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POSITION PAPER ON

Garda Staffing Levels IN COUNTY KILDARE

Catherine Murphy TD | December 2013


Garda Staffing Levels in Kildare MAIN ARGUMENT

The present ratio of Garda staffing resources to division population around Ireland is greatly unbalanced from division to division. The deficit in service provision is particularly pronounced in certain divisions compared to the national ratio, which can be seen to be clustered in the Greater Dublin commuter belt, and to a slightly lesser extent in southern Leinster. The deficit in service provision can also be observed in areas with consistently high population growth levels since the 1970s. With the exception of the Dublin and Limerick areas, there appears to be only a weak connection between recorded crime statistics and levels of service.

SUMMARY POINTS TO NOTE Certain areas suffer a severely disproportionate service compared to others. The most recent available statistics show that Divisions Kildare and Meath fare worst when population to Garda resources are taken in consideration. Kildare has a rate of 661 persons per Garda, and Meath 628 persons per Garda. This compares drastically with Sligo/Leitrim, which has a ratio of 317 persons per Garda – almost double the level of service currently in Kildare.

The population of the Sligo/Leitrim division is 46% of the total population of Kildare (2011), yet the division has almost the same number of GardaĂ­ stationed (318 in Kildare and 307 in Sligo/Leitrim).

Using the most recently available statistics, if the same rate in Kildare of 661 persons per Garda was applied uniformly across the entire country, the force would need to shed approximately 4,800 GardaĂ­. This equates to roughly 40% of the present national force.

Document researched & compiled by Lauren Kurtz


The statistics show a level of divergence that cannot necessarily be accounted for by selected crime rates alone, aside from the areas of Limerick and Dublin. In direct comparisons on selected common offences between Kildare and Sligo/Leitrim, Mayo and Clare, no apparent reason for maintaining such differing staffing levels is clear.

Detected incidents of the selected common crimes reveal either a similar or significantly worse level of criminality in Kildare to other divisions. When rates of detected burglaries are compared (2012) Kildare has the fourth highest rate in the country. Additionally, Kildare has the fifth highest rate of robbery, extortion and hijacking offences in the country and the eighth highest rate of theft.

In contrast, Kildare appears to have very low rates of crimes that are only reported when Garda officers are present to witness the offense. Drug offences and certain traffic offences often go unreported unless an officer is present and witnesses the crime occurring. This can lead to the belief that crime rates are low when in reality the crimes are going undetected. This leaves communities with inadequate Garda resources, like Kildare, vulnerable to criminals.

It is apparent that the worst affected areas in terms of inadequate Garda resources are also the same areas which have experienced rapid population growth. The populations of Kildare and Meath have grown 42% and 43% respectively in the 20 year period from 1991 to 2011.

Kildare in particular has experienced high population growth consistently from the 1960s to the present day, not solely in later years like much of the rest of the country. The population of Kildare rose from 64,420 in 1961 to 210,312 in 2011 (+326%) one of the highest growth rates in the country over that period.

Over the same period, the population of Sligo rose by 11,832 to 65,393 (+22%), the population of Leitrim fell by 1,672 to 31,798 (-5%), that of Clare rose by 58.5% and that of Mayo rose by 5.8%.

It is also apparent that a large variance exists in terms of the expenditure across each Garda region. This reflects the uneven distribution of resources.


A. Geographic Representation of Garda Staffing Ratios (2013)

The commuter belt counties of Kildare and Meath are worst affected, with significant problems in adjacent counties such as Offaly, Laois, Kilkenny and Carlow.


B. Persons per Garda by Division (2013)

Division CAVAN / MONAGHAN CLARE CORK CITY CORK COUNTY NORTH CORK COUNTY WEST DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION EAST DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION NORTH DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION NORTH CENTRAL DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION SOUTH DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION SOUTH EAST DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION WEST DONEGAL GALWAY KERRY KILDARE KILKENNY/CARLOW LAOIS / OFFALY LIMERICK LOUTH MAYO MEATH ROSCOMMON / LONGFORD SLIGO / LEITRIM TIPPERARY WATERFORD WESTMEATH WEXFORD WICKLOW Totals

Total Gardaí (2013) 335 290 663 301 302 415 726

Combined figures for Dublin and Cork (2013)

133,666 117,196

Persons per Garda (2013) 399.00 404.12

1,266

519,032

409.98

3,775

1,273,069

337.24

161,137 250,653 145,502 210,312 150,031 157,246 191,809 122,897 130,638 184,135 103,065 97,191 158,754 113,795 86,164 145,320 136,640 4,588,252

386.42 435.16 488.26 661.36 517.35 540.36 323.46 426.73 428.32 628.45 362.90 316.58 431.40 415.31 344.66 569.88 409.10 402.23

Population (2011)

636 581 689 728 417 576 298 318 290 291 593 288 305 293 284 307 368 274 250 255 334 11,407


C. Garda Resources

Division CAVAN / MONAGHAN CLARE CORK CITY CORK COUNTY NORTH CORK COUNTY WEST DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION EAST

Total Gardaí (2013) 335 290 663 301 302 415

Persons per Garda 399.00 404.12 409.98

49 44 113 39 46 52

Community Gardaí 6 7 27 8 4 30

Garda Reserve 24 15 67 26 30 21

Garda Juvenile Liaison Officers 2 2 7 3 2 6

Vehicles

DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION NORTH

726

109

68

58

12

DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION NORTH CENTRAL

636

65

135

63

4

DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION SOUTH

581

78

54

48

10

DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION SOUTH EAST

689

68

58

75

6

DUBLIN METROPOLITAN REGION WEST

728

106

69

64

11

DONEGAL GALWAY KERRY KILDARE KILKENNY/CARLOW

417 576 298 318 290

386.42 435.16 488.26 661.36 517.35

58 79 38 46 51

30 18 7 0 99

30 69 35 33 39

3 4 4 3 2

LAOIS / OFFALY LIMERICK LOUTH MAYO MEATH ROSCOMMON / LONGFORD SLIGO / LEITRIM TIPPERARY WATERFORD WESTMEATH WEXFORD WICKLOW

291 593 288 305 293 284

540.36 323.46 426.73 428.32 628.45 362.90

47 70 45 52 53 40

11 62 16 3 12 8

32 54 51 35 39 20

2 6 3 2 3 2

307 368 274 250 255 334

316.58 431.40 415.31 344.66 569.88 409.10

48 50 50 42 42 50

9 90 51 11 13 18

25 40 38 29 30 39

2 3 4 2 3 4

337.24


D. 20 Year Population Growth levels by Area

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

122,656 105,370 102,069 110,808

June 2013 Garda Strength 318 293 255 291

150,031

114,577

24%

290

517 *

145,502 250,653 158,754 130,638 122,897 113,795 519,032 136,640 117,196

121,894 180,364 132,772 110,713 90,724 91,624 410,369 97,265 90,918

16% 28% 16% 15% 26% 19% 21% 29% 22%

298 576 368 305 288 274 1,266 334 290

488 * 435 431 428 427 415 410 409 404

133,369

104,089

15%

335

399

86,164

61,880

28%

250

386

161,137

128,117

20%

417

386

103,065

82,193

20%

284

363

1,273,069 191,809 97,191

1,025,304 161,956 80,057

19% 16% 18%

1991 Census

Kildare Meath Wexford Laois / Offaly Carlow / Kilkenny Kerry Galway Tipperary Mayo Louth Waterford Cork Wicklow Clare Cavan / Monaghan Westmeath

210,312 184,135 145,320 157,246

Donegal Longford / Roscommon Dublin Limerick Sligo / Leitrim

Garda Division 1 2 3 4

20-Year Percentage Growth 42% 43% 30% 30%

2011 Census

3,775 593 307 Average

Persons per Garda 661 * 628 * 570 * 540 *

337 323 317 440


E. Population Growth in Selected Counties, 1961 -2011

250,000

200,000 Kildare Meath

150,000

Leitrim Sligo

100,000

Mayo 50,000

Clare

0

1961

1971

1981

1986

1991

1996

2002

2006

2011

Kildare Meath Leitrim Sligo Mayo Clare

1961 1971 1981 64,420 71,977 104,122 65,122 71,729 95,419 33,470 28,360 27,609 53,561 50,275 55,474 123,330 109,525 114,766 73,702 75,008 87,567

1986 1991 1996 2002 2006 2011 116,247 122,656 134,992 163,944 186,335 210,312 103,881 105,370 109,732 134,005 162,831 184,135 27,035 25,301 25,057 25,799 28,950 31,798 56,046 54,756 55,821 58,200 60,894 65,393 115,184 110,713 111,524 117,446 123,839 130,552 91,344 90,918 94,006 103,277 110,950 116,885

State

2,818,341

3,540,643

2,978,248

3,443,405

3,525,719

3,626,087

3,917,203

4,239,848

4,581,269


F. Selected Offences, 2012

10 Counties with the Highest Rates of Selected Offences (Numbers not in bold are not in the top ten) County

Persons per Garda (2012*)

Robbery** rate per 100,000 people

Theft Rate per 100,000 people

Burglary*** Rate per 100,000 people

Dublin (combined) Kildare Kilkenny/Carlow Limerick Louth Meath Tipperary Waterford Westmeath Wexford Wicklow

324.05 665.54 500.10 309.87 415.19 622.08 422.22 392.40 341.92 542.24 405.46

153.0 43.3 32.0 51.1 78.9 27.7 21.4 73.8 25.5

2,963.3 1,403.2 1,217.7 2,114.1 1,664 1,202.4

855.8 823.1 689.2 635.5 933.3 664.7

876.2

436.5

1,863.9 1,458.8 1,326.0 1,621.8

667.9 645.3 739.1 862.1

10.3

35.1

*The ratio from 2012 was used because that is when the crimes were committed **Includes Robbery, Extortion and Hijacking offences ***Burglary includes burglary, aggravated burglary, and possession with intent to burgle

Rates of Selected Offenses 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500

Robbery Rate per 100,000 people

1000

Theft Rate per 100,000 people

Burglary Rate per 100,000 people 500 0


ACCURACY OF REPORTED RATES These types of crimes are reported and recorded even when they occur when the GardaĂ­ are not present at the time of the incident. Thus almost all of these incidents are reported and the rates are an accurate reflection of how much of this type of crime occurs However, certain offences are only reported when Garda officers are present to witness the crime. Most drug offences are only recorded when a Garda officer witnesses them because all those involved are all breaking the law and do not want to involve the Garda. The same is true for people who drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Unless a Garda officer is present to pull drivers over, these dangerous drivers are unreported. As a result, many of these types of offences can go unrecorded when there are not enough Garda present in a county and these types of crimes appear to be decreasing.

4 Counties with the Highest Rate of Selected Offenses (Numbers not in bold are not in the top four)

County

Cavan/Monaghan Dublin Limerick Waterford Westmeath Wexford Wicklow

Persons per Garda (2012) 384.10 324.05 309.87 392.40 341.92 542.24 405.46

Rate of Drivers Under the Influence of Alcohol or Drugs per 100,000 people (2012) 294.8

Rate of drug offences per 100,000 people (2012)

175.8 200.7

570.3 457.8 498.3

239.8 258.1 229.6 133.9

213.2

195.0 238.6

500.7

SUMMARY FACTS Kildare has the 4th lowest rate of drug offences per 100,000 people and the 3 rd lowest rate of drivers driving under the influence per 100,000 people, But because Kildare also has the largest number of persons per Garda officer, (661 people for every officer) it is difficult to know if a majority of offences are being reported. This trend of low rates of certain types of crimes in areas with fewer Garda officers is not unique to Kildare either. Meath has the second largest number of persons per Garda officer (628 people for every officer) and in 2012 had the third lowest rate of drug offences per 100,000 people and the second lowest rate of drivers driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs per 100,000 people. Additionally, with the exception of Wexford, all of the counties with high rates of driving under the influence and high rates of drug offences have very good rates of persons per garda. When you have a Garda force that is too thin on the ground, many criminal acts can go undetected and unreported because there are no GardaĂ­ around to witness the criminal act as it occurs and this can lead to distorted figures that do not accurately represent the amount of crime occurring in an area.


G. Youth Crime

Garda Youth Diversion Program Garda Youth Diversion Programs are nationwide, community-based crime prevention programme. The goal is to divert young people from anti-social and criminal behaviour. Children get involved in these programs at various stages depending on the seriousness of the offense, the informal and formal caution. Children admitted engage with a Garda Juvenile Liaison Officer (JLO) who receive special training and work closely with local Community GardaĂ­. Children Referred to the Garda Youth Diversion Program by select county and Year Year Number of Garda Division Juvenile Liaison 2009 2010 2011 2012 Officers Kildare 546 610 440 447 3 Meath 472 439 328 305 2 Sligo/Leitrim 280 252 197 176 2 Clare 379 480 326 324 2 Mayo 510 423 341 264 2 Limerick 951 940 682 663 6

1000 900 800 700

Kildare

600

Meath

500

Sligo/Leitrim Clare

400

Mayo

300

Limerick

200 100 0 2009

2010

2011

2012

With a few exceptions, over the past few years fewer children have been referred to the program. In 2012 there was a 4% reduction on the number of children referred in 2011. This suggests that fewer children are committing crimes. Because juvenile justice has multiple layers and children are dealt with differently depending on a variety of factors, it is difficult to compile data about the number of crimes committed by children in each county.


GARDA YOUTH DIVERSION PROJECTS

Division

Total Number of Children Referred 2009

Dublin Metropolitan Region (DMR) DMR Eastern 610 DMR North Central 1633 DMR Northern 451 DMR South Central 1309 DMR Southern 358 DMR Western 1645 Eastern Region Kildare 546 Laois/Offaly 574 Meath 472 Westmeath 339 Wicklow 557 Northern Region Cavan/Monaghan 518 Donegal 626 Louth 537 Sligo/Leitrim 280 South Eastern Region Kilkenny/Carlow 486 Tipperary 557 Waterford 670 Wexford 446 Southern Region Cork City 1230 Cork North 657 Cork West 432 Kerry 510 Limerick 951 Western Region Clare 379 Galway 844 Mayo 510 Roscommon/Longford 339

Number of Garda Youth Diversion Projects

Number of Garda Juvenile Liaison Officers

2010

2011

2012

664 1414 453 1226 327 1567

443 333 976 820 245 1143

431 291 1013 217 801 1157

3 5 4 2 7 10

6 4 12 6 10 11

610 492 439 342 433

440 329 328 244 356

447 307 305 225 340

2 5 2 2 2

3 2 3 2 4

506 614 503 252

341 461 334 197

341 413 337 176

2 2 4 1

2 3 3 2

565 609 587 456

441 417 490 371

357 320 380 365

2 4 5 3

2 3 4 3

1265 641 410 475 940

738 421 325 354 682

765 408 292 397 663

7 3 1 6 6

7 3 2 4 6

480 936 423 291

326 595 341 235

324 564 264 237

2 4 2 2

2 4 2 2


H. Expenditure By Garda Region, 2009-2013


SOURCES All-Island Research Observatory Crime Mapping Module, National University of Ireland Maynooth www.airo.ie [accessed October 2012) Central Statistics Office of Ireland, 2012 “Garda Recorded Crime Statistics 2006 – 2010”, Government of Ireland ISSN 2009-0676 Central Statistics Office of Ireland, Census Data www.cso.ie [accessed October 2012] Ireland Youth Justice Service http://www.iyjs.ie/en/IYJS/Pages/WP12000011 [accessed November 2013]

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION (www.oireachtas.ie)                                       

th

20 September 2011 1st December 2011 th 7 February 2012 th 14 February 2012 13 March 2012 th 27 March 2012 8th May 2012 8th May 2012 26th June 2012 26 June 2012 10th July 2012 19th September 2012 19th September 2012 18th October 2012 18th October 2012 18th October 2012 24th October 2012 11th December 2012 16th January 2013 16th January 2013 2nd May 2013 2nd May 2013 19th March 2013 th 13 June 2013 17th July 2013 18th July 2013 th 8 October 2013 th 8 October 2013 8th October 2013 th 8 October 2013 th 8 October 2013 12th November 2013 th 12 November 2013 19th November 2013 th 19 November 2013 19th November 2013 20th November 2013 26th November 2013 th 26 November 2013

[24605/11] [38166/11] [6303/12] [7652/12] [14066/12] [16506/12] [22727/12] [22732/12] [30591/12] [30760/12] [33400/12] [39448/12] [39449/12] [45374/12] [45375/12] [45376/12] [46409/12] [54442/12] [58137/12] [1412/13] [20700/13] [20826/13] [13206/13] [28505/13] [35703/13] [36135/13] [42158/13] [42159/13] [42160/13] [42161/13] [42344/13] [47925/13] [47928/13] [49458/13} [49459/13] [49460/13] [49627/13] [50532/13] [50285/13]


APPENDIX I

NATIONAL GARDA STRUCTURE _______________________________________________

Source: An Garda Síochána website.


APPENDIX II

CRIME DATA ___________________________________________________________________________ Rates were calculated by taking the population of the county in 2011, dividing it by 100,000, and then taking that rate and dividing the total number of that type of reported crimes for the year in the county by it. The number of reported crimes were retrieved from the central statistics office.

County

Cavan/Monaghan Clare Cork (combined) Dublin (combined) Donegal Galway Kerry Kildare Kilkenny/Carlow Laois/Offaly Limerick Louth Mayo Meath Roscommon/Longford Sligo/Leitrim Tipperary Waterford Westmeath Wexford Wicklow

Population (2011)

Persons per Garda (2012*)

Robbery** rate per 100,000 people

Theft Rate per 100,000 people

Burglary*** Rate per 100,000 people

133,666 117,196 519,032 1,273,069 161,137 250,653 145,502 210,312 150,031 157,246 191,809 122,897 130,638 184,135 103,065 97,191 158,754 113,795 86,164 145,320 136,640

384.10 395.93 404.47 324.05 369.58 428.47 473.95 665.54 500.10 538.51 309.87 415.19 429.73 622.08 372.08 318.66 422.22 392.40 341.92 542.24 405.46

13.5 16.2 21.2 153.0 17.4 10.8 11.0 43.3 32.0 19.7 51.1 78.9 10.0 27.7 4.9 15.4 21.4 73.8 25.5 10.3 35.1

843.9 872.0 1,074.0 2,963.3 621.2 979.8 645.4 1,403.2 1,217.7 1,076.7 2,114.1 1,664 874.9 1,202.4 874.2 862.2 876.2 1,863.9 1,458.8 1,326.0 1,621.8

354.6 312.3 296.7 855.8 268.1 392.6 228.9 823.1 689.2 594.6 635.5 933.3 366.7 664.7 520.1 407.4 436.5 667.9 645.3 739.1 862.1

*Persons per garda data from 2012 is used because that is the year the crimes were committed. **Robbery includes robbery, robbery related crimes, hijacking crimes, and extortion crimes ***Burglary includes all burglary related crimes


County

Cavan/Monaghan Clare Cork Dublin Donegal Galway Kerry Kildare Kilkenny/Carlow Laois/Offaly Limerick Louth Mayo Meath Roscommon/Longford Sligo/Leitrim Tipperary Waterford Westmeath Wexford Wicklow

Persons per Garda (2012) 384.10 395.93 404.47 324.05 369.58

Rate of Drivers Under the Influence of Alcohol or Drugs per 100,000 people (2012) 294.8 158.7 194.0 175.8 222.9

Rate of drug offences per 100,000 people (2012) 213.2 223.9 344.5 570.3 154.0

428.47 473.95 665.54 500.10 538.51 309.87 415.19 429.73 622.08 372.08 318.66 422.22 392.40 341.92 542.24 405.46

165.6 216.5 150.0 226.0 163.1 200.7 170.5 160.8 143.4 175.7 154.6 187.8 239.8 258.1 229.6 133.9

199.9 208.9 166.7 302.7 342.7 457.8 327.1 124.0 163.0 190.3 232.5 280.3 498.3 195.0 238.6 500.7

Offense rates over time in select counties County Kildare Kerry Sligo/Leitrim Meath Westmeath Mayo Clare

Offense: Drug Offences

Year

Number of drug offences Rate per 100,000 people Number of drug offences Rate per 100,000 people Number of drug offences Rate per 100,000 people

2010 747 355.2 448 307.9 191 196.5

2011 646 307.2 359 246.7 285 293.2

2012 350 166.4 304 208.9 226 232.5

Number of drug offences

358

280

300

Rate per 100,000 people

194.4

152.1

162.9

Number of drug offences

302

255

268

Rate per 100,000 people

350.5

295.9

311.0

Number of drug offences

187

173

162

Rate per 100,000 people

143.1

132.4

124.0

Number of Drug offences

416

276

262

Rate per 100,000 people

355.0

235.5

223.6


State

County Kildare Sligo/Leitrim Mayo Clare State

County

Number of Drug offences

20,005

17,695

16,464

Rate per 100,000 people

435.9

385.6

358.8

Offense: Dangerous Traffic Offences

Year 2010

2011

2012

Number of violations

389

340

326

Rate per 100,000 people

185.0

161.7

155.0

Number violations

221

196

153

Rate per 100,000 people

227.4

201.7

157.4

Number of violations

264

233

210

Rate per 100,000 people

202.1

178.4

160.7

Number of violations

288

248

189

Rate per 100,000 people

245.7

211.6

161.3

Number of violations

11569

9641

8739

Rate per 100,000 people

252

210.1

190.4

Sligo/Leitrim

Offense: attempts and threats to murder, assault, harassment, and related offences Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Number of violations

399.2

466.1

430.1

353.9

304.5

288.1

Mayo

Rate per 100,000 people Number of violations

526

590

556

449

431

423

Rate per 100,000 people Number of violations Rate per 100,000 people Number of violations Rate per 100,000 people Number of violations Rate per 100,000 people Number of violations Rate per 100,000 people

402.6

451.6

425.6

343.7

329.9

323.8

361 308.0

488 416.4

455 388.2

457 389.9

368 314.0

310 264.5

4,683 367.9

4,908 385.5

4,814 378.2

5,014 393.9

5,012 393.7

4,284 336.5

1,784 343.7

2,084 401.5

2,005 386.3

1,799 346.6

1,744 337.0

1,716 330.6

966 503.6

1,054 549.5

938 489.1

991 516.7

895 466.6

851 443.7

Kildare

Meath

Clare

Dublin

Cork

Limerick

Year 2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

647 307.6

676 321.4

688 327.1

641 304.8

722 343.3

645 306.7

496 269.4

541 293.8

517 280.8

514 279.1

433 235.2

436 236.8

388

453

418

344

296

280


State

Number of violations Rate per 100,000 people

County

Offense: Theft and Related Offences

Kildare

Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Meath Number of Violation Rate per 100,000 people Sligo/Leitrim Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Mayo Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Clare Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Dublin Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Cork Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Limerick Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people State Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people

Offense: Robbery, extortion and hijacking offences Kildare Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Meath Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 Sligo/Leitrim Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Mayo Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Clare Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Dublin Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Cork Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Limerick Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people State Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people

17,666 385.0

19,150 417.3

18,353 400.0

17,704 385.9

17,062 371.9

15,585 339.7

Year 2007 3,122 1,484.5 2,126 1,154.6 1,133 1,166.8 1,137 870.6 1,162 993.16 33,978 2,669.1 6,348 1,223.1 4,253 2,217.4 75,190 1,638.8

2008 2,999 1,426.1 2,202 1,195.9 1,072 1,104.0 1,096 839.2 1,320 1,127.2 34,352 2,698.5 6,817 1,313.5 4,192 2,185.6 76,861 1,675.2

2009 2,967 1,410.8 2,536 1,377.3 1,020 1,050.5 1,147 878.3 1,206 1,029.9 34,313 2,695.4 6,572 1,266.3 4,330 2,257.6 77,031 1,678.9

County

2010 2,733 1,299.5 2,469 1,340.9 952 979.5 956 731.8 1,214 1,035.9 35,555 2,792.9 6,133 1,181.6 4,243 2,212.1 76,828 1,674.5

2011 3,112 1,479.7 2,490 1,352.3 900 926.0 1,022 782.3 1,054 899.3 36,734 2,885.4 6,175 1,189.7 4,160 2,168.8 76,975 1,677.7

2012 2,951 1,403.2 2,214 1,202.4 838 862.2 1,143 874.9 1,022 872.0 37,725 2,963.3 5,575 1,074.1 4,055 2,114.1 76,425 1,665.7

2011

2012

Year 2007

2008

2009

92 43.74 39 21.2 17 17.5 17 13.0 23 19.6 1,314 103.2 139 26.8 115 60.0 2,171 47.3

79 37.6 42 22.8 11 11.3 13 10.0 13 11.1 1,413 111.0 163 31.4 159 82.9 2,299 50.1

153 72.8 64 34.8 19 19.6 15 11.5 29 24.7 1,492 117.2 132 25.4 134 69.9 2,491 54.3

2010 142 67.5 55 29.9 14 14.4 12 9.2 23 19.6 2,097 164.7 155 29.9 160 83.4 3,196 69.7

113 53.7 62 33.7 9 9.3 5 3.8 19 16.2 1,989 156.2 112 21.5 135 70.4 2,932 63.9

91 43.3 51 27.7 15 15.4 13 10.0 19 16.2 1,948 153.0 110 21.2 98 51.1 2,818 61.4


County Kildare

Offense: Burglary and related offences

Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Meath Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Sligo/Leitrim Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Mayo Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Clare Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Dublin Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Cork Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people Limerick Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people State Number of Violations Rate per 100,000 people

Year 2007

2008

2009

1,343 638.6 842 457.2 339 349.5 467 359.2 439 375.2 8,990 706.2 1,420 273.6 1,226 639.2 23,603 514.5

1,405 668.1 883 479.5 366 377.3 341 262.3 526 449.6 9,379 736.8 1,548 298.3 1,423 741.9 24,682 538.0

1,592 757.0 886 481.2 367 378.4 405 311.5 427 365.0 10,728 842.7 1,505 290.0 1,516 790.4 26,911 586.6

2010 1,343 638.6 864 469.2 289 297.4 409 313.1 384 327.7 10,214 802.3 1,502 289.4 1,310 682.9 24,578 535.7

2011 1,692 804.5 1,222 663.6 378 388.9 356 272.5 359 306.3 10,727 842.6 1,678 323.3 1,481 772.1 26,724 582.4

2012 1,731 823.1 1,224 664.7 396 407.4 479 366.7 366 312.3 10,895 855.8 1,540 296.7 1,219 635.5 26,949 587.3


APPENDIX III

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTIONS _______________________________________________

20th September 2011[24605/11] 64. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if the Garda Commissioner is required to produce service level agreements; if so, the role population figures, existing crime rates and so on play in determining the resource allocation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Deputy Alan Shatter: The levels of service to be provided by the Garda Síochána are set out each year in the annual policing plan which is laid before both Houses of the Oireachtas. The annual plan sets out the policing priorities for that year, the key actions to be taken in respect of each priority and the performance indicators by which the outcomes can be measured. The allocation of Garda personnel is determined by Garda management using a distribution model which takes into account a number of factors, including population, crime trends and the policing needs of each Garda division. Deputy Catherine Murphy: If that was the case, I certainly would not be asking this question. I have no confidence whatsoever in the equitable sharing of resources, particularly in view of the blunt instrument that is the public sector recruitment embargo. Areas that have a disproportionately low number of Gardaí relative to their populations do worse in such an environment. Commuter belt areas that have grown rapidly in recent years are a case in point. Does the Minister think it fair that a county such as Kildare, with a population of 209,000, has 328 Gardaí, while the combined area of Sligo-Leitrim, with a population of less than 100,000, has three Gardaí more? No matter how one looks at it, counties Meath, Kildare, Wicklow or Wexford are the kinds of places which are not getting a fair share. I believe criminals themselves are reading the numbers because there have been some high profile happenings in recent years that virtually invite the committing of crimes in places known to have a low ratio of Gardaí. One cannot police without adequate numbers. Deputy Alan Shatter: I reiterate that these are operational decisions made by the Garda Commissioner. In that context it is worth bringing to the Deputy’s attention that the detailed allocation of Garda resources, including equipment, and the allocation of personnel to various units are a matter for the Garda Commissioner to decide upon on the basis of his identified operational requirements. These vary from location to location. The deployment of Garda personnel throughout the country, together with overall policing arrangements and operation of strategy, is continually monitored and reviewed. Such monitoring ensures optimum use is made of Garda resources and the best possible Garda service is provided to the public. The Deputy may not be aware that Garda management is aided by what is known as the Garda establishment re-distribution model. The Commissioner advises that this model indicates the most effective means to distribute Garda personnel and acts as a guide to


Garda management decision making. It takes into account many different policing variables, including socioeconomic factors, census information, crime trends and the minimum establishment required for each district. The allocation of Garda personnel is determined by these factors which also take account of the policing requirements of each division. This very much influences the approach taken by the Garda Commissioner. [720]As Minister for Justice and Equality, it is not my role to direct the Commissioner as to how many Gardaí to allocate to individual districts or Garda stations. The needs in these areas can vary from time to time, depending on crime levels, instances that occur or special events that may give rise to concern. Deputy Catherine Murphy: I have made the point, as have other Deputies in my area, of meeting very senior Gardaí, up to the rank of assistant commissioner. They do not disagree with us. It appears to be that what one has one holds. In the context of an embargo, there is no commitment to redeploying people. I have been listening to this for years. I now have an opportunity to ask the question or put the point whereas for many of those years I did not. I do not accept that the model is working. It certainly does not work in developing areas. Deputy Alan Shatter: The review taking place throughout the Garda Síochána, and the feedback sought by the Garda Commissioner from his senior officers last June to a document produced to them, give senior officers in every area an opportunity to feed into the process. In so far as any senior officer is of the belief that his or her station and the needs of the community he or she serves are not being adequately considered, or in so far as he or she believes there should be a redistribution of the resources of the force in the context of manpower, womanpower or patrol cars, those senior officers have a unique opportunity to feed into that process. Even without it, if senior officers have a complaint to make or a concern to express, they have a direct line to the Garda Commissioner. I reiterate that it is an operational matter for the Garda Commissioner. I refer to an earlier question. The police committees that involve co-operation between senior members of the Garda and members and officials of local authorities provide a very useful forum for local communities to focus on their concerns, or for a senior member of the Garda to raise concerns openly about differences being experienced in any particular station, thereby engaging with local elected representatives. All of this can feed into ensuring we have a better, more responsive and community-oriented police service. That was the initial purpose of providing these committees, to encourage that type of interaction between members of the Garda locally, local communities and elected representatives.


1st December 2011 [38166/11] 130. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he can take account of the inadequate facilities at the Garda station in Clane, County Kildare, which lacks wheelchair access or any private interview space for victims of personal crime including sexual and domestic incidents, has a unisex toilet which contains the only source of water for hand-washing, drinking and cleaning utensils, and lacks basic changing or shower facilities to support Gardaí on duty in inclement weather or on poor terrain; if he will report on the progress of plans to refit the empty adjacent station building which has stood idle for nearly three years; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): The programme of refurbishment of Garda accommodation is based on agreed priorities established by An Garda Síochána. This programme is progressed in close co-operation with the Office of Public Works, which has responsibility for the provision and maintenance of Garda accommodation. I am advised by the Garda authorities that proposals in relation to the refurbishment of Clane Garda station are being developed. These proposals will be progressed in the context of An Garda Síochána’s identified accommodation priorities and in the light of available resources.


7th February 2012 [6303/12] 357. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the position regarding the proposals to redevelop Clane Garda station, County Kildare, in view of the inadequate facilities for both staff and members of the public; if the station has been identified as a high accommodation priority by An Garda Síochána; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): The programme of replacement and refurbishment of Garda accommodation is based on agreed priorities established by An Garda Síochána. This programme is progressed in co-operation with the Office of Public Works, who have responsibility for capital expenditure in relation to Garda accommodation. The Deputy will recall from the reply I gave to her in Parliamentary Question No. 130 on 1st December 2011 that proposals in relation to the refurbishment of Clane Garda station are being developed. The Garda authorities have indicated that these proposals will be taken forward with reference to An Garda Síochána’s overall accommodation priorities and the availability of resources.


14th February 2012 [7652/12] 480. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of Gardaí employed at the end of 2011 by region; the grades in which they were employed; the numbers who have applied under the early retirement scheme by location and grade; the minimum number of Gardaí deemed necessary for the security of the State; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): I have been informed by the Garda Commissioner that the number of Gardaí by rank and Regions, on the 31 December 2011, was as set out in the table hereunder: A/Comm Dublin Metropolitan Region Northern Region South Eastern Region Eastern Region Southern Region Western Region

1 1 0 0 0 1

C/Supt 7 3 4 4 4 3

Supt 22 18 15 14 18 22

Insp 98 26 21 29 39 22

Sgt 527 219 175 212 322 208

Gda 3,555 1,155 1,027 1,259 1,874 1,242

Members of An Garda Síochána who joined the force prior to 1 April 2004 may retire on full pension once they have served for at least 30 years and they have reached 50 years of age. Members of An Garda Síochána who joined the Force on or after 1 April 2004 may retire on full pension once they have served at least 30 years and have reached 55 years of age. In both cases members must retire once they reach 60 years of age. Members of An Garda Síochána who are over 50 years of age and do not have 30 years’ service may also avail of a cost neutral early retirement (C.N.E.R.) scheme. Their pension and lumps sums are actuarially reduced depending on their length of service and age at the time of retirement. Almost all Gardaí take voluntary retirement i.e. they leave before the compulsory retirement age of 60 years of age, rather than early retirement. In 2010 there were 353 voluntary retirements, 9 compulsory retirements and 1 CNER, and in 2011 there 428 voluntary retirements, 8 compulsory retirements and 2 CNER’s. Public servants, including Gardaí, who retire on or before 29 February 2012 will receive pension benefits based on their salary scales applicable on 31 December 2009 and they, like others presently in receipt of public service pensions, will pay a Public Service Pension Reduction (P.S.P.R.) on their pensions thereafter. This reduction is a scaled percentage of their actual pension. Public servants, including Gardaí, who retire after 29 February will receive pension benefits based on their then current salary scales (as already affected by the Financial Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act 2009) but they will not pay the Public Service Pension Reduction on their pensions. I have been informed by the Commissioner that since 1 January 2010, 3 members have availed of the CNER scheme, namely a Garda in Charlestown, a Sergeant in Clara and Sergeant in Garda Headquarters. There is no mathematical formula for determining the optimum strength of the Garda Síochána, or indeed any police force. Instead, it is a matter of Government policy, taking into account all the relevant factors such as population and the crime rate, as well of course as the availability of resources.


13 March 2012 [14066/12] 455. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he intends to review, in conjunction with the Garda Commissioner, the current strategic deployment of GardaĂ­ around the country; if so, if he intends to address the current large disparity in Garda numbers from region to region as part of such a review; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): The Deputy will be aware that the Commissioner, in consultation with his senior management team, is responsible for the detailed allocation of resources, including personnel, throughout the organisation and I have no function in this process. This allocation of resources is constantly monitored and reviewed where necessary, in the context of crime trends, policing needs and other operational strategies in place on a District, Divisional and Regional level to ensure optimum use is made of Garda resources and the best possible Garda service is provided to the public.


27th March 2012 [16506/12] 459. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will provide up to date figures detailing the total deployment of Gardaí by region, division, district and sub-district across the country; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): I am informed by the Garda authorities that the personnel strength of An Garda Síochána as of 29 February 2012, the latest date for which figure are readily available, was 13,635. In addition, as of the same date, there was 935 Garda Reserves. The spreadsheets provided to the Deputy show the distribution of 11,712 Gardaí and 935 Garda Reserve members, by Division, District and Garda Station. There are a further 1,923 Gardaí attached to the various national units such as the National Bureau of Criminal Investigation, the Garda Bureau of Fraud Investigation, Liaison and Protection and other such units.


8th May 2012 [22727/12] 300. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if, in view of the Garda Recorded Crime Statistics report published by the Central Statistics Office recently, he will explain the reasons up to threequarters of burglaries have gone undetected by Gardaí in the period in question; if he can provide statistics to show the level of burglary detection broken down by each Garda division nationwide in the same period or part thereof; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): I share the Deputy’s concern at the incidence of burglaries and other property crimes. Insofar as detection rates are concerned, the most recent CSO analysis shows a detection rate for burglary in the region of 25% for 2010. It is important to note that detection rates do vary according to the nature of the crime and that this is in line with international experience. Detection rates are often found to be lower for certain offences, such as burglaries and some other property crimes, as these generally only come to light after the event and after the offender has left the scene. These offences are inherently more difficult to investigate than some others. While our statistical system is not directly comparable with that of other countries, in the UK, for example, the difficulties presented in detecting burglaries are reflected in the fact that the sanction detection rate for burglaries in England and Wales in 2010/2011 was recorded as 13%. Notwithstanding the investigative challenges faced, however, the Garda is responding effectively and the Deputy will be aware that the Garda Commissioner has recently announced the introduction of a wide range of measures aimed at tackling gangs involved in burglaries. These measures are encompassed in Operation Fiacla, which is particularly focused on identifying and targeting mobile gangs involved in burglaries around the country so as to disrupt their activities and bring them before the Courts. Specific burglary related initiatives are being implemented in each Garda Region in support of Operation Fiacla. I am conscious of the deep distress which burglary can cause to householders, and to the broader impact it can have in terms of fear of crime in our communities and therefore welcome the fact that the Garda Commissioner is deploying the substantial resources available to him in a targeted and strategic approach to confronting those who are engaging in this form of criminality. In relation to the particular statistics requested by the Deputy, the Garda Síochána Act 2005 makes provision for the compilation and publication of crime statistics by the Central Statistics Office, as the national statistical agency, and the CSO has established a dedicated unit for this purpose. I have requested the CSO to provide relevant statistics directly to the Deputy.


8th May 2012[22732/12] 99. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will outline the principles and the reasons underlying Garda staffing deployment across the country; the process by which Gardaí are deployed; the reason Garda numbers per head of population vary so much between different Garda divisions; if the current deployment of Gardaí accurately reflects any specific, centrally coordinated deployment plan; if he will outline the process by which the annual police plan is developed between his Department and An Garda Síochána; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): I should first of all say that the Commissioner is responsible for the detailed allocation of Garda resources, including personnel, throughout the organisation, and I have no function in the matter. I am advised by the Commissioner that, in regard to the deployment of Garda personnel, a distribution model is used which takes into account all relevant factors. These of course include population, but also other factors such as workload, response times, crime trends and the overall policing needs of each Division. Garda Management keeps the allocation of all resources, including distribution of personnel, under review to ensure that the most effective policing service possible is provided to the public. The development of the annual policing plan is governed by section 22(1) of the Garda Síochána Act 2005. This requires the Commissioner, before November each year, to submit to the Minister a policing plan for the following year. On approval, the Minister must cause a copy of the plan to be laid before both Houses of the Oireachtas. The policing plan for 2012 was laid before both Houses on 5 December 2011.


26th June 2012 [30591/12] 433. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the numbers of GardaĂ­ available in each region who have been trained to conduct specialist child interviews as part of the joint protocol with the Health Service Executive; the resources available to them to assist in the carrying out of such interviews; his future plans for this area; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): I have been informed by the Garda Commissioner that the number of Child Specialist Interviewers trained to conduct interviews with children and vulnerable adults, including persons with intellectual disability, per region, as at 22 June 2012 is as set out hereunder: Region D.M.R. Eastern South Eastern Western Southern Northern N.S.S. Total

Number 20 13 12 10 8 8 9 80

Garda personnel, with personnel from the HSE (Children and Family Services Division) undergo an intensive training programme to become competent to deal with all victims of serious crime occurrences but particularly children under 14 years of age and persons with intellectual disabilities. Section 16(1)(b) of the Criminal Evidence Act, 1992 provides for the video recording of statements made by such persons, in respect of whom certain offences are alleged to have been committed. Subject to approval by the court, the video recording may then be played at any criminal court proceedings, thus eliminating the necessity for the child / vulnerable adult to give direct evidence in the normal fashion. Garda Specialist Interviewers are required and facilitated to give priority to the interviewing of children and persons with intellectual disability over other duties. Their training entails an intensive four week course that commences a two-year personal experiential learning programme. Specialist Interviewers undergo professional supervision by Garda trainers of the Crime Training Faculty at the Garda College to ensure that good practice is maintained while they are employed in that role. Seven suitably equipped and dedicated interview suites have been secured at strategic locations throughout the country and are specifically designed to provide appropriate facilities for these interviews.


26 June 2012 [30760/12] 446. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will provide detailed information on the current Garda vehicle fleet, including the manufacturer, model and current distribution of vehicles by district and division; the current arrangements governing the use of Garda vehicles, including the upper acceptable mileage and upper acceptable age for use as Garda vehicles; the number of vehicles which are nearing these upper limits currently in use; his plans to purchase new vehicles in the near future; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): I have sought information from the Garda authorities in relation to the matters raised in this Question and I will respond further to the Deputy as quickly as possible.


10th July 2012 [33400/12] 369. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will explain the reason there are delays to secure Garda clearance; if there are actions underway to reduce the waiting times; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): The Garda Central Vetting Unit (GCVU) provides employment vetting for over 19,000 organisations in Ireland who are registered with the GardaĂ­ for this purpose and which employ/engage persons in a full-time, part-time, voluntary or training capacity to positions where they would have substantial, unsupervised access to children and/or vulnerable adults. The current average processing time at the GCVU is 3 weeks approximately. This, in my view, is well within acceptable limits. Seasonal fluctuations and the necessity to seek additional information on particular applications can, however, result in this processing time being exceeded on occasion. Registered organisations have been advised to take account of these processing times, and the possible need for additional information to be provided in some cases, in their recruitment and selection processes. I would remind the Deputy that since I became Minister I have taken a number of measures to ensure that the time it takes for the processing of vetting applications improves significantly. I remain very conscious of the need to keep the time required to obtain a vetting to the minimum possible.


19th September 2012 [39448/12] 5. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the factors which are taken into

consideration when the annual policing plan is being prepared; if population growth trends and projections across the country that have been taken into account when previous policing plans have been prepared, especially with regard to the geographical distribution of Gardaí; when he expects the next policing plan to be presented to him; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. By the end of October each year, the Commissioner is obliged under the Garda Síochána Act 2005 to submit to the Minister a policing plan for the following year which sets out the proposed arrangements for the policing of the State. The approved plan is laid before both Houses of the Oireachtas. When preparing the plan, the Commissioner must under the Act have regard to a number of matters, including the resources available to the Garda Síochána, the priorities for the Garda Síochána as determined by the Minister, relevant Government policy, and the Garda Síochána's own strategy statement. In addition, the Act provides that the policing plan must include details of certain types of proposals, including proposals to open or close a Garda station, establish or dissolve a Garda national unit, alter certain Garda geographical boundaries, or establish or relocate certain Garda headquarters. The policing plan for 2013 has not yet been submitted to the Minister, and it would be premature to speculate at this stage what it might contain, although it is expected to contain proposals for the further rationalisation of the Garda station network. Clearly, in drawing up arrangements for the policing of the State each year the Commissioner and his senior management team take all relevant factors into account, including population, crime levels and trends, and policing priorities. The objective is to ensure that optimum use is made of Garda resources and the most effective policing service is provided to the public.


19th September 2012 [39449/12] 161. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the reason there is a variance in the numbers of stationed GardaĂ­ per capita across Garda districts; his views on whether there has been a significant and consistent failure to take population growth trends into account when policing plans have been prepared and that this is the primary reason that there is a large variance in Garda resources around the country; if he will confirm that population growth trends have been taken into account for the current policing plan; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY.

The Deputy will be aware that the Garda Commissioner is responsible for the detailed allocation of resources, including personnel, throughout the Garda SĂ­ochĂĄna and the Minister has no direct role or function in that matter. In drawing up arrangements for the policing of the State each year the Commissioner and his senior management team take all relevant factors into account, including population, the geography of the areas to be policed, crime levels and trends, and policing priorities. The objective is to ensure that optimum use is made of Garda resources and the most effective policing service is provided to the public.


18th October 2012 [45375/12] 191. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will provide detailed up to date

information on the current Garda vehicle fleet, including the manufacturer, model and current distribution of vehicles by district and division; the current arrangements governing the use of Garda vehicles, including the upper acceptable mileage and upper acceptable age for use as Garda vehicles; the number of vehicles which are nearing these upper limits currently in use; his plans to purchase new vehicles in the near future; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. The provision and allocation of Garda resources, including transport, is a matter for the Garda Commissioner. In turn, at Garda Divisional level, the allocation of Garda vehicles is a matter for the Chief Superintendent who may make and revise arrangements for the deployment of vehicles throughout the Division in response to policing demands. This flexibility in allocating and re-allocating vehicles among stations, so as to best match the allocation of resources with policing priorities, is crucial to the efficient management of the Garda fleet. As a consequence, the Deputy will appreciate that it is not practicable to provide details of permanent allocations of Garda vehicles. However, I am informed by the Garda authorities that the current Garda fleet consists of 2,457 vehicles, comprised of a number of makes/models, including: Ford Mondeo, Focus and Fiesta and Toyota Avensis and Corolla. Garda vehicles are retired for a variety of reasons, including where vehicles are considered beyond economic repair or as a result of accidents. I understand from the Garda authorities that the relevant manufacturers have indicated that, for safety reasons, patrol cars should be withdrawn from service when the odometer reading reaches 300,000 kilometres. Accordingly, this is the operational policy that is applied by the Garda authorities. Based on current usage, it is estimated that 145 vehicles may be retired between now and the end of the year. As the Deputy will be aware, I recently announced a substantial additional investment in Garda transport, with funding of approximately â‚Ź3 million being made available for the purchase of new vehicles. Arrangements for the provision of these vehicles are currently being made and it is anticipated that 170 new cars will come on stream in December and January.


18th October, 2012 [45376/12] * 189. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of Gardaí employed at present by region; the grades in which they are employed; the numbers who have applied under the early retirement scheme by location and grade; the minimum number of Gardaí deemed necessary for the security of the State; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy * 190. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will provide up to date figures detailing the total deployment of Gardaí by region, division, district and sub-district across the country; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy REPLY. The Deputy will be aware that the Commissioner is responsible for the detailed allocation of resources, including personnel, throughout the organisation and I have no direct function in the matter. This allocation of resources is constantly monitored in the context of crime trends, policing needs and other operational strategies in place on a District, Divisional and Regional level to ensure optimum use is made of Garda resources and the best possible Garda service is provided to the public. Most members of An Garda Síochána who are aged 50 or over and have attained 30 years approved service with An Garda Síochána may apply to retire on a voluntary basis. The following table outlines a breakdown of voluntary retirements from 1 January 2012 to 12 October 2012:

Cavan/Monaghan Clare Cork Harcourt Sq DMR East DMR North DMR North Central DMR West DMR South DMR South Central Garda HQ G.N.I.B Dublin Castle NSS Donegal Galway Kerry Kildare Kilkenny/Carlow Laois/Offaly Limerick Louth

Com

D/Com

A/Com

C/Supt

Supt

Insp

Sgt

Garda

Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0

1 0 1 0 3 2 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0

1 4 3 1 5 9 2 5 1 4 3 3 1 7 5 3 2 0 0 3 7 3

13 10 20 11 10 4 1 6 6 5 11 8 2 5 9 9 9 4 4 5 13 7

16 14 24 13 18 16 3 11 11 10 19 12 5 13 15 12 13 5 5 12 22 10


Mayo Meath Roscommon/Longford Sligo/Leitrim Tipperary Waterford Westmeath Wexford Wicklow Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 16

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 21

4 1 3 2 5 4 0 3 1 95

8 2 7 6 7 6 4 3 4 219

14 5 11 8 13 10 5 7 5 357

The only early retirement scheme available to members of An Garda Síochána is the Cost Neutral Early Retirement Scheme. The following members have availed of Cost Neutral Early Retirement from 1 January 2012 to 12 October 2012:

01.01.12 12.10.12

Com

D/Com

A/Com

C/Supt

Supt

Insp.

Sgt

Garda

Total

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

2

For security and operational reasons, it is not Garda Policy to disclose the number or percentage of personnel on duty in any specific area or over any given period of time. I have however been informed by the Garda Commissioner that as of 30 September 2012, the latest date for which figures are readily available, the allocation of Gardaí across Garda Region, Garda Divisions, Garda Districts and Garda Stations was as set out in the below attachment.


24th October 2012 [46409/12] 35. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality in relation to the recent announcement

that extra vehicles will be provided to An Garda SĂ­ochĂĄna, if he will outline the process by which it is determined the divisions to which the vehicles will be assigned; the way the differences in resource levels around the country will be addressed going forward; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY.

The provision and allocation of Garda resources, including transport, is a matter for the Garda Commissioner in the context of his operational requirements. In turn, at Garda Divisional level, the allocation of Garda vehicles is a matter for the Chief Superintendent who may make and revise arrangements for the deployment of vehicles throughout a Division in response to policing demands. This flexibility in allocating and re-allocating vehicles among stations, so as to best match resources with policing priorities, is crucial to the efficient management of the Garda fleet. I am advised by the Garda authorities that the deployment of transport resources is the subject of on-going analysis and review. This process allows Garda management to allocate available resources within the Force in the most appropriate manner and to ensure an efficient service. I am very pleased that arrangements have been put in place, with special funding being made available for that purpose, to allow the Garda authorities to purchase a significant number of new vehicles. I have no doubt that the provision of an additional 170 vehicles will considerably strengthen the overall effectiveness of the Force in delivering a policing service throughout the country. The vehicles are due to be commissioned in December/January and they will be deployed by the Garda authorities in line with policing requirements.


11th December 2012 [54442/12] 89. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of new Garda cars which will

be deployed as part of his recent announcement; the locations at which said cars will be deployed; if he has determined the allocation of new cars based on need; if he will state the number of cars that have been retired this year; if there will be similar commitments in terms of new Garda cars in 2013 and 2014; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. The deployment of Garda vehicles is a matter for the Garda Commissioner in the context of his identified operational requirements. I have no role in this area and, accordingly, I am not in a position to indicate the stations to which the new vehicles will be allocated. At Garda Divisional level, it is for the Chief Superintendent to make appropriate arrangements for the distribution of vehicles throughout the Division, in response to policing demands. The detailed allocation of vehicles is determined through a process of ongoing analysis. However, I understand from the Garda authorities that, as a result of the recent investment of €3 million in the Garda fleet, arrangements are currently being made for the delivery of the 170 new Garda vehicles which have been purchased . It is anticipated that these vehicles will begin to come on stream over the coming weeks. The most recent order brings the number of new vehicles ordered this year to over 210 at a cost of approximately €4 million. I am also advised by the Garda authorities that 243 vehicles were withdrawn from service between January and November this year. I am conscious of the need to maintain, to the greatest extent possible, the operational effectiveness of An Garda Síochána. It is for that reason that a further €5 million is being made available for the purchase and fit-out of new Garda vehicles in 2013. This level of expenditure, at a time of severe budgetary constraint, represents a very significant investment in Garda transport and I have no doubt that the additional funding will considerably strengthen the overall effectiveness of the Force in delivering a policing service to communities throughout the country. I am also confident that, when the relevant budgetary figures are being determined for 2014, the importance of investment in Garda transport will continue to be recognised.


16th January 2013 [58137/12] 794. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality in view of the reduction of €62 million

in his Department's planned expenditure for 2013 over the previous year, if he will provide assurances that the objectives contained in the 2013 Policing Plan remain realistic, deliverable and affordable; if he will explain how so; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY.

Due to the very difficult financial situation, it has been necessary to reduce the funding available to the Justice Vote Group in 2013 by €62m. However, it is of course the case that the gross expenditure budget for the Vote Group in the current year will be over €2.26 billion and this demonstrates the Government's very strong on-going commitment to the Justice Sector. With regard specifically to the Garda Policing Plan for 2013, the position is that the Plan is based on a number of strategic goals and at its heart is the Garda Síochána's primary objective of combating crime as well as ensuring that people are safe in their communities and on the roads. Copies of the Plan were laid before the Houses of the Oireachtas on 5 December 2012. One of the key elements of the 2013 Plan is that it sets out proposals for continuing the process of restructuring the way in which Garda services are organised and delivered, with the objective of enhancing the efficiency of the Force at a time of financial constraint. This copper fastens the commitment of the Commissioner, who is responsible for operational Garda matters, to smart policing, using available resources effectively and ensuring that the maximum numbers of Garda personnel are available for front-line policing. In that overall context I believe that the objectives set out in the Garda Policing Plan for 2013 will be achieved and that, despite the pressure on the public finances, it will be possible for the Force to operate to the optimum benefit of our communities in a manner that will facilitate the presence of operational Gardaí on patrol preventing and detecting crime.


16th January 2013 [1412/13] 795. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will provide assurances that the

total number of Gardaí leaving the force in 2013 will not be greater than 500; if his attention has been drawn to any plans to respond to the decrease in funding for An Garda Síochána for 2013 with staff reductions; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. Members of An Garda Síochána may retire on a voluntary basis once they have reached 50 years of age and have accrued 30 years’ service. Members must retire on compulsory age grounds on reaching the age of 60. In actual fact, most Gardaí take voluntary retirement ahead of their compulsory retirement age and it is not possible to predict with any certainty the number of Gardaí who will leave the Force during the course of any one year. There are currently over 1,000 Garda members who could retire on full pension. However, there is no basis for expecting that all those who could retire will actually do so. The table below shows the number of voluntary retirements so far notified for 2013 (although this is not a basis for forecasting the likely number of retirements).

Voluntary Compulsory TOTAL 2013

Comm D/Comm A/Comm C/Supt Supt 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1

Insp 0 1 1

Sgt 0 3 3

Gda 13 0 13

Total 14 9 23

It is true that there has been a reduction in the payroll provision limit for An Garda Síochána over last year's figures. However, there are approximately 460 fewer Garda members now than at the beginning of 2012 and consequently the pay bill will be lower in 2013. Additionally, the adjustment to the payroll provision for this year also reflects the potential number of members who could retire in 2013.

27 16 43


2nd May 2013 [20700/13] 34. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will confirm his intention in

relation to the continued operation of the Garda Training College in Templemore, County Tipperary; if he will confirm if his Department has conducted a risk assessment on the implications for the State of allowing the total number of active Garda personnel to fall below 13,000; if he will share this information with Dáil Éireann; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. I would like to assure the House that the Garda College remains fully open as the main training centre for the Garda Síochána. The Chief Superintendent in charge of the College, and the members of the team there, develop, coordinate and direct all training interventions up to the most senior ranks. The College provides operationally focused training across a range of areas including firearms training, driver training, public order training, operational skills programmes, management development programmes and of course Garda Reserve training. In 2012 training was provided in the College for over 5,000 members of the Garda Síochána, and I can confirm for the House, and all those connected with the Garda College, that the College will continue to provide a centre of excellence for training for the Garda Síochána. In relation to Garda strength, I have said that I would not like to see Garda strength fall below the level of 13,000, and I will bring proposals to Government shortly in relation to maintaining Garda operational strength. It is of course the case that a resumption of Garda recruitment, at a time when both overall headcount and the size of the pay bill in the public service must be reduced, would have financial implications that must be managed within the overall resources available to Government. In that context, it is important that the current impasse in relation to the LRC proposals on saving €1 billion from the public service pay bill, including €300 million this year, is first resolved. As Deputies will be aware, the LRC is currently exploring with all the parties concerned the potential for such a resolution, and of course I hope that there is a positive outcome to that process. An Garda Síochána have had a very successful number of months and crime is down in all areas as can be seen from recently published statistics. I am confident that An Garda Síochána, which is an extremely capable and talented force, will be able to carry out their duties, that frontline Garda services will continue to be prioritised, and that the crackdown on organised crime will be maintained.


2nd May 2013 [20826/13] 26. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if, in view of the reduction in direct

Garda resources and funding, he will consider setting aside funding to subsidise Community Alert and Neighbourhood Watch groups to specifically assist them in the placement of signage advertising the phone number of the closest 24/7 manned Garda Station to each such group; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. For many years my Department has provided funding for the Community Alert programme which is operated by Muintir na TĂ­re in partnership with the Garda authorities and which supports the operation of over 1,300 local groups. Funding is provided in relation to the employment and associated costs of a National Coordinator and Development Officers which I believe is the best use of the resources available to me to support an effective crime prevention scheme. I understand that funding for Community Alert is also received from the HSE. The partnership between An Garda SĂ­ochĂĄna and Muintir na Tire was underlined by the signing of an updated Memorandum of Understanding between the two organisations in January this year. In relation to Neighbourhood Watch groups, while certain costs related to their operations are funded from the Garda Vote, there is not a specific financial allocation. I am currently providing the maximum possible funding to Community Alert that is open to me, having regard to the overall restrictions on my Department's resources and other expenditure needs. Accordingly, the provision of funding for the project proposed by the Deputy would necessarily have to be found within that existing allocation and my Department has not received any request from the Garda authorities or from Muintir na Tire to reallocate resources along those lines. I should also advise the Deputy that local Garda management continue to engage with communities through the Joint Policing Committees and other fora to advise them of the relevant local policing arrangements, with a view to ensuring that the best possible policing service is provided to the public at all times.


13th June 2013 [28505/13] 132. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if he is satisfied that the adjustment

measures proposed in the Haddington Road Agreement for members of An Garda Síochána will not adversely impact upon the quality of policing provided at present in view of the closure of Garda stations and the overall reduction in funding provided to the Force in the past number of years; if he has commissioned a study on the impact of said measures; if so, if he will provide this information; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy Ref No: 28505/13

REPLY. The Haddington Road Agreement provides for a review of all aspects of the operation and administration of the Garda Síochána. All factors relevant to the continued delivery of an effective policing service will be taken into account in this review. The terms of the Review are to "encompass all aspects of the operation and administration of An Garda Síochána including:  the structure, organisation and staffing of An Garda Síochána;  the deployment of members and civilian staff to relevant and

appropriate roles;  the remuneration and conditions of service of members of An Garda

Síochána, including an evaluation of annualised hours/shift pay arrangements;  the appropriate structured and mechanism for the future resolution of matters relating to pay, industrial relations and attendance matters." 

The objective is, and will be, that at all times the most effective and efficient service is provided to the public at all times.


17th July 2013 [35703] 206. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality when he expects to move forward

with hiring of civilians to undertake administrative work within An Garda Síochána in order to free up Gardaí to detect and prevent crime; if there are any specific Districts or Divisions where the hiring of civilians will commence or has already commenced; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. The number of civilian staff in the Garda Síochána has increased in recent years to just over 2,000 whole time equivalent staff. Recruitment is carried out through the Public Appointments Service and the Commissioner is responsible for the detailed allocation of resources throughout the organisation. These staff continue to provide vital services in a wide range of areas, such as human resources, training & development, IT and telecommunications, finance and procurement, internal audit, research and analysis, accommodation and fleet management, scene-of-crime support and medical services. In doing so, they release highly trained Gardaí from administrative tasks to operational policing. Civilian staff have also been appointed to the senior management positions of Executive Director of Finance, Executive Director of IT and Head of Legal Affairs. The new Chief Administration Officer has also recently been appointed and a new Director of Communications is expected to take up that position in the near future. I have also received sanction form the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform for the recruitment of two forensic Accountants in the Garda Síochana. We will continue to maximise the number of civilian support staff in An Garda Síochána consistent with overall policy on numbers in the public service and taking into account the scope for the appropriate redeployment of staff from elsewhere in the public service as part of the reform process under the Haddington Road Agreement.


18th July 2013 [36135/16] 514. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will provide up to date figures detailing the total deployment of GardaĂ­ by region, division, district and sub-district across the country; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. The Deputy will be aware that the Garda Commissioner is responsible for the detailed allocation of resources, including personnel, throughout the organisation and I have no direct function in the matter. This allocation of resources is constantly monitored in the context of demographics, crime trends, policing needs and other operational strategies in place on a District, Divisional and Regional level to ensure optimum use is made of Garda resources and the best possible Garda service is provided to the public. I have however been informed by the Garda Commissioner that the personnel strength of every Garda Station, District, Division and Region broken down by rank on 30 June 2013, the latest date for which figures are readily available, is as set out in the table below.


8th October 2013 [42158/13] 458. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the reason redistribution of Garda

personnel so that areas with disproportionately low number of GardaĂ­ relative to their populations will have an increase in Garda personnel has not been among his police priorities; if he intends to make this one of his police priorities for the 2014 year; his reasons for that decision; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. The policing priorities for 2014 have not yet been finalised and are still under consideration. The Deputy will be aware that, as provided for in Section 33 of the Garda SĂ­ochana Act 2005, the Garda Commissioner shall determine the manner in which the Garda SĂ­ochana are to be distributed and stationed throughout the State.


8th October 2013 [42159/13] 459. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the minimum establishment required

for each district and the policing requirements of each division and the way they affect how Garda resources are distributed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. I can inform the Deputy that there is no minimum establishment required for each District. The Garda Commissioner is responsible for the detailed allocation of resources, including personnel, throughout the organisation and that I have no direct function in the matter. This allocation of resources is constantly monitored in the context of demographics, crime trends, policing needs and other operational strategies in place on a District, Divisional and Regional level to ensure optimum use is made of Garda resources and the best possible Garda service is provided to the public. Such monitoring ensures that optimum use is made of Garda resources and the best possible Garda service is provided to the general public.


8th October 2013 [42160/13] 460. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the average Garda time of

response to emergency calls in each district and division; the way this affects how Garda resources are distributed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. I am informed by the Garda authorities that statistics relating to Garda response times for emergency call-outs throughout the country are not readily available. In addition I understand that to compile the relevant figures would require a significant amount of resources which are required for other Garda purposes. The Deputy will be aware that the Commissioner is responsible for the detailed allocation of Garda resources, including personnel, throughout the organisation and I have been advised that the highest importance is given to emergency calls, to ensure that they are responded to on a priority basis. Furthermore, this is an area that is kept under on-going review and the Garda authorities are satisfied that the current service is effective in delivering efficient arrangements to communities.


8th October 2013 [42161/13] [42344/13] * 461. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the factors that were taken into account when deciding which Garda stations to close; the way those decisions were made; the way other Garda stations in the area will adjust to meet the needs of the communities once stations have closed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy * 466. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the steps being taken to address the shortage of An Garda Síochána in rural areas, particularly in the context where closures have been effected of Garda stations in rural areas; if it is proposed to put in place appropriate mobile patrols and other such measures; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Willie Penrose

REPLY. The Policing Plan for 2013, which I laid before the Oireachtas on 5 December 2012, outlined the Garda Commissioner's proposals for the continued reorganisation and consolidation of the Garda Station and District network. In preparing that plan, the Commissioner reviewed all aspects of the Garda Síochána’s policing model, including the deployment of personnel, the utilisation of modern technologies and the operation of Garda stations, both in terms of opening hours and possible closures. In addition, all Divisional Officers were asked to assess the level of activity in each Garda Station in their area. The Commissioner determined as a result of that review that a number of Garda stations should be closed and concluded that the communities covered by the areas in question could be better served by having Gardaí patrolling the areas rather than being confined to a specific premises. I fully agree with the Commissioner's determination in that regard. The revised structures will continue to support An Garda Síochána community policing philosophy through the clustering of services at policing hubs. The centralisation of services will facilitate the introduction of an enhanced grid patrolling system that will be operational and intelligence led. This patrol system will ensure that a high visibility and community oriented policing service continues to be delivered throughout the country. .


12th November 2013 [47925/13] 297. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of juvenile offenders in each county; the programmes under his Department's remit in place in each county to combat juvenile offences; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. The Annual Report of the Committee appointed to monitor the effectiveness of the Diversion Programme under Part 4 of the Children Act 2001, as amended, includes details of the number of incidents of youth crime and the number of individual children referred to the Programme each year. This information is broken down by Garda Region and Division and not by every county. The reports for period 2004 -2011 are available on the website of the Irish Youth Justice Service (www.iyjs.ie). I expect to be able to publish the report for 2012 shortly. However, in the meantime, I have been informed by Garda Commissioner that 12,246 children were referred to the Diversion Programme in 2012. This represents a 4% reduction on the number of children referred in 2011. The attached table gives a breakdown by Garda Region and Division. Tackling youth crime is a key priority for this Government. The youth justice system should be considered in its entirety, from the Garda Diversion Programme to the Children Courts. The principles of the Children Act 2001 require the various authorities to apply, incrementally, a series of "filters" or tests to each case where a child comes into conflict with the law. The first main filter is the Garda Diversion Programme, involving at different stages and depending on the seriousness of the offence, the informal caution and the formal (supervised) caution. Children admitted to the Programme engage with a Garda Juvenile Liaison Officer (JLO). JLOs receive training in restorative justice practices and mediation skills and work closely with local Community GardaĂ­. Where appropriate, children may be referred to a Garda Youth Diversion Project (GYDP). The GYDP are funded and administered by the Community Programmes Unit of the Irish Youth Justice Service. This unit makes up the Department of Justice and Equality element of IYJS which is located in the Department of Children and Youth Affairs. Garda Youth Diversion Projects are nationwide, community-based crime prevention initiatives which seek to divert young people from involvement in anti-social and/or criminal behaviour. The attached table shows a breakdown of the projects by Garda Region and Division. Other community based projects supported by IYJS include 5 Local Drugs Task Force Projects (four in Cork City and one in Dublin West) and 18 Young Persons Probation (YPP) Community Projects. Sixteen of the YPP Community Projects operate locally and the remaining two operate at a national level. The second main filter is the non-custodial sanctions available to the Courts, including dismissal under the Probation Act, unsupervised sanctions (fines, disqualification, peace bond, curfew etc.), Probation supervised sanctions (community service and other community sanctions). Finally, as a last resort, detention may be used. Other Government Departments can also support youth crime prevention through social measures which promote the well-being of people and encourage pro-social behaviour through social, economic, health and educational measures, with a particular emphasis on children and youth, and focus on the risk and protective factors associated with


crime and victimisation. While the principal motivation for many of these responses is one of welfare and equality, programmes of this nature have also been found to reduce offending by improving life opportunities and outcomes generally. For example, my colleague the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Frances Fitzgerald T.D. provides funding to support the provision of quality youth provision throughout the country. This funding supports the provision of youth services and programmes to young people including those from disadvantaged communities. Targeted supports for disadvantaged, marginalised and at risk young people are provided through the Special Projects for Youth Scheme, the Young Peoples Facilities and Services Fund and youth-related Local Drugs Task Force Projects. Table: Number of children referred to the Diversion Programme in 2012 Region Region Division Total

Dublin Metropolitan Region (DMR)

3910

(The Dublin Region has 31 Garda Youth Diversion Projects, 8 Young Persons Probation Community Projects and 1 IYJS-funded Local Drugs Task Force projects) Eastern Region (The Eastern Region has 13 Garda Youth Diversion Projects) Northern Region

1267

(The Northern Region has 9 Garda Youth Diversion Projects and 1 Young Persons Probation Community Project) South Eastern Region

1422

(The South Eastern Region has 14 Garda Youth Diversion Projects) Southern Region (The Southern Region has 23

2525

Number of Garda Youth Diversion Projects

DMR Eastern

431

3

DMR North Central

291

5

1013

4

DMR. South Central

217

2

DMR Southern

801

7

DMR Western

1157

10

Kildare

447

2

Laois/Offaly

307

5

Meath

305

2

Westmeath

225

2

Wicklow

340

2

Cavan/Monaghan

341

2

Donegal

413

2

Louth

337

4

Sligo/Leitrim

176

1

Kilkenny/Carlow

357

2

Tipperary

320

4

Waterford

380

5

Wexford

365

3

Cork City

765

7

Cork North

408

3

Cork West

292

1

DMR Northern

1624

Total Number of Children referred


Garda Youth Diversion Projects, 6 Young Persons Probation Community Projects and 4 IYJS-funded Local Drug Task Force projects) Western Region

1389

(The Western Region has 10 Garda Youth Diversion Projects and 1 Young Persons Probation Community Project) Outside Jurisdiction National Total

109

Kerry

397

6

Limerick

663

6

Clare

324

2

Galway

564

4

Mayo

264

2

Roscommon/Longford

237

2

109 12246

100


12th November 2013 [47928/13] 414. To ask the Minister for Health the position regarding illegal drug use by youth for each

county; the programmes that are in place in each county to combat this issue; and if he will make a statement on the matter. Catherine Murphy T.D.

REPLY. The Drug Prevalence Survey 2010/2011 reports on prevalence rates for illegal drugs in the general population, including young people aged 15-34. Bulletin 2 of the survey, which is available on the National Advisory Committee on Drugs and Alcohol website atwww.nacda.ie, presents the prevalence rates in Ireland, by Regional Drugs Task Force area. Local and Drugs Task Forces operate a range of education and prevention programmes locally which aim to promote healthier lifestyle choices among young people and other vulnerable groups at risk of problem drug use. Provision of youth-specific addiction services is primarily the responsibility of the HSE and accordingly I have asked the HSE to respond directly to the Deputy regarding services available at county level.


19th November 2013 [49458/13] 532. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of Gardaí that have applied under each early retirement scheme introduced in the past five years by location and grade; the number of Gardaí who have voluntarily retired by location and grade; the number of compulsory retirements by location and grade; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy REPLY. I have been informed by the Garda Commissioner that the number of members who have retired under the Cost Neutral Early Retirement (CNER) scheme, broken down by rank, on 31 December 2009 to 2012 and on 1 November 2013, the latest date for which figures are readily available, was as set out in the table hereunder:

Rank

31/12/09 31/12/10 31/12/11 31/12/12

1/11/13

Commissioner D/Commissioner A/Commissioner C/Superintendent Superintendent Inspector Sergeant Garda Total

0

1

1

1

2

1

1 2

1 2

3 5

In general, members of An Garda Síochána may retire on a voluntary basis once they have reached 50 years of age and have accrued 30 years’ service. Members must retire on compulsory age grounds on reaching the age of 60. I have further been informed by the Garda Commissioner that the number of members who have either retired or applied to retire by 31 December 2013, both compulsory and voluntary, broken down by rank for 2013 was as set out in the table hereunder:

Rank

Vol

Comp

Commissioner

0

0

D/Commissioner

1

0

A/Commissioner

0

1

C/Superintendent

0

1

Superintendent

16

0

Inspector

12

1

Sergeant

68

0

Garda

168

8

Total

265

12

The information requested in relation to location is not readily available and would require a disproportionate amount of time to collate in relation to the information sought.


19th November 2013 [49459/13] 533. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will provide detailed up to date information on the current Garda vehicle fleet, including the manufacturer, model and current distribution of vehicles by district and division; the number of vehicles that are approaching the upper acceptable mileage and upper acceptable age for use as Garda vehicles; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. The provision and allocation of Garda resources, including transport, is a matter for the Garda Commissioner. In turn, the deployment of Garda vehicles is kept under on-going review by the Garda authorities and revised in response to policing demands. This flexibility in allocating and re-allocating vehicles, so as to best match the allocation of resources with priorities, is crucial to the efficient management of the Garda fleet. As a consequence, the Deputy will appreciate that it is not practicable to provide these figures at District level. However, I am informed by the Garda authorities that the current Garda fleet consists of 2,459 vehicles, comprised of a number of makes/models, including: Ford, Toyota, Honda, Opel, Fiat, Citroen, Volvo, Renault, Nissan and others. In that context, I am advised by the Garda authorities that the number of Garda vehicles by Division at the end of October 2013 is set out in the attached table. Division

No.

CAVAN-MONAGHAN

49

CLARE

44

CORK CITY

113

CORK NORTH

39

CORK WEST

46

DMR EAST

52

DMR NORTH

109

DMR NORTH CENTRAL

65

DMR SOUTH

78

DMR SOUTH CENTRAL

68

DMR TRAFFIC

61

DMR WEST

106

DONEGAL

58

GALWAY

79

KERRY

38


KILDARE

46

KILKENNY/CARLOW

51

LAOIS-OFFALY

47

LIMERICK

70

LOUTH

45

MAYO

52

MEATH

53

NATIONAL UNITS

768

ROSCOMMONLONGFORD

40

SLIGO-LEITRIM

48

TIPPERARY

50

WATERFORD

50

WESTMEATH

42

WEXFORD

42

WICKLOW

50

TOTAL

2,459

Garda vehicles are retired for a variety of reasons, including where vehicles are considered beyond economic repair or as a result of accidents. I understand from the Garda authorities that the relevant manufacturers have indicated that, for safety reasons, patrol cars should be withdrawn from service when the odometer reading reaches 300,000 kilometres. Accordingly, this is the operational policy that is applied by the Garda authorities. Based on current usage, it is estimated that 93 vehicles may be retired between now and the end of the year. I am conscious of the continuing pressures on the Garda fleet and, in that regard, I am very pleased to have secured a further €9m for investment in the fleet, made up of €5m in 2013 and a further €4m in 2014. At this stage, arising from the additional €5m which has recently been made available, the Garda authorities have arranged for the delivery of 305 new vehicles by the end of 2013. These are in addition to the 133 new Garda vehicles already made available during the year. The most recent investment will bring to €18m the total amount spent on the Garda fleet for the three years 2012 to 2014. This represents a very considerable financial investment in Garda transport, particularly at a time when the level of funding available across the public sector is severely limited. It is a clear indication of my commitment to ensure that, to the greatest extent possible, An Garda Síochána are provided with sufficient resources to enable them to deliver an effective and efficient policing service.


19th November 2013 [49460/13] 534. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the numbers of GardaĂ­ available in each region who have been trained to conduct specialist child interviews as part of the joint protocol with the Health Service Executive; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. As the Deputy will appreciate, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for the distribution of personnel among the Garda Regions, Divisions, and Districts, the various Garda national units and of course Garda Headquarters. Garda management keep this distribution under continuing review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities so as to ensure that the best possible use is made of these resources. I have been informed by the Garda Commissioner that the number of GardaĂ­, in each region, trained to conduct specialist child interviews, are as set out in the table below: Region

Garda

Dublin Metropolitan Region

21

Northern Region

11

Eastern Region

9

Western Region

11

South Eastern Region

11

Southern Region

10


20th November 2013 [49627/13] 148. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the funding provided to the Irish Youth Justice Service in 2013; and if he will make a statement on the matter.

Reply Minister for Justice and Equality (Deputy Alan Shatter): The Irish Youth Justice Service (IYJS) operates across my Department and the Department of Children and Youth Affairs and is staffed by officials from both Departments. The Minister for Children and Youth Affairs has responsibility for the Children Detention Schools and the associated budget. As Minister for Justice and Equality, I have responsibility for the Community Programmes Unit of IYJS. The IYJS Community Programmes Unit has responsibility for policy advice on youth crime prevention, diversion and community sanctions. It is in also responsible for the oversight and funding of Youth Justice Community Programmes. It works closely with An Garda Síochána, the Probation Service and community based organisations. The 2013 budget for Youth Justice Community Programmes is €17.222 million. This is made up of €465,000 for IYJS administration costs and €16.757 million for community based projects. These projects include 100 Garda Youth Diversion Projects (GYDPs) nationwide, 18 Young Persons Probation community projects and 5 Local Drug Task Force (LDTF) projects. Tackling youth crime is a key priority of Government and I am committed to continuing support for these projects which play an important role in supporting the diversion of young people from the criminal justice system and in offering an alternative to custody.


26th November 2013 [50532/13] 504. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of Garda Juvenile Liaison Officers in each county to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy REPLY. As the Deputy will appreciate, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for the distribution of personnel among the Garda Regions, Divisions and Districts, the various Garda national units and of course Garda Headquarters. Garda management keep this distribution under continuing review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities so as to ensure that the best possible use is made of these resources. I been informed by the Garda Commissioner that the number of Juvenile Liaison Officers attached to each Division on 31 October 2013, the latest date for which figures are readily available, was as set out in the table hereunder:

Total

Division

JLO

D.M.R. SC

6

D.M.R. NC

4

D.M.R. North

12

D.M.R. East

6

D.M.R. South

10

D.M.R. West

11

Waterford

4

Wexford

3

Tipperary

3

Kilkenny/Carlow

2

Cork City

7

Cork North

3

Cork West

2

Kerry

4

Limerick

6

Donegal

3

Cavan/Monaghan

2

Sligo/Leitrim

2

Louth

3

Clare

2

Mayo

2

Galway

4

Roscommon/Longford

2

Westmeath

2

Meath

3

Kildare

3

Laois/Offaly

2

Wicklow

4 117


26th November 2013 [50285/13] 497. To ask the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of GardaĂ­ that were

transferred by division to new divisions in 2010, 2011, 2012 and to date in 2013; the extent to which this occurred because of the Garda Commissioner’s policing plan; the extent to which it occurred because of changing demographics or crime trends; the difficulties in transferring Garda between divisions; and if he will make a statement on the matter. - Catherine Murphy

REPLY. I have requested the detailed information sought by the Deputy from the Garda Commissioner and as soon as it is to hand I will pass it on to the Deputy.


Summary position paper on garda resourcing in kildare  

A compilation of Parliamentary Questions and Answers and a critical analysis of Garda resource distribution based on the information gathere...