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an Feinberg joined Catholic Health East in January 2010. As vice president, clinical excellence, Feinberg is responsible for providing clinician perspective and leading change on CHE’s journey to clinical transformation. Previously, he was chief patient safety officer and medical director of clinical informatics for the University of Pennsylvania Health System and an associate professor of clinical neurology at Penn’s School of Medicine. Feinberg received his medical degree from Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and is board-certified in neurology. What prompted you to move from actively practicing medicine to working on the administrative side of health care? I have been moving towards working on the quality improvement side of health care for several years. Although I enjoyed many aspects of practicing neurology, I know that I can have a positive impact upon many more patients in an administrative role focusing on quality improvement and patient safety.

What led you to join a faith-based organization such as Catholic Health East? As I prepared for my first interview for the position at CHE, I was so impressed with the commitment to person-centered care and the importance of spiritual

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healing. As a neurologist who has treated many incurable conditions, I have learned the importance of treating the whole person and his or her family. The Core Values and Mission of CHE embody the critical elements of high-quality, safe, person-centered care.

How does your role fit in with CHE’s movement toward clinical transformation and person-centered care? Striving towards clinical excellence will only occur through true clinical transformation. The outcomes that we work towards require a rethinking and redesign of many age-old processes that are not person-centered. Safe, effective care is, by my definition, person-centered.

Can you elaborate a bit regarding your thoughts on evidence-based medicine and why there is such a trend toward this method of patient care? In the past, many aspects of medical care were centered around vignettes based Horizons Editorial Staff

Published by:

Maria Iaquinto Communications Manager

Scott H. Share Vice President, System Communications

Meg J. Boyd Communication Specialist

Please direct comments and suggestions to info@che.org

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Daniel Feinberg, M.D.

HORIZONS is a publication for the Sponsors, Boards, Regional Leadership, System Office and Colleagues of Catholic Health East.

3805 West Chester Pike, Suite 100 Newtown Square, PA 19073 Phone 610.355.2000 Fax 610.271.9600 www.che.org

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Design, Production, Printing & Mailing Fulfillment by JC Marketing Communications • jcmcom.com • Southington, Conn. Catholic Health East is a community of persons committed to being a transforming, healing presence within the communities we serve. Locations: Located in 11 eastern states from Maine to Florida. Workforce: Approx. 54,000 employees.

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upon the experience and training of colleagues. Over the past few years, the medical literature has really focused on the measurement of outcomes based upon how we deliver care. Clinicians in this era value well-designed, clinical research and respect the results. In transitioning to an evidencebased method of care delivery, we are essentially collecting all of this clinical research and placing it at the fingertips of the clinician and at the bedside of the patient. The improvement in the quality of this research, combined with a prerogative to measure value in terms of operational effectiveness and clinical impact for the person under our care, has transformed the way that we think of evidence-based medicine. For those of us who have been “living” quality improvement, it has been a great trend.

If you could accomplish one major objective during the next year, what would that be? Since CareLink, our evidence-based care initiative, is such an important part of clinical transformation, a critical objective is the success of the design and implementation of computerized provider order entry (CPOE) in several RHCs. Implementing CareLink and allowing clinicians to directly enter treatment and medication orders electronically, allows order entry at point-of-care and off-site, reduces medication errors, improves workflow efficiency and provides real-time errorchecking. Our clinical services department and information services are working hard with our RHCs to make sure that this goes very well! Sponsors Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Scranton, Pa. Franciscan Sisters of Allegany, St. Bonaventure, N.Y. Hope Ministries, Newtown Square, Pa. Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, Greensburg, Pa. Sisters of Mercy of the Americas: Mid-Atlantic Community, Merion Station, Pa. New York, Pennsylvania, Pacific West Community, Buffalo, N.Y. Northeast Community, Cumberland, R.I. South Central Community, Belmont, N.C. Sisters of Providence, Holyoke, Mass. Sisters of St. Joseph, St. Augustine, Fla.

1, 6, 7, 8 Haiti Earthquake Relief Extends Across CHE CHE Updates “Strategic Framework” for 2017 CareLink: Leveraging Technology to Enhance Health New Orleans Still Benefiting from 2005 CHE Donation

Spring 2010

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New Model for Payment Reform Earns National Recognition for Sisters of Providence Health System Across the System CHE Promotions and Appointments 10 Minutes with ... Daniel Feinberg, M.D.

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HORIZONS CATHOLIC

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Haiti Earthquake Relief

Extends Across CHE

“… the earth groaned loud from deep inside … that was worse than the shaking.”

R.N. (GHM volunteer): “It sounds as if there is little infrastructure left that will be able to handle a large mobilization of relief … Once we can get into Haiti, we may want to meet with HSFS staff to assess their needs …”

– An earthquake survivor

On the afternoon of January 12, 2010, for just under 35 seconds, their world shook. When it stopped less than a minute later, hundreds of thousands were dead or dying and many more were missing and/or buried under collapsed buildings. The devastating earthquake that hit the Haitian capital city of Port-au-Prince at 4:53 p.m. on that Tuesday afternoon was a massive magnitude 7.0—the worst to hit Haiti in more than two centuries, and one of the deadliest natural disasters in world history. Immediately following the earthquake, as media outlets began to report on the catastrophic aftermath and devastation throughout the region, communities,

1/12/2010, 10:41 p.m. EST, e-mail from Sr. Mary Jo to Fr. Mede (CEO, Hospital St. Francis de Sales): “Pere Mede, Please give us news of you, our friends at HSFS and damage at the hospital.”

Global Health Ministry’s Long-Time Commitment to Haiti organizations and individuals back home in the United States and around the world were already looking for ways to help. Military and civilian rescue teams were mobilized and awaiting deployment; aid organizations began to organize monetary relief funds; and at Catholic Health East,

Sr. Mary Jo McGinley, R.S.M., executive director, Global Health Ministry, began to reach out to our friends in Haiti for situation updates and a needs analysis. 1/12/2010, 8:12 p.m. EST, Sr. Mary Jo responds to an e-mail from Nadia Morquette,

“I can do everything through him who gives me strength.” – Philippians 4:13 Since 1989, Global Health Ministry (GHM), a supportive health corporation of CHE, has sent teams of medical professionals to provide health care services, education and continued on pages 6, 7, 8 & 9

A PUBLICATION FOR THE SPONSORS, BOARDS, REGIONAL LEADERSHIP, SYSTEM OFFICE AND COLLEAGUES OF CATHOLIC HEALTH EAST


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Planning for the Future

CHE Updates “Strategic Framework” for 2017

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The goal: Develop the plan for CHE’s future.

Multiple design sessions were held in which more than 400 colleagues, Sponsors and board members created the CHE Preferred Health Care Delivery Model that identified the type of health care we aspired to deliver by 2017, goals and strategies for each pillar that identify how we will achieve the Vision and the preferred health care delivery model by 2017, and tactics and key performance indicators (KPIs) that correspond with each of the strategies. A new CHE Vision that focused on “achieving excellence in all we do” was introduced, and the mission statement and core values originally developed in 1998 were affirmed during the design sessions. This process also involved developing strategic and operating plans that were consistent between CHE and the RHCs.

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The Summer 2006 issue of Horizons helped to build awareness about CHE’s planning process.

On an annual basis, several elements of the CHE strategic plan are reviewed and if necessary updated and revised based on major environmental factors, national and global events and market / organizational changes. These factors influence changes to the Mission, Vision, goals, strategies, tactics and KPIs. During the 2010-2011 review process, it was determined that the Mission, the Vision and the 2017 Preferred Health Care Delivery Model required no revisions. Interestingly, many of the elements described in our delivery model are key components being considered in health care reform and position CHE well for the future. In an effort to more narrowly focus our efforts on achieving the 2017 Preferred Health Care Delivery Model, minor modifications have been made to the goals and strategies in our Strategic

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• Focusing all clinical and business processes on person-centered care • Empowering persons to make the best decisions for their health and well-being • Establishing an innovative and collaborative person-centered system for comprehensive care management across the care continuum • Recognizing CHE as a great place to work that delivers effective personcentered health care. This requires that CHE attracts, develops and retains colleagues with the capability and commitment to deliver great results • Assisting leaders with strategy execution “We want to make sure that all colleagues throughout Catholic Health East understand the connection between the planning efforts of their local institution and Catholic Health East,” noted Anna Marie Butrie, vice president, strategy management and operations improvement. “We encourage colleagues and physicians throughout the system to become familiar with CHE’s overall goals and strategies, since they are all critically important to our health system’s ability to achieve the preferred health care delivery model by 2017.” A copy of the updated CHE Strategic Framework can be found on the CHE Portal in the Document Library of the Communications Community. Copies of this updated document have also been distributed to all RHCs/JOAs.

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CHE Promotions and Appointments

Framework. The changes address:

xactly four years ago— in April 2006—key operational and clinical leadership from throughout CHE came together for a threeday intensive planning session.

This initial meeting represented the kickoff of a new strategic management process for Catholic Health East. The challenge was indeed a daunting one. The process focused on envisioning the CHE health delivery model of the future; the year selected was 2017. Then, working backwards from 2017, goals were established that were measurable and time-sensitive to achieve the future model.

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Bob Stanek Retires Congratulations and best wishes to Bob Stanek, who retired as president and chief executive officer of Catholic Health East effective May 1, 2010. Bob joined CHE right at the beginning, serving as executive vice president of the new health system’s Mid-Atlantic Division and then as CHE’s chief operating officer. He succeeded Dan Russell in 2003 to become the health system’s second president and chief executive officer. The development of CHE’s Preferred Health Care Delivery Model for 2017; the creation of CHE’s first Governance Charter; enhancements in quality, safety and satisfaction; the development of the master trust indenture; the growth of ministry formation opportunities; the realization of system synergies and efficiencies through shared IT, supply chain and financial services; an emphasis on leadership and professional development; the evolution of Values in Practice; and a system-wide focus on clinical transformation and developing a person-centered system of care are among the key achievements of Stanek’s tenure. “Bob has been a visionary leader for Catholic Health East,” said Jacque Kinder, chair, CHE board of directors. “During a period of incredible challenges, his guidance, experience and commitment to our Mission, Vision and Core Values helped to strengthen our ministry and prepare us well for the future.” “Since 2003, it has been my privilege and honor to work with all of you to help meet the challenges of providing quality, accessible health care to all who seek our aid … and to truly live a dream,” noted Stanek. “I am thankful for your support, your collegiality … and, most of all, your commitment to ensuring that our health care ministry continues to be a transforming, healing presence in the communities we serve.”

For more information about CHE’s updated Strategic Framework for 2017, please contact Anna Marie Butrie at abutrie@che.org or 610.355.2186.

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Judith Persichilli succeeded Bob Stanek as president and chief executive officer as of May 1. Persichilli joined CHE in 2003 as executive vice president, Mid-Atlantic Division. In 2009, she was named COO. Prior to joining the System Office, she was CEO at St. Francis Medical Center, Trenton, N.J.

Peter DeAngelis has been promoted to chief operating officer. He will also retain his position as executive vice president and chief financial officer.

John Johnson, president and CEO, Mercy Hospital, Miami, Fla., and Holy Cross Hospital, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., has been named executive vice president, ministry operations at CHE. Johnson will be responsible for mergers and acquisitions for the CHE system and for RHCs in the southeast.

Clayton Fitzhugh has been promoted to executive vice president, shared services. He will also retain his role as vice president and chief human resource officer. Fitzhugh will oversee IT, accounts payable, supply chain, payroll and communications.

John Capasso, president of CHE’s Continuing Care Management Services Network, will assume additional responsibilities for several RHCs including Maxis Health System, St. James Mercy Health System and Pittsburgh Mercy Health System.

Jenny Barnett has been promoted to executive vice president, finance. She previously held the position of vice president and chief accounting officer.

Sharon Duffy, M.S.N., R.N., has been promoted to vice president, nursing practice. She previously held the position of director, acute care services.

Debbie Coakley has been promoted to vice president, workforce management. She previously held the position of productivity champion.

Patrick Taylor, M.D., M.B.A., has been promoted to president and chief executive officer of Holy Cross Hospital in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Dr. Taylor previously held the position of executive vice president and chief operating officer at Holy Cross.

Manuel P. Anton III, M.D., has been promoted to president and chief executive officer for Mercy Hospital in Miami, Fla. Dr. Anton previously held the position of chief operating officer at Mercy.


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CareLink: Leveraging Technology W

to Enhance Health

ith the support of hundreds of clinicians, information services experts and key leaders, Catholic Health East is in the midst of transforming the way that care is provided throughout our ministry.

The Westbrook Interfaith Community offered “Westbrook Cares,” the first informational fair for residents at Mission Possible Teen Center on Saturday, February 27. Representing Mercy Health System of Maine, from left: Laurie Clarke, Mercy Westbrook Express Care; Charles Morris, Mercy Recovery Center; Cathy Haley, Mercy Westbrook; Cathy’s daughter Alexis; Amber Reitan, Mercy Westbrook; and Martha O’Connor, VNA Home Health & Hospice.

Mercy Medical, Daphne, Ala., held its Hoops of Hope event on March 2 at the Daphne Civic Center, raising more than $25,000 for pediatric home care, hospice and other charity care programs. The event featured legendary LSU Coach Dale Brown, whose inspirational speech delighted more than 350 attendees. The opening presentation paid tribute to Ashley Taylor, who passed away in June but whose fight for Mercy’s critically ill children has not been forgotten.

This new initiative, CareLink, is an integrated system that involves the development of common order sets, care plans and workflows that will support computerized provider order entry and enhance clinical documentation. CareLink will make it possible for the first time to link clinical information in one electronic record and provide physicians with leading clinical practices and information to ensure optimal care and patient safety. These electronic health records will be accessible 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-aweek no matter where the health care provider or patient is located. As reported in the Winter 2010 issue of Horizons, hundreds of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and other professionals from throughout CHE have been working together for several months to design order sets for common procedures in all specialty areas, as well as develop interdisciplinary plans of care and patient assessments.

On February 24, Catholic Health, Buffalo, N.Y., officially opened the first of three Wound Healing Centers at Sisters of Charity Hospital, St. Joseph Campus. Inspecting one of the center’s two new hyperbaric chambers (from left) is Peter Bergmann, president and CEO of Sisters of Charity Hospital; Marc Kaiser, president and CEO of Precision Health Care; Joseph McDonald, president and CEO of Catholic Health; and Dr. Lee Routsi, medical director of the Wound Healing Centers.

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St. Mary’s Health Care System, Athens Ga., enjoyed a record turnout at its annual breast cancer event honoring breast cancer victim Tyanna O’Brien. This year’s event attracted more than 300 participants to Athens’ Terrapin Brewery. Proceeds will be donated by the Tyanna Foundation to St. Mary’s Women’s Diagnostics Center. Last year’s event raised $12,000; BreastFest 2010 is expected to exceed that amount.

CareLink is the single largest initiative ever designed and implemented by CHE, and it has enormous implications for the future of health care delivery throughout our ministry. “Implementing CareLink and allowing clinicians to directly enter treatment and medication orders electronically, allows order entry at pointof-care and off-site, reduces medication

LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE HEALTH errors, improves work-flow efficiency and provides real-time error-checking,” noted Dan Feinberg, M.D., CHE’s vice president, clinical excellence. (Read more about Feinberg and his perspective on CareLink on page 12 of this newsletter). There is an enormous amount of work involved in building this new system and vetting it with all of the design teams, with physicians and clinicians across the entire health system, and with our MediTech and Siemens colleagues. Because of the complexity and labor-intensive nature of this process, the CareLink initiative is being rolled out in a “wave” process to our regional health corporations (RHCs). St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa., will be the first RHC to implement CareLink, with an anticipated launch in November 2010. “This exciting, challenging initiative, created by clinicians for clinicians, will support clinician workflow all while advancing the delivery of safe, quality care,” said Joseph Conroy, M.D., F.A.C.S., chief medical officer and vice president, medical affairs at St. Mary Medical Center. “Ultimately, this initiative will build a strong bridge to person-centered care consistent with St. Mary’s mission, values and vision.” While St. Mary Medical Center will be the first RHC to “go live” with

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CareLink, all RHCs with acute care hospitals are actively engaged and in some stage of the development process. The next three RHCs scheduled for implementation are St. Peter’s Health Care Services, Albany, N.Y.; Sisters of Providence Health System, Springfield, Mass.; and St. Mary’s Health Care System, Athens, Ga. These implementations will occur during the first half of 2011, with the remaining RHCs to follow by mid-2012. In order for CHE to be considered a “meaningful user” of electronic health records and thus qualify for federal stimulus funds that would help offset a portion of the cost of implementing this initiative system-wide, CareLink must be operational throughout our health system by October 2012. A robust library of communications tools to help build awareness about CareLink system-wide is currently under development, and will be available via the CHE portal. In addition to articles, informational brochures and PowerPoint presentations, the CareLink “tool kit” will include a glossary of terms, awarenessbuilding flyers and tent cards, and other materials that will be easily customizable for use by each RHC. Whether your RHC will be going live in the next few months, or in a year or more, there will be materials available that meet your needs. For more information about CareLink, please contact Scott Share, vice president, system communications, at sshare@che.org or 610.355.2017.


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The Gift That Keeps On Giving

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New Orleans Residents in Need Still Benefiting from 2005 CHE Donation

his issue of Horizons includes an overview of how our ministry is reaching out in many ways to support survivors of the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010, and the efforts currently underway to help rebuild lives and communities. For many, it brings back memories of another devastating event—Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005.

Nearly five years have now passed. Great strides have been made in a city that was almost literally washed off the map. While the scars of the disaster may still be evident in the destroyed neighborhoods that have been abandoned and in the faces of people who lost loved ones, New Orleans is healing. And it’s heartening to know that

After the hurricane … and the depth and breadth of the disaster became evident … CHE decided that the best way to help was to reach out and support the only faith-based hospital in the city: Touro Infirmary. In the aftermath of Katrina, all New Orleans hospitals were closed due to flood damage. With the support of our board members and CEOs, CHE made a monetary donation of $500,000 to help in the hospital’s efforts to reopen and to help restore community-based programs for those who are poor in New Orleans.

Thank you, again, for your support of Touro, our faith-based mission and your unwavering support of the people of New Orleans. The Winter 2006 issue of Horizons highlighted how CHE reached out to Touro Infirmary in New Orleans.

the donation that CHE made back in late 2005 is still benefitting needy residents of the city. We recently received a letter from Touro President James Montgomery, updating us on how the funds we appropriated back in late 2005 are still being used to support important outreach efforts in the New Orleans community. He wrote:

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from CHE and provided names of colleagues who were interested in participating in a Haiti mission. They also held a special luncheon event, featuring 2009 GHM volunteer, Karen Joyce, R.N., director, home health care/hospice services.

Following Hurricane Katrina, CHE made a generous grant to our hospital and this community during an hour of great need …

Thanks to Catholic Health East, Touro now employs a Community Outreach Nurse, Caroline Alterman, R.N., who is dedicated to developing and providing community outreach events and fostering community partnerships. Last year, the Community Outreach Program participated in 134 events with 7,039 attendees and screened more than 2,800 people.

Fr. Douglas Brougher, Touro’s director of pastoral care and community relations, added: Without your financial support we would not be able to sustain and grow our community outreach program. Thank you for allowing us this opportunity to carry out our tradition. As you can see, Catholic Health East touches lives in distant communities as well as those served by our local ministries. We’re thrilled that the funds donated in the aftermath of Katrina continue to touch lives and improve health … and we urge our colleagues at Touro Infirmary to keep up their great work!

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Across Catholic Health East

I am excited to share this update with you about the many ways the Catholic Health East grant is touching lives and creating a healthier community in New Orleans.

Your gift enabled Touro to continue to operate its comprehensive community outreach series. This series combines educational seminars, valuable free screenings and community events with other non-profits and faith-based organizations targeting those in the community most in need.

Katrina’s direct hit on the city of New Orleans brought unparalleled death, devastation and destruction. As we close in on the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation of the Gulf Coast, it is an appropriate time to look back at how CHE reached out to help the residents of New Orleans in 2005, and how our efforts are still making a difference.

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to help rebuild Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Global Health Ministry sent two teams of professionals to provide medical care to earthquake victims. In the Haitian cities of Port-au-Prince, Léogâne and Jacmel, physicians and nurses treated hundreds of patients and performed surgery in tents transformed into operating suites where churches and hospitals once stood. Regular updates about the situation in Haiti and the ongoing needs of the people have been provided system-wide.

Carrie Paston, M.D.

The second Global Health Ministry team arrived in Haiti in March, and included (from l to r): Jill Simon, nurse practitioner, St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne Pa.; Carrie Paston, M.D., Lourdes Health System, Camden, N.J.; and Murielle Jeanty Laguerre, R.N., St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne Pa. Not pictured: Emmanuel Ephene, Mercy Philadelphia Hospital (MHS SEPA); Frantz Francois, Saint Michael Medical Center, Newark, N.J.; Smana Pamphile Clerfe, M.Div., Mercy Behavioral Health, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System; and Janette Dziadon, M.B.A., GHM friend and financial advisor.

St. Mary Medical Center (Langhorne, Pa.) sponsored the first GHM mission to Haiti in January, which included two St. Mary colleagues: Steven Lowe, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon, and Col. Paulette Schank, C.R.N.A., a nurse anesthetist and U.S.A.F. reservist. A blessing ceremony was held for Haiti native Murielle Jeantry, telemetry nurse, and Jill Simon, pediatric nurse practitioner, before they departed for Haiti in March. St. Peter’s Health Care Services (Albany, N.Y.) sent out regular updates to all colleagues, encouraging them to donate to GHM, Catholic Relief Services, American Red Cross and Partners in Health. They also provided names of colleagues interested in joining a mission to Haiti to the state. Catholic Health East System Office colleagues collected over $2,000 for rebuilding Hospital St. Francis de Sales. CHE also held a special chili sale, with homemade chili provided by John Ludwig, an ITSS colleague, and all proceeds were given to GHM. CHE also pledged $100,000 to GHM

20,000 people were killed. Also suffering extensive damage was the port town of Jacmel, situated on the southern coast of Haiti. Seventy percent of its buildings were destroyed.

Looking to the Future “L’Union Fait La Force” The above motto is proudly displayed on Haiti’s flag. Its English translation, “Unity Makes Strength,” echoes CHE’s own— “Together we are so much more.” Never was this as true as during these last few months and will continue to be the over the next few years ahead. Eglise Sacre Coeur

The Numbers “Call upon me in the day of trouble; I will deliver you.” – Psalm 50:15 The U.N. estimates that more than 230,000 people were killed in the Haiti earthquake and at least 300,000 more were injured. More than 1.5 million people are living in makeshift tent cities because they have lost their homes. Over 75 percent of the capital city was destroyed, including more than 100,000 homes, with an additional 200,000 sustaining severe damage; and more than 1,300 education centers and 50 hospitals collapsed. Although the damage in Port-au-Prince is extensive, the worst-hit community was the town of Léogâne, situated atop the earthquake’s epicenter about 20 miles west of the capital. Nearly 80 to 90 percent of its buildings were destroyed and more than 9

Haiti will need a great deal of support to recover, rebuild and restabilize their infrastructure. Global Health Ministry and Catholic Health East are committed to rebuilding the Hospital St. Francis de Sales in Port-au-Prince and will continue to collaborate with its partners to raise the funds and provide the support needed to bring quality health care to the people of Haiti. The system-wide support of our Sponsors, board members, congregations and colleagues illustrates how we live our Core Values every day; it is the living embodiment of our Mission of being a transforming, healing presence in all of the communities we serve. Colleagues still interested in making a donation to Haiti relief efforts, can visit www.globalhealthministry.org. Col. Paulette Schank, C.R.N.A.


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Haiti Earthquake Relief Extends

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The Presidential Palace was not spared the earthquake’s impact. Home to the Haitian president and his family, the attic and second floor of the building collapsed almost completely, and the central pavilion was entirely demolished.

flight into Haiti became available. In addition, colleagues raised over $4,500 with its ”Hearts Across the Ocean” fundraising campaign. The pastoral care department at St. Francis Hospital (Wilmington, Del.) collected financial contributions to support the rebuilding of Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Regular Haiti updates were also posted on the hospital Facebook page.

for emergency relief and an additional $5,000 to GHM for Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Also, Dr. Mary Carrasco, director of A Child’s Place at Mercy, and Smana Pamphile Clerfé, a crisis clinician at Mercy Behavioral Health, were part of a delegation that rescued 53 children from an orphanage in Port-au-Prince.

CNN, an Internet phone to contact loved ones and a computer with Internet access to communicate with loved ones in Haiti.

St. Francis Medical Center (Trenton, N.J.) student nurse practitioner, Anne Bouchard, R.N., collected used orthopedic equipment to send to quake victims. Her husband is a physician involved in the New Jersey chapter of the Association of Haitian Doctors Abroad. She collected canes, walkers, crutches and wheelchairs. St. James Mercy Health System (Hornell, N.Y.) organized a bake sale to raise funds for Haiti relief efforts. The baked goods, as well as 60 pizzas donated by a local business owner, raised over $1,000 for GHM. The St. Joseph of the Pines (Southern Pines, N.C.) community joined together in a service of remembrance and hope for Haiti with associates, residents, volunteers, family members and members of the community. Rev. Carl Naylor, director of mission outreach, led an assemblage of holy people in the Chapel of Belle Meade.

MASH (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) tents were set up to allow medical teams to treat patients and perform surgery. These tents, like the one pictured in the town of Jacmel, were transformed into OR and recovery suites.

Carrie Paston, M.D., emergency department physician at Lourdes Health System, Camden, N.J., takes a look at a patient’s amputated limb. It is estimated as many as 4,000 Haitians have had amputations as a direct result of the earthquake. Many suffered crushing injuries which required the amputation to survive. This number could rise as infections continue to develop.

Saint Joseph’s Health System (Atlanta, Ga.) set up a Haiti Communications Center to serve as a 24/7 resource center for colleagues impacted by the earthquake. The room featured a television broadcasting

Saint Michael’s Medical Center (Newark, N.J.) began collecting funds shortly after the earthquake on behalf of GHM. In February, they held a Hearts for Haiti fundraising event, selling red, white and pink carnations to colleagues, patients and visitors to benefit GHM and colleagues directly affected by the earthquake. Jill Griffin, M.D., a staff physician in the emergency department at Mercy Medical Center, part of Sisters of Providence Health System (Springfield, Mass.), contacted Agape Flights, a non-profit Christian ministry that provides critical services to Caribbean missionaries. Dr. Griffin helped them sort medical supplies until a 8

The first Global Health Ministry team traveled to Haiti in January, and included: Lisa Medvetz, M.D., Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital (MHS SEPA), Darby, Pa.; Col. Paulette Schank, C.R.N.A., St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa.; Mary Gorman, M.D., Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Md.; and Steven Lowe, M.D., St. Mary Medical Center.

St. Mary’s Health Care System (Athens, Ga.) urged colleagues to donate via Catholic Relief Services, American Red Cross or GHM. They published regular updates

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New Model for Payment Reform

Earns National Recognition for Sisters of Providence Health System

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he American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) presented the 2010 Management Innovation Poster Session award to a team from Sisters of Providence Health System (SPHS) at the 2010 Congress on Healthcare Leadership. The award recognizes the innovation judged to be the most creative, broadly applicable and useful to the health care management field. The winning presentation, A Successful “Micro-Accountable Care Organization” as a Model for Evolving Payment Reform in Massachusetts, profiles the Comprehensive Care Management Pilot Program designed to improve care and reduce costs, improve the management of chronic disease, and reduce hospital admissions and readmissions through enhanced care management. The model illustrates a viable ACO approach that can effectively deliver health care value. “Our judges concluded that this poster was the most innovative and broadly applicable to the field of health care management. The description of the micro Accountable Care Organization provided our conference attendees with a model that may be widely emulated as health care reform is implemented in the coming years,” said Thomas C. Dolan, Ph.D., F.A.C.H.E., C.A.E., president and CEO, ACHE. The poster was authored by Mark Fulco, senior vice president, strategy and marketing, SPHS; Phillip Gaziano, M.D., medical director, senior and managed care programs, Hampden County Physician Associates (HCPA); and William Bithoney, M.D., chief medical officer, SPHS. “The ACHE award validates our enhanced model of care,” said Vincent McCorkle, F.A.C.H.E., president and chief executive officer, SPHS. “We have demonstrated that high quality care does cost less and that highly integrated, closely managed, person-centered care drives optimal clinical and financial results.” The new system will reward good performance and health outcomes and will utilize “global payments” to provider networks structured as ACOs. “The SPHS model takes the ACO from concept to reality and represents a solution that

Overview of “Micro-ACO”strategic collaboration model.

places us ahead of the payment reform curve,” he added. As an alternative to Medicare fee-for-service provider arrangements, SPHS and HCPA entered into a risk arrangement with a managed Medicare plan and assumed care coordination and financial responsibility for 5,100 members. A structural framework was designed and key competencies developed to closely manage care, provide quality oversight and medical direction, and tightly manage budget and costs. Performance incentives were aligned so that cost savings are shared by participating HCPA physicians and SPHS if quality and cost effectiveness benchmarks are achieved, placing an emphasis on efficiency and quality rather than volume and intensity. Under the “micro ACO,” care delivery is integrated and structured around a “medical home” model that includes close coordination of outpatient and inpatient care, case management and disease management programs for high-risk chronic conditions. The care management team includes the primary care physician, physician consultant-leader for disease management and care management elements, nurse care coordinators empowered with care management protocols, hospitalist care (hospital and nursing home rounding), and effective home care nursing/therapy utilizing care monitoring technology (Phillips Telehealth system).

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Payment allocation includes monthly permember, per-month payment to primary care physicians and a year-end, pro-rata payout from any medical service fund surplus. Key differences in this arrangement from prior capitation models include the linking of performance measures with an emphasis on person-centered care, an improved risk adjustment model and robust monitoring to measure activities and guard against unintended consequences (ensure quality care rather than limiting care). This approach also successfully engages the patient/consumer by involving the patient in their care, promoting healthier lifestyle, and improving the self-management of chronic illness. The “micro ACO” achieved the goals of improving care and reducing costs. Utilization and length of stay were both decreased, patient satisfaction improved and strong financial performance resulted with spending that was lower than an unmanaged population of the same size. Physician revenue was greater than conventional Medicare reimbursement and SPHS benefited from increased volume and revenue (inpatient nearexclusivity) and surplus payments. This successful model is being used to develop a broader ACO capable of managing larger patient populations and provider contracts under the evolving Massachusetts payment reform system. For more information, please contact Mark Fulco, senior vice president, strategy and marketing, at mark.fulco@sphs.com.


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programs to the poor and underserved communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. GHM’s connection with Haiti began in 1998, when the first of many medical teams arrived to provide care in what has been noted as “the poorest country in the western hemisphere”—approximately 80 percent of Haiti’s population lives below the poverty line. Since that first mission, nearly 100 GHM volunteers have treated more than 5,000 patients in Haiti. Hospital St. Francis de Sales (HSFS), located in the Haitian capital of Port-auPrince, has been serving the country’s poor since 1881. A few years ago, HSFS embarked on an ambitious revitalization journey, initiated by hospital board chairman, Archbishop Joseph Miôt, to develop a network that connected HSFS with 57 rural clinics and three hospitals to serve the poor in Haiti’s countryside. This project included building both a new ambulatory care and maternity building. In 2009, Catholic Health East provided a $100,000 grant to GHM to help build the new maternity building at HSFS. It would include two delivery rooms, 12 patient rooms, a reception area and family waiting room. The building was slated to open in February 2010. But by the morning of January 13, 2010, nearly 70 percent of the hospital lay in ruins; the maternity building, which survived the earthquake, was being used for emergency care; and word soon spread that Archbishop Miôt was among the earthquake’s casualties.

Social Media Plays a Key Role in Aid “Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute. Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and needy.” – Proverbs 31:8-9 By the next day, the extent of the devastation became clearer across the world. Haiti needed help; they needed it now; and they needed a lot of it. Homes, businesses, schools, orphanages and hospitals were destroyed. Unsubstantiated reports of casualties and missing were reported as

anywhere from 50,000 to 500,000. Whatever the numbers, the needs were great – this was a poor country even before catastrophe struck. How would they rebuild? How could they get back on their feet? It would take faith, strength, support and … text messages? Within minutes after the earthquake struck, social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter were inundated with posts and tweets about the destruction in Haiti. And by 9 p.m., the American Red Cross had set up a texting campaign urging people to make a donation of $10 via their cell phones using a simple text code. Coupled with the promotion all over social media outlets, this method raised $5 million in just the first day, and within one week, a record $22 million was raised for Haiti relief through cell phone text messages alone. CHE embraced the social media networking world as well. CHE Regional Health Corporations (RHCs) with Facebook pages and Twitter accounts kept their ‘fans’ up-to-date and posted new information being filtered through Global Health Ministry on a daily basis. Because of the great demand for timely information-sharing, GHM set up its own Facebook page (www.facebook.com/globalhealthministry) to post regular updates on fundraising efforts, upcoming medical missions and the situation on the ground in Haiti.

Catholic Health East Responds “I assure you, as often as you did it for one of my least ones, you did it for me.” – Matthew 25:40 It would take the collective efforts of organizations and individuals worldwide to help Haiti recover and rebuild. Colleagues throughout Catholic Health East (CHE) recognized this need and responded in great fashion. Some of the efforts from across the system are highlighted throughout the next few pages. Eileen Boyle, executive director, Allegany Franciscan Ministries (Palm Harbor, Fla.), met with Raymond Joseph, Haiti’s ambassador to the U.S., 6

to discuss AFM’s commitment to help rebuild Haiti. The AFM Foundation also made a donation of $10,000 to GHM to help with relief efforts. BayCare Health System (Clearwater, Fla.) donated $100,000 to GHM to help rebuild Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Colleagues held a collection for non-perishable food items, supplies and clothing. In addition, the health system collaborated with the Florida Hospital Association and the State of Florida disaster preparation team to determine what assistance they could provide. Catholic Health (Buffalo, N.Y.) donated $5,000 to each of three international relief organizations: GHM, Catholic Relief Services and Ascension Health Seton Institute (the international outreach arm of the Daughters of Charity). The community outreach department at Holy Cross Hospital (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) collected thousands of dollars worth of supplies for Haiti in the days immediately following the quake; and volunteers traveled to Haiti to help assess and triage patients. Relief efforts were also posted on Holy Cross’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

Immaculate Heart of Mary, started a Haiti Fund to directly benefit the Little Sisters of St. Theresa in Haiti. Sr. Theresa’s mother Betsey was a Haitian refugee. The departments of therapeutic recreation and admissions at Mercy Community Health’s Saint Mary Home (West Hartford, Conn.) teamed up with Sodexo Senior Services to organize a benefit lunch, raising over $700 for Haiti relief. Mercy Health System of Maine donated medical supplies and equipment to the International Medical Equipment Collaborative for shipment to Haiti, and also donated $1,000 to Konbit Sante’s Earthquake Response Fund. Konbit Sante is a Maine-based non-profit organization that has a partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Health to improve health care in northern Haiti. Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania colleagues collected vitamins, medications and other supplies. Colleagues also collected over $6,500 which was delivered directly to the people of Haiti through GHM. Lisa Medvetz, M.D., Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital (Darby, Pa.) surgeon, was part of GHM’s first mission to Haiti in January. In addition, the radiology department at Nazareth Hospital (Philadelphia, Pa.) reached out to vendors for a donation of X-ray film. Their partner, CareStream Health, sent 25 cases to help ensure injured Haitians have access to diagnostic imaging.

Lourdes Health System (Camden, N.J.) allowed colleagues to make donations via payroll deduction and by swiping their ID badges in the cafeteria or gift shop. The Lourdes Wellness Center sponsored a “Yoga for Haiti” class; in lieu of the usual tuition for the class, participants were asked to make their checks out to Global Health Ministry. Carrie Paston, M.D., a Lourdes ER physician, traveled with the second mission team to Haiti.

Mercy Hospital (Miami, Fla.) created a Haiti disaster relief account at the Mercy Credit Union allowing associates to make donations by check, cash or account transfer. They also collected items such as clothing, non-perishable food, medical supplies, water, blankets, first-aid kits, diapers and formula.

Maxis Health System (Carbondale, Pa.), named for Sr. Theresa Maxis, the foundress of the Sisters, Servants of the

McAuley Ministries, the grant-making arm of Pittsburgh Mercy Health System, donated $5,000 to Catholic Relief Services

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Matthew Dial, a resident of Carroll Place, part of Mercy Medical (Daphne, Ala.), started a campaign to raise money to help Haiti. He networked his fundraising efforts through his personal contacts, the staff and residents, raising $1,500 for Haiti.

concludes on pages 8 & 9


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programs to the poor and underserved communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. GHM’s connection with Haiti began in 1998, when the first of many medical teams arrived to provide care in what has been noted as “the poorest country in the western hemisphere”—approximately 80 percent of Haiti’s population lives below the poverty line. Since that first mission, nearly 100 GHM volunteers have treated more than 5,000 patients in Haiti. Hospital St. Francis de Sales (HSFS), located in the Haitian capital of Port-auPrince, has been serving the country’s poor since 1881. A few years ago, HSFS embarked on an ambitious revitalization journey, initiated by hospital board chairman, Archbishop Joseph Miôt, to develop a network that connected HSFS with 57 rural clinics and three hospitals to serve the poor in Haiti’s countryside. This project included building both a new ambulatory care and maternity building. In 2009, Catholic Health East provided a $100,000 grant to GHM to help build the new maternity building at HSFS. It would include two delivery rooms, 12 patient rooms, a reception area and family waiting room. The building was slated to open in February 2010. But by the morning of January 13, 2010, nearly 70 percent of the hospital lay in ruins; the maternity building, which survived the earthquake, was being used for emergency care; and word soon spread that Archbishop Miôt was among the earthquake’s casualties.

Social Media Plays a Key Role in Aid “Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute. Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and needy.” – Proverbs 31:8-9 By the next day, the extent of the devastation became clearer across the world. Haiti needed help; they needed it now; and they needed a lot of it. Homes, businesses, schools, orphanages and hospitals were destroyed. Unsubstantiated reports of casualties and missing were reported as

anywhere from 50,000 to 500,000. Whatever the numbers, the needs were great – this was a poor country even before catastrophe struck. How would they rebuild? How could they get back on their feet? It would take faith, strength, support and … text messages? Within minutes after the earthquake struck, social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter were inundated with posts and tweets about the destruction in Haiti. And by 9 p.m., the American Red Cross had set up a texting campaign urging people to make a donation of $10 via their cell phones using a simple text code. Coupled with the promotion all over social media outlets, this method raised $5 million in just the first day, and within one week, a record $22 million was raised for Haiti relief through cell phone text messages alone. CHE embraced the social media networking world as well. CHE Regional Health Corporations (RHCs) with Facebook pages and Twitter accounts kept their ‘fans’ up-to-date and posted new information being filtered through Global Health Ministry on a daily basis. Because of the great demand for timely information-sharing, GHM set up its own Facebook page (www.facebook.com/globalhealthministry) to post regular updates on fundraising efforts, upcoming medical missions and the situation on the ground in Haiti.

Catholic Health East Responds “I assure you, as often as you did it for one of my least ones, you did it for me.” – Matthew 25:40 It would take the collective efforts of organizations and individuals worldwide to help Haiti recover and rebuild. Colleagues throughout Catholic Health East (CHE) recognized this need and responded in great fashion. Some of the efforts from across the system are highlighted throughout the next few pages. Eileen Boyle, executive director, Allegany Franciscan Ministries (Palm Harbor, Fla.), met with Raymond Joseph, Haiti’s ambassador to the U.S., 6

to discuss AFM’s commitment to help rebuild Haiti. The AFM Foundation also made a donation of $10,000 to GHM to help with relief efforts. BayCare Health System (Clearwater, Fla.) donated $100,000 to GHM to help rebuild Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Colleagues held a collection for non-perishable food items, supplies and clothing. In addition, the health system collaborated with the Florida Hospital Association and the State of Florida disaster preparation team to determine what assistance they could provide. Catholic Health (Buffalo, N.Y.) donated $5,000 to each of three international relief organizations: GHM, Catholic Relief Services and Ascension Health Seton Institute (the international outreach arm of the Daughters of Charity). The community outreach department at Holy Cross Hospital (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) collected thousands of dollars worth of supplies for Haiti in the days immediately following the quake; and volunteers traveled to Haiti to help assess and triage patients. Relief efforts were also posted on Holy Cross’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

Immaculate Heart of Mary, started a Haiti Fund to directly benefit the Little Sisters of St. Theresa in Haiti. Sr. Theresa’s mother Betsey was a Haitian refugee. The departments of therapeutic recreation and admissions at Mercy Community Health’s Saint Mary Home (West Hartford, Conn.) teamed up with Sodexo Senior Services to organize a benefit lunch, raising over $700 for Haiti relief. Mercy Health System of Maine donated medical supplies and equipment to the International Medical Equipment Collaborative for shipment to Haiti, and also donated $1,000 to Konbit Sante’s Earthquake Response Fund. Konbit Sante is a Maine-based non-profit organization that has a partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Health to improve health care in northern Haiti. Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania colleagues collected vitamins, medications and other supplies. Colleagues also collected over $6,500 which was delivered directly to the people of Haiti through GHM. Lisa Medvetz, M.D., Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital (Darby, Pa.) surgeon, was part of GHM’s first mission to Haiti in January. In addition, the radiology department at Nazareth Hospital (Philadelphia, Pa.) reached out to vendors for a donation of X-ray film. Their partner, CareStream Health, sent 25 cases to help ensure injured Haitians have access to diagnostic imaging.

Lourdes Health System (Camden, N.J.) allowed colleagues to make donations via payroll deduction and by swiping their ID badges in the cafeteria or gift shop. The Lourdes Wellness Center sponsored a “Yoga for Haiti” class; in lieu of the usual tuition for the class, participants were asked to make their checks out to Global Health Ministry. Carrie Paston, M.D., a Lourdes ER physician, traveled with the second mission team to Haiti.

Mercy Hospital (Miami, Fla.) created a Haiti disaster relief account at the Mercy Credit Union allowing associates to make donations by check, cash or account transfer. They also collected items such as clothing, non-perishable food, medical supplies, water, blankets, first-aid kits, diapers and formula.

Maxis Health System (Carbondale, Pa.), named for Sr. Theresa Maxis, the foundress of the Sisters, Servants of the

McAuley Ministries, the grant-making arm of Pittsburgh Mercy Health System, donated $5,000 to Catholic Relief Services

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Matthew Dial, a resident of Carroll Place, part of Mercy Medical (Daphne, Ala.), started a campaign to raise money to help Haiti. He networked his fundraising efforts through his personal contacts, the staff and residents, raising $1,500 for Haiti.

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The Presidential Palace was not spared the earthquake’s impact. Home to the Haitian president and his family, the attic and second floor of the building collapsed almost completely, and the central pavilion was entirely demolished.

flight into Haiti became available. In addition, colleagues raised over $4,500 with its ”Hearts Across the Ocean” fundraising campaign. The pastoral care department at St. Francis Hospital (Wilmington, Del.) collected financial contributions to support the rebuilding of Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Regular Haiti updates were also posted on the hospital Facebook page.

for emergency relief and an additional $5,000 to GHM for Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Also, Dr. Mary Carrasco, director of A Child’s Place at Mercy, and Smana Pamphile Clerfé, a crisis clinician at Mercy Behavioral Health, were part of a delegation that rescued 53 children from an orphanage in Port-au-Prince.

CNN, an Internet phone to contact loved ones and a computer with Internet access to communicate with loved ones in Haiti.

St. Francis Medical Center (Trenton, N.J.) student nurse practitioner, Anne Bouchard, R.N., collected used orthopedic equipment to send to quake victims. Her husband is a physician involved in the New Jersey chapter of the Association of Haitian Doctors Abroad. She collected canes, walkers, crutches and wheelchairs. St. James Mercy Health System (Hornell, N.Y.) organized a bake sale to raise funds for Haiti relief efforts. The baked goods, as well as 60 pizzas donated by a local business owner, raised over $1,000 for GHM. The St. Joseph of the Pines (Southern Pines, N.C.) community joined together in a service of remembrance and hope for Haiti with associates, residents, volunteers, family members and members of the community. Rev. Carl Naylor, director of mission outreach, led an assemblage of holy people in the Chapel of Belle Meade.

MASH (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) tents were set up to allow medical teams to treat patients and perform surgery. These tents, like the one pictured in the town of Jacmel, were transformed into OR and recovery suites.

Carrie Paston, M.D., emergency department physician at Lourdes Health System, Camden, N.J., takes a look at a patient’s amputated limb. It is estimated as many as 4,000 Haitians have had amputations as a direct result of the earthquake. Many suffered crushing injuries which required the amputation to survive. This number could rise as infections continue to develop.

Saint Joseph’s Health System (Atlanta, Ga.) set up a Haiti Communications Center to serve as a 24/7 resource center for colleagues impacted by the earthquake. The room featured a television broadcasting

Saint Michael’s Medical Center (Newark, N.J.) began collecting funds shortly after the earthquake on behalf of GHM. In February, they held a Hearts for Haiti fundraising event, selling red, white and pink carnations to colleagues, patients and visitors to benefit GHM and colleagues directly affected by the earthquake. Jill Griffin, M.D., a staff physician in the emergency department at Mercy Medical Center, part of Sisters of Providence Health System (Springfield, Mass.), contacted Agape Flights, a non-profit Christian ministry that provides critical services to Caribbean missionaries. Dr. Griffin helped them sort medical supplies until a 8

The first Global Health Ministry team traveled to Haiti in January, and included: Lisa Medvetz, M.D., Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital (MHS SEPA), Darby, Pa.; Col. Paulette Schank, C.R.N.A., St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa.; Mary Gorman, M.D., Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Md.; and Steven Lowe, M.D., St. Mary Medical Center.

St. Mary’s Health Care System (Athens, Ga.) urged colleagues to donate via Catholic Relief Services, American Red Cross or GHM. They published regular updates

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he American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) presented the 2010 Management Innovation Poster Session award to a team from Sisters of Providence Health System (SPHS) at the 2010 Congress on Healthcare Leadership. The award recognizes the innovation judged to be the most creative, broadly applicable and useful to the health care management field. The winning presentation, A Successful “Micro-Accountable Care Organization” as a Model for Evolving Payment Reform in Massachusetts, profiles the Comprehensive Care Management Pilot Program designed to improve care and reduce costs, improve the management of chronic disease, and reduce hospital admissions and readmissions through enhanced care management. The model illustrates a viable ACO approach that can effectively deliver health care value. “Our judges concluded that this poster was the most innovative and broadly applicable to the field of health care management. The description of the micro Accountable Care Organization provided our conference attendees with a model that may be widely emulated as health care reform is implemented in the coming years,” said Thomas C. Dolan, Ph.D., F.A.C.H.E., C.A.E., president and CEO, ACHE. The poster was authored by Mark Fulco, senior vice president, strategy and marketing, SPHS; Phillip Gaziano, M.D., medical director, senior and managed care programs, Hampden County Physician Associates (HCPA); and William Bithoney, M.D., chief medical officer, SPHS. “The ACHE award validates our enhanced model of care,” said Vincent McCorkle, F.A.C.H.E., president and chief executive officer, SPHS. “We have demonstrated that high quality care does cost less and that highly integrated, closely managed, person-centered care drives optimal clinical and financial results.” The new system will reward good performance and health outcomes and will utilize “global payments” to provider networks structured as ACOs. “The SPHS model takes the ACO from concept to reality and represents a solution that

Overview of “Micro-ACO”strategic collaboration model.

places us ahead of the payment reform curve,” he added. As an alternative to Medicare fee-for-service provider arrangements, SPHS and HCPA entered into a risk arrangement with a managed Medicare plan and assumed care coordination and financial responsibility for 5,100 members. A structural framework was designed and key competencies developed to closely manage care, provide quality oversight and medical direction, and tightly manage budget and costs. Performance incentives were aligned so that cost savings are shared by participating HCPA physicians and SPHS if quality and cost effectiveness benchmarks are achieved, placing an emphasis on efficiency and quality rather than volume and intensity. Under the “micro ACO,” care delivery is integrated and structured around a “medical home” model that includes close coordination of outpatient and inpatient care, case management and disease management programs for high-risk chronic conditions. The care management team includes the primary care physician, physician consultant-leader for disease management and care management elements, nurse care coordinators empowered with care management protocols, hospitalist care (hospital and nursing home rounding), and effective home care nursing/therapy utilizing care monitoring technology (Phillips Telehealth system).

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Payment allocation includes monthly permember, per-month payment to primary care physicians and a year-end, pro-rata payout from any medical service fund surplus. Key differences in this arrangement from prior capitation models include the linking of performance measures with an emphasis on person-centered care, an improved risk adjustment model and robust monitoring to measure activities and guard against unintended consequences (ensure quality care rather than limiting care). This approach also successfully engages the patient/consumer by involving the patient in their care, promoting healthier lifestyle, and improving the self-management of chronic illness. The “micro ACO” achieved the goals of improving care and reducing costs. Utilization and length of stay were both decreased, patient satisfaction improved and strong financial performance resulted with spending that was lower than an unmanaged population of the same size. Physician revenue was greater than conventional Medicare reimbursement and SPHS benefited from increased volume and revenue (inpatient nearexclusivity) and surplus payments. This successful model is being used to develop a broader ACO capable of managing larger patient populations and provider contracts under the evolving Massachusetts payment reform system. For more information, please contact Mark Fulco, senior vice president, strategy and marketing, at mark.fulco@sphs.com.


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New Orleans Residents in Need Still Benefiting from 2005 CHE Donation

his issue of Horizons includes an overview of how our ministry is reaching out in many ways to support survivors of the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010, and the efforts currently underway to help rebuild lives and communities. For many, it brings back memories of another devastating event—Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005.

Nearly five years have now passed. Great strides have been made in a city that was almost literally washed off the map. While the scars of the disaster may still be evident in the destroyed neighborhoods that have been abandoned and in the faces of people who lost loved ones, New Orleans is healing. And it’s heartening to know that

After the hurricane … and the depth and breadth of the disaster became evident … CHE decided that the best way to help was to reach out and support the only faith-based hospital in the city: Touro Infirmary. In the aftermath of Katrina, all New Orleans hospitals were closed due to flood damage. With the support of our board members and CEOs, CHE made a monetary donation of $500,000 to help in the hospital’s efforts to reopen and to help restore community-based programs for those who are poor in New Orleans.

Thank you, again, for your support of Touro, our faith-based mission and your unwavering support of the people of New Orleans. The Winter 2006 issue of Horizons highlighted how CHE reached out to Touro Infirmary in New Orleans.

the donation that CHE made back in late 2005 is still benefitting needy residents of the city. We recently received a letter from Touro President James Montgomery, updating us on how the funds we appropriated back in late 2005 are still being used to support important outreach efforts in the New Orleans community. He wrote:

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from CHE and provided names of colleagues who were interested in participating in a Haiti mission. They also held a special luncheon event, featuring 2009 GHM volunteer, Karen Joyce, R.N., director, home health care/hospice services.

Following Hurricane Katrina, CHE made a generous grant to our hospital and this community during an hour of great need …

Thanks to Catholic Health East, Touro now employs a Community Outreach Nurse, Caroline Alterman, R.N., who is dedicated to developing and providing community outreach events and fostering community partnerships. Last year, the Community Outreach Program participated in 134 events with 7,039 attendees and screened more than 2,800 people.

Fr. Douglas Brougher, Touro’s director of pastoral care and community relations, added: Without your financial support we would not be able to sustain and grow our community outreach program. Thank you for allowing us this opportunity to carry out our tradition. As you can see, Catholic Health East touches lives in distant communities as well as those served by our local ministries. We’re thrilled that the funds donated in the aftermath of Katrina continue to touch lives and improve health … and we urge our colleagues at Touro Infirmary to keep up their great work!

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I am excited to share this update with you about the many ways the Catholic Health East grant is touching lives and creating a healthier community in New Orleans.

Your gift enabled Touro to continue to operate its comprehensive community outreach series. This series combines educational seminars, valuable free screenings and community events with other non-profits and faith-based organizations targeting those in the community most in need.

Katrina’s direct hit on the city of New Orleans brought unparalleled death, devastation and destruction. As we close in on the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation of the Gulf Coast, it is an appropriate time to look back at how CHE reached out to help the residents of New Orleans in 2005, and how our efforts are still making a difference.

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to help rebuild Hospital St. Francis de Sales. Global Health Ministry sent two teams of professionals to provide medical care to earthquake victims. In the Haitian cities of Port-au-Prince, Léogâne and Jacmel, physicians and nurses treated hundreds of patients and performed surgery in tents transformed into operating suites where churches and hospitals once stood. Regular updates about the situation in Haiti and the ongoing needs of the people have been provided system-wide.

Carrie Paston, M.D.

The second Global Health Ministry team arrived in Haiti in March, and included (from l to r): Jill Simon, nurse practitioner, St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa.; Carrie Paston, M.D., Lourdes Health System, Camden, N.J.; and Murielle Jeanty Laguerre, R.N., St. Mary Medical Center. Not pictured: Emmanuel Ephene, Mercy Philadelphia Hospital (MHS SEPA); Frantz Francois, Saint Michael Medical Center, Newark, N.J.; Smana Pamphile Clerfe, M.Div., Mercy Behavioral Health, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System; and Janette Dziadon, M.B.A., GHM friend and financial advisor.

St. Mary Medical Center (Langhorne, Pa.) sponsored the first GHM mission to Haiti in January, which included two St. Mary colleagues: Steven Lowe, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon, and Col. Paulette Schank, C.R.N.A., a nurse anesthetist and U.S.A.F. reservist. A blessing ceremony was held for Haiti native Murielle Jeantry, telemetry nurse, and Jill Simon, pediatric nurse practitioner, before they departed for Haiti in March. St. Peter’s Health Care Services (Albany, N.Y.) sent out regular updates to all colleagues, encouraging them to donate to GHM, Catholic Relief Services, American Red Cross and Partners in Health. They also provided names of colleagues interested in joining a mission to Haiti to the state. Catholic Health East System Office colleagues collected over $2,000 for rebuilding Hospital St. Francis de Sales. CHE also held a special chili sale, with homemade chili provided by John Ludwig, an ITSS colleague, and all proceeds were given to GHM. CHE also pledged $100,000 to GHM

20,000 people were killed. Also suffering extensive damage was the port town of Jacmel, situated on the southern coast of Haiti. Seventy percent of its buildings were destroyed.

Looking to the Future “L’Union Fait La Force” The above motto is proudly displayed on Haiti’s flag. Its English translation, “Unity Makes Strength,” echoes CHE’s own— “Together we are so much more.” Never was this as true as during these last few months and will continue to be the over the next few years ahead. Eglise Sacre Coeur

The Numbers “Call upon me in the day of trouble; I will deliver you.” – Psalm 50:15 The U.N. estimates that more than 230,000 people were killed in the Haiti earthquake and at least 300,000 more were injured. More than 1.5 million people are living in makeshift tent cities because they have lost their homes. Over 75 percent of the capital city was destroyed, including more than 100,000 homes, with an additional 200,000 sustaining severe damage; and more than 1,300 education centers and 50 hospitals collapsed. Although the damage in Port-au-Prince is extensive, the worst-hit community was the town of Léogâne, situated atop the earthquake’s epicenter about 20 miles west of the capital. Nearly 80 to 90 percent of its buildings were destroyed and more than 9

Haiti will need a great deal of support to recover, rebuild and restabilize their infrastructure. Global Health Ministry and Catholic Health East are committed to rebuilding the Hospital St. Francis de Sales in Port-au-Prince and will continue to collaborate with its partners to raise the funds and provide the support needed to bring quality health care to the people of Haiti. The system-wide support of our Sponsors, board members, congregations and colleagues illustrates how we live our Core Values every day; it is the living embodiment of our Mission of being a transforming, healing presence in all of the communities we serve. Colleagues still interested in making a donation to Haiti relief efforts, can visit www.globalhealthministry.org. Col. Paulette Schank, C.R.N.A.


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ith the support of hundreds of clinicians, information services experts and key leaders, Catholic Health East is in the midst of transforming the way that care is provided throughout our ministry.

The Westbrook Interfaith Community offered “Westbrook Cares,” the first informational fair for residents at Mission Possible Teen Center on Saturday, February 27. Representing Mercy Health System of Maine, from left: Laurie Clarke, Mercy Westbrook Express Care; Charles Morris, Mercy Recovery Center; Cathy Haley, Mercy Westbrook; Cathy’s daughter Alexis; Amber Reitan, Mercy Westbrook; and Martha O’Connor, VNA Home Health & Hospice.

Mercy Medical, Daphne, Ala., held its Hoops of Hope event on March 2 at the Daphne Civic Center, raising more than $25,000 for pediatric home care, hospice and other charity care programs. The event featured legendary LSU Coach Dale Brown, whose inspirational speech delighted more than 350 attendees. The opening presentation paid tribute to Ashley Taylor, who passed away in June but whose fight for Mercy’s critically ill children has not been forgotten.

This new initiative, CareLink, is an integrated system that involves the development of common order sets, care plans and workflows that will support computerized provider order entry and enhance clinical documentation. CareLink will make it possible for the first time to link clinical information in one electronic record and provide physicians with leading clinical practices and information to ensure optimal care and patient safety. These electronic health records will be accessible 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-aweek no matter where the health care provider or patient is located. As reported in the Winter 2010 issue of Horizons, hundreds of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and other professionals from throughout CHE have been working together for several months to design order sets for common procedures in all specialty areas, as well as develop interdisciplinary plans of care and patient assessments.

On February 24, Catholic Health, Buffalo, N.Y., officially opened the first of three Wound Healing Centers at Sisters of Charity Hospital, St. Joseph Campus. Inspecting one of the center’s two new hyperbaric chambers (from left) is Peter Bergmann, president and CEO of Sisters of Charity Hospital; Marc Kaiser, president and CEO of Precision Health Care; Joseph McDonald, president and CEO of Catholic Health; and Dr. Lee Routsi, medical director of the Wound Healing Centers.

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St. Mary’s Health Care System, Athens Ga., enjoyed a record turnout at its annual breast cancer event honoring breast cancer victim Tyanna O’Brien. This year’s event attracted more than 300 participants to Athens’ Terrapin Brewery. Proceeds will be donated by the Tyanna Foundation to St. Mary’s Women’s Diagnostics Center. Last year’s event raised $12,000; BreastFest 2010 is expected to exceed that amount.

CareLink is the single largest initiative ever designed and implemented by CHE, and it has enormous implications for the future of health care delivery throughout our ministry. “Implementing CareLink and allowing clinicians to directly enter treatment and medication orders electronically, allows order entry at pointof-care and off-site, reduces medication

LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE HEALTH errors, improves work-flow efficiency and provides real-time error-checking,” noted Dan Feinberg, M.D., CHE’s vice president, clinical excellence. (Read more about Feinberg and his perspective on CareLink on page 12 of this newsletter). There is an enormous amount of work involved in building this new system and vetting it with all of the design teams, with physicians and clinicians across the entire health system, and with our MediTech and Siemens colleagues. Because of the complexity and labor-intensive nature of this process, the CareLink initiative is being rolled out in a “wave” process to our regional health corporations (RHCs). St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa., will be the first RHC to implement CareLink, with an anticipated launch in October 2010. “This exciting, challenging initiative, created by clinicians for clinicians, will support clinician workflow all while advancing the delivery of safe, quality care,” said Joseph Conroy, M.D., F.A.C.S., chief medical officer and vice president, medical affairs at St. Mary Medical Center. “Ultimately, this initiative will build a strong bridge to person-centered care consistent with St. Mary’s mission, values and vision.” While St. Mary Medical Center will be the first RHC to “go live” with

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CareLink, all RHCs with acute care hospitals are actively engaged and in some stage of the development process. The next three RHCs scheduled for implementation are St. Peter’s Health Care Services, Albany, N.Y.; Sisters of Providence Health System, Springfield, Mass.; and St. Mary’s Health Care System, Athens, Ga. These implementations will occur during the first half of 2011, with the remaining RHCs to follow by mid-2012. In order for CHE to be considered a “meaningful user” of electronic health records and thus qualify for federal stimulus funds that would help offset a portion of the cost of implementing this initiative system-wide, CareLink must be operational throughout our health system by October 2012. A robust library of communications tools to help build awareness about CareLink system-wide is currently under development, and will be available via the CHE portal. In addition to articles, informational brochures and PowerPoint presentations, the CareLink “tool kit” will include a glossary of terms, awarenessbuilding flyers and tent cards, and other materials that will be easily customizable for use by each RHC. Whether your RHC will be going live in the next few months, or in a year or more, there will be materials available that meet your needs. For more information about CareLink, please contact Scott Share, vice president, system communications, at sshare@che.org or 610.355.2017.


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Planning for the Future

CHE Updates “Strategic Framework” for 2017

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The goal: Develop the plan for CHE’s future.

Multiple design sessions were held in which more than 400 colleagues, Sponsors and board members created the CHE Preferred Health Care Delivery Model that identified the type of health care we aspired to deliver by 2017, goals and strategies for each pillar that identify how we will achieve the Vision and the preferred health care delivery model by 2017, and tactics and key performance indicators (KPIs) that correspond with each of the strategies. A new CHE Vision that focused on “achieving excellence in all we do” was introduced, and the mission statement and core values originally developed in 1998 were affirmed during the design sessions. This process also involved developing strategic and operating plans that were consistent between CHE and the RHCs.

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The Summer 2006 issue of Horizons helped to build awareness about CHE’s planning process.

On an annual basis, several elements of the CHE strategic plan are reviewed and if necessary updated and revised based on major environmental factors, national and global events and market / organizational changes. These factors influence changes to the Mission, Vision, goals, strategies, tactics and KPIs. During the 2010-2011 review process, it was determined that the Mission, the Vision and the 2017 Preferred Health Care Delivery Model required no revisions. Interestingly, many of the elements described in our delivery model are key components being considered in health care reform and position CHE well for the future. In an effort to more narrowly focus our efforts on achieving the 2017 Preferred Health Care Delivery Model, minor modifications have been made to the goals and strategies in our Strategic

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• Focusing all clinical and business processes on person-centered care • Empowering persons to make the best decisions for their health and well-being • Establishing an innovative and collaborative person-centered system for comprehensive care management across the care continuum • Recognizing CHE as a great place to work that delivers effective personcentered health care. This requires that CHE attracts, develops and retains colleagues with the capability and commitment to deliver great results • Assisting leaders with strategy execution “We want to make sure that all colleagues throughout Catholic Health East understand the connection between the planning efforts of their local institution and Catholic Health East,” noted Anna Marie Butrie, vice president, strategy management and operations improvement. “We encourage colleagues and physicians throughout the system to become familiar with CHE’s overall goals and strategies, since they are all critically important to our health system’s ability to achieve the preferred health care delivery model by 2017.” A copy of the updated CHE Strategic Framework can be found on the CHE Portal in the Document Library of the Communications Community. Copies of this updated document have also been distributed to all RHCs/JOAs.

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CHE Promotions and Appointments

Framework. The changes address:

xactly four years ago— in April 2006—key operational and clinical leadership from throughout CHE came together for a threeday intensive planning session.

This initial meeting represented the kickoff of a new strategic management process for Catholic Health East. The challenge was indeed a daunting one. The process focused on envisioning the CHE health delivery model of the future; the year selected was 2017. Then, working backwards from 2017, goals were established that were measurable and time-sensitive to achieve the future model.

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Bob Stanek Retires Congratulations and best wishes to Bob Stanek, who retired as president and chief executive officer of Catholic Health East effective May 1, 2010. Bob joined CHE right at the beginning, serving as executive vice president of the new health system’s Mid-Atlantic Division and then as CHE’s chief operating officer. He succeeded Dan Russell in 2003 to become the health system’s second president and chief executive officer. The development of CHE’s Preferred Health Care Delivery Model for 2017; the creation of CHE’s first Governance Charter; enhancements in quality, safety and satisfaction; the development of the master trust indenture; the growth of ministry formation opportunities; the realization of system synergies and efficiencies through shared IT, supply chain and financial services; an emphasis on leadership and professional development; the evolution of Values in Practice; and a system-wide focus on clinical transformation and developing a person-centered system of care are among the key achievements of Stanek’s tenure. “Bob has been a visionary leader for Catholic Health East,” said Jacquelyn Kinder, chair, CHE board of directors. “During a period of incredible challenges, his guidance, experience and commitment to our Mission, Vision and Core Values helped to strengthen our ministry and prepare us well for the future.” “Since 2003, it has been my privilege and honor to work with all of you to help meet the challenges of providing quality, accessible health care to all who seek our aid … and to truly live a dream,” noted Stanek. “I am thankful for your support, your collegiality … and, most of all, your commitment to ensuring that our health care ministry continues to be a transforming, healing presence in the communities we serve.”

For more information about CHE’s updated Strategic Framework for 2017, please contact Anna Marie Butrie at abutrie@che.org or 610.355.2186.

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Judith Persichilli succeeded Bob Stanek as president and chief executive officer as of May 1. Persichilli joined CHE in 2003 as executive vice president, Mid-Atlantic Division. In 2009, she was named COO. Prior to joining the System Office, she was CEO at St. Francis Medical Center, Trenton, N.J.

Peter DeAngelis has been promoted to chief operating officer. He will also retain his position as executive vice president and chief financial officer.

John Johnson, president and CEO, Mercy Hospital, Miami, Fla., and Holy Cross Hospital, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., has been named executive vice president, ministry operations at CHE. Johnson will be responsible for mergers and acquisitions for the CHE system and for RHCs in the southeast.

Clayton Fitzhugh has been promoted to executive vice president, shared services. He will also retain his role as vice president and chief human resource officer. Fitzhugh will oversee IT, accounts payable, supply chain, payroll and communications.

John Capasso, president of CHE’s Continuing Care Management Services Network, will assume additional responsibilities for several RHCs including Maxis Health System, St. James Mercy Health System and Pittsburgh Mercy Health System.

Jenny Barnett has been promoted to executive vice president, finance. She previously held the position of vice president and chief accounting officer.

Sharon Duffy, M.S.N., R.N., has been promoted to vice president, nursing practice. She previously held the position of director, acute care services.

Debbie Coakley has been promoted to vice president, workforce management. She previously held the position of productivity champion.

Patrick Taylor, M.D., M.B.A., has been promoted to president and chief executive officer of Holy Cross Hospital in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Dr. Taylor previously held the position of executive vice president and chief operating officer at Holy Cross.

Manuel P. Anton III, M.D., has been promoted to president and chief executive officer for Mercy Hospital in Miami, Fla. Dr. Anton previously held the position of chief operating officer at Mercy.


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an Feinberg joined Catholic Health East in January 2010. As vice president, clinical excellence, Feinberg is responsible for providing clinician perspective and leading change on CHE’s journey to clinical transformation. Previously, he was chief patient safety officer and medical director of clinical informatics for the University of Pennsylvania Health System and an associate professor of clinical neurology at Penn’s School of Medicine. Feinberg received his medical degree from Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and is board-certified in neurology. What prompted you to move from actively practicing medicine to working on the administrative side of health care? I have been moving towards working on the quality improvement side of health care for several years. Although I enjoyed many aspects of practicing neurology, I know that I can have a positive impact upon many more patients in an administrative role focusing on quality improvement and patient safety.

What led you to join a faith-based organization such as Catholic Health East? As I prepared for my first interview for the position at CHE, I was so impressed with the commitment to person-centered care and the importance of spiritual

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healing. As a neurologist who has treated many incurable conditions, I have learned the importance of treating the whole person and his or her family. The Core Values and Mission of CHE embody the critical elements of high-quality, safe, person-centered care.

How does your role fit in with CHE’s movement toward clinical transformation and person-centered care? Striving towards clinical excellence will only occur through true clinical transformation. The outcomes that we work towards require a rethinking and redesign of many age-old processes that are not person-centered. Safe, effective care is, by my definition, person-centered.

Can you elaborate a bit regarding your thoughts on evidence-based medicine and why there is such a trend toward this method of patient care? In the past, many aspects of medical care were centered around vignettes based Horizons Editorial Staff

Published by:

Maria Iaquinto Communications Manager

Scott H. Share Vice President, System Communications

Meg J. Boyd Communication Specialist

Please direct comments and suggestions to info@che.org

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Daniel Feinberg, M.D.

HORIZONS is a publication for the Sponsors, Boards, Regional Leadership, System Office and Colleagues of Catholic Health East.

3805 West Chester Pike, Suite 100 Newtown Square, PA 19073 Phone 610.355.2000 Fax 610.271.9600 www.che.org

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Design, Production, Printing & Mailing Fulfillment by JC Marketing Communications • jcmcom.com • Southington, Conn. Catholic Health East is a community of persons committed to being a transforming, healing presence within the communities we serve. Locations: Located in 11 eastern states from Maine to Florida. Workforce: Approx. 54,000 employees.

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upon the experience and training of colleagues. Over the past few years, the medical literature has really focused on the measurement of outcomes based upon how we deliver care. Clinicians in this era value well-designed, clinical research and respect the results. In transitioning to an evidencebased method of care delivery, we are essentially collecting all of this clinical research and placing it at the fingertips of the clinician and at the bedside of the patient. The improvement in the quality of this research, combined with a prerogative to measure value in terms of operational effectiveness and clinical impact for the person under our care, has transformed the way that we think of evidence-based medicine. For those of us who have been “living” quality improvement, it has been a great trend.

If you could accomplish one major objective during the next year, what would that be? Since CareLink, our evidence-based care initiative, is such an important part of clinical transformation, a critical objective is the success of the design and implementation of computerized provider order entry (CPOE) in several RHCs. Implementing CareLink and allowing clinicians to directly enter treatment and medication orders electronically, allows order entry at point-of-care and off-site, reduces medication errors, improves workflow efficiency and provides real-time errorchecking. Our clinical services department and information services are working hard with our RHCs to make sure that this goes very well! Sponsors Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Scranton, Pa. Franciscan Sisters of Allegany, St. Bonaventure, N.Y. Hope Ministries, Newtown Square, Pa. Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, Greensburg, Pa. Sisters of Mercy of the Americas: Mid-Atlantic Community, Merion Station, Pa. New York, Pennsylvania, Pacific West Community, Buffalo, N.Y. Northeast Community, Cumberland, R.I. South Central Community, Belmont, N.C. Sisters of Providence, Holyoke, Mass. Sisters of St. Joseph, St. Augustine, Fla.

1, 6, 7, 8 Haiti Earthquake Relief Extends Across CHE CHE Updates “Strategic Framework” for 2017 CareLink: Leveraging Technology to Enhance Health New Orleans Still Benefitting From 2005 CHE Donation

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New Model for Payment Reform Earns National Recognition for Sisters of Providence Health System Across the System CHE Promotions and Appointments 10 Minutes with ... Dan Feinberg, M.D., F.A.A.N.

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Haiti Earthquake Relief

Extends Across CHE

“… the earth groaned loud from deep inside … that was worse than the shaking.”

R.N. (GHM volunteer): “It sounds as if there is little infrastructure left that will be able to handle a large mobilization of relief … Once we can get into Haiti, we may want to meet with HSFS staff to assess their needs …”

– An earthquake survivor

On the afternoon of January 12, 2010, for just under 35 seconds, their world shook. When it stopped less than a minute later, hundreds of thousands were dead or dying and many more were missing and/or buried under collapsed buildings. The devastating earthquake that hit the Haitian capital city of Port-au-Prince at 4:53 p.m. on that Tuesday afternoon was a massive magnitude 7.0—the worst to hit Haiti in more than two centuries, and one of the deadliest natural disasters in world history. Immediately following the earthquake, as media outlets began to report on the catastrophic aftermath and devastation throughout the region, communities,

1/12/2010, 10:41 p.m. EST, e-mail from Sr. Mary Jo to Fr. Mede (CEO, Hospital St. Francis de Sales): “Pere Mede, Please give us news of you, our friends at HSFS and damage at the hospital.”

Global Health Ministry’s Long-Time Commitment to Haiti organizations and individuals back home in the United States and around the world were already looking for ways to help. Military and civilian rescue teams were mobilized and awaiting deployment; aid organizations began to organize monetary relief funds; and at Catholic Health East,

Sr. Mary Jo McGinley, R.S.M., executive director, Global Health Ministry, began to reach out to our friends in Haiti for situation updates and a needs analysis. 1/12/2010, 8:12 p.m. EST, Sr. Mary Jo responds to an e-mail from Nadia Morquette,

“I can do everything through him who gives me strength.” – Philippians 4:13 Since 1989, Global Health Ministry (GHM), a supportive health corporation of CHE, has sent teams of medical professionals to provide health care services, education and continued on pages 6, 7, 8 & 9

A PUBLICATION FOR THE SPONSORS, BOARDS, REGIONAL LEADERSHIP, SYSTEM OFFICE AND COLLEAGUES OF CATHOLIC HEALTH EAST

Horizons - Spring 2010  

CHE's quarterly newsletter.