated by allowing Puck to have his fling; and, he added, only by allowing Puck this sort of perquisite in the first number is it possible to ensure his suffering any restraint at all in future numbers. Witk this explanation the editor had perforce to be content, but he looks forward witb not a little curiosity to the, future.

(Continued from column 3.) is only necessary to state plainly the opposite truths that stand for ever opposed to the untruths. The present newspaper is the first available for publishing the repudiations in systematic order as written out immediately after each lecture. The first appears on another page in this issue and it is proposed to continue the series weekly.


1

Short Story

the night. No more words he said, but he turned and led the way; while the young man, who could, sing on the mandolin, wasted none of his words on this discourteous object. They ascended the short oak stairway down which mine host had come, the great timbers of which were gnawed by a myriad r a t s , and they went by passages with the light of one candle into the interior of in Heaven and its fragments had fallen the inn, which went back farther from on spain. All the way he went he thd street than the young man had gazed a t those flowers, the first anemoues supposed; indeed he perceived when they of the year; and long after, whenever came to the great corridor at the end he sang the old airs of spain, he thought of which was his appointed chamber, of spain as it appeared that day in all that here was no odrinary inn, as it the wonder of spring; the memory lent had appeared from outside, but that it a beauty to his voice and a wistfulness penetrated into; the fastness of some to his eyes that accorded not ill with great family of former times, which had the theme of the songs he sang, and fallen on evil days. The vast size of were more than one* to melt ' proud it. the noble design, where the rats had hearts deemed cold. And so gazing he spared the carving, and what the; moths came to a town that stood on a hill, had left of the tapestrhs, all testified before he was yet tired, though he had to that; and, as for the evil days, they done nigh twenty of those flowery miles hung about the place, evident even by of spain; and since it was evening, and the light of one candle guttering with the light was fading away, he went to every draught that flew from the haunts an inn and drew his sword in the of the rats, an inseparable heirloom for twilight and knocked with the hilt of all who disturbed those corridors. it upon the oaken door. And so they came to the chamber. In answer to that summons, steps Mine host entered, bowed without came thumping down the inner stairway. grace in the doorway, and extended his Different windows took the light of a candle, and none other light shone in left hand, pointing into the room. The the house; it was clear that it was impression made upon the young man moving with the steps all down the was as of some darkness long undisechoing stairway. The sound of steps turbed and yielding reluctantly to the ceased to reverberate upon wood, and candle's intrusion. And indeed there now they slowly moved over stone flags; was room for darkness in that chamber, our young man now heard breathing, for the walls went up into such an one breath with every steps, and at altitude that you could scarcely see the length the sound of bolts and chains ceiling, at which mine host's eyes undone and the* breathing now very glanced, and the young man followed close. The door was opened swiftly; his look. a man with mean eyes, and an expression He accepted the accommodation with devoted to evil, stood watching him for a nod; as indeed he would have accepted an instant; then the door slammed to any room in that inn, for the young are again, the bolts were heard going back sv/ift judges of character, and one again into their places, the steps and who had accepted such a host was unthe breathing moved away over the likely to find fault with rats or the stone floor, and the inner stairway profusion of giant cobwebs, dark with began again to echo. the dust of years, that added so much "If the wars are here," said our to the dimness of that sinister inn. They young man, "good, and I will sleep turned now and* went back, in the wake under the stairs." And he listened in of that guttering candle, till they came the street for the sound of war and, again to the humbler part of the buildhearing none, continued his discourse. ing. Here mine host pushed open a door "But if I have not come as yet to the and indicated his dining-chamber. There wars I sleep under a roof." a long table stood, and on it parts of For the second time therefore he the head and hams of a boar; and at drew his sword, and began to strike the far end of the table a plump and methodically a t the door, noting the sturdy man was seated in shirt-sleeves grain of the wood and hitting where it feasting himself on the boar's meat. He was softest Scarsely had he got a leaped up at once from his chair as soon good stripe of the oak to look like coming as his master entered, for he was the away, when steps once more descended servant; mine host may have said much the wooden stair and came lumbering to him with a flash of his eyes, but he ovfer the stones; both steps and breath- said no more with his tongue but the ing were quicker, for mine host was one word, "Bog"; he then bowed himhurrying to save his door. self out, leaving our young man to take When he heard the sound of the bolts the only chair and to be waited upon by and chains again our young man ceased its recent possessor. to beat upon the door: once more it The boar's meat was cold and gnarled, opened swiftly, and he saw mine host another piece of meat stood on a plate before him, eying him with those bad eyes; of too much girth, you might on a shelf and a loaf of bread nearby, have said, to be nimble, yet somehow but the rats had had most of the bread: suggesting to the swift intuition of the young man demanded what the meat youth, the spirit and shape of a spider, was. "Unicorn's tongue," said the serwho despite her ungainly build is agile vant, and the young man bade him set the dish before him, and he set-to well enough in her way. content, though it may be suspected that Mine host, standing there in the doorthe unicorn's tongue was only horse: it way, said nothing; and our young man, was a credulous age, as all ages are. who seldom concerned himself with the At the same time he pointed to a threepast, holding that the. future is all we legged stool that he perceived in a can order the scheme* of (and may be corner of the room, then to the table, even here he was wrong), made no then to the boar's meat, and lastly to mention of bolts or door and merely the servant, who perceived that he was demanded a bed for the night.' permitted to return to his feast, to which Mine host rubbed his chin, he had he ran with alacrity. neither beard nor moustache but wore I have said that our young man seldom hidious whiskers; he rubbed it thoughtfully and looked at the young man. concerned himself with the past, but Yes, he said, he could have a bed for considered chiefly the future: it was of

M I N E H O S T FIRST INSTALMENT. X5

35

Being convinced that his hour had tome, a father called for his eldest son and so addressed him: "O eldest son of mind, your younger brother being dull and clever, on whom those iraits that women love have not been bestowed by €?pd, I will'leave him these my ancestral valleys, for not unlikely it was some siirof mine has caused his spirit to be visited with dulness, as Holy Writ slets forth, the sins of the fathers being visited on the children; and thus I make amends. But to you I leave my long, most flexible, ancient Castilian blade; and what it will not win for you in the wars, that shall be won for you by your mandolin, for you have a way with R that goes well with the old airs of tpain. And choose, m y son, rather a moonlight night when ^ou sins under those curved balconies that I knfsw, ah me, so well; for there is much advantage in the moon. And if any statue should gleam on the grass near by, or i | the magnolia bfe in blossom, or even the nightingale singing, or if anything l e beautiful in the night, in any of these things also there is advantage; for a maiden will attribute to her lover afi manner of things that are not his a t all, but are* the outpourings from the hand of God. There is also this advantage in the moon, that, if interrupters come, the moon lightr is better suited to the play of a blade than the mere darkness of night; indeed but the merry play of my sword in the moonlight w^as a joy to see, it so flashed, so danced, so sparkled. In the moonlight also one makes no unworthy stroke, but nath scope for those fair passes that Sevastini taught, which were" "long ago Hre wonder of Madrid/' The old lord paused, and breathed for * little space, as it were gathering Breath for his last words to his son* He breathed deliberately, then spoke atgain. " I leave you," he said, "well content t h a t you have the two accomplishments, my son, that are most needful m a Christian man, skill with the *word and a way with the mandolin." And with t h a t grand manner that they Had at t h a t time in Spain, although his strength was failing, he gave to his eldest son hin Castilian sword. Then gathering his strength for the last time and looking a t his son, "The sword to the wars," he said. "The mandolin to the balconies."' With t h a t he fell back «ead. Now there were no wars at that time so far as was known in spain, but that old lord's eldest son, regarding those last words of his father as a commandment, determined then and there that Be must gird his legacy to him and seek for the wars, wherever those wars might be*; and, so soon as the obsequies «f the sepulture were ended, he set forth on foot along a road of spain, his legacy dangling- from his girdle in its long, straight, lovely scabbard, blue velvet with emeralds on it. Upon his back he had slung his mandolin. And the time ef the year was spring, a time when the warmth coming up out of Africa to the South first touches spain and multitudes of anemones come forth a t l e r feet. All the way as he went that young man looked a t the flame of those southern flowers, flashing on either side of l i m , as though the rainbow had broken

the future that he was thinking when he asked this question: Why did my worthy and entirely excellent host shut his door in my face? "Did he s o ? " said the servant. "He then bolted it and found it necessary to put the chains back on it, doubtless for some good reason." "Yes," said the servant thoughtfully, and looking at the young man, "and so he might. He must have liked you." Verily was our young man just the one to send out into the wide world with a sword and a mendolm, for he had much shrewed sense. He never pressed a point, but when something had been said that might mean much he preferred to store it, as it were, in his mind and pass on to other things, somewhat as one might kill game and pass on and kill more and bring it all home, while a savage would cook the first kill and eat it on the spot. So he never exclaimed at the servants remark "That is not the way to treat one you like." Instead his attention passed to the rings which the servant wore on his little fingers; they were gold and of excellent workmanship and had once held precious stones, as large gaps testified; in our present time they would have been priceless, but in an age when* workers only worked at arts that they understood, and then worked for the joy of it, before the word artistic became rediculous, exquisite work went without saying; and as the rings were slender- they were of little intrinsic value. Our young man made no comment upon the rings; it was enough for him to have noticed them. He merely noted that they were not ladies' rings, for no lady's ring would have fitted on to any one of those fingers: the rings therefore of gallants: and not given to the servant by their owners, for whoever wore the precious stones needed the rings to wear them in, and rings did not wear out like hose, which a gallant well give to a servant. Nor, thought he, had the servant stolen them, for whoever stole them would keep them whole or part with them whole and get a better price. Beside the servant had an honest face, or a face at least that seemed honest in such an inn: and while these thoughts were passing through his mind the servant spoke again: "Good hams," said he, having already eaten one and started on another. Perhaps he spoke out of gratitude for the honour and physical advantage of being permitted to sit there and eat those hams, perhaps tentatively, to find out whether he might consume the second, perhaps merely to start a conversation, being attracted by the honest looks of the young man. "You are hungry?" questioned the young man. "Praise God I am always hungry," answered the servant. "If I were not hungry I should starve." "Is that s o ? " said the young man. "You see," continued the servant, "the manner of it is this: my master gives me no food, and it is only when I am hungry that I dare to rob him by breaking in, as you saw me, upon his viands; were I not hungry I should not dare to do so, and so " He made a sad and expressive movement with his two hands suggestive of autumn leaves blown hence to die. T "He gives you no food?" again questioned the young man. "It is the way of many men with their dog," explained the servant, "They give him no food," and then rubbed his hands cheerfully, "yet the dog does not die." "And he gives you no wages?" "Just these rings," replied the servant. (Te be concluded Next Week.)

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CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

1935.

13

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Dead King Defender of CatholiC RightS.

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Attachment

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Austrian N a t i o n to tke F a i t L

Stopped Expulsion Of T h e J e s u i t s .

King Alexander attended the services PREVEXTS NATIONALISM FROM GOING TOO FAR. in his palace chapel regularly, and beI Tried for Rapprochement B e t w e e n fore any important undertaking he. used I Catholics and Orthodox. (By NCWC News Service) Vienna. to retire to his modest country residence (From the "Universe" Special at Oplenats where he built a magnificent Correspondent) Austria's attachment to the Catholic it is now sought to force upon us by King Alexander, whose death has Byzantine church to the glory of God Faith was expressed by Prince Starhem- brutal and reprehensible means. and the memory of his ancestors. Here I shocked the whole civilised world, was he has often been known to spend a berg, Vice-Chancellor, in an oration he a devout and earnest Christian. delivered during the celebrations held in "Catholicism is a source of force for quiet hour in prayer and meditation. Brought up in the Orthodox Church, Vienna in honour of a famous priestthe Austrians because it is the Catholic he was faithful to her sacramental statesman, Fr. Marco d'Aviano. Faith which forms a proper nationalism HOLY FATHER'S SYMPATHY teaching, and his deep religious convicand saves us from pushing nationalism I am able to reveal that the Holy tions enabled him to see how close she It was Fr. d'Aviano who, 250 years to extremes, and because it is the Father has always shown a very special stood to the Catholic Church, which has ago, brought about the alliance between Catholic Faith which creates that interest and sympathy for King always recognised the validity of the nationalism which is not confined to Alexander. Informed through his the Hapsburg Emperor, Leopold I, the Orthodox priesthood. King of Poland, and the Republic o l itself, but conceives the definition One of King Alexander's most ardent Papal Nuncio at Belgrade of King Venice, which resulted in rescuing nation' as an element which must wishes was for a rapprochement between Alexander's efforts on behalf of ChrisEurope from Turkish domination. His serve the whole world. tian principles and morality in the j his Catholic and Orthodox subjects. cause of Beatification was introduced ** Possibly," he said to me on one public and national life of the country, in 1703, but came to a standstill. On "Therefore, we Austrians are on the the Holy Father has frequently sent j occasion, "you Catholics envisage the the occasion of the present celebrations right national ground. We are of opinion J ultimate reunion of the churches from him messages of goodwill. a telegram was sent to the Holy Father that it is willed by God that there should j a different angle, but before that stage Only last year, when I had the imploring him to raise the priest- be various peoples and nations, that the I of the discussion is reached there is privilege of a private audience with the statesman to the honours of the altar. members of a nation should be conscious much that can be achieved on both sides. It was signed by President Miklas, of being members of such nation, and There is so great a need of better under- Holy Father, J l i s Holiness gave me a Cardinal Innitzer, Prince Starhemberg from this consciousness derive their standing and more knowledge of one special blessing for King Alexander and and Fr. Valstagna, General of the duties towards the nation. on his efforts for the good of his people. another between Catholics and Orthodox, Capuchins. "I look upon the present Pope as "It is our opinion that it is an order King Alexander's marriage was one of the greatest men of the age willed by God, that in case of need we Prince Starhemberg said: and a fearless champion of right and ideally happy, and with* Queen Marie "Just as did the days of Fr. Marco should go as far~as to take up arms for justice,' and" I follow his efforts for and the three little boys home life at d'Aviano, our times show that one of the preservation and the future developEastern reunion with the deepest res- the palace was a model to the nation-of_ the mam sources ol Austria's strength ment of our nation. the Christian family, where religion pect and interest." is the Catholic Faith, and just as then "But it cannot be an order willed King Alexander had many personal comes first and principles of duty are the warriors, set out to fight under the by God that one nation shall grow put into practcie. friends among the Catholic Hierarchy sign of the Cross against the Crescent powerful at the expense of another, of Yugoslavia, and chief of these was ^orH3ie-4iberty of Austria,—so we may w that one nation shall take the view The late King will have the suffrages Mgr. Bauer, Archibishop of Zagreb. say without exaggeration that the great that all others are inferior and must The King told me himself only last June of all his Catholic subjects at home and congress of Catholics held here in Vienna be suppressed. of his deep filial affection for Mgr. of numerous friends abroad, and prayers exactly a year ago was the real birthwill certainly be offered, too, for Bauer and, to quote but one example, hour of a new Austria. "We think it to be the order willed when I ventured to mention the newly- his widow and for his schoolboy son who by God that means and ways should be appointed Coadjutor, Mgr. Stepinac, has so suddenly been called to the "That congress was a protest of the found to progress to future development whom I had just seen in Zagreb, King throne. German Austrians against that mate- in agreement with other nations, states Alexander said very simply: rialistic conception of nationslism which and countries." THE POPE'S CONDOLENCES " I have not yet met him, and indeed The Holy Father telegraphed to the I had never even heard of him until Mgr. Bauer came to see me a few weeks ago. Queen at Marseilles expressing his grief Mgr. Bauer looked so weary and anxious at the crime and his profound sympathy. and there had been so many difficulties His Holiness also sent messages of deep about the choice of an Archbishop sympathy to Yugoslavia and France Coadjutor with right of succession that through the Papal Nuncios at Belgrade when he begged me as a personal favour and Paris. to give my approval to the nomination of Dr. Stepinac I did not hesitate for an family is perpetuated above the casket instant. I said if you think he is the LANCASHIRE MISSIONS holding the altar stone of the original right man to succeed you, I have nothing FOURTH CENTENARY church. When Lancashire was a wilto say but to give my consent. My faith in Mgr. Bauer is implicit." In the ancient Roman Catholic Church derness of woods, moors, and mosses, CHAMPION OF JESUITS. of St. Swithin, Gill Moss, where a French the site of the first chapel formed part The Archbishop himself has frequently King once worshipped, and Lancashire of one of the mosses with which West spoken to me of King Alexander's high ncbility lie buried alongside the graves Derby is supplied, such as Page Moss, <jualities and of his own paternal of village worthies, a memorial shrine Black Moor Moss, and Pilch Moss. affection for him. Grievances and diffito mark the fourth centenary of the The second church of the mission was culties of Catholics in Yugoslavia were mission was, recently decicated by the built on the site of the existing school settled whenever these could be laid by Very Rev. Dean Oldham, of St. Alban's Mgr. Bauer before the King, and the Liverpool, who is a canon of the Lourdes at Gill Moss in 1534, and was transferred to Croxteth Hall, the^ seat of the vexed problem of religious instruction Basilica. Molyneux family, about 1614. Later it in the schools which anti-clerical factors « was moved to a cottage attached to a wanted to dispose of by complete The memorial took the form of a farmhouse and King Louis XVIII. of elimination was regulated to a large shrine to Our Lady of Lourdes, with France worshipped there, according to extent by Mgr. Bauer's intervention paintings of the peasant girl St. BernaIt is difficult to express the a record in the baptismal register. The with the King. dc-tte and the prayer of the sick, by Miss mission returned to its original home in reverent love w e feel for A. campaign against the Jesuits Mary Egan, a girl parishioner. An oak 1824, when the present church, accomstarted in Yugoslavia soon after the those w h o are gone. A panel bears the names of thirty-six modating 800, was opened. One of the events in Spain was cut short by King priests who have served the mission, funeral here and a Symbol few relics of a historic past is a frail Alexander himsejf and, far from them including Viscount Molyneux, S.J., one of remembrance aid and silver ciborium, used only at Christmasbeing banished from the country as the of seven members of the Molyneux time, on the rim of which is engraved comfort the bereaved. anti-clericals had desired, the King family who belonged to the Jesuit Order, " The gift of ye Hon. Mary Molyneux, sanctioned the enlargement of the Jesuit and also the sixth Lord Stormer, who of Croxteth, 1738. Pray for her." Church in Belgrade. was chaplain in 1747. The King told me that he had been The Very Rev. Dean Oldham, after Relics Of The Past reading up the history of the Society ^ blessing the memorial shrine, congratu°- Jesus and that as a consequence he The church, built in Romanesque style, lated the parishioners on the memorial a s full of admiration for their scholarPENHAS ROAD. SINGAPORE ha> still traces in the sanctuary of the and said there had been a wonderful ship and devotion. He did not think original church built more than 400 years number of shrines erected in honour of that the Orthodox Church had anything ago, and the xrrest of the Molyneux Lourdes in this country. from the Jesuits in Yugoslavia.

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DEATH

OF F A T H E R

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

1935. FROM

LESTER.

Just as the printers' work was over, and the copies of the November Stella Maris had been sent to its many subscribers all over the world, there came b us the sad news of the death of father Lester. At present we can do Ittle more than record our great loss ±nd the loss to so many who, month by month, looked forward to his kindly instructions and to his solution of their doubts and difficulties. In our January number we hope to say more about him and the work that he has done, not only - with the pen in his contributions to the press in the Stella Maris, but his great work also in the training of so many of Our Lady's Young Priests, and in his fostering the "Knights," the **Handmaids" and "Pages" of the Blessed Sacrament. Then may we make atonement for the present scant notice of him. His death was somewhat sudden and unexpected. He was busy as usual on Tuesday, October 23 rd, but early next morning he was taken seriously ill and the doctor and his Confessor were summoned to his bedside, when he received the last rites of the Church. His illness was heart failure and an attack of asthma, and these were beyond his resisting power. He had not quite reached his seventieth year, and if he had survived up to Candlemas next he would have attained his Golden Jubilee as a Jesuit. As a convert to the Catholic Faith he was well acquainted with the difficulties and manifold trials of those who seek refuge in the One Fold and his advice and help were often asked and never refused. "We commend him to the earnest prayers and supplications of all our readers—May he rest in peace. PROM REV. JAMES IGNATIUS ROBINSON, S.J. T h e two organizations started by Father Lester are very different in method and detail, indeed, the two seem to be quite distinct. The Rights and Handmaids envisage a great army composed of every class, devoted to the Blessed Sacrament and showing their devotion by frequent and regular reception; the other, that of the "Young Priests," deals with a chosen few desirous of being associated with the Holy Eucharist as a Sacrament and a Sacrifice, and aiming at being ranked among Its Sacred ministers. Although the two seem so different in character and method, they are really closely connected. 'The carrying out of Pius X's Decree on Frequent and Daily Communion leads necessarily to a greater love and appreciation of the Blessed Sacrament, and very often to the desire to be still imore closely united to Him in His Priesthood. Among Rnights who cultivated the spirit of chivalry, the "'.Knightly Spirit," some would be sure to aspire to a life of greater sacrifice and service. The Young Priests are not all young, pd they are not priests. Father Lester's een insight that many who had left heir schooldays behind and yet ambiioned to become Priests could only attain their ambition by some interval of special training, not ecclesiastical, but v h i c h would enable them to begin their ecclesiastical studies preparatory to ordination. It is this preparatory course that he provided at Osterley. Without some such course, humanly speaking, there was no chance of embarking no the ecclesiastical courses of philosophy and theology. Of course, without generous he}£. this would hav% been impossible; thiswas %yfa*%J*& grateful to his "Hairy Godmothers"; and no dubt they are grateful to him for giving them the opportunity of co-operating in so glorious a work, and are almost as proud

THE

TIMES OF OCTOBER 25 th.

From a very kind notice in The Times wc extract the following: \

" Father Lester, who was himself a convert to the Roman Catholic Faith, was peculiarly successful in recommending that Faith to others. As editor of Stella Maris, a small magazine with a literary skill the Roman Catholiclic large circulation, he presented with teaching and answered, tactfully and wisely, the difficulties of numberless correspondents. . . H e will be remembered as one who, apart from his great piety and charm, was able to carry any work through with the sole help of his own personality."

WISH

CARDINAL

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FOR F R E N C H ACADEMY. I (From the " Universe" Correspondent) I Paris. Strong opinion favours the candidature of Cardinal Verdier, Archbishop of Paris, for a place in the French Academy, but so far the Cardinal has modestly declined to accept nomination. If he should be * elected, he would rill the vacancy caused by the death of M. Poincare. The place rendered vacant by the death of M. Louis Barthou is intended for Paul I Claudel, the great Catholic poet, now J French Ambassador at Brussels and formerly Ambassador at Washington.

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The Rev. Edmund Lester, S K.B.S., Editor of " Stella Maris and Founder of the Knights, Handmaids and Pages of the Blessed Sacrament, and of Our Lady's Young Priests, who died, aged 68, at Champion House, Osterley, on October 24, 1934. Eternal rest give unto him, O Lord—And let perpetual light shine upon him. Our Lady of Osterley—Pray for him. 99

as he was of the 226 Young Priests who are now priests and no longer young. FROM REV. CLEMENT TIGAR, S J . The death of our beloved Editor has come as a terrible blow to the readers of Stella Maris all over the Englishspeaking Catholic world. He has made three solid and enduring contributions to the history of Catholicism in the twentieth century—Osterley, the Knights of the Blessed Sacrament, and Stella Maris. Since the beginning of the work at Osterley, two hundred and twenty of the vocations which he served have been brought successfully to the priesthood, and they are scattered over all the dioceses of England and Wales, as well as parts of Canada, the United States and Africa; over 400 more are studying Philosophy and Theology on their way to the priesthood. The K.B.S. and H.B.S. Crusade has carried into effect the earnest desire of Pope Pius X "to re-establish all things in Christ." Stella Maris has given English-speaking Catholics an inspiring message month bv month, and taught them to look on their religion as something that calls for youthful ardour and enthusiasm. Behing these three solid works was the inspiring personality of Father Edmund Lester. The dominant note of his rich and forceful character was his power of inspiring others. That was the secret of the powerful influence he exerted over countless souls—he was an inspiring leader of men. He had a great big human heart, full of sympathy for the so-called "failures" of humanity, full of encouragement for any and every good work, and full of boyish enthusiasm. He never threw cold water on the efforts and methods of others, even though they were not in line with his own. He had one great ambition—never to refuse doing an act of kindness. How he achieved that ambition, hundreds who read these lines will testify. He had a peculiar kind of instinct for seeing the good in everybody, and, with delightful humour, making allowances for the foibles and short-comings of poor human nature in everybody.

The source and mainspring of his great-hearted charity was wholly supernatural. These are the words he loved to quote to his young priests: "Be thou an example to the Faithful —in word, in conversation, in charity, in faith, in chastity. "Labour as a good soldier of Jesus Christ. Carefully study to present thyself approved unto God—a workman that needeth not to be ashamed. "In all things show theyself an example of good works—in doctrine, in integrity, in gravity, in sound speech. "In all things let us exhibit ourselves as the Ministers of God—in much patience, in labours, in sweetness, in unfeigned charity." This glorious ideal of St. Paul was the ideal he longed for, strove a.ffer, and meditated on. All who knew Him would say that his life and conversation showed a constant and unswering approximation to that ideal. There is one virtue he had that many of his friends would not have had the opportunity of noticing, and it is the virtue which puts the hall-mark on all the other virtues—genuine humility. Habitually, he accepted criticism of himself and of his methods with a calm and unruffled serenity fo soul. It sometimes happened that he submitted his brilliant writings to the scrutiny of critics younger than and inferior to himself. He always accepted their criticisms wih unquestioning humility, and changed anything in his writings to which they took exception. His cheery optimism, his boyish humour, his gentle humility, and his bighearted charity will be an inspiration to us in the darker moments of life every time we look at the photograph contained in this magazine. Let us show our appreciation of what he has been to us, way he wants to be helped, by offering and done for us, by helping him in the prayer^ and Masses- that God many speedily cleanse him from any blemish or imperfection tat may still remain to be effaced before he can enjoy the Beatific Vision. f

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CONGO

WELCOMES

NEW

BISHOP. Bishop Six, of the Scheut Fathers, the new Vicar-Apostolic of Leopoldville, Belgian Congo, being welcomed by the civic authorities on his arrival a t Leopoldville. No colonising power gives so. much attention to missions as does Belgium. The Governments aids the missionary as priest, as educator, as doctor and as messenger of charity. (Fides).

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CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

" Y o u ! " cried Rose Marie, with inspiring disdain of the very thought. " Well, go then, since you must or be conscripted. I give thanks that you are not accountable; and may the dear Lord forgive those who call the Prince of Peace a God of Battles. But if you, my Rene, must go soldiering to other mten's harm, I for my part at least can but try to heal." Then, parting from him with a helpful show of courage, she had enrolled herself among the nurses and been sent—he knew not whither.

He was a tall and strapping young fellow, lean and muscular of body, well balanced of mind, and pre-eminently a man of peace. If you had met him a year earlier in his native Alsatian village, and questioned him concerning his scheme of life, he would have | answered you in the direct mode of ! speech that matched his thought, someI what as follows: Sadly thinned was his company from " Mousieur, my grandfather was many bloody encounters, and now it was blacksmith of Falons, my father was combined with one of the famous gardes ! blacksmith of Falons, and I, too, will mobiles, wild fellows and reckless, whose keep the forge. But, since Rose Marie officers could scarcely keep them within has the fancy, I will also buy a little the bounds of prdcarious shelter. Yet farm, with a cow and chickens, and even these had come to envy not a little my good mother shall sit m our Rene's mention twice in despatches for chimney-corner and enjoy warm milk " conspicuous bravery." and new-laid eggs. Who is Rose " It comes in the day's work," he said I Marie, do you ask? Ah, Monsieur, quietly. His panic of the new recruit I she is the best and sweetest—yes, and the prettiest girl in all France. We are overcome, his sickening horror of the to be married as soon after Christmas continuous and inevitable cruelty held as the dicipline of the Church permits; in abeyance, he was now but a calm, but what she can see in a plain, stupid cldar-headed servant of the military fellow like me is a wonder. The good machine, obedient to the call of duty * nuns have taught her music and many however repugnant. " A duty, 0 God accomplishments; and she can, besides, of Love! A duty, my Rose Marie! " cook and spin and nurse the sick. It Yet, under the hottest rain of bullets, is only on Sundays and feast-days he reloaded and fired and reloaded again, I that I feel anywhere near her, for I or went forward and dealt out death J have a sort of voice—and she has at closer quarters with the same taught me—and I sing in the choir. mtechanical precision as he was formerly You must hear our anthems, for the wont to turn out horseshoes at the forge. cure, Father Ambrose, says to everyNow as he crouched, watching, a one t h a t his choir is not so bad. But twinge from an old wound touched by | it is all owing to Rose Marie's drilling. the gathering cold of the night made I wish you may be here for the him change his position. Presently he .wedding." ^slipped to a higher mound, behind which * * * * * he could stand nearly upright. And as And now it was Christmas, indeed, he gazed, his eyes ranging over a wide but instead of being married our young scerie, " Where is she? Where is she? " stalwart was far from „his beloved saad_ iterated an inned* voice " on this eve of from his Alsatian village. He was the dear Lord's birthday? My Hose watching out the weary night in blood- Marie, lover of peace—and of me! " stained and bitterly cold trenches It was near to twelve o'clock now, "Somewhere on the Western front." To and freezing ever harder. Over the icy him it was - bewildering when he came, to think of it. He who had shaken and earth, which cracklied as one trod, could cufl'ed in easy-going finality many a be plainly distiugnished the challenge village adversary, but never entered into of the German advanced posts " Wer more vindictive combat; he who had da ? " On the German side no doubt been used to forgive, with the large could be heard with equal distinctness, tolerance of a mild nature and strong the French " Qui vive? " frame, all things forgivable; hel who Suddenly a brooding silence seemed had,-even- in just resentment of the to retign over the deathful scene. For seemingly unforgivable, let Rose Marie's an interval big guns had ceased their soft ejyes and persuasive voice turn him cannonading and rifles had ceased to flash. from contemplated retaliation; he was An officer stamped his feet to restore new a combatant, amidst armed hosts circulation. Then a tall private, alert opposed, to spoil or be despoiled, to and active, of well cut features and a wound or be wounded, to kill or be killed, calm, intelligent expression, stepped out to inspire or to causa to suffer hope and of the shadow and saluted. despair in homes behind the trenches "What is it " on either side. It was bewildering * Captain, may I have leave of absence indeed. from the watch for a little while " " There is nothing unpardonable," he "Nonsense; you are beside yourself could heare Rose Marie's voice even now, "or how could any of us dare to die step into your place instantly. Do you when the time comes! Peace; is always suppose! that I am less cold than yourself? Or anyone else, for that matter? and forever best."_ Sullen cannonading roared and echoed Do not be afraid—this is only a breathing among the surrounding hills and hollows. spell. Wait a little when the firing Shells camel cleaving and whistling to beings again we shall be warm enough." scatter inanimate dust or animate flesh. The soldier did not move. Still salutSmoke lifted and fell. Through acrid ing, he continued most respectfully yet and choking fumes and from out of the pertinaciously. " Captain, I beg of you, obscurities of the* night came commands give me permission. The matter will how best to kill, or a sudden cry or take but a few moments, I assure you, moan as a comrade fell now on this side and you will have no reason to regret now on that, to remain still or to writhe it." in indirect agony. "Peace! Peace!" " The duce I will not! Who are you, counselled Rose Marie; and this was anyhow, and what do you want to do? " what came. Who am I? Why, I am Rene Dufour, At least he had not volunteered for this inhuman slaughter until his very chief singer in Father Ambrose's choir. What I want "to do, Captain, must, borne and people had been threatened. "They will call mei coward," he has please, remain a secret, for a few minutes only." said at last.

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SATURDAY, JANUARY

5th,

1935.

" Then let it remain undone. No further foolishness. Get back. If I were to let one private return to the town tonight, I might as well send back the whole company." " Why—Captain— " smiling frankly —"I have no desire to go back to the town tonight. I want to go in this direction," and hei pointed over toward the German lines. " I ask for only ten minutes leave of absence." The officer's curiosity was keenly awakened. And quiet still brooded over the wintry scene. " Well, then "—he hesitated—" you may go for that length of time. But remember^lt is your own desire. You are seeking almost certain death." Rene immediately leaped forth and advanced swiftly towards the enemy lines. In the silence of the night the frozen crust of the light fall of snow could be heard crunching under his feet. His shadow lengthened mysteriously as he got farther away. At tie n paces distance from the enemy he stood fast, drew himself up and saluted. Then, in a deep-chested and powerful baritone voice, with moving fervour of expression, he began the beautiful Christmas hymn of the composier Adam: " Minuit, Cretiens, e'est l'heiure solonnelle, Ou l'homme-Diew descendit sur nous." " Tis midnight, Christians, the solemn hour At which the God-man camse down t us." 0

Sounding forth so unexpectedly over the silvery scene under the now sparkng winter sky, such added beauty was lent to the sacred song, through the memories of this Holy Eve, that its contrast with the outward circumstances of the occasion touched even the hardest hearts. Not a weapon was raised against the daring singer. No call was heard. In unbroken silence the men of both armies listened to this touching reminder of home and family and their boyhood's faith in religion. His song ended, the brave soldier saluted once more, turned on his heel, and marched deliberatively back to his own lines.

1 5

The Christmas singers crouched once more to their work of precision, directing their missiles for each other's destruction. One singer, however, was destined never again to take the • lifte of his fellow man. Barely had t h e storm of battle been renewed when Rene Dufour crumpled up suddenly a s he Knelt, rolled over and gasped. "Seigneur Dieu!" When he waked again, weeks afterwards in hospital, he fancied a t first thai he might be in heaven. But a sharp pain in his side quickly dissipated t h e idea, and when a cool hand was laid on his forehead he looked up to seel— not an angel nor even a Sister of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, but one who bore on her sieve the insignia of field-nurse "0, Sister" called a well-remembered voice "Thank be to God! ho is conscious." "Rose Marie!" "You must not talk. and sleep."

When he awoke, and was at last allowed to talk a little, "How came you here," he asked, "away from behind the fighting lines?" " I had just been transferred to your section of the front and I heard of your singing to the armies about t h e Holy Infant Jesus. So I quickly got Peave to come and nurse you, since someone must do so. Your singing was an inspiration. But for the news of it I should newer have found you. As for your recovery, you owe it to God's goodness in reward for your hymn. "Well," interposed a Voice, "Speaking as a surgeon, I should say that what ever reward may be due, my man, yov have it here," and the doctor pointec to Rose Marie. And after pausing tc take note of the patient's progress he continued: "When you were brought in we had our hands full and many died, but you had Nurse Rose Marie's undivided attention and she saved your life. Thank her." :

* Captain, 1^ report my return, I hope you do not regret your permission." Before tha officer could answer, attention was called to the German lines, where, in his turn advancing thence towards the French lines, the heavy ngure of an artilleryman could now be seen. Ten paces from the lines he halted, saluted, and in full voice poured forth the beautiful German hymn in praise and thanksgiving for the birth of the Holy Infant, at whose coming heavenly messengers sang the divine behest of " Peace to men of good will." " Vou Himmel hoch, datcomm ich her, Ich bring euch gute, neue Mahr." " From Heaven above to earth I come, To bring glad news to fevery home. Ending his song with the joyous cry " Weiknachtseit! " " Christmas time! " From the German lines came the glad refrain in full chorus: "Weihnachtseit!" to be answered as with one voice from the Frerch lines by " Noel! Noel! f " Christmas! Christmas! " An hour after the artilleryman had retraced his steps and disappeared into the (Jerman trenches, cannon commenced once more to roar forth "their messengers of destruction.

Take this now,

T l U c U .


16

MALAYA

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

1935.

Scouting In Ireland your patrol leader, your teachers, your SOUND TRAINING. clergy. The benefits of the Catholic Scout movement were explained by his Eminence Cardinal MacRory when he presented THE HIDDEN YEARS colours to the Armagh troop in the " Obedience is sometimes difficult, but grounds of his residence, Ara Coeli, it is always good for us. Our Blessed after last Mass in St. Patrick's Cathedral Lord taught the importance and necesrecently. ~ sity of obedience by word and example. " I understand," he said, "that the first Our Lord was once a Boy, and the little Scout principle is that a Scout glories that we know about His boyhood after .in his Faith, and is true to it all his the age of twelve is told us in portion life. I don't know very much about of a single verse of Sacred Scripture, scouting—for that, as for many other but that little is of extreme importance. things, I was born too soon—but I know St. Luke had just told how the Boy enough to know that scouting does not Jesus was lost by Mary and Joseph on consist altogether in marching and the return journey from Jerusalem to drilling and recreation. It has also more Nazareth, and how after three days He serious things in view. was found in the Temple, and then the "It does indeed aim at developing a Evangelist adds: 'And He went down boy's bodily strength by means of with them and came to Nazareth, and marching and various exercises, and at was subject to them.' making him healthy and flippy. It aims, too, at the strengthening of his body on "Note this well, my dear boys. He the old principle, 'A healthy mind in a was subject to them. The Son of God, healthy body/ but its aims reach far the Creator of the world, was subject beyond all this. as a Boy to His parents. If ever you find obedience difficult, think of this VALUABLE TRAINING example left us by the Son of God. "Catholic scouting aims at nothing less than helping to prepare a boy for THEIR ABIDING PURPOSE a decent, happy, successful life in "Take care also to be pure, truthful this world, and for a life of unending and unselfish—in a word, to be all that happiness hereafter. youi Scout law expects you to be. Love "For success in this world you need your country, for patriotism, when not character, and much oij the Scout trainpushed too far, is a virtue, and thank ing and discipline is directed at building God that you have such a lovely country up character. This is why you are to love. i expected and required to be truthful and trustworthy, to be cheerful under "Finally, as your own law charges difficulties, to be courteous, to be thrifty, you, direct your training and all your to be punctual, to be obedient. actions for the glory of God. Thus will "All this, though you boys may not your training make you good boys and advert to the fact, means a most valuprepare you to be good men, efficient, able training for the battle of life. edifying citizens? here and happy fellow"Not only is it important for yourcitizens of the Saints hereafter." selves, but it will be important for your neighbours, for your employers, for D A N G E R O U S TIMES. your partners in some business. In a B i s h o p of Ossory's Appeal F o r word, it is important for the whole Scout Movement. society into which a boy enters. Speaking after the Confirmation cere"NOP is this nearly all," continued his Eminence. "Catholic Scouting aims a t mony in St. John's Parish Church, training your souls. One of your Scout Kilkenny, the Bishop of Ossory, Most principles is that a Scout glories in his Rev. Dr. Collier, made a strong appeal holy Faith and is true to it all his life. on behalf of the Catholic Boy Scouts. Another, that he is pure in thought, "These are dangerous times," he said, word and deed. And another, that he "more dangerous than people realise, does all for the glory of God. and a tremendous appeal is being made to youth all over the world. Youth are THE POPE'S TRIBUTE being asked to do this and that, many "Hence, our Holy Father, Pius XI, of these things being doubtful, many said some time ago to a body of young of them dangerous." Catholic Scouts: 'You are Scouts, who Speaking of the value of Catholic bring to your scouting the beautiful and associations, his Lordship referred to sublime characteristics of your Catholic the Pope's anxiety regarding the situaFaith and Catholic life. Scouting is a tion in Germany and Italy, where the good thing; but of itself it is only a Governments were capturing the youth good thing of earth. You, by your faith for their own purposes. The Pope was and spiritual motives, doing all for the no less anxious about the youth of glory of God, turn it into an affair of Ireland, where efforts were being made heaven.' to lure youth into oath-bound organisa" T h e mere cult and training of the tions. body was well known and practised in His Lordship said the one great pagan times, as witn'ess the famous Catholic organisation for youth was sports of Greece; 'but your association the Catholic Boy Scouts, and he was aims at much more than that—it aims anxious to see it built up on better a t developing and training the enjire lines in the Catholic city of Kilkenny boy, body and soul, so that he may be than at present. true to himself, efficient in his work, and It was a great Catholic organisation. useful to society, and, what is still more Its rules were admirable principles of important, t h a t he may attain the end conduct for the training of the Catholic for which he was created and be for- 1>oy, and he had deliberately decided to ever happy with God in Heaven. strengthen and extend it throughout the *I say to you, then, go on with your city and diocese. work on these lines, bearing in mind It would keep the youth out of these principles, and God bless the dangerous organisations which were not work. Take care to be always obedient recognised or approved by the Catholic to all who have authority over you; Church, because it was definitely a to your parents, your scout-master, Catholic, religious organisation.

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Malaya

Cup

RUGGER:—A. Rozario "All Blues" plays for State and Malaya Cup Matches. G. Pinto, "All Blues" plays for State and Malaya. P. Scully, "All Blues" played for Malaya Cup.

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

AROUND THE

Honours.

CRICKET:—A. R. Chapman. Negris opening batsman and Cricket Captain of the Negri Sembilan Club and Member of the "All Blues" Rugger team plays for State. F. De Silva, Negris Bowler plays for State.

CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

PENANG Mr. P. C. Dias, who has served for the past 23 years on the clerical staff of the Penang Harbour Board, and who was appointed Chief Clerk in 1927, has been elected Chairman of the Management Committee of the Penang Harbour Board Employees Co-operative Thrift and Loan Society. SOCIETY

OF DE

ST. VINCENT PAUL

PENANG CONFERENCE GENERAL MEETING

5th,

1935.

17

PARISHES

He said that he was an old Vincention himself, and that his father had taken a leading part in the activities of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul in Ireland, and that he was very happy indeed to be present at the meeting. After the secret collection had been made, the closing prayers were said by His Lordship. At the request of the Bro. President, His Lordship gave his blessing to those present. FEAST OF ST. FRANCIS XAVIER NOVENA AND RETREAT

Concluding, Mr. Reutens assured las. Lordship of their undivided loyalty, love and esteem and their fervent prayers as to assist him in the arduous duties which he had to perform as Bishop of the diocese of Malacca. PENANG—BALIK PULAU. ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL. ANNUAL CONCERT. St. George's School, Balik Pulau, he!* its tenth annual Concert on the night of Thursday, December 13th, 1934. A* always, the school hall was packed t« its utmost with a large gathering of parents of pupils and friends of the school.

The Church of St. Francis Xavier The Second Quarterly General Meeting of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul Penang celebrated the patronel feast on was held on Saturday, the 8th December, 16th December 1934 in a most befitting Punctually at 7-45 p.m. the entertain1934 at the Parochial House of the manner. In preparation for the solemn Assumption Church at 5 p.m. There occasion a Novena was held when Rev. ment began with a prologue which was were present over 30 members and lady Father Bulliard of Salem Mission gave well spoken by a pupil of Std. III. The HOCKEY:—E. Alexander for State, the benefactresses. Mr. T. E. Conagham, stimulating and edifying sermons in item "Hamis and Khamis" rendered by State Goalie Messrs. K. Kandiah, Honorary Legal Adviser to the Con- clear, expressive Tamil to the congrega- pupils of Standards IV. and V. in the Kong Yong, J. Reutens, Alma Reau vernacular nearly brought the house ference, and Messrs. F. A. Reutens and tion each evening. The salutary effect of this Novena and down with roars of laughter. tens and R. Lopez. The E. Valberg, Presidents respectively Catholic Action in the two parishes of retreat on the parishinners is evidenced children in the Primary Class produced BILLIARDS:—Chan Nam Seng, Negri the Immaculate Conception and the by the fact that there were about 1000 an enjoyable item entitled " Mother Sembilan, Champion for 1934. communicants Goose's Party " which was well rendered. Assumption, also Mrs. E. Valberg, Presi- confessions and 2900 Mr. E. C. Dewitt the genial Superdent of the Society of Lady Benefai- during the season. The church was A sham court scene—"Mercy for a thief* visor of the Singer Sewing Machine tresses of the Society of St. Vincent de packed beyond capacity on the feast day —which was well received by the crowd* Co., of Negri Sembilan, Pahang, and the procession in the evening was provided a fitting finale for the night's Paul were amongst those present. Kelantan and Trengganu attained his well attended. entertainment. The meeting was presided over by 51st birthday and held a Social at his It is earnestly hoped that the His Lordship Mgr. A. Devals, .D.D., At the conclusion, the Rev. Fr. J. Lee* bungalow Temiang Road Seremban Bishop of Malacca, who said the opening recurrence of the feast of St. Francis director of the school, thanked the admultos amos. ^.-J^ra#ers^__A_J^rituaJ^ Reading followed, Xavier each year will bring increased guests for their kind attendance and The coming of a g e o f Mr. success in recalling wayward and lukereminded them to come again to attend ~ after which the President of the ConChapman the youngest son of Mr. and warm Catholics to that Christian path the prize-giving function at 10 a.m. OK ference addressed the meeting. of life which must necessarily savour Mrs. R. V. Chapman of Sind Mahal, the following day. The Bro. Secretary was next called of piety and virtue. " Our thanks are Temiang Road, Seremban was celeupon to read a Paper, entitled, "A Lay due to Rev. Father Bulliard, who by his brated by a large gathering of friends ANNUAL PRIZE-GIVING. Religious Society." forceful sermons, has proved himself a and relat ;ves with a Social and Dance. His Lordship next addressed the MeetAt the prize-giving function on Friday The-friends of Mr. W. E. Kraal of ing, in the course cf his speech he said pulpitier of rare merit and zeal. We Seremban will be glad to learn that that he it was a great honour to preside feel assured that the memory of this December 14, 1934, The Rev. Fr. J. Lee* he has quite recovered from his at the meeting, and he was very pleased soul-inspiring mission shall remain long in his address to the audience, welcome! Mr. C. R. Howitt, the new District Officer* illness and is now confined to his to see the amount of good work that had indelible in our hearts. who so kindly honoured the school witfe house. been done in so short a time, and the his gracious presence on that occasion. PULAU TIKUS. results attained. He felt proud for the The school was* closing that day for the CLERICAL APPOINTMENTS. parishioners of The Assumption, who Catholics in Pulau Tikus turned out Christmas Vacation which would last five have taken the leadership in the work in their numbers on Sunday, December 9, weeks. After having given a review of Kuala Lumpur. of Christian Charity ir\ the organisation to welcome the Rt. Rev. Dr. A. Devals, the school's work for the whole yeai^ Fr. A. Francis, newly ordained at of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul Penang on December 8, 1934 at Penang, according to the rules and the spirit of Bishop of Malacca, who paid his first the Rev. Director mentioned the neceshas been appointed assistant to Fr. V. its pious founder; and in being the first official visit to the parish, which by a sity of having a qualified doctor Hermann, vicar of St. Anthony's Church, Conference of the Society of St. Vincent happy coincidence, was also celebrating stationed in Balik Pulau to attend t» that day the feast of the Church—the emergency cases and give general advice Kuala Lumpur. ^ de Paul to be affiliated to the head of Immaculate Conception. on health, paid a tribute to the staff, the Siciety in Paris. There were other ENGAGEMENT. The Church was filled to capacity for pupils and friends of the school w i » Societies of the same name, but they the Pontifical High Mass at eight o'clock. contributed their respective parts for the December 25. were not following the rules of the The grounds were appropriately be- welfare of the school, and concluded byAt 250 Tupai Kechil, an engagement Society, and he had been told that it was ceremony took place between Mr. Lee not possible to keep to the rules. It was flagged with banners and after Mass, asking Mr. Howitt to give the childrem Boon Beng a convert and Miss Dorothy therefore very gratifying indeed, to see all present gathered outside the paro- some advice before the prizes were disYong Sooi Chin daughter cf Mr. and that the Conference of the Assumption chial house, the porch of which was tributed. decorated with festoons with the word Mrs. Yong Ah Choy of Batu Gajah. had shown that the rules of the Society MR. HO WITT'S REPLY. "Welcome" conspicuous against a backcould be followed, and that the Active ground of greenery over the entrance. BIRTHS. Members thoroughly undered the spirit In reply, Mr. Howitt said that* he wat Mr. F. A. Reutens, President of the very delighted when he received the Ess.—On December S, 1934, at Singa- of the Society. pore, to Cinthia, wife of Mr. Cuthbert He congratulated the parishioners of Catholic Action Society of the parish, invitation to come to Balik Pulau tc s—a son—Richard Neville. the Assumption, and the Lady Benefac- extended, on behalf of the parishioners, preside at the prize-giving of St. George** Spykerman.—On Thursday Dec. 20, tresses for their splendid support and a warm welcome to the guest of honour. School. He said that he was muck 1934, at Perit Bunter, to Ethel (nee co-operation with the Conference in the impressed by the school itself—being: "We are truly grateful to you," con- pleasantly situated in a delightful place. Roserio), wife of Eric Spykerman—a best Catholic Action in the world. He tinued the speaker, "for the visit." We He wished the teachers and pupils v e r ^ son—Thomas Arthur. tendered his most hearty thanks to the Tiruchelvam.—On Monday Dec. 17, President and Secretary, the Active and appreciate the honour that has been con- very happy holidays and advised them 1934, at Penang, to Mary Hombeline (nee Honorary members, and Lady Benefac- ferred on us. The presence of so many to carry on the traditions of the school Michael), wife of G. R. Tiruchelvam— tresses, and hoped that, soon in the Catholics here this morning speaks more and to continue their studies in the way two daughters—Mary Florence Olivia diocese, other parishes will follow their eloquently than my poor words can ex- the Rev. Fr. Director had incalcated m press, the great esteem and love which them. He congratulated heartily the and Felice Beatrice Therese. splended example. we have for you. Tan.—On Dec. 1, 1934, at Ipoh, to many lucky prize-winners and the LuiBefore the conclusion of the meeting, " I take this opportunity publicly to coln House for their great achievement. Agnes (nee Ng Siok Cheng), wife of Mr. Conagham complimented the ConTan Ah Poy—a son—Francis Xavier. ference on the scrupulous care in which express to you, my Lord, our sincere He assured the Rev. Fr. Director that the funds had been administered, and the affection for and deep debt of gratitude any request he made for the betterment MARRIAGES. wisdom of building up a reserve. He we owe to our venerable parish priest, of Balik Pulau would be given due a Rev. Father Renard, who has not spared consideration. De Souza—Seremban, N. S.—At the recommended to the Conference himself in carrying out the many duties After the prizes were distributed, & Church of the Visitation, on January 12, method of augmenting the funds of the attached to his office. We are proud of curtailed concert programme was gone 1935, Arthur Joseph Michael, son of Mrs. Society, by means of collection boxes on Jrrm and feel still prouder to know that through before the function was finally . De Souza, of Temiang Road, Serem- Sundays after Mass. This was a method our sentiments with regard to our parish brought to a close with three cheers for ban, to Norah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. adopted by the Conferences in Ireland priest, are felt and echoed by you." the. District Officer. and had met with success. D'Costa of Malacca. SOCCER:—G. Pinto, plays for State and Malaya Cup. R. Newman, plays for State and Malaya Cup.

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M A L A Y A CATHOLIC L E A D E R ,

18

wedding

Beiis

SATURDAY,

JANUARY

5th,

1935.

F

AROUND THE PARISHES

Jtd

— js

PENANG. PRETTY WEDDING AT CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION. The Church of the Assumption was the scene of a pretty wedding on the 26th December, 1934, at 8 o'clock in the morning, the contracting parties being Mi. Alexander Peterson, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. F. Peterson, of Bangkok, and Miss Agelina Vaz, eldest daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Edward Vaz of Penang. The bride comes from an old and respected Eurasian family, her grandfather being the late Capt. Vaz and the bridegroom is the Chief Engineer of Siiom Ice Works, Bangkok. The Nuptial Mass was choral, the celebrant being the Rev. Father Souhait, while Mr. A. de Cruz presided at the organ. The bride looked charming in a beautiful dress of silk net, adorned with satin baby ribbons, and carried a pretty sheaf of orchids of oleanders. She was attended by her sister, Matilda, as bridesmaid, who wore a dress of pale blue satin and hat to match. She carried a bouquet of oleanders. The little sisters of the bride, Little Mary and Pauline Vaz, in frocks of pink silk net, made dainty flower girls, whilst Master Albert Coules, cousin of the bride was page. Mr. E. J. Pennefather of Singapore acted as bestman. The sponsors for the bride were Mr. and Mrs. G. B. Baptist, and Mr. & Mrs. J. F. Augustin, of Alor Star for the bridegroom. After the service, a reception was held at 7, Arratoon Road, the residence of the late Capt. Vaz. The large party of relatives and friends a t the reception testified to the popularity of the two families. The health of the happy couple was proposed by Mr. J. F. Augustin and the bridegroom responded paying a tribute at the same time to the bridesmaid. The bestman responded. Lavish hospitality was dispensed to all present and much convivialty prevailed. Dancing was indulged in till afternoon, when the happy couple left for their honeymoon, which is being spent at Penang Hill. The bride wore a travelling dress of red and white check elephant crepe smartly done in red organdie with a hat to match. Miss Lucy Oliveiro was solely responsible for the dresses and also the cake decorations, which were of silver thread. Mr. and Mrs. Paterson were the receipients of many handsome and valuable presents. The marriage took place a t the Church of the Assumption on Saturday morning, the 29th December, the Rev. Father Scuhait officiating, Mr. P. Jeremiah, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. B. Jeremiah ©f Bukit Mertajam and Miss May Augustin of the Penang Convent, eldest daughter of the late Mr. & Mrs. S. W. Augustin of Penang.

Mr. H. Jeremiah, brother of the bridegroom, acted as bestman, and the sponsors were Mr. & Mrs. J. B. Robless and Mr. & Mrs. J. F. Augustin. After the ceremony the reception was held at the Convent where Rev. Father Souhait proposed the toast of the newly married couple, and Mr. J. F. Augustin the Penang Convent. X MAS AT THE CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION. The Church of The Assumption held an overflow congregation on Xmas Eve, when Catholics, rich and poor alike, joined in heralding the Birth of Christ, Our Saviour. The decorations of the Main Altar, artistically carried out in red and gold, the work of the Nuns of the Penang Convent, were strikingly impressive and beautiful. The service commenced at 11-80 p.m. with the singing of the Matins and the following carols:—"The Lord at first had Adam made," "Shepherds Awake," "On the birthday of the Lord," "O Holy Night" and "Te Deum." The choir and orchestra under the baton of Mr. Ben de Cruz, the Veteran Musical Director, gave a superb rendering of the Musical High Mass. The various parts of the Mass, the "Kyrie," " Sanctus" and "Benedictus" from Mozart's XII Mass, were curtailed and re-arranged to suit the choir, while the "Gloria," "Credo" and "Agnes Dei" were from the "Mass in honour of,the Bessed Sacrament," by Victor Hammerel. During the Offertory, the first portion of Mozart's "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" was sung and during the Holy Communion the "Adeste Fidellis" and "Angels we have heard on high." Tre Solemn High Mass was sung by Rev. Father Souhait, who also delivered an eloquent sermon on the Nativity. The large number of Communicants was a glowing testimony of the piety and faith of the parishioners of The Assumption, and must have gladdened the heart of the Reverend Vicar of the Parish. The Choir Orchestra rendered suitable selections of Music before, during and after Mass. SEREMBAN. $1,000 FOR CHURCH EXTENSION. At the recent inaugural meeting of the Catholic Actionests of Seremban held at the Parochial House under the Chairmanship of the Rev. Fr. G. Auguin. A drive was initiated in aid of the Church Extension building funds and over $1,000^ was subscribed. BUILDING COMMENCED. The building operations in connection with the extension of the Catholic Church Seremban have now commenced and are under the supervision of Rev. Fr. Auguin, our Parish Priest and Mr. P. Peris of the P.W.D. has kindly come forward to assist^ him in his spare-time with his technical knowledge. Many thanks.

'The bride looked charming in a dress of white satin with a tulle veil held in .place with* orange blossoms, was given av;ay by the Lady Superior of the Penang Convent. She carried a sheaf of fern FORMER SEREMBANITE TAKES and white lillies from Brastagi. Miss Annie McDougall, the bridesmaid, looked VOWS IN PARIS. attractive in a dress - of champagne Sister St. Lucy formerly known" "as~ coloured silk with hat to match. She carried a boquet of carnations, also from Miss Adelaide the eldest daughter of Mr. & Mrs. L. V. Wooden of Seremban j£ Brastagi. and now of ^ a h a n g , took her final vows The Misses Mary and Hennee Forbes at the convent of the Sisters of St. Maur, acted as flower girls and were dressed "Paris, France, last September and it now in pale pink. They carried baskets of in the Singapore Convent. "" lillies.

BROTHER CONSTANTINE.

KUALA LUMPUR.

In connection with the funeral ceremonies of the Veteran Catholic Educationist the late Rev. Brother Constantine of Seremban. His body was_placed^n_ a special catafalque and laid out in State in the large Reading Room of the School, and during the day and night a large number of his past pupils and friends both Catholics and non-Catholics of all classes paid their final respects to him. With a great manifestation of sympathy—a group of the Catholic Actionists of Seremban recited the Holy Rosary at intervals. The coffin was carried from the school to the Church by the "Old Boys" and after the Requiem High Mass which was offered by the Rev. Fr. G. Auguin, the funeral cortege war drawn by the Lay Teachers of the School to the Cemetery and from thence ecrried by the Teachers to the grave.

[ |up The Rev. Father Bulliard of S a l e i a T (South India), gave a Mission at s t P Anthony's Church, Kuala Lumpur j m — ^ _ . „ , ^ fFr commenced on Tuesday the 18th Decenty.P ber and closed on the Eve of C h r i s t m a s f On Sunday the 23rd December before thi ^vening service a group photo was takei s t and Mr. A. Mariasoosaypillay, on b e h a l of the Parishers, gave a short speec] thanking Rev. Father Bulliard for t h | kindness he has taken to give a retrea for the benefit of this Parishers. fc response Rev. Father Bulliard spoke j Fr fe* words generally on the conditionl of Catholics in Malaya and he was we] in pleased for the magnificent church buil Fa by Catholics of this Parish. Fa Sp Sodality of the Immaculate ConceptioBJ St. Anthony's Church. jth The Members of the Sodality of thJ°f Immaculate Conception of St. Anthony'lnie Church, Kuala Lumpur, are r e m i n d e l that the Annual General Meeting w h i c l | postponed, will be held at S i >n Anthony's School, on Sunday the (th January, 1935, at 4-15 p.m. clu so Third Order of St. Francis of St. Anthony's Church, Kuala Lump ap The Monthly Meeting of the Thi of Order of St. Francis of Assisi will Se held on Sunday, the 20th January, 19! M Sa at 5 p.m.

SCHOOL HOLIDAYS. The St. Pauls Institution closes to-day for Christmas holidays and will open again on the 21st of January, 1935. A requiem High Mass offered by the lay Tutorial Staff of St. Paul's on December 17th was largely attended with a big crowd of Communicants. NEW CEMETRY SITE. The Catholic portion of the Christian Cemetery of Seremban has room for only another twelve graves, A New site has been granted by the Government at about 2nd mile Sikamat Road, Seremban, and the ground is now being prepared and road approaches laid. TUTOR ON LEAVE. Mr. A. J. Dairiam of the Lay Staff of the St. Paul's Insitution, Seremban, was the guest of honour at a dinner given by his colleagues at the Lee San Hotel on Monday Last, on the eve of his departure on long leave to India. CLERICAL APPOINTMENT. Rev. Father A. D. Vindargon the* newly ordinained priest at Malacca has arrived at Seremban and is now attached to the Church of The Visitation, Seremban as assistant to Rev. Fr. G. Auguin the parish Priest, and also has taken over the Tamil Mission from Rev. Fr. F . Desilva, his district is now extended to the whole of Johore and Singapore. We wish Fr. Desilva the* best of luck in his new spheres. SCHOLARSHIP WON. Congratulations to Mr. A. B. Ponniah Pensioner of the Medical Dept. Seremban as father, and to his son Mr. Benedict Ponniah formerly of St. Paul's Institution, Seremban, for having been the only successful student this year 1934 for the F.M.S. Queen's Scholarship and the first Catholic Student in the F.M.S- to attain this Honour. Retreat and a mission for the Tamil Congregation will commence from the 13th to the 20th January, 1935, will be given by Rev. Fr. M. F. Bulliard from the Salem Mission of South India. Mr. R. J. Galistan the President of the Catholic Action, Seremban, with his coworkers have made a collection for a Christmas tree to be given to the Poor and Orphans in the Seremban Convent during Christmas week. :

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Fa FEAST OF THE IMMACULATE CO] Du CEPTION OF THE MOST BLESS L. Re VIRGIN MARY. R. Dr The ninth of December was a M letter day for the Sodalists of Anthony's Church, Kuala Lumpur, w< M they celebrated their " Mother's Day,! M preceded by a Triduum kindly preachi M by Rev. Fr. V. Hermann, Parish Prii Da an In the morning there was Solemn Hi Th Se Mass followed by a Solemn Thanksgi V. by the Sodalists. Da The Annual General Meeting of Sodality will be held on 5th Janu: th 1935, at 4-45 p.m., after the montl prayer meeting at 4-15 p.m. 1

TAIPING. December 8th:—The feast of Immacuiate Conception was inciden the feast of the bodaiity of St. Gorj Scnooi, Taiping. General Holy munion took place in the morning, wJ in the evening the boys were tr< to a two-hour Cinema show in school hall. The show comprised a 9 ox very amusing comical pictures. Bro. Henry, the School Principal as as President of the Sodality, distrib photos of the Sodaiity-Group to members during the interval.

December 24th:r—The Church of Lady of the Sacred Heart was in fesi colours to mark the Anniversary of Saviour's Birth. A few lad.es gentlemen colunteered to decorate Church and Crib and worked so ind gab.y that the Church was never befoj so beautifully done up. The Statue the Sacred Heart outside the Church i floodlit; electrical installation made and outside, within the saneluary around the Crib, while the musical was excellently sung. However H came down in torrential showers durif the Midnight service and continued *J Ph the small hours of the morning.

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ECEPTION TO FATHER A FRANCIS.

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p appreciated. A short scetch of the death i of St. Francis Xavier was staged by Senior Members of the Church Choir. 9! Mr. J. Thivy posed admirably as the Saint of the East. Among those present were: Rev. Fathers J. Fourgs, N. Deredec, O. O] Dupoirieux, J. Aloysius, G. Ladislaus, S L. Ashness, B. Ashness and J. Edmond; Rev. Bros. Dositheus Edmund, Charles, R. Ashness, P. S. Clement; Mr. L. Thivy, Dr. and Mrs. C. R. Paul, Mr. Mor Singh, Mr. and Mrs. C. Arul, Mr. and Mrs. Morais, Mr. and Mrs. S. Saminathan, y,! Mr. and Mrs. K. P. A. Pillay, Mr. and hi Mrs. J. Emmanuel, Mr. and Mrs. P. X. Dairiam, Mr. and Mrs. V. Perera, Mr. and Mrs. D. John, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. i Thivy; Messrs. B. R. Stanislaus, Lip Seng Onn, Tan Boon Quee, A. Francis, V. Morais, J. James, A. P. Sawimuthu, David Lourdes and many others. Credit is due to those who managed the function which was a complete l

REVEREND FATHER, Yours Sincerely in Jesus The Parishoners of the Church of OUR LADY OF LOURDES, IPOH. IPOH, 9th December, 1934.

19

1935.

SINGAPORE.

ADDRESS

More than 200 ladies and gentlemen To — jsat down to tea at the reception held at REVEREND FATHER ANDREW Parochial House, Silbin Road, Ipoh, FRANCIS. Kn honour of the newly ordained Father Dear and Revd. Father, It is with mingled feelings of pleasure [ * > brought |up and educated in the parish of Our and pride, that we are assembled here this evening, to express our reverential l e i a T € s e n°t m 0 r e t h a 'n a d - Z e n p r i e s t s o f t h e sentiments, on the auspicious occasion s t P i0CeSe f M a I a c c a °0 n a r r i v a l F a t h e r of your elevation to the eternal fFrancis was garlanded by Mr. L. Tivy, Priesthood. enty.P., M.S.C. An address was read That you are constituted a physician masf . . R. Paul, and another of souls and a custodian of the gates of r . E. Arul. Then a prethi salvation, we do fully acknowledge. At kei s t a t i o n was made of a fine Chalice the same time we rejoice in the fact handsome Missal, gifts to the half that the Almighty has bestowect 13ieordained from the parish. In a ec] privfege on your person, to be the first c h Mr. Mor Singh, former th| in this parish to reveive the Holy Master of St. Michael's School, ea Orders. ii the younger days of Father fc We do not deem it out of place to e j Francis and voiced the joy of his friends mention, what an amount of complacency ionl his elevation to the priesthood. As we] instrumental in fostering the vocation of would be actually experienced by uil Father Francis the speaker mentioned Reverend Father Deredec, the instrument Father N. Deredec, who was present. and supporter of your holy vocation. Before concluding our congratulations, Spaking in Tamil, Mr. Arul next ex we pray our Divine Savious to favour tioBJ sed the joy of the parishoners at your Reverence, with good health and jthe occasion and explained the dignity spiritual gifts, for the salvation of souls priesthood, exhorting other young in our Lord's vineyard. Also we b sr of thJ°f ny'lnien of the parish to follow where Father you to remember us in the Holy Sacrifice ndel children of the of the Mass. school acquitted themselves credithicl|P Deign to accept, dear Father, this useSi y a concert later in the evening; >nd the Third Ipoh Troop of Boy Scouts ful keepsake, in token of Reverend (the only Troop in Malaya attached ex- Father Deredec and the faithful of the clusively to their parish church) gave Church of our Lady of Lourdes. We beg to remain, some comic displays which were much A

5th,

Reception in Honour of Rev. S. Lee. The Chinese Catholic Action and the Catholic Young Men's Association held a joint Reception on 26th Dec. 1934 in honour of the Feast of St. Stephen—the Feast of their Spiritual Director Rev. S. Lee, at the Association's Premises Church of St. Peter and Paul. Speeches were given by Mr. Lee Keng Guan, the President of the Chinese Catholic Action, and Mr. Teo Kim Song the Hon. Secretary of the Catholic Young Men's Association congratulating the Spiritual Director on his Feast. They assured him of their devotion and cooperation and expressed their gratitude at his many sympathetic painstaking efforts on their behalf praying that God will bless him with "Many happy returns of the day." The Spiritual Director replied thanking the Chinese Catholic Action and the Catholic Young Men's Association for their Reception and the respective speakers for their kind sentiments and praise. He presented the Catholic Action with a silver crucifix and candle stands. Beautiful Victoria Confectionary calendars were distributed to the Assembly kindly presented by Mr. Joseph Chong Sin Tong, who was responsible for the catering of the Reception. The Spiritual Director a so presented tickets to the members for the Alhambra show "Alice in Wonderland." The Reception ended with chers to the JSpirtual Director and no doubt the members gravitated to the Alhambra immediately after. 7

DEATHS. Phun Ngit Onn.—Pray for the repose of the soul of Mrs. John Phun Ngit Onn, the dearly, loved wife of Mr. John Phun Ngit Onn, Billiard Captain, Old TRAGIC DEATH Michaelians' Association, Ipoh, who died Lau.—Pray for the repose of the soul on 12, December 1934, aged 30. On of Agnes Miriam Lau Yuet Yee who whose soul,. sweet Jesus, have mercy. died on December 19, at Bukit Tengah. R.I.P. aged 17. Fortifed by the rites of Holy Holmberg.—Of your charity pray for Church, sweet Jesus, have mercy. R.I.P. the repose of the soul of Harold Patric Agnes met with a motor accident Holmberg, of Ipoh, who died on Dec. while going on a visit to her relatives 18, 1934, aged 34. Sweet Jesus, have place, sustaining a fractured sku.l and mercy. R.I.P. succumbed to her injuries. She was a Teow Chon.—On December 21, at Ipoh, pupil of the Convent, Taiping, dearly fortified by* the rites of Holy Church, loved by ail who knew her for the exem- Mrs. Teow Chon, dearly loved wife of plary qualities she possessed. She ap- the late Towkay Teow Chon of Papan, peared for the School Certificate Cam- and beloved mother of Teow Tit Hin, bridge Exam. 1934. She leave? behind Teow Tet Kwee, Teow Tet Kean and a large number or relatives and friends Teow Tet Choy. On whose soulj sweet to mourn for her. Jesus, have mercy. R.I.P.

IPOH. Christmas is a season of busy preparation and keen enjoyment. This year it is no exception. Ipoh folk have had rac rc than their usual round of shopping, culinary and general preparations, and festivities this year. There was their new Catholic Paper to talk about—its appearance and make-up, what it should be and should have been, what it ought to contain and what not, the beautiful stories anr articles in it, the pleasing Catholic touch about it, its future and the support the Catholics will give to it. Then os Christmas Eve, the Times of Malaya flashed on its numerous posters throughout Perak the ominous phrase " Boycott agaipst Catholiis." It was something of a shock to many, but on digging into the pages of the paper, one found only a local outbreak in a small part of Japan! Sensational as presentday journalists out for sales of their papers dubber the occurrence, this new phase of Catholic persecution di3 not raise a hair, but Malaya Catholic Leader readers yould like to have more details of the boycott. The weather on Christmas night at Ipoh \vas the worst ever experienced these twenty years. The evening was rainy and though it cleared up after nightfall, heavy rain came down before midnight and went on till past four in the morning. The inclement weather hurt the vanity of a certain class of church-goers not a little, but the miry condition of the entrance roads to St. Michael's must have taken off what philosophy there was left in them, for the roads, just repaired specially for the occasion, were in many parts several inches deep in mud! But neither the rain nor the muddy road4 dampened the t:ue Christmas spirit and St. Michael's was packed to overflowing with worshippers. The congregation was not less numerous than in previous years. Musical Mass was sung at both the midnight and morning service at St. Michael's. The Mass chosen for the night service was Missa Tertia by M. Hailer, sung in two parts. Adeste Fidel is was sung in parts after the Offertory, with "Angels we have heard on High," also sung in parts, ending up. The management of the chiir was in the hands of Rev. Fr. Ladislaus, with Mr. C. J. Skelchy and Mr. B. M. Remedios at the organ. To these gentlemen is clue the credit of bringing up the choir of St. Michael's to a high standard.

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H if *J Photo shows Rev, Father D. Vendargon, parents, brothers and sisters with Bishop A. Devais and Malacca clergy. Taken on Sunday 16th Dec. in Malacca where Father Vendargon celebrated his solemn mass and was given a grand reception by the whole congregation at his parents quarters.

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TIGER BEER Mexican Government Denounced by its Own 'Supporters' that they did not wish to be fooled with false promises but wanted a " Socialism Proves A Boomerang implanted which will favour the labouring masses and do away with privileged (By NCWC News Service) politicians who monopolise the national Mexico City. wealth." The cream of the jest was that the The great demonstration under compulsion which was to have shown sup- microphones which had been installed port of and enthusiasm for the National to broadcast eulogies of the Revolution Revolutionary Party, the President, its by Generals Calles and President-elect Government and especially the amend- . Gardena* had to be silenced to keep the ment of Article 3 of the Constitution protests of the people from being heard. proved to be somewhat of a boomerang. Under compulsion and in fear of los« A N T I - C A T H O L I C F O R C E S F I R E mg their jobs, the majority of federal AT ONE ANOTHER. employees turned out—although some MISTAKEN IDENTITY WHILE tendered their resignations—and were CLOSING CHURCHES. joined by groups of peasants, labourers, (By NCWC News Service) and the Party leaders and organisations, as well as some definitely Communistic Mexico City. groups; hot they <Jjd not confine themThe first bloodshed of the new wave selves to consideration of the educaof persecution in Mexico has occurred tional laws. among the anti-Catholic forces themThey protested in general against selves. their present economic status, and the Police and soldiers fired upon one protests were hurled against the very another at Queretaro, through mistaken Cen einment which had ordered them to identity, while carrying out the Goverparwk in its support. nor's orders to close all churches. Added to the fact that they were marSo far President Rodriguez has not chaagf nnder compulsion, there is the signed the order for expulsion of the further fact that even though they were forced to march by the President and Hierarchy, but anti-Catholics are enhis Ministers, they took this opportunity couraged by a statement made by Calles t o protest against working conditions to a group of senators and deputies at instead of acclaiming the educational of Cuernavaca to the effect that Mexican Catholics were planning a "subversive" the Government. movement, but the the Government "will know how to meet it." PLACARDS CONFISCATED Compulsory Parade of L o y a l t y

Some groups carried placards which wen? confiscated hurriedly by the police, Wat not even the increased number of oflSeers on duty was sufficient to choke mS the cries that came from the throats • f the marchers. Even the most enthusiastic Revolutionists could hardly consider the demonstration to be that m£ contented workers. While some groups carried banners demanding an improvement of their pre* 9ent economic state and real social justice, others, such as the fabrile and railway workers, through their leaders, denounced the injustices and irregularities from which they now suffer as they passed before President Rodriguez, who jreviewed the parade from the balcony • f the National Palace. Teachers in the official schools dejoanded that those teachers who had seen unjustly dismissed by Narciso g B&issols, during his term of ofiiee as Kmister of Public Education, be reinstated and that the budget for education he increased by 10,000,000 pesos so that teachers might receive decent salaries. These banners were promptly ernfiseated by the police. "DOWN

WITH

CALLES"

Students belonging to the Revolu\ fionary -Students?—Federation cried •Down with Calles, owner of sugar While this same group \ properties ! 1 -was marching by the palace balcony, 1 tfeey increased their cries and three speakers declared, before the President, w

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78 B I S H O P S S P E A K A S O N E T O DENOUNCE

MEXICAN

GOVT.

Joint S t a t e m e n t I s s u e d by t h e A m e r i c a n Hierarchy. (Ry NCWC News Service) Washington. Solemnly deploring the "anti-Christian tyranny" in Mexico and citing the grave persecutions directed against Catholics and all religion in . that unhappy country, the Bishops of the United States call for a crusade of prayer for the ending of these sad conditions. "We implore the faithful," the Bishops say, " to pray most earnestly, to offer their self-denials and their special acts of devotion for the ending of the persecution of the Church in Mexico. We ask them to make themselves apostles proclaiming to the world the iniquity and the tyranny that mutilate and despoil the Body of Christ." This call came in a statement issued at the general meeting of the Bishops of the United States held at the Catholic University of America and attended by 78 Cardinals, Archbishops and Bishops from every section of the country.

Taking cognisance of " the expressions unwittingly offered, at times, of sympathy with and support of governments and policies which are absolutely at variance with our own American principles," the Bishops deplore these, declaring: " They give colour to the boast of the supporters of tyrannical policies, that the influence of our American Government is favourable to such policies. We do not believe, for a moment, that it is. It could not be." Step by step, with forceful brevity and compelling clarity, the statement enumerates some of the many indignities tc which Catholics and all religion are subjected in Mexico. It cites the limitation and, in some cases, entire exclusion of the clergy, the confiscation of church property and educational and charitable institutions, the denial of rights of freedom of assembly, speech and the Press, the outlawing of schools for training candidates for the priesthood, the expulsion of Bishops, priests, nuns and members of the laity, the denial of liberty of religious worship. ATTEMPT TO FAKE A CATHOLIC PLOT." u

To attempt to justify the new attack upon the Church, the Mexican Government is endeavouring to create the impression that there is a "Catholic plot" on foot. The accusation has been denied emphatically by Archbishop Diaz, the Primate of Mexico. The Archbishop has forbidden Catholics to employ arms in resisting the closing of churches and the expulsion of the clergy by state forces. Government officials have announced that they will hold the Mexican Hierarchy responsible for^whatever happens.

PERSECUTED MEXICANS SEEK L I B E R T Y U N D E R U N I O N JACK. Find security under British Flag in Honduras. PEOPLE FOLLOW EXILED PRIESTS INTO JUNGLE. Many of the Mexican Catholic laity have voluntarily followed their priests into exile, and at the present time more than 10,000 Catholics who have fled the religious persecution in Mexico are now living in the jungles of British Honduras, where they are ministered to by exiled priests. This fact was revealed by Bishop Joseph Aloysius Murphy, SJ., Vicar Apostolic of Belize, British Honduras, in an interview with the NCWC News Service at Milwaukee, U.S.A. Bishop Murphy is visiting Marquette University. With him is his brother, the Rev. Thomas Murphy, SJ., who has been a member of the Society of Jesus for 62 yearSi

" The Soviet Russians cannot hold a candle to the^ contemptible meanness of the civil officials of Mexico in their persecution of Catholics," Bishop Murphy said. "The cruelty of the Mexican persecution in the name of public welfare is positively devilish." PROTESTS TO SCOTISH MEXICAN PRESIDENT & BRITISH PREMIER. (From the "Universe*" Correspondent) Glasgow, Tuesday. Messages were sent from here to-day to the President of Mexico and the British Prime Minister *on behalf of 600,000 Catholics of the West of Scotland, condemning the religious persecution in Mexico.

CERTIFIED MASS WINE

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PLEA FOR JUSTICE Presenting again, as American citizens, their plea "that justice may be done," the Bishops assert that "no man's voice should sound an uncertain note."

BON AMIS 6 3 ,

SELKGIE

Published by Laurence Henderson and Printed by Lithographers Limited, 37/38, Wallich Street, Singapore, S.S.

BROS. ROAD.