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Across the System

Our Health Ministry:

Catholic Health East Sponsors and Organizations

Our Mission...

Catholic Health East is a community of persons committed to being a transforming, healing presence within the communities we serve.

To effect this mission: • We treat all persons whom we serve and with whom we work with respect and compassion, calling forth their best human potential; • We provide a full range of services that support healthy communities, including quality medical care and holistic approaches to healing body, spirit and mind; • We collaborate with others who share a common mission and vision; • We continually seek ways to assure access to services to persons most in need; • We identify and develop leaders in Catholic health ministry; and • We advocate public policies and initiatives, particularly those in the area of healthcare, that ensure quality of life for all.

Our Core Values...

Our Vision... Inspired by our Mission and committed to our Core Values, Catholic Health East will achieve excellence in all we do, creating a system that empowers communities and individuals to achieve optimal health and quality of life.

population will demand continuing care services (long-term care, assisted living, home care, etc.) at a rate far exceeding the current availability of these services. To harness and share the continuing care expertise that exists in our system, CHE created the Continuing Care Management Services Network (CCMSN), in which a team of continuing care experts works collaboratively with continuing care leaders throughout CHE to help support and enhance the growth of continuing care services. A related organization, Catholic Health East Senior Services Management (CHESSM), was formed to provide consultative and management services to organizations and facilities not affiliated with CHE.

recycling program: oil used for cooking in the hospital’s kitchen is sent to an outside company which processes it for bio-diesel use in automobiles.

Catholic Health East Sponsors

St. Francis Medical Center (Trenton, N.J.) was recognized in September 2008 by the PatientCentered Care Institute, a division of NRC-Picker, as a performance leader in radiation oncology services and as one of the best hospitals in the nation at providing patient-centered care. The award was based on survey data collected by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ survey of “Hospital Patient Experiences” as well as other inpatient and outpatient survey data.

Franciscan Sisters of Allegany Allegany, New York

Nazareth Hospital, part of Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, was the second community hospital in the country to achieve certification for stroke care from The Joint Commission. The hospital has received state and national recognition for its continued excellence in stroke care.

Courage We dare to take the risks our faith demands of us.

Integrity We keep our word and are faithful to who we say we are.

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Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

Sisters of St. Joseph St. Augustine, Florida Sisters of Mercy of the Americas: Mid-Atlantic Community Merion, Pennsylvania New York, Pennsylvania, Pacific West Community Buffalo, New York Northeast Community Cumberland, Rhode Island South Central Community Belmont, North Carolina

Catholic Health East Regional Health Corporations and Joint Operating Agreements

Lourdes Health System Camden, New Jersey Maxis Health System Carbondale, Pennsylvania

Mercy Health System of Maine Portland, Maine Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania Conshohocken, Pennsylvania Mercy Hospital Miami, Florida Mercy Medical Daphne, Alabama Pittsburgh Mercy Health System Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Justice

We care for and strengthen the ministry and all resources entrusted to us.

Sisters of Providence Holyoke, Massachusetts

Mercy Community Health West Hartford, Connecticut

We demonstrate our connectedness to each other through inclusive and compassionate relationships.

Stewardship

Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill Greensburg, Pennsylvania

Holy Cross Hospital Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Community

We give priority to those whom society ignores.

Hope Ministries Newtown Square, Pennsylvania

Catholic Health Buffalo, New York

We believe that each person is a manifestation of the sacredness of human life.

Commitment To Those Who Are Poor

Franciscan Sisters of St. Joseph Hamburg, New York

BayCare Health System Clearwater, Florida

Reverence For Each Person

We advocate for a society in which all can realize their full potential and achieve the common good.

Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary Scranton, Pennsylvania

CHE facilities have increasingly demonstrated their commitment to recycling and other “go green” efforts. In 2008, Nazareth Hospital (part of Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania), earned the EPA Energy Star Award for its implementation of an energy conservation program that included the installation of more energyefficient technology throughout its facility; the hospital joined an elite group of 66 hospitals nationwide that achieved this distinction. Many CHE facilities implemented or enhanced their paper and supply recycling efforts. One facility (Mercy Medical Center, part of Sisters of Providence Health System) initiated a unique kitchen oil

To create and nurture a quieter healing environment for its patients, Sisters of Providence Health System’s Mercy Medical Center implemented a unique noise reduction initiative in 2008. Devices known as “Yacker Trackers” were installed near nurses stations on patient floors throughout the hospital. The devices, equipped with sound sensors, resemble traffic lights; they shine from green to yellow to red, as noise levels increase and reach unacceptable levels. Mercy Magic, a dedicated workforce of volunteers for Mercy Medical (Daphne, Ala.) was honored in May 2008 by the American Hospital Association, receiving its national Hospital Award for Volunteer Excellence award. Mercy Magic volunteers help meet the needs of Mercy’s pediatric rehabilitation patients, and are involved in Guardian Angel, a program that help funds pediatric home care for young patients in need.

Saint Joseph’s Health System Atlanta, Georgia Saint Michael’s Medical Center Newark, New Jersey Sisters of Providence Health System Springfield, Massachusetts St. Francis Hospital Wilmington, Delaware St. Francis Medical Center Trenton, New Jersey St. James Mercy Health System Hornell, New York St. Joseph of the Pines Southern Pines, North Carolina St. Mary Medical Center Langhorne, Pennsylvania St. Mary’s Health Care System Athens, Georgia St. Peter’s Health Care Services Albany, New York

Catholic Health East Supportive Health Corporations Allegany Franciscan Ministries, Inc. Global Health Ministry Stella Maris Insurance Company, Ltd.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Message from...

Sponsors Council Coordinator, Board Chair and CEO Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Mary Persico, I.H.M., Ed.D. Coordinator CHE Sponsors Council

An integral part of Catholic Health East’s Mission is to “… continually seek ways to assure access to services to persons most in need.” Never have these words had more meaning than they do today. As the United States struggles to right itself from the worst economic conditions since The Great Depression, millions of Americans are forced to deal with the devastating reality of home foreclosures and job losses … and nearly 50 million citizens are without health insurance. Given these circumstances, our collective Mission to be a transforming, healing presence in the communities we serve challenges us as never before.

Included in these numbers are charity care, unpaid costs of Medicaid programs and free and subsidized community health and education services. Behind these numbers are the stories and faces of the people who make these programs possible … and the grateful recipients of those who benefit from these programs and services.

One of the characteristics that distinguishes Catholic Health East from most other health systems is our geographic diversity; our hospitals, long-term care and assisted living facilities, retirement communities and home care agencies are located in 11 eastern States stretching from Maine to Florida. This longitudinal view of our nation’s communities provides us with a unique vantage point from which to make two key observations: the effects of this recession know no county, city or zip code boundaries, and likewise, our ministry’s capacity to reach out to those in need knows no bounds. Collectively, Catholic Health East facilities provided over $301 million in community benefit programs and services in 2008, representing an eight percent increase over the prior year.

Jacquelyn S. Kinder, Ed.D. Chairperson, Board of Directors Catholic Health East

People like Dora, a continuing care retirement community resident who volunteers at a local soup kitchen … and Randolph and Kip, two homeless people in towns hundreds of miles apart, both getting their lives back together thanks to homeless outreach programs … and Tanya, a recovering addict who is learning to live with HIV … and Christine, who benefited from needed emotional support after her miscarriage. All of these people … and so many thousands more … have one thing in common: their lives were enriched thanks to community benefit programs and services available throughout Catholic Health East organizations. You’ll meet Dora, Randolph, Kip, Tanya, Christine and many other individuals in the pages that follow, as members of our health ministry each share stories of lives that have been touched by our community benefit initiatives. You’ll also learn about some of the key accomplishments and achievements of our individual facilities, as they focus on providing the best possible care to patients,

Robert V. Stanek President & CEO Catholic Health East

residents and families in a soothing, healing environment. These initiatives are an integral part of who we are as a ministry. Our Vision calls upon all Catholic Health East facilities and our 54,000 colleagues to achieve excellence in all we do. Our Mission guides us to treat all persons we serve with respect and compassion … support healthy communities … collaborate with others … and serve those most in need. And among our seven Core Values is Commitment To Those Who Are Poor, giving priority to those whom society ignores. We don’t provide these services because someone told us we had to. Rather, it is a fundamental part of being a Catholic health entity. The first women religious went from crowded urban neighborhoods to remote rural areas seeking out those in most need of care. That is the legacy of our religious Sponsors, and it is the foundation upon which we build healthy communities to this day. We thank all of the people who help make our health care services possible—Sponsors, board members, colleagues, physicians, volunteers, auxilians and donors. It is because of their collective guidance, inspiration, dedication and commitment that we are privileged and honored … and blessed … to make a difference in the lives of so many.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Allegany Franciscan Ministries

Kidz Bite Back! Eleven-year-old Allison is one of more than 250 ‘Kidz Bite Back!’ leaders who have trained more than 2,500 other fourth and fifth graders about healthier choices even as they are bombarded by the slick ad campaigns of the fast food/junk food, video game and television industries. “My dad thought tap water was bad for you and you only needed to eat one vegetable every day,” said Allison. “I told him I learned that I should eat five vegetables every day and drink at least three glasses of water every day. He said, ‘Huh ...’ and now he buys more vegetables so I won’t lecture him.” Allison teaches other kids what she has learned about how Big Fat Industries™ target kids with advertising and free toys and how Couch Potato Companies try to get kids to watch TV and play video games all the time. “I’m also telling everyone about the Kidz Creed—eating less fast food and junk food, drinking lots of water instead of soft drinks, spending less time with TV and video games, eating a bunch of fruits and vegetables, and getting outside and being active every day," she added.

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Allison, a kid leader, talks about Kidz Bite Back! with fellow fifth graders in Tampa, Fla.

‘Kidz Bite Back!’ is a kid-created, kid-led counter-marketing campaign that mobilizes kids to take responsibility for their eating and exercising habits

while engaging parents to empower everyone to make healthier choices. It is the centerpiece of a childhood obesity initiative funded by Allegany Franciscan Ministries with grants totaling $300,000.

‘Kidz Bite Back!’ is a … counter-marketing campaign that mobilizes kids to take responsibility for their eating and exercising habits.

The initiative addresses major social and health issues such as the skyrocketing number of children with early stage diabetes. It reaches a diverse population of kids and includes nontraditional exercise and activities for kids who are often left out of conventional sports programs. Collaborators include St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital (BayCare), the local YMCA, health departments and school districts in the Tampa Bay, Florida area.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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BayCare Health System

Safe Sitter Class Teaches Children Valuable Lessons The Safe Sitter ® class taught by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital’s Child Advocacy Center was named the Top Safe Sitter location for 2008, training more kids than any other site in the country. Safe Sitter is a medically accurate babysitting training program designed for young adolescents. The full-day class provides the basic information every good babysitter should know, including how to handle minor to life-threatening situations, how to rescue a choking infant or child, how to communicate with Emergency Medical Services, accident and behavior management, how to entertain kids and other babysitting tips. ®

St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital celebrated 20 years of teaching Safe Sitter in 2008, and has had thousands of graduates who understand the responsibility needed when caring for Tampa Bay’s young children. One such student was 13-year-old Brianna. Initially, Brianna wasn’t thrilled when her mother suggested she take a Safe Sitter class at SJCH. But since she occasionally

Brianna, 13, holds her baby brother, Jace (seven months). Her ability to stay calm and use the skills she learned in Safe Sitter class helped save Jace’s life.

We are so glad she took the class. If she had not, we may not have Baby Jace in our lives. We are so thankful.

watched her three younger brothers, the teenager agreed and enjoyed the class almost immediately. “The instructor really took the time to explain everything and answered everyone’s questions without making us feel silly for asking them,” said Brianna.

Months later, Brianna had the opportunity to put the skills she learned to good use when her seven-month-old brother began choking. “Jace was playing on the floor with some of his toys when I heard a weird noise. I noticed his face was red and he looked panicked,” said Brianna. “I picked him up and quickly turned him over and did several back blows. Eventually he began to cry and then threw up the item he was choking on.” Brianna’s quick thinking and ability to stay calm helped to save her brother’s life. “We are so glad she took the class,” said Brianna’s mother, Lonissa. “If she had not, we may not have Baby Jace in our lives. We are so thankful.”

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Catholic Health

On the Road to Recovery Thanks to a remarkable set of circumstances and a network of caring individuals, 14-year-old Makara, from Cambodia, found herself in capable hands at Kenmore Mercy Hospital last March. Her amazing journey began 12,000 miles away in the tiny village of Svay Rolom in Cambodia, a country with limited medical resources, where she was discovered by the medical missionary group, Operation Renewed Hope (ORH). Makara was diagnosed with an aneurysmal bone cyst, a rare bone disease that caused the bone in her leg to become so diseased it could break simply by walking on it. So she relied on crutches to navigate her tiny village. ORH treated Makara at its free medical clinic in Cambodia; however, doctors determined that to prevent eventual amputation of her leg, she needed extensive surgery and rehabilitation. After several American physicians declined to perform the surgery, Deborah Franco of Lockport, N.Y., heard of the young girl’s plight and put ORH in touch with her friend, Andrew Cappuccino, M.D.

Makara holds the hand of Deborah Franco, whom she calls her “American mama.”

across the globe to Buffalo, N.Y., made possible by RAPTIM International Travel, which specializes in humanitarian and missionary airfare. Makara then underwent surgery, where Dr. Cappuccino and a team of doctors, nurses and technicians from Kenmore Mercy Hospital (part of Catholic Health) removed the cyst,

So, in mid-March, Makara began her whirlwind journey

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It is a miracle … the whole thing, from start to end.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

resurfaced the affected area with bone grafting, and inserted a metal rod to support her leg. Now, Makara is making an amazing recovery. She is already walking with only one crutch and will likely be liberated of that soon. Hosting Makara as she continues her physical rehabilitation, are the Franco and Cappuccino families. “She has settled well here and is amazingly picking up English quickly,” said Franco. Franco ascribed everything coming together as the work of God. “It is a miracle … the whole thing, from start to end,” she said.


Global Health Ministry

Mother and Child Project believed that “ …it wasWenormal for

Definition of Maternal Mortality: The number of women who die per 100,000 live births.

Source: World Health Organization (WHO) 2004 Report of 2000 data.

some women to die during or after childbirth until we learned we can do things that will keep mothers alive. Now that we know these deaths can be prevented, we want to work together to find ways to stop new mothers from dying …

The paraphrased quote above summarizes the words spoken by community groups gathered in 2005 in remote villages in the Andes of northern Peru. The realization that the average maternal mortality rate in Peru is one of the highest in Latin America prompted the development of a new program entitled the Madre y Niño (Mother and Child) Project— a collaborative effort between the Chulucanas Department of Health, the Health Ministry of the Diocese of Chulucanas and Global Health Ministry working directly with local communities in remote regions where the known maternal deaths far exceeded the norm in Peru. The reason for this high mortality rate is that most families in the remote mountain towns have little or no access to health care. The majority of births are unattended by a trained person; most of the women have little or no education, are undernourished, with little or no access to prenatal care; and their cultural beliefs are primitive and counterproductive. For example, the men refused to allow women to be examined by a male doctor, and they believed that a woman should not wash after childbirth, leading to frequent infections.

In rural Peru, local volunteers carry a pregnant woman, who had complications during delivery, to the closest paved road. A short wave radio message was sent to local health officials who met the travelers and transported the woman to lifesaving medical care.

In November 2004, the Chulucanas Department of Health asked Global Health Ministry to work with the Diocese of Chulucanas to help them address the problem of maternal mortality in three target areas of Peru—Pacipampa, Frias and Chalaco. Global Health Ministry acquired two grants from the Sisters of Mercy—totaling $90,000. Using these funds, they developed and implemented the Madre y Niño project with the goal of reducing maternal mortality by 50 percent in five years. The Madre y Niño project provides for a nurse to conduct trainer education sessions for community volunteers and midwives each month. A teaching manual was created composed primarily of drawings to teach family-centered prenatal and birthing practices; identify signs of high-risk pregnancies; and the importance of basic hygiene and good nutrition. Since its inception, more than 100 midwives and local volunteers have attended the

training sessions, along with the local health department staff who are building trust in the communities. They have been welcomed into homes of pregnant women for family education sessions and most families seek help immediately when they recognize an at-risk pregnancy or problems develop during delivery. Also, upon hearing that hemorrhaging new mothers could be helped if they received medical care, local communities created a “First-Responders” alert system to use short wave radio communication to bring mothers in distress to medical care. The results of the project are clear: maternal deaths declined from 18 in 2004 to seven in 2007. The Madre y Niño project has since been replicated in other regions of Peru and Global Health Ministry is working with remote communities in Guatemala to initiate the program with the local health department and community leaders.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Holy Cross Hospital

Community Outreach Provides Free Immunizations to Children Sonya was surprised to receive a call from her daughter Jocelyn’s school. The registrar indicated that Jocelyn would need to be picked up from school and would not be able to return until her immunizations were brought up to date. Jocelyn, age 6, sat in the office waiting for her mom that afternoon looking confused, rejected and sad. Her expression mimicked the same one on her tired mother’s face. Jocelyn, one of five children, had no health insurance. Ineligible for Florida KidCare and denied by Medicaid, Sonya did not know where to turn. She did not have the ability to pay for a private doctor and could not afford to spend her day out of work waiting at the local health department. Sonya felt helpless and despondent and the situation hopeless … then she remembered that more than a year ago, her daughter had received immunizations at a community health fair—for free. She quickly returned home to find the shot record issued at the fair. Finally locating the paperwork she’d received more than a year ago, Sonya called the contact number provided and reached

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Pictured from left: Janet Jones, R.N., N.C.S.N., a community outreach school nurse for Holy Cross Hospital, with Sonya and six-year-old Jocelyn.

Holy Cross Hospital community outreach school nurse, Janet Jones, R.N., N.C.S.N. Nurse Janet responded at once to this mother’s plea for help. Locating Jocelyn’s original record, she planned for Sonya and Jocelyn to meet her at her assigned community location

Mom expressed her sincere thanks to Nurse Janet and said she and Jocelyn were very grateful.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

the following day. The next morning and three bus rides later, they arrived at a parochial school clinic where Jocelyn received her immunizations immediately and for free. Mom expressed her sincere thanks to Nurse Janet and said that she and Jocelyn were very grateful. The journey had been most worthwhile and her experience better than any other clinic or doctor’s office. Jocelyn was able to rejoin her classmates later that morning and mom made it in to work on time! The Holy Cross Hospital community outreach department is able to provide children’s immunizations (free of charge) via the Florida Vaccine for Children Program.


Lourdes Health System

Looking Good and Feeling Better Doris thought her world had ended when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in September 2007. As she prepared for a partial mastectomy at Lourdes Medical Center of Burlington County in Willingboro, N.J., Doris visited the hospital’s Cancer Center, which supplements clinical care with emotional, educational and aesthetic support for patients. “When women lose their breasts, many feel they’re not the same,” said Doris, 60, of Beverly, N.J. “At Lourdes, they help you realize you are still beautiful, you’re still the same person. That was helpful.” Doris is just one of the many cancer patients who have benefited from the comprehensive support programs offered at Lourdes. Last year, nearly 4,000 people received assistance, cancer screenings or disease information through the Center. A multi-pronged program, the Center includes a Caring Boutique where patients can receive wigs, hats, prosthesis bras and temporary and permanent prostheses; it also provides nutrition classes, support groups, retreats, wellness activities and a navigator to guide them through treatment.

Randi Solden, R.N., patient navigator, (right), is one of the Lourdes staff members helping patients like Doris adjust to a diagnosis of cancer.

Following surgery, Doris underwent radiation treatments five days a week for seven weeks. To help deal with the stresses of therapy, she participated in the American Cancer Society’s Look Good … Feel Better ® program, where cosmetologists teach patients how to enhance their appearance using make-up and disguise hair loss through wigs, turbans and scarves. Doris also took part in support group meetings and an all-day relaxation and education retreat. The programs are open to individuals with any type of cancer, regardless of where they are receiving their treatment, noted Denise Cortland, administrator of the Lourdes

At Lourdes, they help you realize you are still beautiful, you’re still the same person. That was helpful.

Cancer Program. “Patients look to us to help them regain a sense of self-confidence and control over their lives,” she said. “Every day, we’re inspired by patients who, thanks to our services, have a renewed outlook on life.”

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Maxis Health System

Hospital Helps to Make Golden Memory

Photo of Betty and Robert taken in 1946 at Rogers Corner in Manhattan shortly after they met.

Betty and Robert, lifelong residents of Carbondale, Pa., celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on March 26, 2008. Unlike previous milestones the couple had shared, their Golden anniversary was not celebrated with Mass at the church where they first stood together to take Sister Ann McLaughlin, I.H.M., hospital chaplain, Marian their vows, nor was it followed Community Hospital (standing), visits with Betty at home. Betty is holding one of the many photographs of Robert and by an elaborate family her that are on display prominently throughout her home. gathering. The Jubilarians had a unique celebration—a celebration planned by and hospital chaplains decorated the shared with caregivers at room with flowers and candles Marian Community When the need for and food services provided the Hospital who formed a hospice care had finally cake on which the couple’s original cake topper sat. special bond with the family been determined, the Reverend Leo Cummings, during Robert’s admission family chose Marian hospital chaplain, performed into hospice care. the ceremony.

“During my conversations with Betty, she expressed the importance of her marriage and the couple’s desire to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary together,” said Sister Ann McLaughlin, I.H.M., hospital chaplain, spiritual care department, Marian Community Hospital. “Because the actual anniversary was not until July we knew there was a chance Robert would not be here to celebrate. Planning the renewal of vows allowed the family to accept what was coming.” Robert (or “Floodie” as Betty affectionately called him) had faced illness before. Throughout a 15-year period, physicians had given him cancer diagnoses on

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because of the compassionate care they had received in the past.

three separate occasions. Each time with Betty at his side, Robert fought his cancer with courage and overcame the illness. When the need for hospice care had finally been determined, the family chose Marian because of the compassionate care they had received in the past. Some of those same staff members from the past were those who participated in the renewal of vows. Nursing staff helped Robert into formal attire,

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

“Everyone was so good to us. So many people were involved,” said Betty. “I can still see the chef coming in with the cake. He had such a smile on his face.” Less than a week after the renewal of vows, Robert passed away with Betty at his side. Since that time Betty has turned to the support of the staff at Marian Community Hospital by attending the Bereavement Support Group. Although Betty misses her husband greatly, she knows he is always with her in spirit. “All I know is if Jesus is as good as my “Floodie” was to me; he is happy,” she said.


Mercy Community Health

Giving Back is the Greatest Reward When Dora serves lunch to the people who come to the soup kitchen at Mercy Housing & Shelter in Hartford, Conn., she cannot help but think that she is making her mother very proud. A resident of The McAuley— Mercy Community Health’s Continuing Care Retirement Community—Dora often takes Dora has been serving meals at a local soup kitchen part in a monthly service as part of McAuley’s monthly community service program since 2006. program whereby a team prepares, delivers and serves Finney, activities director at The a meal to the hungry. She McAuley. has been a part of this We want them initiative since 2006, but for Dora has assisted Janet Finney and Pastoral Care Assistant Dora, serving others has to know that we care Sister Mary Fahy not only with been a lifelong mission. food preparation, but also by “My mother instilled in us children a desire to give to other people. When I grew up, we weren’t wealthy, but we were better off than others,” said Dora. “And because of that, my mother taught us that we should give nice things to people when we could.” On the second Wednesday morning of each month, colleagues from Sodexo Senior Services who work in The McAuley kitchen prepare a nutritious meal; residents create the desserts. “In February, Dora created a wonderful Valentine’s Day celebration with candies and delicious brownies. She does a lot of the baking,” said Janet

rounding up volunteers to make the trip to the soup kitchen. She tells prospective volunteers that this is one of the most rewarding programs they can take part in at The McAuley. “We go to show the people there that we appreciate and respect them,” Dora said. “We want them to know that we care about them, and we try to give them hope. I got involved with this shortly after my husband died, because like a lot of people who live at The McAuley, I’m concerned about poverty in Hartford. We live reasonably well here in West Hartford, and I want to give back. When we serve at the soup kitchen, we get to talk to the people who go there, and we find that we all share the same human feelings.”

about them, and we try to give them hope. The people there express great gratitude, which really is a gift we receive from them.

And as Dora learned all those years ago from her mother, nice things come back to those who give. In Dora’s words, “The people there express great gratitude, which really is a gift we receive from them.”

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Mercy Health System of Maine

Providing Comfort Miles from Home They say your children never stop being your babies. No matter how grown up they become. So when Carol found out her adult son Dwight needed a kidney transplant, she was as devastated as any mother would be. Fearful for her son’s life as he underwent treatment in a Portland, Maine hospital, more than 50 miles away from their hometown of Damariscotta, she turned to Gary’s House, an affiliate of Mercy Health System of Maine, for help. She knew she needed to be near Dwight as he went through dialysis and waited for a kidney transplant. She knew she needed to see him each morning, and to say goodnight to him every evening. Gary’s House, a hospitality home for the families of patients undergoing treatment at nearby hospitals, offered a perfect solution. It was just five minutes from the hospital and only $15 a night. “This house was a lifesaver to me, because the first eight days I had stayed at a hotel and maxed out everything I had,” said Carol. She came to Gary’s House at the end of every difficult day, where she was greeted with warmth, understanding and a peaceful environment in which to unwind. While a resident at Gary’s House, Carol made new friends and drew strength from

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Carol credits Gary’s House with giving her the solace she needed while awaiting her son Dwight’s (at left) kidney transplant.

While a resident at Gary’s House, Carol made new friends and drew strength from other families going through similar hardships.

other families going through similar hardships … and she finally saw her son Dwight through the successful kidney transplant both had prayed and hoped for. That life-saving kidney was donated by a friend

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

of Dwight’s—a former coworker and single mother—a remarkable gift from a remarkable woman. Her son is now fully recovered from his ordeal. “It's a miracle before my eyes,” said Carol. “He looks more healthy now than he has in five years.” Carol came back to Portland recently to serve as keynote speaker for an event to raise funds for Gary’s House. In front of an audience of hundreds, she told her story of fear, sadness and stress. She also told her story of the hope provided by the woman who helped save Dwight’s life and by Gary’s House, a place she’ll always remember with gratitude for giving her the solace she needed during a difficult time.


Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania

Screenings Aim to Save Student Athletes’ Lives The Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA) requires all high school athletes to pass a physical exam to be eligible to play. But even those physicals alone can’t identify all the potential risk factors in sudden cardiac death—a rare but still occurring tragedy in young athletes. The American Heart Association defines sudden cardiac death as death resulting from an abrupt loss of heart function, where the victim may or may not have been diagnosed with heart disease.

De’Andre, a senior at Penn Wood High School in Lansdowne, Pa., is in better shape and now off insulin completely after participating in Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital’s free health screenings in June 2008.

Martin O’Riordan, M.D., section chief of the division of cardiology at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital (MFH), spent part of 2006 in Italy screening athletes to identify those who are at risk for sudden cardiac death. In June 2008, at his suggestion, MFH teamed up with Penn Wood High School in Lansdowne, Pa., to both fulfill its student athletes’ PIAA requirements and detect potential sudden cardiac death risk factors and other potential health problems.

De’Andre, 18, a senior at Penn Wood, was one such student. De’Andre, who was obese and diabetic, also had a family history of cardiac problems. He was referred for a stress echocardiogram (stress echo) to evaluate his heart function. A stress echo combines an ultrasound study of the heart with a stress test, measuring blood flow before and after exercise; it is frequently used to help diagnose coronary artery disease.

In addition to getting their PIAA physicals, the students also underwent a comprehensive screening that included an electrocardiogram (EKG), an exam and consultation with an attending cardiologist and a musculoskeletal evaluation with a physical therapist and an orthopedic surgeon. In addition to the potential health benefits, this program allowed students who couldn’t otherwise afford this exam to be able to play high school sports.

Fortunately, De’Andre was cleared to return to the football field; after losing weight, he has even been able to come off insulin completely.

A total of 78 Penn Wood athletes came to MFH over two sessions. As a result of the screenings, 32 students were recommended to seek follow-up care for potentially serious health problems.

“The screenings helped to make me more aware,” said De’Andre, a defensive tackle and offensive lineman for Penn Wood’s football team. “I was taking 40 to 60 units (of insulin) twice a day. I am off the insulin now. It makes it easier to live.” The screenings were well received by both the students and the health care providers who were involved. “This is a great example of how two organizations can work together to provide important health services to the community,” said Dr. O’Riordan.

As much as we provided a service to the community, volunteers also found it to be a valuable and rewarding experience.

In addition to six cardiologists and two orthopedists, many of MFH’s departments volunteered their time and resources, including the cath lab, cardiology, physical therapy, pre-admission testing and nursing education departments, operating room and office staff from Kelly Cardiovascular. “As much as we provided a service to the community, volunteers also found it to be a valuable and rewarding experience,” said Trish DiCanzio, clinical program director for cardiac services at MFH. Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital is a member of the Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Conshohocken, Pa.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Mercy Hospital of Miami

Reaching Out to the Uninsured Aracely came to the United States from Panama in 1996 and has spent the last 13 years making a modest living as a housekeeper. Her family’s medical history includes a long history of colon polyps. Her father died of colon cancer and her sister received a positive diagnosis for colon polyps. Aracely was determined to monitor her health and be as healthy as possible, but her modest income prevented her from being able to obtain medical insurance. She desperately searched for a place where she could receive health care despite her inability to pay. In 2003, Aracely began visiting the St. John Bosco Clinic in Miami, Fla. The clinic provides free health care to disadvantaged children and adults who are underinsured and underserved. St. John Bosco

During her two-week stay at Mercy Hospital, Aracely received compassionate, professional care from a wonderful nursing staff and a fantastic group of surgeons and physicians.

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Aracely thanks God and Mercy Hospital every day for the care she received at a time when she needed it most.

Clinic is a parish-based primary care program staffed by volunteer physicians, support staff and Mercy Hospital employees.

physicians acted quickly and performed an emergency laparotomy (abdominal incision) with a partial colectomy.

Mercy Hospital helped her to receive the exams to test for polyps, including a fecal occult blood test and a barium enema. All of the tests returned normal, much to everyone’s happiness.

During her two-week stay at Mercy Hospital, Aracely received compassionate, professional care from a wonderful nursing staff and a fantastic group of surgeons and physicians. She spent the Thanksgiving holiday in the hospital and everyone on staff did their best to make Aracely feel thankful.

In November of 2008, Aracely once again came into the clinic, this time complaining of extreme pain in her lower abdomen. She was immediately taken to the emergency room at Mercy Hospital where a CT scan revealed a large mass. ER

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

Today, Aracely will tell you that she has a lot to be “thankful for” and she “thanks God and Mercy Hospital every day” for the care she received.


Mercy Medical

Rehabilitation with Compassion Makes a Difference High-school sweethearts Steve and Millie had been married for 34 years with two grown children and four grandchildren, when their lives changed overnight. Originally from Michigan, they had moved to Alabama to be closer to their family and to look for work. One evening, having developed a bad headache, Steve collapsed and was rushed to the ER. At age 51, he had suffered a stroke. To make matters worse, he had no health insurance. After several days in the ICU, Steve was referred to Mercy Medical’s acute rehabilitation hospital in Daphne, Ala. Steve had leftsided weakness, high blood pressure, chronic lower back and neck pain, and was unable to flex or extend any of his joints. The plan of care included aggressive rehabilitation for 10 days. Steve’s wife greatly appreciated the compassionate services provided by Mercy Medical. “With this being what they call a charity case, we didn’t expect much. What we got was fantastic,” said Millie. “I was surprised; I really was. Mercy was much different than other hospitals; much more caring. Everybody was kind. They would ask if we needed anything or needed to talk. Steve had days

Steve with his occupational therapist, Joanne Castrillo, try out “Wiihabilitation” to build strength on his left side weakened by a stroke.

where he was very depressed and they would spend time talking with him. It was a big difference. Even when Steve came home, Mercy Medical helped us get his wheelchair, a commode, a walker and everything.” Mercy staff members worked with other organizations including Ecumenical Ministries and Goodwill to supply Steve’s medical equipment for his transfer into Mercy Home Health. Steve had the benefit of receiving rehabilitative therapies and nursing care at home from the same Mercy professionals he had come to know. “JoJo and the other therapists would always answer my questions. They explained things so I could understand. Before now, I couldn’t move my left arm. I couldn’t even stand. Now I can go down steps, and can get into the van. Everybody

at Mercy has been extremely supportive and it helps me a lot,” Steve said. “After my stroke, I didn’t know my own birthday and couldn’t spell my name. I was scared and didn’t know what to expect. They really made me feel comfortable. Mercy treated me with open arms and dignity.”

After my stroke … I was scared and didn’t know what to expect. They really made me feel comfortable. Mercy treated me with open arms and dignity.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Pittsburgh Mercy Health System

Offering Support in Time of Need He sits down to talk and he jumps right into talking about Redd Up and Green Up Pittsburgh, initiatives supported by the mayor to beautify city neighborhoods. He loves designing and creating public gardens, making beauty where once there was blight. He has ideas for six new plots this year, safe places where children can play. His enthusiasm is palpable. Randolph is a tall, middle-aged man with a graying beard and moustache, long tapered fingers and kind eyes that contradict the difficulties of his life. He is a client at Operation Safety Net ®, a “street medicine” program providing access to health care for the homeless population in the Pittsburgh area. Nothing has been easy for Randolph whose exuberant youth was laced with drinking and drugs. He earned a football scholarship to a North Carolina junior college, but lasted only a semester. The Air Force looked like a good alternative so he enlisted. That didn’t last long either. Honorably discharged, Randolph married the woman he loved, got a job, settled down and had two great children. But he lived fast. Involved in a

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Randolph, an Operation Safety Net client, loves to design and create public gardens.

serious crime at the age of 30, he went to jail. “Life doesn’t stand still in jail,” Randolph said. On his 40th birthday, Randolph was released. Since then he’s been living on the streets off and on, working various jobs and

I’m happy. For once in my life, I don’t have to worry about anything.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

trying to get his life together. Operation Safety Net plays a significant role in helping Randolph put the pieces of his life back together. Recently, Randolph became eligible for Section 8 Housing. Melody Miller, his caseworker at Operation Safety Net, helped him through the bureaucratic hoops. “Operation Safety Net offers the supports Randolph needs. Even with all the strikes against him, we believe in him; we believe he can succeed this time.” He’ll be settled just in time for the planting season and Green Up Pittsburgh. “I’m happy. For once in my life, I don’t have to worry about anything.”


Saint Joseph’s Health System

Helping the Homeless Kip is a middle-aged, pleasant man who looks directly into your eyes when he speaks to you and smiles engagingly. After all, he was once a very successful salesman. Sharing his journey, Kip said, “I had refused to deal with my depression that was getting worse and worse, until I fell so far into the black hole that I ended up homeless on the streets.” Kip visited Mercy Care Clinic at St. Luke’s one day where he was diagnosed with pneumonia and taken by ambulance to Grady Memorial Hospital. A doctor at Grady referred him to Saint Joseph’s Mercy Care Services Recuperative Care Unit. Mercy Care recently opened this 19-bed unit, located adjacent to its primary care clinic, to provide recuperative care to homeless persons upon discharge from Grady Hospital. A critical social service component assists individuals with moving into housing and accessing other needed services necessary to break the cycle of homelessness. The program is funded by grants from Saint Joseph’s Mercy Foundation, the Kaiser Foundation, the Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta and the United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta. “Everybody was so pleasant there and I was so grateful not to

Kip is pictured with Mercy Care case manager, Amanda Wagner, L.M.S.W. Mercy Care helped give Kip hope for his future.

have to go back into the cold night sick,” said Kip. “But more than that, I was introduced to a social worker who helped me apply for my benefits so I could

sleep when I wanted it or needed it. When you have choices, you have power. That was a great boost to me—a chance to have power over some things in my own life again.”

Nearing its 25th year of delivering integrated primary health and dental care, education and social services, Mercy Care reaches thousands of persons in need throughout Atlanta, Ga., each year. It is sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy and Saint Joseph’s Health System.

Mercy Care gave me hope that things would work out … I would never have made it without the help of Saint Joseph’s Mercy Care Services.

get permanent housing. I also got eyeglasses and a referral for mental health treatment. At the Recuperative Care Unit I had the choice to bathe, eat and

“Mercy Care gave me hope that things would work out,” said Kip. “You know, I drove by here for 25 years as a salesman in my expensive car and $500 suits and I never noticed this place or these folks on the street. They were invisible to me. Now I will never forget them. I am one of them and I am going to give back. I would never have made it without the help of Saint Joseph’s Mercy Care Services.”

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Saint Michael’s Medical Center

HIV Clinic Gives Patients New Hope When Tanya was admitted to Saint Michael’s Medical Center in Newark, N.J., she was very sick and very afraid. Suffering from pneumonia and dangerously underweight, Tanya was struggling with an addiction to narcotics and had been diagnosed with HIV. “I didn’t know whether I would live or die,” explained this 46year-old mother of three. “I had recently moved back to New Jersey and was staying with a family member. I needed to get healthy so my children and I could find a place to live on our own.” At Saint Michael’s, Tanya’s health improved to the point where she was referred to a transitional housing program designed to help her and her family get back on their feet. She also enrolled in the hospital’s behavioral health program, which helped her break the deadly cycle of drug addiction. Tanya then became a client of the Peter Ho Memorial Clinic, among the oldest and largest clinics in the state of New Jersey for the treatment of HIV and AIDS. Saint Michael’s, nationally renowned for its infectious disease research program, established the clinic in 1982. The clinic has more than 1,800 patients on its roster and has won awards for its innovative treatment, prevention and education programs. Today Tanya is managing her illness by adhering to an effective regimen of medications. She has been clean and sober for two years, and she regularly

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Tanya (on the right) with her HIV counselor, Patrice Flowers. Saint Michael’s established the Peter Ho Memorial Clinic, one of the oldest and largest clinics in New Jersey for the treatment of HIV and AIDS, in 1982.

They’ve helped me understand that people living with HIV can still enjoy long, productive and happy lives.

attends Narcotics Anonymous meetings. Tanya also serves as a peer facilitator at the clinic, working with other patients and members of the community to spread the word about the importance of getting tested for HIV and reducing the stigma and misconceptions surrounding the disease. “Tanya is definitely a success story,” said HIV Counselor

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

Patrice Flowers. “Not only has she turned her own life around, but her efforts as a peer facilitator and support group leader are helping others to do the same. She has even played an instrumental role in helping the Peter Ho Memorial Clinic develop a consumer advisory board to promote increased advocacy and education in the community.” Tanya credits the talented doctors, counselors and staff of the clinic at Saint Michael’s Medical Center with enabling her to take charge of her health. With their support, she now looks with renewed hope to her family’s future. “They are always there to answer my questions, provide encouragement and keep me pointed in the right direction,” said Tanya. “They've helped me understand that people living with HIV can still enjoy long, productive and happy lives.”


Sisters of Providence Health System

Companions on the Journey A child’s special connection to his/her mother doesn’t diminish with age, it may even be strengthened when the traditional roles are reversed and the child becomes the caretaker. The children of one Springfield, Mass., family were always close, and when their 90-year-old mother suffered a stroke and then a near-fatal infection over several weeks, they came together again as adults to oversee her care and remind her of their love and affection. Mark remembers how helpless he and his siblings felt as they watched their mother’s health deteriorate. “The nurses at Mercy Medical Center first told us about the ‘Companions on the Journey’ program. By that time, we had spent countless hours at my mother’s bedside and we were exhausted,” he said. “Coincidentally, our family had already established a connection with Dave Fish, one of Mercy’s transportation employees who also volunteered as a ‘companion’. Dave’s presence became a tremendous comfort during our mother’s illness, and he was actually with her when she passed away in the early morning hours.” Mercy Medical Center’s Companions on the Journey program began in 2006 under the direction of Chaplain Beverly Matakaetis in the Sister Caritas Cancer Center, with funding from the Lance Armstrong Foundation as a culturally sensitive, end-of-life program for hospitalized patients and their

Pictured from left to right: Dave Fish, Companions on the Journey volunteer; Chaplain Beverly Matakaetis; and Mark, who is grateful for the care his mother received during her final days at Mercy Medical Center.

family members. Trained volunteers focus on the care of the dying person, with attention to perceptions of pain and rituals around the time of death. They also offer relief to family members who maintain a bedside vigil. “We felt an instant bond to the ‘companions’ who visited with our mother. When we left the hospital after a long day, it was comforting to know she would not be alone,” said Mark. “They even posted a schedule on her bulletin board with names of people who would be sitting with her, praying with her, and holding her hand through the night. It was a great comfort.” Mark speaks for his entire family when he recalls the support provided by the Companions on the Journey program. “We only have praise for the men and women of the ‘companions’ program. Their presence was a gift that comforted our mother during her final days, and we will always be grateful.”

Dave’s presence became a tremendous comfort during our mother’s illness, and he was actually with her when she passed away in the early morning hours.

“The Companions on the Journey program truly reflects our Mission as a transforming, healing presence in the communities we serve,” said Sister Kathleen Sullivan, R.S.M., senior vice president of mission, Sisters of Providence Health System.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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St. Francis Hospital

Multiple Blessings Miriam and José arrived in the U.S. in 2005. A year later, Miriam gave birth to a baby girl. José worked seven-days-a-week; his grueling schedule meaning that Miriam was often alone. Although José had his legal papers and they planned to begin the process of getting papers for Miriam, she still longed to return to Mexico to be close to her family. When Miriam became pregnant once again, though she still wanted to return to Mexico, she started prenatal care at the Center of Hope at St. Francis Hospital in Wilmington, Del. It was there that Miriam was told that she was expecting twins. She was then reluctant to return to Mexico because of a lack of financial assistance for health care services and because medical specialists demand payment in advance, and in full. So Miriam and José decided to stay in the States and see what the Center of Hope doctors would say. To their surprise, the couple soon found out that they were not expecting twins … They were actually expecting triplets! The triplets arrived safely in the capable hands of Center of Hope physicians. Miriam and José experienced several ‘miracles’ in a row, one after another: • José’s immigration papers arrived well in advance of the time expected. This in itself baffled everyone, because these documents usually take months to materialize.

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José and Miriam, with three-year-old Yaretzi (standing between mom and dad) and triplets, Marijosé, Joann and Jenifer.

They do not know what they have done to deserve all of the miracles and blessings that God brought to them, but they are very thankful.

• The Center of Hope made arrangements for Medicaid for all their children and for the delivery. They also assisted with clothes, diapers and other baby necessities.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

• Miriam received financial aid from St. Francis Hospital, which took care of all her prenatal expenses. • Their tremendous worry about baby furniture evaporated when José’s boss gave them furniture in ‘threes’. • The owner of the horse farm where José worked provided them with a house on the property to accommodate the family—one of the triplets was subsequently named after the boss. Today, Miriam, José and their four children are doing great. They do not know what they have done to deserve all of the miracles and blessings that God brought to them, but they are very thankful.


St. Francis Medical Center

Children’s Futures … Caring and Support Today Tears glisten in Carmen’s eyes as she fondly remembers the first time she stepped into Children’s Futures at St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton, N.J. Carmen speaks through an interpreter when she says she knows for sure that her life would have been drastically different without this partnership organization.

Marisol Weaver-Henderson, Children’s Futures center coordinator; Carmen; Giovanni; and Lenore Scott, site supervisor of Children’s Futures.

Carmen contacted Children’s Futures, which, she was told, could provide support, clothing and links to other services for her family. Children’s Futures is a program for all pregnant women and new parents living in the City of Trenton, to ensure that their families get excellent health care and support.

Giovanni required a collaborative treatment to ensure his developmental growth. Children’s Futures staff administered the Ages and Stages Developmental Screening coupled with a hearing and vision screening. Based on the results, Giovanni was referred for evaluation and assessment. He was provided with one-toone home visits by Early Intervention. During this time it was discovered that Giovanni had a hearing problem and an appointment was made with a recommended ENT specialist. The Mercer County Special Child Health Services, the Trenton Board of Education and Children’s Futures collaborated on the treatment for Giovanni and also to secure the family a living facility.

Jordan presented to St. Francis as a three-year-old who was not toilet trained and, therefore, not able to participate in pre-school services. He exhibited behavioral problems and was unable to interact appropriately with other children.

Carmen and the staff at Children’s Futures and St. Francis feel certain that Giovanni, without intervention, would surely have developed more behavioral problems including increased stressors, depression and mood swings.

In November 2006, Carmen and her husband came to this country and started their family. Following the birth of their two sons, Jordan and Giovanni, all were living in a bedroom in a friend’s house. The living conditions were poor, and Carmen knew that her sons, ages three and one-and-a-half, were suffering. Their isolated living arrangement was producing behavioral issues.

Carmen and her boys continue to attend group meetings, with the support and guidance of Children’s Futures and St. Francis Medical Center.

Today he talks, sings and dances with spirit and exuberance. Carmen and her boys continue to attend group meetings, with the support and guidance of Children’s Futures and St. Francis Medical Center. Carmen’s eyes continue to glisten as she ends her narrative. This story began as a tale of despair and uncertainty three long years ago. Today her voice and words exude potential for her children and hope for her family.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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St. James Mercy Health System

A Recipe for Hope A certified saucier chef, Judy loved creating with her hands. But last summer, she had to put her life on hold. Judy aspirated and arrived at her local hospital, suffering kidney and liver failure, and was put on a ventilator for weeks. Needing intense rehab for his wife, Norm found hope at McAuley Manor at Mercycare, a division of St. James Mercy. “It was the only nearby ventilatorequipped facility … that also provided dialysis if needed,” he said. Judy was admitted in September. She could not walk, talk or breathe independently. Others had given up, but the McAuley Manor staff saw her potential. “They got me to move,” Judy said. By the end of October she was off the ventilator and could talk for the first time in months. Next was walking. “She was at McAuley Manor almost two months before getting out of bed,” said Norm. “It was a really slow process … not something that happened overnight.” Finally, Judy was able to stand. Her goal was to get home by Christmas and to continue raising her four-year-old granddaughter. “Judy’s will to get better was unbelievable,” said one caregiver. “She tested us; but we all loved her because every day she improved and got stronger.”

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Judy, pictured with husband Norm behind her, was discharged from McAuley Manor on December 8, and sent home, where she is happily busy cooking and caring for her young granddaughter.

If it wasn’t for McAuley Manor I would not be alive … I would not have made it.

After nearly three months, Judy was discharged on December 8. “A lot of it was the drive and determination among the employees,” said Norm. “They cared about getting her home.”

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

But as one nurse said, “Judy helped us too … she gave us hope.” “She’s a success story that’s still in the making,” said Norm. Judy concurred. “If it wasn’t for McAuley Manor I would not be alive … I would not have made it,” she said. Now she is cooking again. “I’ve got my hands back … been cooking up a storm … and filling up my freezer!” McAuley Manor …“was sent to me from God.”


St. Joseph of the Pines

C.A.R.E. is a Child’s Best Friend One of St. Joseph of the Pines’ community benefit programs involves the services of not only St. Joseph associates, but also its four-legged, specially trained volunteers. Moore County Schools adopted the Canine Assisted Reading Education (C.A.R.E.) program in April 2006 as part of Luther and Friends Canine Visitor’s Bureau. St. Joseph’s Jeralie Andrews, director of volunteer services, and her dog Darby were part of the third graduating class. They have been working in Robbins Elementary School in a rural section of the county for two years. The mission of C.A.R.E. is to expand a child’s interest in reading, laying the groundwork for a lifetime of education, ultimately leading to a higher quality of life. Mrs. Dunlap, Robbins Elementary School’s second grade teacher, said that while the therapy reading program has been quite beneficial to all of her students, one student in particular has formed a special bond with Darby and looks forward to her weekly visits. “This program has instilled confidence in Kyle as he takes risks with reading in a relaxed, comfortable environment with Darby,” she said. “I would recommend all schools implement this program into their reading instruction.” Second-grader Kyle is one example of the program’s success. Dunlap explained how C.A.R.E. has helped to calm Kyle

Kyle sits quietly reading with Darby by his side for encouragement. Stroking the dog’s fur, Kyle relaxes ... which helps him read better.

and allow him to focus on the task at hand, while motivating him to read more. He can now be found quietly reading, flipping pages, while his hand eases along Darby’s coat for reassurance. He relaxes, feels comforted and works harder to control his activity level and urge to talk. “A canine reading buddy doesn’t judge a child’s reading ability; but rather, a good therapy dog will give his or her full attention to the child,” Andrews said. “Darby is a good ambassador. She shows the children how a properly trained and cared-for dog can behave. One of her most notable moves is the nudge with her nose under a child’s hand.” Kyle’s mother, Paula, also agreed. “My son Kyle really enjoys reading with Darby. Knowing he will have his turn reading with her makes him want to read better,” said Paula. “Kyle loves animals and by interacting with Darby and making her a part of his reading program, we feel he

The mission of C.A.R.E. is to expand a child’s interest in reading, laying the groundwork for a lifetime of education, ultimately leading to a higher quality of life.

has been doing much better. Darby helps calm kids that might be having a bad day so they can read better.” Andrews said that Darby brings the best out in the children who read to her. “They learn they have to project and read clearly for her to hear them,” she said. “And I’m there to help if they stumble on a word, to check their comprehension and to teach the proper way to care for a dog.”

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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St. Mary Medical Center

Providing Hope for a Better Life Edna, a 27-year-old refugee from Liberia and Ghana, came to America to make a better life for her two children who remained back in her homeland. But things did not turn out as expected. Upon her arrival in the United States, Edna landed a job—with medical benefits—in housekeeping. However, she soon found out she was pregnant with her third child and was unable to continue working; so she lost her insurance coverage. While her husband was back in Ghana with the other children, she was left alone to care for herself and their unborn child. Unemployed, uninsured and isolated from family back in Ghana, Edna sought help from St. Mary Community Ministries. Thirty weeks into her pregnancy, she benefited from the prenatal care provided by Mother Bachmann Maternity Center. Nutritionists there helped Edna manage her gestational diabetes through better diet. Edna also made use of the free shuttle van service, which provided transportation to and from her medical appointments. She was counseled by a St. Mary social worker and received case management services from Catholic Social Services.

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Edna and her young son now live in a transitional apartment supported by St. Mary Community Ministries.

“Thanks to St. Mary, I delivered a healthy baby,” explained Edna. “They helped me find a place to stay—God bless them.” Edna—who at one point was virtually homeless, spending days at the mall and nights at a

Thanks to St. Mary, I delivered a healthy baby. They helped me find a place to stay— God bless them.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

train station—now lives in one of the 10 transitional apartments supported by St. Mary Community Ministries in partnership with the Bucks County Housing Group. She takes her infant son to the St. Mary Children’s Health Center for medical care. As for her future, Edna has a positive outlook: “I see myself very happy and working. I want all my children and my husband together, and will do everything possible to make that happen.” “Edna is diligently working on her goals,” said Lunda Miller, R.N., of St. Mary Community Ministries. “When I saw her last, she appeared confident, hopeful for the future, and grateful for her blessings.”


St. Mary’s Health Care System

Infant Bereavement Service Helps Families Cope In June 2008, Christine was overjoyed to learn that she was pregnant. However, just 11 weeks later that joy turned to grief—an ultrasound found no heartbeat. Wanting to ensure that the remains of their baby were treated with dignity and respect, Christine and her husband entered St. Mary’s Infant Bereavement Service. “The service is wonderful,” Christine said. “If you have a loss, you always feel that your baby is part of you. It’s honoring life as it should be honored.” According to Family Birth Center nurse Andrea Johnson, R.N., the new service grew out of the staff’s desire to go beyond standards set by Georgia law, which says that the remains of babies miscarried or stillborn at less than 20 weeks can be handled as medical waste—unless the parents want to work with a funeral home. “Every life is valuable,” Andrea said. “We felt our Mission and Values call us to provide another option for those families.” The staff approached Lord and Stephens Funeral Home East, which agreed to be a partner in creating the service. The funeral home donated a burial site and a marker, and provides cremation services at no charge to the families.

Christine visits the site at Athens Memory Gardens where her pre-born baby and others have been ceremoniously laid to rest. “It means a lot to us that our baby is remembered,” she said.

Each year on the Sunday closest to All Saints Day, families and members of St. Mary’s staff gather at Athens Memory Gardens. At the first service, held in 2008, the message was simple: We care.

The Lord called me before my birth; from within the womb God called me by name. – Isaiah 49:1

“It means a lot to us that our baby is remembered,” Christine said. Today, Christine, who is a nurse in St. Mary’s Women’s and Children’s Unit, counsels women who have suffered a fetal loss, sharing her own experiences and telling them about the Infant Bereavement Service. “I’ve probably signed up 15 people,” she said. “They have all been very receptive to it. From the day you learn you are pregnant you begin bonding with your baby, so it’s a real loss that should be honored.”

Inscription on the memorial at Athens Memory Gardens

“As a Catholic hospital, we feel it is essential to honor each and every life,” said Anita Razor, R.N., family birth center manager. “Our Infant Bereavement Service is an important way of comforting grieving families and giving them some closure. It helps them move on, knowing that their loss is not forgotten.”

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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St. Peter’s Health Care Services

Free Cancer Screening Program Saves Lives When Kathy started feeling pain in her back last year, she immediately worried that her ovarian cancer was recurring. Not long after that, Kathy noticed a newspaper advertisement for the Cancer Screening Program at St. Peter’s Health Care Services. The program offers free cancer screenings for people with little or no health insurance. “I would have put it off because I didn’t have the money to pay for insurance,” said Kathy, 49, a single mother with five children at home. To her great relief, the free ovarian cancer exam at St. Peter’s Family Health Center in downtown Albany and a subsequent CT scan at St. Peter’s Hospital showed no sign of a recurring cancer. “With my history [of ovarian cancer], it feels good to know that I don’t have a malignancy,” Kathy said. “Everything looks good.” Kathy participated in a stateand federally-funded program which targets breast, cervical, colorectal and prostate cancer. Identifying and encouraging people to attend screenings and educational events can be a challenge. Therefore, many people are diagnosed only after a more-advanced cancer causes symptoms that cannot be ignored.

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Kathy, a single mother of five, participated in St. Peter’s Cancer Screening Program after worrying that her ovarian cancer had come back.

For the past year, St. Peter’s has been the contract holder for the Cancer Services Program and regional coordinator of the cancer education, outreach and prevention services offered throughout 30 hospitals, private organizations and physicians in

The Cancer Screening Program can save lives by letting us bridge the gap between proper health care and those people who have too little or no insurance coverage.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

the Albany, N.Y., area. When state funding of this program was threatened last year, St. Peter’s Cancer Care Center helped organize a lobbying campaign which saved the Cancer Screening Program from a mid-year cut. “Working with the St. Peter’s Hospital Foundation and the staff of the American Cancer Society, St. Peter’s has been able to bring cancer screenings and education to people who lack adequate health insurance,” said Wayne Holmen, director of St. Peter’s Cancer Care Center. “Time is critical in the detection and treatment of cancer. The Cancer Screening Program can save lives by letting us bridge the gap between proper health care and those people who have too little or no insurance coverage.”


2008

Catholic Health East Overview & Statistics

2008 Cost of Care for the Poor

$ 89,998,793

29.9%

Cost of Community Benefit Programs

$ 104,167,591

34.5%

Unpaid Costs of Medicaid Programs

$ 107,331,298

35.6%

TOTAL

$ 301,497,682

100%

Cost of Care for the Poor includes the cost of charity care granted in the provision of care for uninsured patients who qualify for free care, uninsured patients who qualify for discounts and lowincome underinsured patients who qualify for discounted or forgiven charges for amounts that are the patient’s responsibility.

2008 Community Benefit Care for Cost Mix Unpaid Costs the Poor

of Medicaid Programs $107,331,298

$89,998,793

29.9%

35.6%

Cost of Community Benefit Programs includes community health education such as classes, support groups, and self-help programs; community-based clinical services such as screenings, one-time or

Community Benefit Programs $104,167,591

34.5%

occasional clinics, free clinics and mobile clinics; health care support services; cash, grants and in-kind goods and services donated without compensation; and volunteer service hours of health system employees. Unpaid Costs of Medicaid Programs includes shortfalls related to Medicaid, State Children’s Health Insurance Programs (SCHIP), public and/or indigent care (medical programs for low-income or medically indigent patients) and local and state government programs that reimburse health care providers for persons not eligible for Medicaid.

CHE’s 2008 Community Benefit information has been calculated and presented in accordance with the Catholic Health Association’s A Guide for Planning and Reporting Community Benefits.

Overview of Key Catholic Health East Services* Number of Facilities 34

Staffed Beds 7,724

Long Term Acute Care Hospitals

4

139

Long Term Care (Hospital-Based & Freestanding Facilities)

25

2,802

Assisted Living Facilities

14

866

Continuing Care Retirement Communities

4

669

Psychiatric and Rehabilitation Facilities

8

316

Home Health/Hospice Agencies

32

1,532,874 visits**

Medicaid Managed Care Programs

1

2 million (covered lives)**

Acute Care Hospitals

*As of April 2009 **2008 Statistics

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Across the System

I

n addition to the outstanding community benefit programs and services offered throughout CHE, many of our health care facilities and clinicians are also recognized locally, regionally and nationally for their excellence in care. From Top 100 hospital lists to attaining magnet designation for nursing to clinical rankings in the top 10 percent of hospitals nationwide, our organizations are well known for their dedication to quality. A sampling of some of the achievements, accomplishments and milestones reached by CHE affiliates throughout 2008 follows.

Hundreds of CHE leaders participated in CHE’s Excellence in Ministry program, part of ministry formation at the Institute for Excellence in Ministry. Groups of 30 colleagues meet for two days, twice a year, over a period of three years. Through presentations, story-telling, reflection and sharing, Excellence in Ministry offers a dynamic growth process involving the personal experiences of participants, the Catholic tradition as it affects health care, and the demands of today’s health care environment. Saint Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta was recognized by the Magnet Recognition Program® for the fourth consecutive time for excellence in nursing services. Designated by the American Nursing Credentialing Center, an affiliate of the American Nursing Association, Magnet is considered the gold standard of nursing care. Only one other hospital worldwide has been recognized four consecutive times.

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enhances the availability of needed medical services and programs for residents of Greene County. CHE utilizes the Joint Commission’s Core Measure Sets as the primary measure by which to track our progress in improving the quality of care throughout our health system. Our goal is to be in the top 10 percent nationwide in these quality measures. These well-defined measures can be compared with all other hospitals in the nation. In 2008, CHE achieved its goal of moving our entire system-wide performance at least 50 percent of the way from our 2007 baseline to the 90th percentile level of performance.

In August 2008, Saint Michael’s Medical Center, a 357-bed regional tertiary care, teaching and research center located in Newark, N.J., was welcomed into the CHE family. With this addition, all four CHE facilities in New Jersey (the others are Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton, and Lourdes Medical Center of Burlington County in Willingboro) formed CHE New Jersey and now serve three of the state’s largest cities and constitute New Jersey’s largest Catholic health care system.

Mercy Health System of Maine held a public grand opening of its new Fore River campus in September, marking the beginning of a new chapter in the history of health care in greater Portland. This 151,000 square-foot facility is designed as a short-stay inpatient and full-service outpatient surgical and obstetrical facility. Minnie G. Boswell Memorial Hospital, an acute care critical access hospital located in rural Georgia, was acquired by Saint Joseph’s Health System in March 2008. Now known as Saint Joseph’s East Georgia, this acute care critical access hospital

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

In October 2008, Catholic Health’s Mercy Hospital of Buffalo broke ground on a new state-of-the-art emergency department. The $32 million construction project features a 46,000 square-foot addition located along the front of the hospital that will triple the size of the current ER facility. Currently operating one of the busiest emergency departments in the region, Mercy Hospital is responding to a critical community need for expanded emergency services. Saint Joseph’s Health System launched the International College of Robotic Surgery (ICRS), a non-profit training center for robotic surgical teams from around the world. Under the leadership of two of the country’s leading robotic cardiothoracic surgeons, Douglas Murphy, M.D., and Sudhir Srivastava, M.D., ICRS will provide training for all da Vinci ® Surgical System robotic surgery specialties, beginning with intracardiac and cardiac revascularization. St. Francis Hospital in Wilmington, Del., launched The Vascular Institute at St. Francis Hospital; it offers a multidisciplinary team approach for the early diagnosis and treatment of all forms of peripheral vascular disease.


Across the System Health Care Decisions Day, a nationwide event focused on raising awareness about the importance of advance care planning and educating communities about tools such as living wills and medical power of attorney.

Journey Through the Body ® is a hands-on display of larger-than-life models of human body parts created and maintained by St. Peter’s Health Care Services (Albany, N.Y.). Now in its 11th year, Journey Through The Body allows children to examine and, in some cases, travel through models of select parts of the human body to learn about their functions, components, strengths and limitations. The annual event, which is free to the public, is held over a two-day period at a local mall; the 2008 event attracted over 10,000 students and other visitors. In April 2008, Mercy Behavioral Health, part of Pittsburgh Mercy Health System, opened the first Fairweather Lodge in Allegheny County. Developed by Dr. George Fairweather in California in 1963 as a way to integrate people recovering from mental illness into the community, this psychosocial rehabilitation model combines congregate living with collaborative employment. The underlying principle is that people achieve success by supporting one another, by working with each other, and by making their own decisions. Members of the MBH Fairweather Lodge started and now operate a commercial cleaning business that provides over 20 hours of paid employment per person per week.

Lourdes Health System (Camden, N.J.) was one of many CHE affiliates that participated in the first annual National

convenience and personalized attention; as well as improved meal accuracy for specialized diets.

Mercy Hospital of Miami became the latest CHE hospital to launch a Patient Navigator Program. This comprehensive initiative, launched in concert with the American Cancer Society, is designed to assist individual cancer patients in navigating the often complex health care system. The program provides free, on-site guidance for cancer patients, survivors and caregivers and links those affected by cancer to local education and support specialists known as “navigators” who serve as personal guides for patients as they face the psychological, emotional and financial challenges along their cancer journey. It works to bridge the gap between initial cancer diagnosis, treatment and successful survivorship, with a focus on the medically underserved.

BayCare Health System (Clearwater, Fla.) became the second health care system in the country to use biometric palm scanning technology to register patients. Its Patient Secure Identity system uses near-infrared light to scan the unique vein pattern in a person’s hand, streamlining and improving the accuracy of the patient identification process and minimizing the amount of personal information a patient needs to communicate either verbally or in written form during registration. Maxis Health System’s Marian Community Hospital (Carbondale, Pa.) and Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania’s Mercy Suburban Hospital both introduced Personal Choice Dining, an innovative meal preparation and delivery system. Each patient is assigned a host/hostess, who meets with the patient up to six times per day to personally review meal options that will be compliant with their prescribed diets. Benefits to patients include greater

The healing power of music is recognized throughout the health care industry; several CHE facilities sponsor music therapy programs for their patients and residents. One example is at Mercy Community Health’s Saint Mary Home (West Hartford, Conn.), where the department of therapeutic recreation strives to create a comprehensive menu of activities planning, including frequent musical performances for residents. CHE’s Comprehensive Care Management initiative is a valuesbased, person-centered, collaborative system of support and caring that promotes health-enhancing relationships through efficient and effective care … with the goal of optimizing each individual’s health potential through informed decision-making, effective communication and process facilitation, resulting in the right care delivered in the right setting at the right time. Launched in early 2008, Phase I is linked initially to the foundational activity of implementing MIDAS+ software across CHE, which will transform hospital case management processes system-wide. Three pilot projects were initiated; program objectives included the creation of value through enhanced care coordination and improved alignment of incentives, to impact access to timely and appropriate care (and to enhance the quality and efficiency of that care), and to measure and document outcomes and learnings.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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Across the System St. Mary Medical Center (Langhorne, Pa.) and Sisters of Providence Health System (Springfield, Mass.) were among the CHE affiliates who launched “quality report cards” on their websites in 2008. This information is designed to update local communities on the hospitals’ comprehensive quality and safety programs, and shows how these facilities perform as compared to internal and external benchmarks and standards.

The nation’s nursing shortage, as well a recent study reporting that more than one in four first-year nurses change jobs after their first year of work, reinforces the importance of nurse retention for all hospitals. To help address this issue, Holy Cross Hospital (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) introduced its Nurse Residency program, a one-year program designed to ease the transition to practice for new graduate nurses in their first professional role. The program, comprised of structured seminars, small group discussion and case studies, was developed by the University HealthSystem Consortium in collaboration with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and is now available at 51 sites throughout 27 states. The program has reduced attrition among first-year nurses, and is proving to be an excellent recruiting tool as well.

St. James Mercy Health System (Hornell, N.Y.) joined several other CHE acute care hospitals in implementing a bar code medication administration

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(BCMA) system in 2008. Bar code technology helps ensure that the right dosage of the right medication is given to the right individual at the right time.

work) and Best Practices in Spirituality (a bi-monthly coaching conference call to support those who provide spiritual care to patients and families).

With an estimated 400,000 preventable medication errors occurring in U.S. hospitals each year, CHE has placed great emphasis on its BCMA initiative systemwide. Utilizing Meditech’s Barcode Medication Verification application software and Siemens’ Medication Administration Check application software, CHE IT colleagues led BCMA installations at several facilities in 2008. The system will improve communication between the hospital pharmacy and nursing staff, improve efficiency of the prescription order entry process, and help the hospital comply with standards and patient safety goals. All CHE hospitals are scheduled to have bar code medication administration systems in place by the end of 2009.

In October 2008, St. Mary’s Health Care System (Athens, Ga.) broke ground on a much-needed facility dedicated exclusively to the treatment of Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. The creation of this 34-bed facility will help meet the rising need for safe, compassionate dementia care in the community. The new service will incorporate the latest innovations for dementia care and will feature facilities that are designed to maximize safety and comfort, decrease stress and encourage visits from friends and loved ones. It will include several twobedroom suites, making it possible for spouses to remain together.

Spirituality in the Workplace, developed by CHE’s mission integration department, is the practice of reflection and celebration that reminds colleagues of the meaning of life and the dignity of our work. A series of structures and processes that provides colleagues with the opportunity to realize the sacredness of everyday encounters, Spirituality in the Workplace aims to connect meaning and purpose in the work environment. Two new offerings initiated in 2008 include Spirit at Work (monthly meetings for colleagues to take part in conversations about life experiences and to reflect together on the meaning of life and

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

Therapy Village offers a unique opportunity for patients to relearn routine daily activities in an environment that will resemble what they will encounter after leaving St. Joseph of the Pines (Southern Pines, N.C.). It accommodates patients with joint replacements, congestive heart disease, prosthetic limbs, debilitating arthritis or neurological impairment. Therapy Village’s walls embrace life-sized daily living apparatuses, such as automobiles, grocery store shelves, a putting green, a mini theater, bank and post office areas and a restaurant setting. By 2020, there will be nearly 55 million people age 65 and over in the United States … representing a 36 percent increase in just a little more than a decade. This growing portion of the


Across the System

Our Health Ministry:

Catholic Health East Sponsors and Organizations

Our Mission...

Catholic Health East is a community of persons committed to being a transforming, healing presence within the communities we serve.

To effect this mission: • We treat all persons whom we serve and with whom we work with respect and compassion, calling forth their best human potential; • We provide a full range of services that support healthy communities, including quality medical care and holistic approaches to healing body, spirit and mind; • We collaborate with others who share a common mission and vision; • We continually seek ways to assure access to services to persons most in need; • We identify and develop leaders in Catholic health ministry; and • We advocate public policies and initiatives, particularly those in the area of healthcare, that ensure quality of life for all.

Our Core Values...

Our Vision... Inspired by our Mission and committed to our Core Values, Catholic Health East will achieve excellence in all we do, creating a system that empowers communities and individuals to achieve optimal health and quality of life.

population will demand continuing care services (long-term care, assisted living, home care, etc.) at a rate far exceeding the current availability of these services. To harness and share the continuing care expertise that exists in our system, CHE created the Continuing Care Management Services Network (CCMSN), in which a team of continuing care experts works collaboratively with continuing care leaders throughout CHE to help support and enhance the growth of continuing care services. A related organization, Catholic Health East Senior Services Management (CHESSM), was formed to provide consultative and management services to organizations and facilities not affiliated with CHE.

recycling program: oil used for cooking in the hospital’s kitchen is sent to an outside company which processes it for bio-diesel use in automobiles.

Catholic Health East Sponsors

St. Francis Medical Center (Trenton, N.J.) was recognized in September 2008 by the PatientCentered Care Institute, a division of NRC-Picker, as a performance leader in radiation oncology services and as one of the best hospitals in the nation at providing patient-centered care. The award was based on survey data collected by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ survey of “Hospital Patient Experiences” as well as other inpatient and outpatient survey data.

Franciscan Sisters of Allegany Allegany, New York

Nazareth Hospital, part of Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania, was the second community hospital in the country to achieve certification for stroke care from The Joint Commission. The hospital has received state and national recognition for its continued excellence in stroke care.

Courage We dare to take the risks our faith demands of us.

Integrity We keep our word and are faithful to who we say we are.

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Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

Sisters of St. Joseph St. Augustine, Florida Sisters of Mercy of the Americas: Mid-Atlantic Community Merion, Pennsylvania New York, Pennsylvania, Pacific West Community Buffalo, New York Northeast Community Cumberland, Rhode Island South Central Community Belmont, North Carolina

Catholic Health East Regional Health Corporations and Joint Operating Agreements

Lourdes Health System Camden, New Jersey Maxis Health System Carbondale, Pennsylvania

Mercy Health System of Maine Portland, Maine Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania Conshohocken, Pennsylvania Mercy Hospital Miami, Florida Mercy Medical Daphne, Alabama Pittsburgh Mercy Health System Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Justice

We care for and strengthen the ministry and all resources entrusted to us.

Sisters of Providence Holyoke, Massachusetts

Mercy Community Health West Hartford, Connecticut

We demonstrate our connectedness to each other through inclusive and compassionate relationships.

Stewardship

Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill Greensburg, Pennsylvania

Holy Cross Hospital Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Community

We give priority to those whom society ignores.

Hope Ministries Newtown Square, Pennsylvania

Catholic Health Buffalo, New York

We believe that each person is a manifestation of the sacredness of human life.

Commitment To Those Who Are Poor

Franciscan Sisters of St. Joseph Hamburg, New York

BayCare Health System Clearwater, Florida

Reverence For Each Person

We advocate for a society in which all can realize their full potential and achieve the common good.

Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary Scranton, Pennsylvania

CHE facilities have increasingly demonstrated their commitment to recycling and other “go green” efforts. In 2008, Nazareth Hospital (part of Mercy Health System of Southeastern Pennsylvania), earned the EPA Energy Star Award for its implementation of an energy conservation program that included the installation of more energyefficient technology throughout its facility; the hospital joined an elite group of 66 hospitals nationwide that achieved this distinction. Many CHE facilities implemented or enhanced their paper and supply recycling efforts. One facility (Mercy Medical Center, part of Sisters of Providence Health System) initiated a unique kitchen oil

To create and nurture a quieter healing environment for its patients, Sisters of Providence Health System’s Mercy Medical Center implemented a unique noise reduction initiative in 2008. Devices known as “Yacker Trackers” were installed near nurses stations on patient floors throughout the hospital. The devices, equipped with sound sensors, resemble traffic lights; they shine from green to yellow to red, as noise levels increase and reach unacceptable levels. Mercy Magic, a dedicated workforce of volunteers for Mercy Medical (Daphne, Ala.) was honored in May 2008 by the American Hospital Association, receiving its national Hospital Award for Volunteer Excellence award. Mercy Magic volunteers help meet the needs of Mercy’s pediatric rehabilitation patients, and are involved in Guardian Angel, a program that help funds pediatric home care for young patients in need.

Saint Joseph’s Health System Atlanta, Georgia Saint Michael’s Medical Center Newark, New Jersey Sisters of Providence Health System Springfield, Massachusetts St. Francis Hospital Wilmington, Delaware St. Francis Medical Center Trenton, New Jersey St. James Mercy Health System Hornell, New York St. Joseph of the Pines Southern Pines, North Carolina St. Mary Medical Center Langhorne, Pennsylvania St. Mary’s Health Care System Athens, Georgia St. Peter’s Health Care Services Albany, New York

Catholic Health East Supportive Health Corporations Allegany Franciscan Ministries, Inc. Global Health Ministry Stella Maris Insurance Company, Ltd.

Catholic Health East Community Benefit Annual Report 2008

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CHE's 2008 Community Benefit Annual Report  

Catholic Health East's community benefit for ministries from Maine to Florida for calendar year 2008.

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