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10 Minutes with... Daniel Moen

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aniel P. Moen joined Catholic Health East as president and chief executive officer of Sisters of Providence Health System (SPHS) in January 2011. Prior to joining SPHS, he served as president and chief executive officer of Heywood Hospital in Gardner, Massachusetts for over 20 years. Prior to that, Moen served for 10 years in progressively responsible leadership positions with Holden Hospital in Holden, Mass., including two years as president and chief executive officer. Moen earned an Associate of Science degree in radiologic technology from Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester, Mass., a Bachelor of Science degree in management from Worcester State College, and a Master of Health Administration from Clark University/University of Massachusetts Medical School, also in Worcester. Moen has served as chair of the Massachusetts Hospital Association, helping to lead that organization in the midst of groundbreaking health care reform legislation.

What prompted you to join Sisters of Providence Health System after many years at a smaller Massachusetts hospital? There were several factors, but I found the Mission of the Sisters of Providence Health System to be most appealing—serving a population that has historically been underserved, guiding a larger organization in a larger service area, and the opportunity to oversee a wider range services that are provided by the organization—all of these factors were attractive to me.

SPHS was one of the founding members of Catholic Health East. What do you see as some of the benefits to being part of a larger health system? There are numerous benefits to being part of a larger health system, and particularly at CHE where we have incredible talent at the corporate level. It’s extremely helpful to have access to high levels of expertise in areas such as information systems and

S Dancing Classrooms Teaches Self-Confidence and Teamwork 1 & 5 Colleague Commitment: Back to the Basics 2 Core Values Kindle Contest CHE and Drexel University Online Celebrate 10 Years 3 Patient-Centered Medical Homes Transform Care Delivery The Heart of the Home 4 Decision Support Helps CHE Meet Future Challenges Fall Prevention: A Top Priority 5 Across the System CareLink Website Springs Forward 10 Minutes with … Daniel Moen

President and CEO, Sisters of Providence Health System

Health care is a prominent topic this election year. As a pioneer in implementing major health reform legislation, what are some of the “lessons learned” in Massachusetts that you think can benefit the nation? Massachusetts has shown that we can provide health insurance coverage for virtually everyone, in a pluralistic type of way. It doesn’t have to be a “one size fits all” Daniel Moen approach, or a “Medicare for everyone” solution. There is a way to provide coverage for the vast majority of the population, and that’s extremely positive. But some compliance, as well as up-to-date information about important questions remain. How do we afford this? How governmental issues in Washington. This level of expertise is not something you find at a smaller, “stand do we make the larger health care system cost effective? I believe the answers point toward the next phase of alone” institution. Our relationship with CHE is also health reform, and that’s payment reform, which will beneficial from a financial standpoint, in terms of reward organizations for managing the care of a expertise and access to capital. Additionally, I have population, as opposed to being compensated on the found the sharing of ideas across the regional health corporations—seeing what’s happening in other states, sheer volume of tests and procedures performed. listening to what’s happening in other organizations, Looking ahead at 2012 and beyond … working on issues collaboratively, and the meetings I what are some of the biggest have had with other CEOs—to be extremely valuable challenges—and opportunities— from a thought and idea generation perspective.

What are some of the benefits you hope to realize when SPHS implements the CareLink initiative? What will be the biggest challenges?

facing SPHS and CHE?

Massachusetts is going to lead the nation in payment reform, but going forward across the country, significant challenges will revolve around how we pay for care. There is tremendous pressure on federal and state budgets, employers are concerned about rate increases We are really looking forward to the CareLink for employee health insurance and these factors, in implementation. I’m a big believer in electronic addition to our efforts to improve quality and safety, will medical records and computerized physician order entry; this is the gateway to improved quality, reducing drive significant change for all health care systems and variations in care and helping to improve efficiencies in hospitals. One of our biggest opportunities at SPHS is the Massachusetts Medicaid waiver and our ability to earn hospitals over the long run. But we are aware of the funding for transformational types of projects. We are challenges we will encounter during CareLink’s implementation. This is a significant change, especially working to tie all these elements together in a way that will make us more efficient, allow us to provide even for physicians and how they do their work. It’s a big change for the hospital staff as well, as far as processes higher quality care, and achieve better outcomes for patients. Colleague satisfaction is also very important. are concerned. Like any change, the CareLink Great care is the natural result of the efforts of staff implementation will be a challenge because of its breadth and depth. However, I believe it will be worth members who enjoy their work, are engaged with the goals of the organization and want to be part of that it in the long run, and I think our staff members who change. are involved in the process are supportive as well. If Horizons Editorial Staff

Published by:

Maria Iaquinto Communications Manager

Please direct comments and suggestions to info@che.org

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people have the right training and they understand where we are trying to take the organization from a quality standpoint, they will be “on board” with this initiative.

HORIZONS is a publication for the Sponsors, Boards, Regional Leadership, System Office and Colleagues of Catholic Health East.

3805 West Chester Pike, Suite 100 Newtown Square, PA 19073 Phone 610.355.2000 Fax 610.271.9600 www.che.org www.facebook.com/catholichealtheast

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Scott H. Share Vice President, System Communications

Meg J. Boyd Communication Specialist Design, Production, Printing & Mailing Fulfillment by JC Marketing Communications • jcmcom.com • Southington, Conn. Catholic Health East is a community of persons committed to being a transforming, healing presence within the communities we serve. Locations: Located in 11 eastern states from Maine to Florida. Workforce: Approx. 60,000 employees.

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Sponsors Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Scranton, Pa. Franciscan Sisters of Allegany, St. Bonaventure, N.Y. Hope Ministries, Newtown Square, Pa. Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, Greensburg, Pa. Sisters of Mercy of the Americas: Mid-Atlantic Community, Merion Station, Pa. New York, Pennsylvania, Pacific West Community, Buffalo, N.Y. Northeast Community, Cumberland, R.I. South Central Community, Belmont, N.C. Sisters of Providence, Holyoke, Mass. Sisters of St. Joseph, St. Augustine, Fla.

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HORIZONS

Dancing Classrooms: Teaching Respect, I

Self-Confidence and Teamwork

t’s not often that you see elementary school children willingly and enthusiastically dancing the Merengue, Foxtrot, Rumba, Tango and Swing.

who are typically introverted and reserved to step out and shine. It focuses physical energy and increases health through the joy of movement. It builds self-esteem and social skills as it improves children’s confidence and ability to relate to others.

But in several fifth-grade classrooms in Pittsburgh, it’s becoming a common sight. From January through May, students from 10 public and Catholic schools are participating in a unique learning experience called Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh. Dancing Classrooms began in 1994 in New York City under the direction of Pierre Dulaine and Yvonne Marceau, directors of the American Ballroom Theater Company. Now an international program, Dancing Classrooms has served more than 300,000 young ladies and gentlemen worldwide. In the fall of 2009, Mercy Behavioral Health, part of the Pittsburgh Mercy Health System, introduced Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh as a program of its prevention unit. With Pittsburgh Public Schools as its first partner, Mercy Behavioral Health engaged 300 children from six schools in the inaugural semester.

“One of the reasons we brought Dancing Classrooms to Pittsburgh was because it fit well with the curriculum we already use in schools like PATHS,” said Mark Rogalsky, prevention services unit manager for Mercy Behavioral Health and site director for Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh.

Students from Sister Thea Bowman Catholic Academy (Team Magenta) compete in Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh’s Colors of the Rainbow Team match on January 7, 2012. Photo by Archie Carpenter.

Dancing Classrooms provides an atmosphere that allows students who are typically introverted and reserved to step out and shine. It builds self-esteem and social skills as it improves children’s confidence and ability to relate to others.

Over a 10-week period, students learn classic ballroom and Latin On the heels of that success, four dances from local teaching artists Catholic schools supported by the Extra who have been trained in the Mile Education Foundation and Dulaine method. The twice-weekly McAuley Ministries adopted the dance classes are incorporated into program the following semester. To the academic curriculum. At the end date, more than 1,500 fifth graders in of each semester, dancers proudly 26 Pittsburgh public and Catholic demonstrate their newly acquired schools have benefited.

skills to parents, teachers and other classmates. Every fifth grader has the opportunity to learn, grow and ultimately vie for a spot to compete in the citywide Colors of the Rainbow team match that concludes the semester. Dancing Classrooms provides an atmosphere that allows students

The Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) Curriculum, developed by Mark Greenberg, Ph.D., promotes social and emotional development among young children. “Dancing Classrooms picks up where PATHS leaves off, and helps fifth graders apply what they’ve learned,” explained Rogalsky. School administrators, teaching artists and parents agree that Dancing Classrooms has a perceptible and positive impact on participating youngsters. “It’s so rewarding to see the changes in their demeanor through dancing, how the children help each other, interact with each other,” said Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh teaching artist Rozana Sweeney.

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A PUBLICATION FOR THE SPONSORS, BOARDS, REGIONAL LEADERSHIP, SYSTEM OFFICE AND COLLEAGUES OF CATHOLIC HEALTH EAST


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CHE Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary of

Partnership with Drexel University Online

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marks the 10th year of CHE’s educational partnership with Drexel University Online and both organizations’ collaboration to offer discounted Drexel tuition for all CHE colleagues and their families. Throughout this year, CHE and Drexel Online will be celebrating their alliance with special on-site events and by acknowledging colleagues who have taken the next step in achieving their educational goals. Drexel Online will be making numerous visits to CHE hospitals throughout the year to discuss the benefits of CHE’s educational partnership. Events include “Lunch and Learn” presentations, “Coffee Rounds,” “Nibbles and Knowledge” and other exciting educational workshops. Since 2002, hundreds of CHE colleagues have taken advantage of this wonderful opportunity and have earned degrees through Drexel’s online programs for both professional and personal advancement. “It would not be possible to pursue my goal of becoming a nurse practitioner without the flexibility of Drexel’s online program,” said Rachel Wyckoff, a registered nurse at Lourdes Emergency Department at Deborah, Browns Mills, N.J., who is pursuing a master’s in nursing with Drexel Online. “The programs are centered around the needs of the working professional.”

Drexel’s highly-respected online nursing program was recently recognized nationally by U.S. News and World Report as the number two online nursing program in the country and was also awarded with the prestigious “Honor Roll” status by the publication. “In the 21st century, as patient needs and care environments have become more complex, nurses need to attain requisite competencies to deliver high-quality care,” said Nora Triola, Ph.D., R.N., NEA-BC, CHE’s executive vice president and chief nursing officer. Competencies include leadership, health policy, system improvement, research,

Residents of Belle Meade at St. Joseph of the Pines, Southern Pines, N.C., recently welcomed speaker Barbara Bennett, investor education specialist with the North Carolina Department of Secretary of State Securities Division, who presented a program entitled ‘Women in Transition.’ Bennett’s program teaches women ways to protect themselves against fraud, identity theft, unethical financial advice and abuse. Pictured: Bennett (right) with Belle Meade resident Dorothy Baker (left).

In the 21st century, as patient needs and care environments have become more complex, nurses need to attain requisite competencies to deliver high-quality care.

Nora Triola, Ph.D., R.N., CHE executive vice president and chief nursing officer

evidence-based practice, teamwork and collaboration, as well as competency in specific content areas such as community, public health and geriatrics. To respond to these increasing demands, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, in its 2011 report, “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health,” calls for nurses to achieve higher levels of education and suggests that they be educated in new ways that better prepare them to meet the needs of the population. “Changing focus from acute care to community settings that include aspects of primary care, public health, and long-term care are necessary, along with a system that promotes seamless academic progression,” said Triola. “These competencies and curricula are exactly what we receive from our partnership with Drexel University.” “Drexel is educating people to provide care as it should be provided, not as it is,” said Gloria F. Donnelly, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, dean and professor, Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions. “We are developing opportunities for our students to develop new perspectives and solutions to traditional problems in real health care environments like CHE.” Many CHE colleagues have chosen to pursue other degrees outside of the clinical realm, including certificates, bachelor and master degrees in information technology and health services administration. Janet Centanino, a procurement manager at 2

CHE, was able to earn a master’s in library and information science while working full-time with two children. “As a participating school within CHE, Drexel provides colleagues with reduced tuition rates and the ability to defer payments, which is a huge advantage,” said Centanino. Nat’e Parker-Guyton, R.N., M.S.N., NEA-BC, CPHIMSS, clinical informatics officer, Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, earned a post master’s certificate in health care informatics while working as a chief nursing officer. “The Drexel health care informatics program online changed my life,” said Parker-Guyton. “I have worked as a nurse for many years; transforming my career path with health care informatics and information technology operations opened many doors for me. Health care informatics has allowed me to blend my experience as a nurse and in operations to lead transformative efforts related to leveraging technology within our organization.” From hospital to hospital and across departments, CHE colleagues have taken advantage of Drexel Online’s tuition assistance and flexible online programs to pursue a better education and a better career. As CHE and Drexel mark this 10-year anniversary of collaboration, both organizations are excited about the future of their partnership. Visit www.drexel.com/che or contact Kathy Pischke, senior business development specialist, Drexel Online, at Kp399@drexel.edu for more information.

Lincoln Financial Group, CHE’s retirement plan provider, held a team-building activity—‘Wagons of Hope’—at its recent annual sales conference in Florida. Nearly 300 Lincoln employees participated in fun challenges to earn wagon parts and decorations needed to build and embellish Radio Flyers for Holy Cross Hospital (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) community outreach locations. The wagons were donated to lower income day care centers in the community. Pictured from l to r: Joanne Salvador, R.N., PACU, Holy Cross Hospital; Janet Jones, R.N., M.S.N., NCSN and Regine Lefevre, Holy Cross Community Outreach, with the decorated wagons.

Derek Del Giacco shows off his new one-bedroom apartment at Operation Safety Net’s Trail Lane Apartments. Operation Safety Net, part of Pittsburgh Mercy Health System and sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy, built these dedicated apartments for those living on the streets. The apartments represent a ‘housing-first’ approach and are the first of their kind in southwestern Pennsylvania in that residents also have on-site access to physical and behavioral health care services. To date, Operation Safety Net has housed more than 800 individuals, giving them hope and a place to call home. St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa., received a $25,000 gift from Sesame Place to support the expansion of pediatric emergency services as part of the “Sesame Place Cares” initiative, started in fall 2011. Pictured, Dr. Julio Vializ examines Elmo for February’s American Heart Month.

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Below: A pediatric patient enjoys the cookie he decorated as part of the Valentine’s Day fun at St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital, part of BayCare Health System, Clearwater, Fla. Panera Bread hosted a special cookie decorating party at the hospital. During the celebration, hospitalized children decorated heart-shaped cookies donated by Panera and created holiday cards for their sweethearts.


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Decision Support:

Helping CHE Meet the Challenges of the Future

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ealth care continues to change at a rapid rate. The pace of technological advancements, changing regulations and growing competition make it even more crucial that leadership at both the RHC and system levels have complete access and understanding of the drivers of cost and revenue associated with the provision of care.

A unified CHE decision support system will help us effectively combine and organize data, enabling our RHCs and the System Office to use a single source of information for strategic decision-making. Jennifer Barnett, CHE executive vice president and chief financial officer

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The Heart of the Home

ome is where the heart is, or should we say, where the kitchen table is. It’s where one grows up sharing meals, exchanging stories, completing homework, discussing family matters, consoling each other in times of tragedy and celebrating triumphs. It is where—especially for most of our elderly— Sunday dinners meant so much. It is the nucleus of the home. Or at least it used to be. And it is this elderly population that is being served in our nursing homes today.

A bedroom at Mary’s Meadow at Providence Place in Holyoke, Mass.

Top: At Eddy Village Green, Cohoes, N.Y., residents and staff enjoy a family-style meal in the large country kitchen.

In order to support these news objectives, decision support is evolving from a basic cost accounting and utilization reporting function into a true business intelligence solution that requires the operational integration of administrative, clinical, quality and cost data to provide the ability to enhance care delivery and operations.

Typically, nursing homes have had an “institutional” feel and appearance. However, at places like Eddy Village Green, part of The Eddy, an innovative care model has been introduced and it has enjoyed great success. The Eddy, in Troy, N.Y., is the senior services component of Northeast Health, which became part of CHE last fall when it joined together with Seton Health and St. Peter’s Health Care Services to form St. Peter’s Health Partners.

“Operating successful organizations in today’s complex health care environment requires increasing attention to detail,” said Jennifer Barnett, CHE’s executive vice president and chief financial officer. “A unified CHE decision support system will help us effectively combine and organize data, enabling our RHCs and the System Office to use a single source of information for strategic decision-making.”

This latest innovation, known as THE GREEN HOUSE® “We see far fewer elders struggling with behaviors, concept, was introduced by William H. Thomas, M.D., which we believe is a result of a quieter, calmer founder and director of innovation of the Green House Project, a national, non-profit organization that has helped environment, increased privacy and a deeper knowing of the elders by staff who provide the care,” said James open over 100 models houses in 28 states. “The Green House model creates ‘homes’ for individuals Farnan, administrator of Eddy Village Green. “We have in need of skilled nursing services that are indeed home in also seen a sustained reduction in falls among the elders living in the Green Houses.” every way, while meeting all of the regulatory

With the help of decision support tools, companies can more easily and effectively focus their attention on key performance metrics and organizational goals through alerts, business scorecards and a variety of different graphical views such as graphs, charts, tables and text interpretations. Several CHE RHCs—including Sisters of Providence Health System, Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, St. Mary Medical Center, St. Francis Hospital, Holy Cross Hospital, St. Peter’s Health Partners, St. Mary’s Health Care System, Mercy Health System of Maine and Lourdes Health System—have implemented some degree of decision support capabilities. Without a single decision support system across CHE, however, the full benefits of this initiative are not being realized. “While Mercy Health System has certainly realized worthwhile results from our early decision support efforts, we certainly see even greater

benefits accruing to our ministry, as well as to Catholic Health East as a whole, through the introduction of a system-wide decision support program,” said Dan Ahern, vice president, strategic planning at MHS SEPA. Ahern serves as the lead for CHE’s decision support initiative. To address the challenges that we face as a system, CHE is in the process of implementing a standard, system-wide decision support program. Some of the key benefits of a system-wide approach to decision support that will be realized in 2012 include: • Allowing for the replication of best practices at RHCs; • Providing the ability to perform operational service line analysis across all RHCs; • Supporting managed care contracting; and • Facilitating operational improvement and planning.

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A system-wide program will allow for standard interfaces, implementation practices and consistency. While a significant investment in time and resources is required, in the long run, the initiative will prove to be extremely cost-effective. With every RHC separately devoting resources to manage a decision support program, there is no opportunity to lower costs by sharing resources across RHCs, providing facilitation or enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of a system-wide program. In addition, a system-wide program can provide central maintenance of applications, reports and workflows which will reduce redundant work across the RHCs. Watch for much more information about the ongoing development of CHE’s system-wide decision support system. For more information about decision support efforts at CHE, please contact Dan Ahern, vice president, strategic planning, MHS SEPA, at dahern@mercyhealth.org

Lower right: An aerial view of Eddy Village Green campus in Cohoes, N.Y.

requirements of a nursing home,” said Laurie Mante, vice president, residential services for St. Peter’s Health Partners. “The houses all have private bedrooms and bathrooms, comfortable living and dining space, with an open, family style country kitchen, where all meals are prepared from scratch.” The homes also offer amenities such as fireplaces, ceiling fans and access to the outdoors.

The Green House model also appeals to staff and families alike. “Our self-managed work teams make their own schedules, and figure out how to get the care, laundry, cooking, etc., done around the elders’ schedule,” said Farnan. One sign that staff like this model: the retention rate for nursing assistants has increased by over 50 percent since the Green House was introduced.

Eddy Village Green, located in Cohoes, N.Y.—about 10 miles north of Albany—is the first Green House campus in New York and the largest in the country. Opened in 2008, its 16 houses are ‘home’ to 192 elders. A second Eddy Village Green opened February 2011 at the Beverwyck housing community in Slingerlands, N.Y., which consists of two houses, for a total of 24 beds.

The families of residents are just as pleased. Letters have been written expressing gratitude for the staff. Comments include how ‘attentive and compassionate all the staff were’, ‘Dad was so loved and so well cared for by everyone’, and one family wrote ‘The concept of the individual houses for a small number of residents is wonderful; but it’s just a house unless you have people like the staff … who make it truly a home’.

“Much like the name says, the term ‘Green House’ is symbolic of life and living—we believe this is a place where people continue to live and grow, despite their need for help due to physical or cognitive challenges,” said Mante. “The residents of the Green Houses are just like other nursing home residents—they tend to be, on average, in their late 80s, and must need significant help with activities of daily living to live here.”

Mary’s Meadow at Providence Place, sponsored by the Sisters of Providence of Holyoke and managed by Sisters of Providence Health System, Springfield, Mass., is adapted to this model. Offering long-term skilled nursing care and short-term rehabilitation services, it was built to ‘be a home’, said Sr. Joan Mullen, S.P., chair of the

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Providence Place/Mary’s Meadow board and former president of the Sisters of Providence. Located on the campus of the Sisters of Providence’s former Mother House in Holyoke, Mass., Mary’s Meadow offers four separate 10-person houses that are designed to offer elders accommodations with a comfort level equal to that of residential homes. “Mary’s Meadow follows a social rather than a medical model,” said Sr. Joan. “Or in other words, clinical care within a habilitative, social model.” Benefits include giving seniors a deinstitutionalized choice for long-term care, a sense of belonging and community, and empowerment for the elders. The model gives the elders a sense of dignity. They can still make decisions about daily life, restoring a sense of control—an integral part of one’s independence and continued growth. At Mary’s Meadow and Eddy Village Green, once again the kitchen table is a source of comfort, where bread is broken across generations, cards are played, decisions are made and celebrations take place. For more information about Eddy Village Green, please contact Laurie Mante, vice president, residential services, St. Peter’s Health Partners, at mantel@nehealth.com and/or visit www.thegreenhouseproject.org. For more information on Mary’s Meadow, visit www.marysmeadow.org or e-mail Jackie Boileau at j.boileau@marysmeadow.org.


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Fall Prevention: A Top Priority

reventing falls and protecting patients from injury presents a challenge to all health care providers across the continuum of care. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls are the leading cause of accidental injury and the sixth leading cause of death among elderly Americans, and are the primary cause of reported adverse events in hospitals incurring expense, liability risk and personal suffering. The CDC estimates that by the year 2020, the annual direct and indirect cost of fall injuries is expected to reach nearly $55 billion. Because of the enormous personal and economic costs of fall-related injuries, reduction of falls is a top priority for Catholic Health East (CHE). To focus on this critically important issue, CHE recently held its first Falls Collaborative seminar for our acute care hospitals and long term care providers. This program was developed in collaboration with CHE System Office’s clinical services and risk services staff, as well as CHE’s Continuing Care Management Services Network. Over 100 CHE colleagues came together on March 2 to learn and share evidence-based strategies for fall prevention and injury protection. “This collaborative is a tribute to the pursuit of Vision 2017 and to being a healing and transforming presence in the communities that we serve,” said Nora Triola, Ph.D., R.N., NEA-BC, CHE‘s executive vice president and chief nursing officer. The Falls Collaborative is the result of a partnership between CHE and Patricia Quigley, Ph.D., M.P.H., ARNP, CRRN, FAAN and FAANP. Dr. Quigley, a clinical nurse specialist and a nurse practitioner in rehabilitation, is one of the nation’s leading experts on the subject of fall prevention and injury protection and has published extensively on this topic. Quigley has used her clinical expertise and interdisciplinary research findings to develop multiple fall and injury reduction toolkits, which contain materials that can be used in the provision of bedside and community care. She also leads an interdisciplinary clinical team in the development of evidence-based tools and

Dr. Patricia Quigley, a national expert on fall and injury prevention, shared her expertise and experiences with over 100 CHE colleagues at the first CHE Falls Collaborative seminar.

most hospitals have done before in the acute care setting.”

Triola acknowledged that fall prevention efforts require a multi-disciplinary approach to be successful: “It takes a village to make things happen. And in this room is our village.” Among the professionals attending the conference were: chief medical officers, chief nursing officers, clinical directors, nursing home administrators, pharmacists, physicians, managers, advance practice nurses, therapists and safety officers.

During her presentation, Quigley discussed the different types of falls and how the plan of action will be different for each kind of fall. Some falls require a closer look at the organization to see what types of falls are occurring: accidental, anticipated physiological, unanticipated physiological or intentional.

Before the official start of the face-to-face meeting, 15 minute time slots for “Coffee with Pat” were offered so that the RHC colleagues could meet directly with this subject matter expert on specific barriers, challenges, etc., at their organizations. “We discussed the concept of an interdisciplinary fall rounds process,” said Kathy Brodbeck, R.N., M.S., NEA-BC, executive vice president and chief nursing officer, St. Peter‘s Health Partners. “For high risk patients, Dr. Quigley recommended that we conduct a team visit with each patient, and to develop a plan that is unique to each patient. This is a new concept for us at St. Peter‘s.” “Dr. Quigley recommended to us that we need to focus more on those patients who are at high risk for injury, those who are vulnerable for loss of function or loss of life and/or those who are admitted because of a fall or fall in our care, irrespective of a fall risk score,” said Mary Ellen Rauner, R.N., M.A., chief nursing officer, administration for Mercy Suburban Hospital, East Norriton, Pa. “We need to move away from overreliance on the use of a high risk score for fall on a screening tool as the primary basis for clinical interventions. This is a different focus than what

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“We have to remember that nursing can’t do it all,” said Carol Pilotti, R.N., B.S.P.A., CRRN, BIS, nurse manager at St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa. “Dr. Quigley also reminded us that the assessment tool is purely a screening tool. The whole team needs to utilize their assessment skills in developing the plan for interventions and what they are going to do to keep patients safe.” In preparation for this meeting, colleagues at CHE‘s acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities were asked to complete an online organizational self-assessment tool developed by Quigley. The response to the survey was phenomenal, with over 700 surveys returned. The results were shared at the meeting and will be used to help guide CHE as we strategically address opportunities for improvement at both the local and system levels. Quigley will be providing ongoing consultation throughout the year with CHE. We look forward to the enhanced collaboration and communication that this new initiative will bring to all colleagues and, most importantly, the increased safety for the patients and residents entrusted to our care. For more information about fall prevention, please contact Sharon Duffy, CHE vice president, nursing practice, at sduffy@che.org.

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Patient-Centered Medical Home:

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clinical practice guidelines, while always emphasizing the importance of clinical expertise.

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Transforming the Delivery of Care

ne of the biggest criticisms of our nation’s health care system is the fragmentation of care. Typically, there is little to no connection between an individual’s health encounters across the continuum of outpatient and inpatient care. For example, an individual may receive good episodic care, but have no one to turn to with questions about his or her overall return to health, transfers between facilities, dialogue between multiple care providers, medication management … the list goes on and on. This type of uncoordinated care can result in poor quality, ineffective treatment and costly care.

together to develop seven “joint principles of the PCMH.” These seven principles focus on: personal physician, physician-directed medical care, a whole person orientation, coordinated care, quality and safety, enhanced access to care and payment. According to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), a not-for-profit organization focused on improving health care quality, a patient-centered medical home is a model of care that strengthens the clinician-patient relationship by replacing episodic care with coordinated care and a long-term healing relationship.

In the medical home model, each patient has Ray Welch leads the a relationship with a primary care clinician who discussion at MHS SEPA’s leads a team that takes collective responsibility for recent PCMH kick-off meeting. patient care, providing for the patient’s health executive vice president, ministry operations, care needs and arranging for appropriate care CHE. “Mercy is committed to the vision of with other providers as needed. improving community access to health services A new type of health care model—known as Some of the key benefits promised by the that improve the health of individuals and the patient-centered medical home (PCMH)—is medical home model include more accessible gaining more and more attention as a possible care, improved provider-patient communications communities.” “breakthrough” in the way health care is According to Kate Millay, director of quality and enhanced ability to take full advantage of delivered. It promises a high degree of management for ambulatory services at MHS new technologies to prescribe medications and coordination and better quality for a lower cost. tests, track results, obtain clinical support SEPA, Mercy is seeking NCQA certification of its evolving medical home model. “We’re information and monitor performance. The concept of the medical home is first convinced that implementing the Supported by electronic health records (EHRs), attributed to the American Academy of patient-centered medical home will help us caregivers can more easily assist patients with Pediatrics, which introduced this terminology improve the patient experience, while education and self management, coordinate back in 1967; the organization envisioned the recognizing our clinicians for their innovations patient health care activities, arrange visits to medical home as a “central source for all the and efforts.” specialists, and remind patients when they need medical information about a child, especially check-ups and tests. The medical home model those with special needs.” Fast-forward to Deborah Leonard, MHS SEPA’s vice president supports fundamental changes in primary care 2002, when seven national family medicine of physician services, added, “We believe that service delivery and payment reforms, with the organizations created The Future of Family PCMH certification will have meaning for goal of improving health care quality. Medicine; one key recommendation was that insurers and purchasers of our care, signifying “every American should have a personal our commitment to provide improved quality at The movement towards PCMH is happening medical home through which to receive his or throughout Catholic Health East. One example is lower cost.” her acute, chronic and preventive services. Mercy Health System of Southeastern Dr. Helen Thorpe, physician champion for These services should be accessible, Pennsylvania (MHS SEPA), where five physician the ambulatory EHR at MHS SEPA, agrees that accountable, comprehensive, integrated, practices are participating in a pilot that the PCMH model of care offers benefits to patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid and transforms each office to a patient-centered patients as well as providers. “The PCMH satisfying to both patients and their physicians.” medical home. On February 13, physicians, concept aligns beautifully with the goal of leaders and staff gathered for a breakfast meeting providing the right care to the right person at Over the last decade, the concept of the to kick-off the initiative at MHS SEPA. PCMH has continued to evolve. In 2007, the the right time,” said Dr. Thorpe. “It provides the American Association of Family Practitioners, “The patient-centered medical home initiative resources for the Mercy health care team to the American College of Physicians, the work with patients to promote healthy supports our 2012 physician alignment and American Academy of Pediatrics and the health care delivery model strategies,” said H. Ray behaviors and to facilitate access to appropriate American Osteopathic Association came levels of care and follow-up.” Welch Jr., president and CEO of MHS SEPA and 9


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Celebrate Our Core Values and

Win a Kindle!

CHE Contest

A Kindle will be awarded for the best personal story, poem or image on Care for Those Who Are Poor.

Deadline: June 11, 2012 As you know, Catholic Health East is continuing its reflection on our Core Values. Living our Core Values is a way of furthering CHE’s Mission; when practiced, they continue the legacy of our Sponsors and are a key component of our organizational spirituality. Core Values education serves as an important means of providing ministry formation to all colleagues. To help keep our Core Values ever-present, CHE is ‘celebrating’ one Core Value each quarter. All colleagues throughout the system are encouraged to share their stories, poems, images or patient vignettes related to the Core Value being celebrated: Care for Those Who Are Poor. Last quarter, we asked you to submit your stories for the Core Value of Justice. We received many wonderful submissions; but only one winning entry could be chosen for a prize. That submission is featured at the right. The remaining submission deadlines are: • Care for Those Who are Poor, June 11, 2012 • Stewardship, September 10, 2012 • Courage, December 10, 2012 • Integrity, March 11, 2013

Prizes

CHE will award a Kindle to the colleague who submits the best story (500 word maximum), poem or image related to Care for Those Who Are Poor. The winner will be announced at the system-wide webinar on that Core Value and featured in system-wide publications. The system-wide webinar on Care for Those Who Are Poor will be held at noon on June 21. Information on how you can join in on that webinar will be shared shortly. To be eligible for the contest, submission of your creative material (story, poem, etc.) should be sent to pboyle@che.org by June 11, 2012.

Kihra Kohler, Training and Development Coordinator, Mercy Behavioral Health, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System

Justice By Kihra Kohler Training and Development Coordinator Mercy Behavioral Health, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System

Justice is like coming home Finding comfort and solace in those around you. Justice is a warm meal Filling and nutritious after years of nothing. Justice is a feeling of safety Sheltered from the storms of life and anger of others. Justice is a sense of belonging Having people realize that there is more to you than your past. Justice is understanding Being surrounded by people who know you are not your illness. Most of all Justice is love Being able to give and receive without fear and hesitation.

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CareLink Website Springs Forward

he CareLink website will launch in early spring, providing patients, physicians, clinical and non-clinical staff, prospective colleagues and partners with information, education and resources related to the CareLink initiative, including information about electronic health records (EHRs), computerized provider order entry (CPOE), evidence-based medicine and best practices across our health care system. CareLink is designed to connect the patient, caregivers and clinicians by linking all of a patient’s medical information into one record … and enabling multiple health care providers to have immediate access to this record at the bedside, in the office or even remotely. With ready access to electronic charts, we can reduce the need for repetitive diagnostic tests or procedures, and in turn, improve overall patient care coordination across multiple disciplines and provider locations.

Another piece of the CareLink initiative is the implementation of standardized clinical order sets for the treatment of specific conditions. Developed through a collaboration of our clinicians and based on the latest clinical research and evidence, standardized order sets will help us apply best practices to patient care, resulting in clinical efficiency, comprehensive care coordination and better outcomes for our patients. Here are some of the features the new CareLink website will include: • Video clips of clinicians discussing CareLink; • Links to individual LMS (learning management system) training sites; • FAQs, fact sheets, talking points and key messages; • A comprehensive CareLink glossary; • An order set library for physicians; • A CareLink blog; and • News and status updates across the RHCs.

Upcoming CareLink Roll-Outs Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania May 1, 2012 St. Peter’s Hospital, Albany, N.Y. May 1, 2012 (Internists only) St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa. June 5, 2012

Dancing Classrooms: Teaching Respect,

Self-Confidence and Teamwork continued from page 1 “This experience has been better than any world championship I’ve ever danced. It’s beautiful.” According to one parent, “My son was always a gentleman; however, he’s really taking on gentleman-like qualities. Also he’s beginning to take school and his work more seriously. Thank you for what you’ve done to improve my son in more ways than one. God bless.”

Fifth graders from Pittsburgh Lincoln K-5 (Team Yellow) and Pittsburgh Spring Hill K-5 (Team Blue) Tango at Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh’s Colors of the Rainbow team match on January 7, 2012. Photo by Archie Carpenter.

Teaching artist and ballroom champion Terry Sweeney has watched introverted children “come alive through dance.” He’s seen children with autism perform above and beyond expectations. He recalls one particularly shy young lady who blossomed through Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh. Teachers reported that it

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wasn’t until after she started the program that they noticed her smiling in school. “Dancing Classrooms helped me like my classmates,” explained Will, a student who took part in the program in 2011. “We had to be a team. At first it was hard but if you keep at it, you get it. My teacher said that is also the way in other things.” For more information on Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh, contact Mark Rogalsky, unit manager for prevention services, Mercy Behavioral Health, at 412.320.2321 or visit Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh’s blog at http://dancingclassroomspgh.org. This article was contributed by Kimberly Flaherty, director, public relations, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System.


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Colleague Commitment: Back to the Basics

atholic Health East’s vision statement calls for us to achieve “excellence in all we do.” The achievement of excellence requires a team of talented, committed colleagues. We recognize that colleague commitment and engagement is a crucial component to the delivery of effective, person-centered health care and that we must cultivate an organizational culture that attracts, develops and retains the best skilled, values-based colleagues to carry our Mission forward into the future.

Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania

One of our organizational goals is to achieve top 10 percent performance in colleague commitment when compared to our peers nationally. How do we measure our progress towards achieving this goal? We ask our colleagues to tell us how we’re doing! In April 2011, all Regional Health Corporations (RHCs) completed an annual colleague commitment survey; over 24,000 colleagues (representing a 73 percent response rate) participated. Our survey results provided great insight into our organizational strengths, as well as system-wide opportunities for improvement. Overall, we achieved a commitment indicator score of 3.94 (out of a 5.0 scale), a slight drop from our 2008 score of 3.97. Despite this decline, we significantly outpaced the national health care average on survey questions such as “the person I report to is a good communicator,” and “the environment at this organization makes employees in my work unit want to go above and beyond what’s expected of them.” Even more promising is, when asked if they liked the work they do, 94 percent all survey participants responded favorably. In comparison to the 2008 survey results, we made improvement on colleague satisfaction with benefits, teamwork among staff and physicians, and organizational respect for spiritual beliefs. From an improvement perspective, our biggest opportunities include enhancing colleague perceptions of how we care about customers, the quality of care and service provided, and job security. Since the initial release of our survey results, many improvement initiatives have been implemented. For

emulate their Core Values and provide excellent care and service to patients and their families.

Brian Ray, patient access manager (left) and C.J. Johnson, clinical education training coordinator, take part in an exercise during Holy Cross Hospital’s leadership ‘boot camp’.

example, every RHC now requires leaders of lower scoring work units to implement improvement plans. To date, nearly 500 of these plans have been completed across the system. In total, approximately 1,082 work units have documented improvement plans. To assist in driving improvement in areas where significant opportunity exists, our CEOs were given a tool which summarizes the lowest scoring work unit’s performance trends, highlights unit strengths and colleague concerns, and also provides sample verbatim comments from survey respondents which aids in identifying key opportunities to make immediate and meaningful changes. A number of our CEOs have made it a practice to round on these units using this information as the foundation for creating a shared dialogue of improvement. In addition to our system-wide initiatives, all RHCs have embarked on journeys to improve colleague commitment locally. Many have gone “back to the basics” as a means to re-engage with their workforce. This involves revisiting evidence-based strategies and rejuvenating other proven practices and activities which were successful in the past. The beauty of such an approach is that 6

At Mercy Suburban Hospital in East Norriton, Pa., part of Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Gretchen Pendleton, vice president of human resources, has taken a holistic approach to driving improvement in colleague commitment. As all work units were required to document and implement improvement plans, Gretchen conducted an analysis on the similarities between all leaders’ plans. A common theme quickly emerged and was identified by more than 20 leaders as an opportunity—recognizing colleagues for a job well done. In conjunction with the marketing department, Gretchen scheduled an interdisciplinary meeting to bring together these leaders to discuss what was working well, what could be improved, and to share best practices and expedite organizational change relative to this question.

At Mercy Suburban Hospital, posters and visual aids—such as this wrap around the main lobby desk, noting its recent designation as a Primary Stroke Center —build awareness about notable recognitions within the organization.

we are not reinventing the wheel or implementing new or costly strategies, but rather resurrecting what were once vital elements of our organizational culture that somehow in the hustle and bustle of our busy days had inadvertently fallen by the wayside.

Sisters of Providence Health System At Sisters of Providence Health System in Springfield, Mass., improvement efforts have been embraced by members of the senior leadership team, all of whom have committed to rounding on individual work units and then discussing what they have learned during leadership meetings. The purpose of such discussions is to make meaningful changes within a short period of time, recognizing the uniqueness of the challenges each work unit faces and how small changes can make the biggest difference in some areas. “The main generator of culture is leadership,” said John Knuerr, director of mission and organizational development. “Leadership must shine light into the organization but must also hold up the mirror and ask, ‘what am I doing to contribute and move the

Sisters of Providence Health System’s monthly colleague newsletter, Colleague Connection, features key survey findings and leadership responses.

needle to improve colleague commitment?’” To answer that question, the senior leadership team receives regular updates on the progress that is made within each work unit, as departmental directors periodically review action plan progress and discuss the impact actions are having on “moving the needle in the right direction.” An ‘Engagement Moment’ is a standing agenda item at monthly management meetings where information and tips on colleague engagement are presented. Workshops are offered on enhancing management skills, including the effective use of Values in Practice tools such as Rounding with Reason and Managing Up. In addition, a monthly CEO communication is sent to all colleagues aptly titled Colleague Connection, which covers the key survey findings and leadership’s responses.

Holy Cross Hospital Holy Cross Hospital, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., has applied a laser-like focus to drive improvement by targeting lower-scoring work units, partnering with leaders in a one-on-one fashion to address the distinctive issues that surfaced on the survey. Human Resources Director Geoff Washburn and

Associate Relations Coordinator Rachel Thompson meet with each leader to review their survey data and improvement plans, as well as share best practices that will assist leaders in making meaningful improvement. Leaders are also required to put colleague commitment on their departmental meeting agendas, as a means to continuously solicit feedback from their staff. To further reinforce that colleague commitment is a “non-negotiable” priority for Holy Cross, President and CEO Patrick Taylor, M.D., sends a quarterly letter to each colleague’s home detailing the organizational changes that are being made as a result of the survey. In addition, more than 200 Holy Cross leaders have attended a four-hour colleague commitment “boot camp,” which provided education on the most current science and literature behind colleague engagement (linking high colleague engagement to high quality, revenue and customer loyalty) and also equipped them with tools and strategies to convert disengaged colleagues to highly engaged colleagues. Organizationally, Holy Cross is also coordinating the implementation of an enhanced rewards and recognition program to provide ample opportunities for leaders and colleagues to celebrate those who 7

In addition to collaborative brainstorming, human resources and marketing have focused their efforts on communicating across all levels by quickly disseminating information from their monthly management meetings. This equips all leaders with talking points for their departmental and team meetings to ensure that important information is cascaded down through the organization. They have also utilized visual aids such as posters and wraps to consistently message and advertise notable recognitions within the organization, such as their recent Top Performer Quality recognition by The Joint Commission, their designation as a Primary Stroke Center, the building of their new cancer center and the recent growth experienced in their sleep disorders and bariatric surgery programs. All colleagues in attendance at Mercy Suburban’s all-colleague meetings also received training focused on the Core Value of Reverence for Each Person, to address a survey opportunity to improve colleagues’ perceptions of being treated with respect. In January, their leaders participated in a train-the-trainer program to ensure that their entire organization benefits from this training. For more information about colleague commitment initiatives across the system, please contact Lisa Satteson, CHE director, Values in Practice, at lsatteson@che.org. This article was contributed by Lisa Satteson, CHE director, Values in Practice.


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Colleague Commitment: Back to the Basics

atholic Health East’s vision statement calls for us to achieve “excellence in all we do.” The achievement of excellence requires a team of talented, committed colleagues. We recognize that colleague commitment and engagement is a crucial component to the delivery of effective, person-centered health care and that we must cultivate an organizational culture that attracts, develops and retains the best skilled, values-based colleagues to carry our Mission forward into the future.

Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania

One of our organizational goals is to achieve top 10 percent performance in colleague commitment when compared to our peers nationally. How do we measure our progress towards achieving this goal? We ask our colleagues to tell us how we’re doing! In April 2011, all Regional Health Corporations (RHCs) completed an annual colleague commitment survey; over 24,000 colleagues (representing a 73 percent response rate) participated. Our survey results provided great insight into our organizational strengths, as well as system-wide opportunities for improvement. Overall, we achieved a commitment indicator score of 3.94 (out of a 5.0 scale), a slight drop from our 2008 score of 3.97. Despite this decline, we significantly outpaced the national health care average on survey questions such as “the person I report to is a good communicator,” and “the environment at this organization makes employees in my work unit want to go above and beyond what’s expected of them.” Even more promising is, when asked if they liked the work they do, 94 percent all survey participants responded favorably. In comparison to the 2008 survey results, we made improvement on colleague satisfaction with benefits, teamwork among staff and physicians, and organizational respect for spiritual beliefs. From an improvement perspective, our biggest opportunities include enhancing colleague perceptions of how we care about customers, the quality of care and service provided, and job security. Since the initial release of our survey results, many improvement initiatives have been implemented. For

emulate their Core Values and provide excellent care and service to patients and their families.

Brian Ray, patient access manager (left) and C.J. Johnson, clinical education training coordinator, take part in an exercise during Holy Cross Hospital’s leadership ‘boot camp’.

example, every RHC now requires leaders of lower scoring work units to implement improvement plans. To date, nearly 500 of these plans have been completed across the system. In total, approximately 1,082 work units have documented improvement plans. To assist in driving improvement in areas where significant opportunity exists, our CEOs were given a tool which summarizes the lowest scoring work unit’s performance trends, highlights unit strengths and colleague concerns, and also provides sample verbatim comments from survey respondents which aids in identifying key opportunities to make immediate and meaningful changes. A number of our CEOs have made it a practice to round on these units using this information as the foundation for creating a shared dialogue of improvement. In addition to our system-wide initiatives, all RHCs have embarked on journeys to improve colleague commitment locally. Many have gone “back to the basics” as a means to re-engage with their workforce. This involves revisiting evidence-based strategies and rejuvenating other proven practices and activities which were successful in the past. The beauty of such an approach is that 6

At Mercy Suburban Hospital in East Norriton, Pa., part of Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Gretchen Pendleton, vice president of human resources, has taken a holistic approach to driving improvement in colleague commitment. As all work units were required to document and implement improvement plans, Gretchen conducted an analysis on the similarities between all leaders’ plans. A common theme quickly emerged and was identified by more than 20 leaders as an opportunity—recognizing colleagues for a job well done. In conjunction with the marketing department, Gretchen scheduled an interdisciplinary meeting to bring together these leaders to discuss what was working well, what could be improved, and to share best practices and expedite organizational change relative to this question.

At Mercy Suburban Hospital, posters and visual aids—such as this wrap around the main lobby desk, noting its recent designation as a Primary Stroke Center —build awareness about notable recognitions within the organization.

we are not reinventing the wheel or implementing new or costly strategies, but rather resurrecting what were once vital elements of our organizational culture that somehow in the hustle and bustle of our busy days had inadvertently fallen by the wayside.

Sisters of Providence Health System At Sisters of Providence Health System in Springfield, Mass., improvement efforts have been embraced by members of the senior leadership team, all of whom have committed to rounding on individual work units and then discussing what they have learned during leadership meetings. The purpose of such discussions is to make meaningful changes within a short period of time, recognizing the uniqueness of the challenges each work unit faces and how small changes can make the biggest difference in some areas. “The main generator of culture is leadership,” said John Knuerr, director of mission and organizational development. “Leadership must shine light into the organization but must also hold up the mirror and ask, ‘what am I doing to contribute and move the

Sisters of Providence Health System’s monthly colleague newsletter, Colleague Connection, features key survey findings and leadership responses.

needle to improve colleague commitment?’” To answer that question, the senior leadership team receives regular updates on the progress that is made within each work unit, as departmental directors periodically review action plan progress and discuss the impact actions are having on “moving the needle in the right direction.” An ‘Engagement Moment’ is a standing agenda item at monthly management meetings where information and tips on colleague engagement are presented. Workshops are offered on enhancing management skills, including the effective use of Values in Practice tools such as Rounding with Reason and Managing Up. In addition, a monthly CEO communication is sent to all colleagues aptly titled Colleague Connection, which covers the key survey findings and leadership’s responses.

Holy Cross Hospital Holy Cross Hospital, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., has applied a laser-like focus to drive improvement by targeting lower-scoring work units, partnering with leaders in a one-on-one fashion to address the distinctive issues that surfaced on the survey. Human Resources Director Geoff Washburn and

Associate Relations Coordinator Rachel Thompson meet with each leader to review their survey data and improvement plans, as well as share best practices that will assist leaders in making meaningful improvement. Leaders are also required to put colleague commitment on their departmental meeting agendas, as a means to continuously solicit feedback from their staff. To further reinforce that colleague commitment is a “non-negotiable” priority for Holy Cross, President and CEO Patrick Taylor, M.D., sends a quarterly letter to each colleague’s home detailing the organizational changes that are being made as a result of the survey. In addition, more than 200 Holy Cross leaders have attended a four-hour colleague commitment “boot camp,” which provided education on the most current science and literature behind colleague engagement (linking high colleague engagement to high quality, revenue and customer loyalty) and also equipped them with tools and strategies to convert disengaged colleagues to highly engaged colleagues. Organizationally, Holy Cross is also coordinating the implementation of an enhanced rewards and recognition program to provide ample opportunities for leaders and colleagues to celebrate those who 7

In addition to collaborative brainstorming, human resources and marketing have focused their efforts on communicating across all levels by quickly disseminating information from their monthly management meetings. This equips all leaders with talking points for their departmental and team meetings to ensure that important information is cascaded down through the organization. They have also utilized visual aids such as posters and wraps to consistently message and advertise notable recognitions within the organization, such as their recent Top Performer Quality recognition by The Joint Commission, their designation as a Primary Stroke Center, the building of their new cancer center and the recent growth experienced in their sleep disorders and bariatric surgery programs. All colleagues in attendance at Mercy Suburban’s all-colleague meetings also received training focused on the Core Value of Reverence for Each Person, to address a survey opportunity to improve colleagues’ perceptions of being treated with respect. In January, their leaders participated in a train-the-trainer program to ensure that their entire organization benefits from this training. For more information about colleague commitment initiatives across the system, please contact Lisa Satteson, CHE director, Values in Practice, at lsatteson@che.org. This article was contributed by Lisa Satteson, CHE director, Values in Practice.


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Celebrate Our Core Values and

Win a Kindle!

CHE Contest

A Kindle will be awarded for the best personal story, poem or image on Care for Those Who Are Poor.

Deadline: June 11, 2012 As you know, Catholic Health East is continuing its reflection on our Core Values. Living our Core Values is a way of furthering CHE’s Mission; when practiced, they continue the legacy of our Sponsors and are a key component of our organizational spirituality. Core Values education serves as an important means of providing ministry formation to all colleagues. To help keep our Core Values ever-present, CHE is ‘celebrating’ one Core Value each quarter. All colleagues throughout the system are encouraged to share their stories, poems, images or patient vignettes related to the Core Value being celebrated: Care for Those Who Are Poor. Last quarter, we asked you to submit your stories for the Core Value of Justice. We received many wonderful submissions; but only one winning entry could be chosen for a prize. That submission is featured at the right. The remaining submission deadlines are: • Care for Those Who are Poor, June 11, 2012 • Stewardship, September 10, 2012 • Courage, December 10, 2012 • Integrity, March 11, 2013

Prizes

CHE will award a Kindle to the colleague who submits the best story (500 word maximum), poem or image related to Care for Those Who Are Poor. The winner will be announced at the system-wide webinar on that Core Value and featured in system-wide publications. The system-wide webinar on Care for Those Who Are Poor will be held at noon on June 21. Information on how you can join in on that webinar will be shared shortly. To be eligible for the contest, submission of your creative material (story, poem, etc.) should be sent to pboyle@che.org by June 11, 2012.

Kihra Kohler, Training and Development Coordinator, Mercy Behavioral Health, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System

Justice By Kihra Kohler Training and Development Coordinator Mercy Behavioral Health, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System

Justice is like coming home Finding comfort and solace in those around you. Justice is a warm meal Filling and nutritious after years of nothing. Justice is a feeling of safety Sheltered from the storms of life and anger of others. Justice is a sense of belonging Having people realize that there is more to you than your past. Justice is understanding Being surrounded by people who know you are not your illness. Most of all Justice is love Being able to give and receive without fear and hesitation.

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CareLink Website Springs Forward

he CareLink website will launch in early spring, providing patients, physicians, clinical and non-clinical staff, prospective colleagues and partners with information, education and resources related to the CareLink initiative, including information about electronic health records (EHRs), computerized provider order entry (CPOE), evidence-based medicine and best practices across our health care system. CareLink is designed to connect the patient, caregivers and clinicians by linking all of a patient’s medical information into one record … and enabling multiple health care providers to have immediate access to this record at the bedside, in the office or even remotely. With ready access to electronic charts, we can reduce the need for repetitive diagnostic tests or procedures, and in turn, improve overall patient care coordination across multiple disciplines and provider locations.

Another piece of the CareLink initiative is the implementation of standardized clinical order sets for the treatment of specific conditions. Developed through a collaboration of our clinicians and based on the latest clinical research and evidence, standardized order sets will help us apply best practices to patient care, resulting in clinical efficiency, comprehensive care coordination and better outcomes for our patients. Here are some of the features the new CareLink website will include: • Video clips of clinicians discussing CareLink; • Links to individual LMS (learning management system) training sites; • FAQs, fact sheets, talking points and key messages; • A comprehensive CareLink glossary; • An order set library for physicians; • A CareLink blog; and • News and status updates across the RHCs.

Upcoming CareLink Roll-Outs Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania May 1, 2012 St. Peter’s Hospital, Albany, N.Y. May 1, 2012 (Internists only) St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa. June 5, 2012

Dancing Classrooms: Teaching Respect,

Self-Confidence and Teamwork continued from page 1 “This experience has been better than any world championship I’ve ever danced. It’s beautiful.” According to one parent, “My son was always a gentleman; however, he’s really taking on gentleman-like qualities. Also he’s beginning to take school and his work more seriously. Thank you for what you’ve done to improve my son in more ways than one. God bless.”

Fifth graders from Pittsburgh Lincoln K-5 (Team Yellow) and Pittsburgh Spring Hill K-5 (Team Blue) Tango at Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh’s Colors of the Rainbow team match on January 7, 2012. Photo by Archie Carpenter.

Teaching artist and ballroom champion Terry Sweeney has watched introverted children “come alive through dance.” He’s seen children with autism perform above and beyond expectations. He recalls one particularly shy young lady who blossomed through Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh. Teachers reported that it

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wasn’t until after she started the program that they noticed her smiling in school. “Dancing Classrooms helped me like my classmates,” explained Will, a student who took part in the program in 2011. “We had to be a team. At first it was hard but if you keep at it, you get it. My teacher said that is also the way in other things.” For more information on Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh, contact Mark Rogalsky, unit manager for prevention services, Mercy Behavioral Health, at 412.320.2321 or visit Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh’s blog at http://dancingclassroomspgh.org. This article was contributed by Kimberly Flaherty, director, public relations, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System.


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Fall Prevention: A Top Priority

reventing falls and protecting patients from injury presents a challenge to all health care providers across the continuum of care. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls are the leading cause of accidental injury and the sixth leading cause of death among elderly Americans, and are the primary cause of reported adverse events in hospitals incurring expense, liability risk and personal suffering. The CDC estimates that by the year 2020, the annual direct and indirect cost of fall injuries is expected to reach nearly $55 billion. Because of the enormous personal and economic costs of fall-related injuries, reduction of falls is a top priority for Catholic Health East (CHE). To focus on this critically important issue, CHE recently held its first Falls Collaborative seminar for our acute care hospitals and long term care providers. This program was developed in collaboration with CHE System Office’s clinical services and risk services staff, as well as CHE’s Continuing Care Management Services Network. Over 100 CHE colleagues came together on March 2 to learn and share evidence-based strategies for fall prevention and injury protection. “This collaborative is a tribute to the pursuit of Vision 2017 and to being a healing and transforming presence in the communities that we serve,” said Nora Triola, Ph.D., R.N., NEA-BC, CHE‘s executive vice president and chief nursing officer. The Falls Collaborative is the result of a partnership between CHE and Patricia Quigley, Ph.D., M.P.H., ARNP, CRRN, FAAN and FAANP. Dr. Quigley, a clinical nurse specialist and a nurse practitioner in rehabilitation, is one of the nation’s leading experts on the subject of fall prevention and injury protection and has published extensively on this topic. Quigley has used her clinical expertise and interdisciplinary research findings to develop multiple fall and injury reduction toolkits, which contain materials that can be used in the provision of bedside and community care. She also leads an interdisciplinary clinical team in the development of evidence-based tools and

Dr. Patricia Quigley, a national expert on fall and injury prevention, shared her expertise and experiences with over 100 CHE colleagues at the first CHE Falls Collaborative seminar.

most hospitals have done before in the acute care setting.”

Triola acknowledged that fall prevention efforts require a multi-disciplinary approach to be successful: “It takes a village to make things happen. And in this room is our village.” Among the professionals attending the conference were: chief medical officers, chief nursing officers, clinical directors, nursing home administrators, pharmacists, physicians, managers, advance practice nurses, therapists and safety officers.

During her presentation, Quigley discussed the different types of falls and how the plan of action will be different for each kind of fall. Some falls require a closer look at the organization to see what types of falls are occurring: accidental, anticipated physiological, unanticipated physiological or intentional.

Before the official start of the face-to-face meeting, 15 minute time slots for “Coffee with Pat” were offered so that the RHC colleagues could meet directly with this subject matter expert on specific barriers, challenges, etc., at their organizations. “We discussed the concept of an interdisciplinary fall rounds process,” said Kathy Brodbeck, R.N., M.S., NEA-BC, executive vice president and chief nursing officer, St. Peter‘s Health Partners. “For high risk patients, Dr. Quigley recommended that we conduct a team visit with each patient, and to develop a plan that is unique to each patient. This is a new concept for us at St. Peter‘s.” “Dr. Quigley recommended to us that we need to focus more on those patients who are at high risk for injury, those who are vulnerable for loss of function or loss of life and/or those who are admitted because of a fall or fall in our care, irrespective of a fall risk score,” said Mary Ellen Rauner, R.N., M.A., chief nursing officer, administration for Mercy Suburban Hospital, East Norriton, Pa. “We need to move away from overreliance on the use of a high risk score for fall on a screening tool as the primary basis for clinical interventions. This is a different focus than what

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“We have to remember that nursing can’t do it all,” said Carol Pilotti, R.N., B.S.P.A., CRRN, BIS, nurse manager at St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa. “Dr. Quigley also reminded us that the assessment tool is purely a screening tool. The whole team needs to utilize their assessment skills in developing the plan for interventions and what they are going to do to keep patients safe.” In preparation for this meeting, colleagues at CHE‘s acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities were asked to complete an online organizational self-assessment tool developed by Quigley. The response to the survey was phenomenal, with over 700 surveys returned. The results were shared at the meeting and will be used to help guide CHE as we strategically address opportunities for improvement at both the local and system levels. Quigley will be providing ongoing consultation throughout the year with CHE. We look forward to the enhanced collaboration and communication that this new initiative will bring to all colleagues and, most importantly, the increased safety for the patients and residents entrusted to our care. For more information about fall prevention, please contact Sharon Duffy, CHE vice president, nursing practice, at sduffy@che.org.

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Patient-Centered Medical Home:

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clinical practice guidelines, while always emphasizing the importance of clinical expertise.

E D I T I O N

Transforming the Delivery of Care

ne of the biggest criticisms of our nation’s health care system is the fragmentation of care. Typically, there is little to no connection between an individual’s health encounters across the continuum of outpatient and inpatient care. For example, an individual may receive good episodic care, but have no one to turn to with questions about his or her overall return to health, transfers between facilities, dialogue between multiple care providers, medication management … the list goes on and on. This type of uncoordinated care can result in poor quality, ineffective treatment and costly care.

together to develop seven “joint principles of the PCMH.” These seven principles focus on: personal physician, physician-directed medical care, a whole person orientation, coordinated care, quality and safety, enhanced access to care and payment. According to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), a not-for-profit organization focused on improving health care quality, a patient-centered medical home is a model of care that strengthens the clinician-patient relationship by replacing episodic care with coordinated care and a long-term healing relationship.

In the medical home model, each patient has Ray Welch leads the a relationship with a primary care clinician who discussion at MHS SEPA’s leads a team that takes collective responsibility for recent PCMH kick-off meeting. patient care, providing for the patient’s health executive vice president, ministry operations, care needs and arranging for appropriate care CHE. “Mercy is committed to the vision of with other providers as needed. improving community access to health services A new type of health care model—known as Some of the key benefits promised by the that improve the health of individuals and the patient-centered medical home (PCMH)—is medical home model include more accessible gaining more and more attention as a possible care, improved provider-patient communications communities.” “breakthrough” in the way health care is According to Kate Millay, director of quality and enhanced ability to take full advantage of delivered. It promises a high degree of management for ambulatory services at MHS new technologies to prescribe medications and coordination and better quality for a lower cost. tests, track results, obtain clinical support SEPA, Mercy is seeking NCQA certification of its evolving medical home model. “We’re information and monitor performance. The concept of the medical home is first convinced that implementing the Supported by electronic health records (EHRs), attributed to the American Academy of patient-centered medical home will help us caregivers can more easily assist patients with Pediatrics, which introduced this terminology improve the patient experience, while education and self management, coordinate back in 1967; the organization envisioned the recognizing our clinicians for their innovations patient health care activities, arrange visits to medical home as a “central source for all the and efforts.” specialists, and remind patients when they need medical information about a child, especially check-ups and tests. The medical home model those with special needs.” Fast-forward to Deborah Leonard, MHS SEPA’s vice president supports fundamental changes in primary care 2002, when seven national family medicine of physician services, added, “We believe that service delivery and payment reforms, with the organizations created The Future of Family PCMH certification will have meaning for goal of improving health care quality. Medicine; one key recommendation was that insurers and purchasers of our care, signifying “every American should have a personal our commitment to provide improved quality at The movement towards PCMH is happening medical home through which to receive his or throughout Catholic Health East. One example is lower cost.” her acute, chronic and preventive services. Mercy Health System of Southeastern Dr. Helen Thorpe, physician champion for These services should be accessible, Pennsylvania (MHS SEPA), where five physician the ambulatory EHR at MHS SEPA, agrees that accountable, comprehensive, integrated, practices are participating in a pilot that the PCMH model of care offers benefits to patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid and transforms each office to a patient-centered patients as well as providers. “The PCMH satisfying to both patients and their physicians.” medical home. On February 13, physicians, concept aligns beautifully with the goal of leaders and staff gathered for a breakfast meeting providing the right care to the right person at Over the last decade, the concept of the to kick-off the initiative at MHS SEPA. PCMH has continued to evolve. In 2007, the the right time,” said Dr. Thorpe. “It provides the American Association of Family Practitioners, “The patient-centered medical home initiative resources for the Mercy health care team to the American College of Physicians, the work with patients to promote healthy supports our 2012 physician alignment and American Academy of Pediatrics and the health care delivery model strategies,” said H. Ray behaviors and to facilitate access to appropriate American Osteopathic Association came levels of care and follow-up.” Welch Jr., president and CEO of MHS SEPA and 9


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Decision Support:

Helping CHE Meet the Challenges of the Future

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ealth care continues to change at a rapid rate. The pace of technological advancements, changing regulations and growing competition make it even more crucial that leadership at both the RHC and system levels have complete access and understanding of the drivers of cost and revenue associated with the provision of care.

A unified CHE decision support system will help us effectively combine and organize data, enabling our RHCs and the System Office to use a single source of information for strategic decision-making. Jennifer Barnett, CHE executive vice president and chief financial officer

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The Heart of the Home

ome is where the heart is, or should we say, where the kitchen table is. It’s where one grows up sharing meals, exchanging stories, completing homework, discussing family matters, consoling each other in times of tragedy and celebrating triumphs. It is where—especially for most of our elderly— Sunday dinners meant so much. It is the nucleus of the home. Or at least it used to be. And it is this elderly population that is being served in our nursing homes today.

A bedroom at Mary’s Meadow at Providence Place in Holyoke, Mass.

Top: At Eddy Village Green, Cohoes, N.Y., residents and staff enjoy a family-style meal in the large country kitchen.

In order to support these news objectives, decision support is evolving from a basic cost accounting and utilization reporting function into a true business intelligence solution that requires the operational integration of administrative, clinical, quality and cost data to provide the ability to enhance care delivery and operations.

Typically, nursing homes have had an “institutional” feel and appearance. However, at places like Eddy Village Green, part of The Eddy, an innovative care model has been introduced and it has enjoyed great success. The Eddy, in Troy, N.Y., is the senior services component of Northeast Health, which became part of CHE last fall when it joined together with Seton Health and St. Peter’s Health Care Services to form St. Peter’s Health Partners.

“Operating successful organizations in today’s complex health care environment requires increasing attention to detail,” said Jennifer Barnett, CHE’s executive vice president and chief financial officer. “A unified CHE decision support system will help us effectively combine and organize data, enabling our RHCs and the System Office to use a single source of information for strategic decision-making.”

This latest innovation, known as THE GREEN HOUSE® “We see far fewer elders struggling with behaviors, concept, was introduced by William H. Thomas, M.D., which we believe is a result of a quieter, calmer founder and director of innovation of the Green House Project, a national, non-profit organization that has helped environment, increased privacy and a deeper knowing of the elders by staff who provide the care,” said James open over 100 models houses in 28 states. “The Green House model creates ‘homes’ for individuals Farnan, administrator of Eddy Village Green. “We have in need of skilled nursing services that are indeed home in also seen a sustained reduction in falls among the elders living in the Green Houses.” every way, while meeting all of the regulatory

With the help of decision support tools, companies can more easily and effectively focus their attention on key performance metrics and organizational goals through alerts, business scorecards and a variety of different graphical views such as graphs, charts, tables and text interpretations. Several CHE RHCs—including Sisters of Providence Health System, Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, St. Mary Medical Center, St. Francis Hospital, Holy Cross Hospital, St. Peter’s Health Partners, St. Mary’s Health Care System, Mercy Health System of Maine and Lourdes Health System—have implemented some degree of decision support capabilities. Without a single decision support system across CHE, however, the full benefits of this initiative are not being realized. “While Mercy Health System has certainly realized worthwhile results from our early decision support efforts, we certainly see even greater

benefits accruing to our ministry, as well as to Catholic Health East as a whole, through the introduction of a system-wide decision support program,” said Dan Ahern, vice president, strategic planning at MHS SEPA. Ahern serves as the lead for CHE’s decision support initiative. To address the challenges that we face as a system, CHE is in the process of implementing a standard, system-wide decision support program. Some of the key benefits of a system-wide approach to decision support that will be realized in 2012 include: • Allowing for the replication of best practices at RHCs; • Providing the ability to perform operational service line analysis across all RHCs; • Supporting managed care contracting; and • Facilitating operational improvement and planning.

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A system-wide program will allow for standard interfaces, implementation practices and consistency. While a significant investment in time and resources is required, in the long run, the initiative will prove to be extremely cost-effective. With every RHC separately devoting resources to manage a decision support program, there is no opportunity to lower costs by sharing resources across RHCs, providing facilitation or enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of a system-wide program. In addition, a system-wide program can provide central maintenance of applications, reports and workflows which will reduce redundant work across the RHCs. Watch for much more information about the ongoing development of CHE’s system-wide decision support system. For more information about decision support efforts at CHE, please contact Dan Ahern, vice president, strategic planning, MHS SEPA, at dahern@mercyhealth.org

Lower right: An aerial view of Eddy Village Green campus in Cohoes, N.Y.

requirements of a nursing home,” said Laurie Mante, vice president, residential services for St. Peter’s Health Partners. “The houses all have private bedrooms and bathrooms, comfortable living and dining space, with an open, family style country kitchen, where all meals are prepared from scratch.” The homes also offer amenities such as fireplaces, ceiling fans and access to the outdoors.

The Green House model also appeals to staff and families alike. “Our self-managed work teams make their own schedules, and figure out how to get the care, laundry, cooking, etc., done around the elders’ schedule,” said Farnan. One sign that staff like this model: the retention rate for nursing assistants has increased by over 50 percent since the Green House was introduced.

Eddy Village Green, located in Cohoes, N.Y.—about 10 miles north of Albany—is the first Green House campus in New York and the largest in the country. Opened in 2008, its 16 houses are ‘home’ to 192 elders. A second Eddy Village Green opened February 2011 at the Beverwyck housing community in Slingerlands, N.Y., which consists of two houses, for a total of 24 beds.

The families of residents are just as pleased. Letters have been written expressing gratitude for the staff. Comments include how ‘attentive and compassionate all the staff were’, ‘Dad was so loved and so well cared for by everyone’, and one family wrote ‘The concept of the individual houses for a small number of residents is wonderful; but it’s just a house unless you have people like the staff … who make it truly a home’.

“Much like the name says, the term ‘Green House’ is symbolic of life and living—we believe this is a place where people continue to live and grow, despite their need for help due to physical or cognitive challenges,” said Mante. “The residents of the Green Houses are just like other nursing home residents—they tend to be, on average, in their late 80s, and must need significant help with activities of daily living to live here.”

Mary’s Meadow at Providence Place, sponsored by the Sisters of Providence of Holyoke and managed by Sisters of Providence Health System, Springfield, Mass., is adapted to this model. Offering long-term skilled nursing care and short-term rehabilitation services, it was built to ‘be a home’, said Sr. Joan Mullen, S.P., chair of the

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Providence Place/Mary’s Meadow board and former president of the Sisters of Providence. Located on the campus of the Sisters of Providence’s former Mother House in Holyoke, Mass., Mary’s Meadow offers four separate 10-person houses that are designed to offer elders accommodations with a comfort level equal to that of residential homes. “Mary’s Meadow follows a social rather than a medical model,” said Sr. Joan. “Or in other words, clinical care within a habilitative, social model.” Benefits include giving seniors a deinstitutionalized choice for long-term care, a sense of belonging and community, and empowerment for the elders. The model gives the elders a sense of dignity. They can still make decisions about daily life, restoring a sense of control—an integral part of one’s independence and continued growth. At Mary’s Meadow and Eddy Village Green, once again the kitchen table is a source of comfort, where bread is broken across generations, cards are played, decisions are made and celebrations take place. For more information about Eddy Village Green, please contact Laurie Mante, vice president, residential services, St. Peter’s Health Partners, at mantel@nehealth.com and/or visit www.thegreenhouseproject.org. For more information on Mary’s Meadow, visit www.marysmeadow.org or e-mail Jackie Boileau at j.boileau@marysmeadow.org.


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CHE Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary of

Partnership with Drexel University Online

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marks the 10th year of CHE’s educational partnership with Drexel University Online and both organizations’ collaboration to offer discounted Drexel tuition for all CHE colleagues and their families. Throughout this year, CHE and Drexel Online will be celebrating their alliance with special on-site events and by acknowledging colleagues who have taken the next step in achieving their educational goals. Drexel Online will be making numerous visits to CHE hospitals throughout the year to discuss the benefits of CHE’s educational partnership. Events include “Lunch and Learn” presentations, “Coffee Rounds,” “Nibbles and Knowledge” and other exciting educational workshops. Since 2002, hundreds of CHE colleagues have taken advantage of this wonderful opportunity and have earned degrees through Drexel’s online programs for both professional and personal advancement. “It would not be possible to pursue my goal of becoming a nurse practitioner without the flexibility of Drexel’s online program,” said Rachel Wyckoff, a registered nurse at Lourdes Emergency Department at Deborah, Browns Mills, N.J., who is pursuing a master’s in nursing with Drexel Online. “The programs are centered around the needs of the working professional.”

Drexel’s highly-respected online nursing program was recently recognized nationally by U.S. News and World Report as the number two online nursing program in the country and was also awarded with the prestigious “Honor Roll” status by the publication. “In the 21st century, as patient needs and care environments have become more complex, nurses need to attain requisite competencies to deliver high-quality care,” said Nora Triola, Ph.D., R.N., NEA-BC, CHE’s executive vice president and chief nursing officer. Competencies include leadership, health policy, system improvement, research,

Residents of Belle Meade at St. Joseph of the Pines, Southern Pines, N.C., recently welcomed speaker Barbara Bennett, investor education specialist with the North Carolina Department of Secretary of State Securities Division, who presented a program entitled ‘Women in Transition.’ Bennett’s program teaches women ways to protect themselves against fraud, identity theft, unethical financial advice and abuse. Pictured: Bennett (right) with Belle Meade resident Dorothy Baker (left).

In the 21st century, as patient needs and care environments have become more complex, nurses need to attain requisite competencies to deliver high-quality care.

Nora Triola, Ph.D., R.N., CHE executive vice president and chief nursing officer

evidence-based practice, teamwork and collaboration, as well as competency in specific content areas such as community, public health and geriatrics. To respond to these increasing demands, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, in its 2011 report, “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health,” calls for nurses to achieve higher levels of education and suggests that they be educated in new ways that better prepare them to meet the needs of the population. “Changing focus from acute care to community settings that include aspects of primary care, public health, and long-term care are necessary, along with a system that promotes seamless academic progression,” said Triola. “These competencies and curricula are exactly what we receive from our partnership with Drexel University.” “Drexel is educating people to provide care as it should be provided, not as it is,” said Gloria F. Donnelly, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, dean and professor, Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions. “We are developing opportunities for our students to develop new perspectives and solutions to traditional problems in real health care environments like CHE.” Many CHE colleagues have chosen to pursue other degrees outside of the clinical realm, including certificates, bachelor and master degrees in information technology and health services administration. Janet Centanino, a procurement manager at 2

CHE, was able to earn a master’s in library and information science while working full-time with two children. “As a participating school within CHE, Drexel provides colleagues with reduced tuition rates and the ability to defer payments, which is a huge advantage,” said Centanino. Nat’e Parker-Guyton, R.N., M.S.N., NEA-BC, CPHIMSS, clinical informatics officer, Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, earned a post master’s certificate in health care informatics while working as a chief nursing officer. “The Drexel health care informatics program online changed my life,” said Parker-Guyton. “I have worked as a nurse for many years; transforming my career path with health care informatics and information technology operations opened many doors for me. Health care informatics has allowed me to blend my experience as a nurse and in operations to lead transformative efforts related to leveraging technology within our organization.” From hospital to hospital and across departments, CHE colleagues have taken advantage of Drexel Online’s tuition assistance and flexible online programs to pursue a better education and a better career. As CHE and Drexel mark this 10-year anniversary of collaboration, both organizations are excited about the future of their partnership. Visit www.drexel.com/che or contact Kathy Pischke, senior business development specialist, Drexel Online, at Kp399@drexel.edu for more information.

Lincoln Financial Group, CHE’s retirement plan provider, held a team-building activity—‘Wagons of Hope’—at its recent annual sales conference in Florida. Nearly 300 Lincoln employees participated in fun challenges to earn wagon parts and decorations needed to build and embellish Radio Flyers for Holy Cross Hospital (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) community outreach locations. The wagons were donated to lower income day care centers in the community. Pictured from l to r: Joanne Salvador, R.N., PACU, Holy Cross Hospital; Janet Jones, R.N., M.S.N., NCSN and Regine Lefevre, Holy Cross Community Outreach, with the decorated wagons.

Derek Del Giacco shows off his new one-bedroom apartment at Operation Safety Net’s Trail Lane Apartments. Operation Safety Net, part of Pittsburgh Mercy Health System and sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy, built these dedicated apartments for those living on the streets. The apartments represent a ‘housing-first’ approach and are the first of their kind in southwestern Pennsylvania in that residents also have on-site access to physical and behavioral health care services. To date, Operation Safety Net has housed more than 800 individuals, giving them hope and a place to call home. St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa., received a $25,000 gift from Sesame Place to support the expansion of pediatric emergency services as part of the “Sesame Place Cares” initiative, started in fall 2011. Pictured, Dr. Julio Vializ examines Elmo for February’s American Heart Month.

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Below: A pediatric patient enjoys the cookie he decorated as part of the Valentine’s Day fun at St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital, part of BayCare Health System, Clearwater, Fla. Panera Bread hosted a special cookie decorating party at the hospital. During the celebration, hospitalized children decorated heart-shaped cookies donated by Panera and created holiday cards for their sweethearts.


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10 Minutes with... Daniel Moen

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aniel P. Moen joined Catholic Health East as president and chief executive officer of Sisters of Providence Health System (SPHS) in January 2011. Prior to joining SPHS, he served as president and chief executive officer of Heywood Hospital in Gardner, Massachusetts for over 20 years. Prior to that, Moen served for 10 years in progressively responsible leadership positions with Holden Hospital in Holden, Mass., including two years as president and chief executive officer. Moen earned an Associate of Science degree in radiologic technology from Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester, Mass., a Bachelor of Science degree in management from Worcester State College, and a Master of Health Administration from Clark University/University of Massachusetts Medical School, also in Worcester. Moen has served as chair of the Massachusetts Hospital Association, helping to lead that organization in the midst of groundbreaking health care reform legislation.

What prompted you to join Sisters of Providence Health System after many years at a smaller Massachusetts hospital? There were several factors, but I found the Mission of the Sisters of Providence Health System to be most appealing—serving a population that has historically been underserved, guiding a larger organization in a larger service area, and the opportunity to oversee a wider range services that are provided by the organization—all of these factors were attractive to me.

SPHS was one of the founding members of Catholic Health East. What do you see as some of the benefits to being part of a larger health system? There are numerous benefits to being part of a larger health system, and particularly at CHE where we have incredible talent at the corporate level. It’s extremely helpful to have access to high levels of expertise in areas such as information systems and

S Dancing Classrooms Teaches Self-Confidence and Teamwork 1 & 5 Colleague Commitment: Back to the Basics 2 Core Values Kindle Contest CHE and Drexel University Online Celebrate 10 Years 3 Patient-Centered Medical Homes Transform Care Delivery The Heart of the Home 4 Decision Support Helps CHE Meet Future Challenges Fall Prevention: A Top Priority 5 Across the System CareLink Website Springs Forward 10 Minutes with … Daniel Moen

President and CEO, Sisters of Providence Health System

Health care is a prominent topic this election year. As a pioneer in implementing major health reform legislation, what are some of the “lessons learned” in Massachusetts that you think can benefit the nation? Massachusetts has shown that we can provide health insurance coverage for virtually everyone, in a pluralistic type of way. It doesn’t have to be a “one size fits all” Daniel Moen approach, or a “Medicare for everyone” solution. There is a way to provide coverage for the vast majority of the population, and that’s extremely positive. But some compliance, as well as up-to-date information about important questions remain. How do we afford this? How governmental issues in Washington. This level of expertise is not something you find at a smaller, “stand do we make the larger health care system cost effective? I believe the answers point toward the next phase of alone” institution. Our relationship with CHE is also health reform, and that’s payment reform, which will beneficial from a financial standpoint, in terms of reward organizations for managing the care of a expertise and access to capital. Additionally, I have population, as opposed to being compensated on the found the sharing of ideas across the regional health corporations—seeing what’s happening in other states, sheer volume of tests and procedures performed. listening to what’s happening in other organizations, Looking ahead at 2012 and beyond … working on issues collaboratively, and the meetings I what are some of the biggest have had with other CEOs—to be extremely valuable challenges—and opportunities— from a thought and idea generation perspective.

What are some of the benefits you hope to realize when SPHS implements the CareLink initiative? What will be the biggest challenges?

facing SPHS and CHE?

Massachusetts is going to lead the nation in payment reform, but going forward across the country, significant challenges will revolve around how we pay for care. There is tremendous pressure on federal and state budgets, employers are concerned about rate increases We are really looking forward to the CareLink for employee health insurance and these factors, in implementation. I’m a big believer in electronic addition to our efforts to improve quality and safety, will medical records and computerized physician order entry; this is the gateway to improved quality, reducing drive significant change for all health care systems and variations in care and helping to improve efficiencies in hospitals. One of our biggest opportunities at SPHS is the Massachusetts Medicaid waiver and our ability to earn hospitals over the long run. But we are aware of the funding for transformational types of projects. We are challenges we will encounter during CareLink’s implementation. This is a significant change, especially working to tie all these elements together in a way that will make us more efficient, allow us to provide even for physicians and how they do their work. It’s a big change for the hospital staff as well, as far as processes higher quality care, and achieve better outcomes for patients. Colleague satisfaction is also very important. are concerned. Like any change, the CareLink Great care is the natural result of the efforts of staff implementation will be a challenge because of its breadth and depth. However, I believe it will be worth members who enjoy their work, are engaged with the goals of the organization and want to be part of that it in the long run, and I think our staff members who change. are involved in the process are supportive as well. If Horizons Editorial Staff

Published by:

Maria Iaquinto Communications Manager

Please direct comments and suggestions to info@che.org

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people have the right training and they understand where we are trying to take the organization from a quality standpoint, they will be “on board” with this initiative.

HORIZONS is a publication for the Sponsors, Boards, Regional Leadership, System Office and Colleagues of Catholic Health East.

3805 West Chester Pike, Suite 100 Newtown Square, PA 19073 Phone 610.355.2000 Fax 610.271.9600 www.che.org www.facebook.com/catholichealtheast

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Scott H. Share Vice President, System Communications

Meg J. Boyd Communication Specialist Design, Production, Printing & Mailing Fulfillment by JC Marketing Communications • jcmcom.com • Southington, Conn. Catholic Health East is a community of persons committed to being a transforming, healing presence within the communities we serve. Locations: Located in 11 eastern states from Maine to Florida. Workforce: Approx. 60,000 employees.

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Sponsors Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Scranton, Pa. Franciscan Sisters of Allegany, St. Bonaventure, N.Y. Hope Ministries, Newtown Square, Pa. Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, Greensburg, Pa. Sisters of Mercy of the Americas: Mid-Atlantic Community, Merion Station, Pa. New York, Pennsylvania, Pacific West Community, Buffalo, N.Y. Northeast Community, Cumberland, R.I. South Central Community, Belmont, N.C. Sisters of Providence, Holyoke, Mass. Sisters of St. Joseph, St. Augustine, Fla.

Spring 2012

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HORIZONS

Dancing Classrooms: Teaching Respect, I

Self-Confidence and Teamwork

t’s not often that you see elementary school children willingly and enthusiastically dancing the Merengue, Foxtrot, Rumba, Tango and Swing.

who are typically introverted and reserved to step out and shine. It focuses physical energy and increases health through the joy of movement. It builds self-esteem and social skills as it improves children’s confidence and ability to relate to others.

But in several fifth-grade classrooms in Pittsburgh, it’s becoming a common sight. From January through May, students from 10 public and Catholic schools are participating in a unique learning experience called Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh. Dancing Classrooms began in 1994 in New York City under the direction of Pierre Dulaine and Yvonne Marceau, directors of the American Ballroom Theater Company. Now an international program, Dancing Classrooms has served more than 300,000 young ladies and gentlemen worldwide. In the fall of 2009, Mercy Behavioral Health, part of the Pittsburgh Mercy Health System, introduced Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh as a program of its prevention unit. With Pittsburgh Public Schools as its first partner, Mercy Behavioral Health engaged 300 children from six schools in the inaugural semester.

“One of the reasons we brought Dancing Classrooms to Pittsburgh was because it fit well with the curriculum we already use in schools like PATHS,” said Mark Rogalsky, prevention services unit manager for Mercy Behavioral Health and site director for Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh.

Students from Sister Thea Bowman Catholic Academy (Team Magenta) compete in Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh’s Colors of the Rainbow Team match on January 7, 2012. Photo by Archie Carpenter.

Dancing Classrooms provides an atmosphere that allows students who are typically introverted and reserved to step out and shine. It builds self-esteem and social skills as it improves children’s confidence and ability to relate to others.

Over a 10-week period, students learn classic ballroom and Latin On the heels of that success, four dances from local teaching artists Catholic schools supported by the Extra who have been trained in the Mile Education Foundation and Dulaine method. The twice-weekly McAuley Ministries adopted the dance classes are incorporated into program the following semester. To the academic curriculum. At the end date, more than 1,500 fifth graders in of each semester, dancers proudly 26 Pittsburgh public and Catholic demonstrate their newly acquired schools have benefited.

skills to parents, teachers and other classmates. Every fifth grader has the opportunity to learn, grow and ultimately vie for a spot to compete in the citywide Colors of the Rainbow team match that concludes the semester. Dancing Classrooms provides an atmosphere that allows students

The Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) Curriculum, developed by Mark Greenberg, Ph.D., promotes social and emotional development among young children. “Dancing Classrooms picks up where PATHS leaves off, and helps fifth graders apply what they’ve learned,” explained Rogalsky. School administrators, teaching artists and parents agree that Dancing Classrooms has a perceptible and positive impact on participating youngsters. “It’s so rewarding to see the changes in their demeanor through dancing, how the children help each other, interact with each other,” said Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh teaching artist Rozana Sweeney.

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A PUBLICATION FOR THE SPONSORS, BOARDS, REGIONAL LEADERSHIP, SYSTEM OFFICE AND COLLEAGUES OF CATHOLIC HEALTH EAST

Horizons - Spring 2012  

CHE's quarterly newsletter

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