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NEW HAMPSHIRE:

OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 2014


IFC


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRO IMPETUS: NOT GOOD ENOUGH VISION & VALUES EMBRACING COMPETENCIES SUPPORTING TEACHERS LEVERAGING STAKEHOLDERS INTEGRATING THE SYSTEM EXAMPLES OF PROGRESS LESSONS LEARNED QUESTIONS & CHALLENGES TRACKING PROGRESS CONCLUSION


WE ALL KNOW THE GROUND IS SHIFTING BENEATH OUR FEET, THE WORLD IS CHANGING AND OUR SCHOOLS NEED TO AS WELL. WE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE HAVE


RECOGNIZED THAT FOR A WHILE AND WE ARE FOCUSING ON TRANSFORMING INSTRUCTION BY EMPOWERING STUDENTS AND EDUCATORS.


In New Hampshire, we see education as a critical driver for both the economic development of aour state and the underpinnings of our democracy. Neither is truly possible unless we invest in a 21st century system of education, from birth through adult. We are clear that the knowledge economy will not wait for our students if they are not prepared with the right mix of the knowledge, skills and dispositions.

EDUCATION IS A CRITICAL DRIVER FOR BOTH THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF OUR STATE AND THE UNDERPINNINGS OF OUR DEMOCRACY. Our local communities matter deeply here, so we have come to see the role of the New Hampshire Department of Education (NHDOE) as one of support for improving and innovating within districts rather than as an arbiter of those

We chose to tell this story in a way that models the transformation we seek—multiple modalities rich with diverse opportunities to not only read, watch and listen, but also apply the material, data and artifacts to your own work. We also recognize that we all digest content differently today, and therefore this publication

efforts. This publication represents our state’s collective story—one of the successes and struggles to transform an entire education system in a way that is done from the bottom up rather than the top down—to promote ownership that can result in real and lasting change. The fabric of our education system is knitted together with many hands: strong leaders, teachers and families who are on the frontlines and demand the best for our young people. Elected officials who understand and help drive the development of policy to support this shift. Our business community, which recognizes that success is inextricably linked to investing in our schools. The higher education institutions that work tirelessly to prepare our learners for success in the workplace. The education partnerships both locally and nationally that help us design and support our vision. Successful transformation of our system is not feasible without the aligned contribution of all of these voices, but as you can imagine that effort is complex. This publication is a space to share and synthesize this complexity; to reflect on our hard fought accomplishments and lessons learned as we hold steady to the belief that only through clarity of purpose and aligned vision will we continue to dramatically improve the outcomes for all of our students.

was designed to let you consume information on different levels, based on interest. Additionally, as a state moving towards competency-based learning system-wide, this publication offers a series of “evidences” of work throughout our state to demonstrate the progress and good work.


TITLE FOR INFOGRAPHIC HERE

population (2013):

population:

1,323,459

316,128,839

# school age children (5-17)

# school age children:

208,887

49,600,000

Ethnic Groups

Ethnic Groups

94.4% white

2.4% Asian 1.4% Black 3.0% Hispanic

5.1% Asian

median household income

$64,925

median household income

13.1% Black

77.9% white

16.9% Hispanic population growth:

population growth:

0.22%

child poverty

$53,046

0.75%

15.6%

OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 4


REASONS TO INNOVATE An outdated model. Our traditional learning model values time instead of mastery. We care that our students have learned—through a variety of personalized methods, not bound by the classroom walls—and can show evidence of their learning through authentic assessments and move on when ready. Higher education and workforce needs:

• B y 2018, 64 percent of our state’s jobs will require post-secondary education making it even more critical that we create pathways from our K-12 schools to our community colleges and university system.

• O ver the next 10 years, nearly two-thirds of job opportunities in New Hampshire will come from replacement needs from retirement or workers who have changed occupations.

• H  ealthcare will be one of our fastest growing job markets. An estimated one out of every nine workers will be in the healthcare field.

• F  or every 100 bachelor’s degrees produced annually in New Hampshire, 86 degree holders ages 22-64 enter the state and 78 people ages 22-64 with bachelor’s degrees leave making a net gain of 8 degrees per 10018. That means we need to continue to work together to create jobs and opportunities for our young, educated workforce.

THE IMPETUS FOR CHANGE While New Hampshire has historically been a top performer in the country, as evidenced by comparatively high graduation rates from high school and standardized exams (such as the NAEP and SAT), the state has not been content to rest on its laurels. Rather, there been a growing dissatisfaction with the system on the part of educational leaders and the business community. Over the past decade, this has manifested itself as a growing move toward competency-based system.

THE FIRST CHALLENGE OF LEADERSHIP IS TO BE WILLING TO MAKE DIFFICULT DECISIONS WHILE THEY STILL HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO SHAPE FUTURE OUTCOMES. While New Hampshire has historically been a top performer in the country, as evidenced by comparatively high graduation rates from high school and standardized exams (such as the NAEP and SAT), the state has not been content to rest on its laurels. Rather, there been a growing dissatisfaction with the system on the part of educational leaders and the business community. Over the past decade, this has manifested itself as a growing move toward


KEY EVENTS IN OUR HISTORY TO SUPPORT A SHIFT 2013

‘13 Review of the Minimum Standards for School Approval, which did TKTK17.

15 ‘13 ESEA Flexibility Waiver . New Hampshire took advantage of the U.S. Depa

of Education’s invitation to request flexibility pertaining to specific requirem of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. In exchange, New Hampshire mus develop and implement comprehensive initiatives designed to improve ed within the state16.

‘11 ‘10

‘13 New Hampshire Task Force on Effective Teaching Phase II Report. The Pha task force was convened to implement the Phase I Report by designing a practical approach to teacher evaluation14.

‘08 ‘07 ‘06 ‘05 ‘04

‘11 NHDOE convened a task force in order to design a clear vision for a “fair13 a equitable” teacher evaluation system, and produced the Phase I Report .

11 ‘10 NESSC Policy Framework for Proficiency Based Graduation . In 2010, Mai

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont passed joint resolutions of s for the New England Secondary School Consortium (NESSC), a partnershi working to develop innovations in the design and implementation of secon education12.

the compulsory age in which students must sta ‘08 New Hampshire changed 9

school from 16 to 18 , which made a significant impact on the dropout rate statewide—in the 2011-12 school year dropout rates were 1.26% compared national average TKTK10.

7 ‘10 Nellie Mae Education Foundation Extended Learning Pilot . Four ELO pilot

were given substantial financial support and technical assistance in order ‘07 develop comprehensive programs designed8 to provide all students with th opportunity to participate in an ELO project .

‘06 Awarded the National Governors Association’s (NGA) Supporting Student

‘98

(S3) grant4, which allocates $50K for integrating expanded learning opport (ELO) into state education reform agendas5. With the funds, New Hampsh a program that gave high school students an opportunity to earn credit for part in ELOs, which led to a reduction in the dropout rate among participat students6.

‘05 We enact a change to the Minimum Standards3 for School Approval stating competencies must be implemented by 2008.

’04- New Hampshire launches a competency-based education pilot in 27 high ‘98

1995

1 ‘95 Interest in credentialing learning, particularly within the business sector.

OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 6


WHY GOOD ENOUGH High School Graduation Rate in 2010 86.3%

New Hampshire1

Nationally, New Hampshire

78.2%

National Average2

has been and continues to be an effective system of learning when compared with other states, but that doesn’t mean we’re prepared to rest on our laurels.

In 2012, New Hampshire’s dropout rate was

3

1.2%

compared to the national rate of

7%

4

Why? In 2008, New Hampshire changed the compulsory age

of schooling from 16 to 185, making a significant impact on the dropout rate statewide. One year after legislation, dropout rates 6 7 decreased from 2.5% to 1.7% . A Look at Standardized Tests Combined SAT Scores (YEAR) For more SAT scores, click here.

1498

1567

8th Grade NAEP Scores (2013) Reading8

266

Four-year college or university Other than a fouryear college Armed Forces Employed

Math9

284

Post-graduation plans for New Hampshire high school seniors10

Unemployed

296

Unknown


IS NOT GOOD ENOUGH Four Year College Graduation Rate11 62%

39%

New Hampshire

National Average

Average Income Across Education Levels18 High School Graduates

Associate’s Degree

$33,390 $29,423

Bachelor’s Degree

$42,768 $38,607

$51,322 $50,360

For every 100 bachelor’s degrees produced annually in New Hampshire, 86 degree holders ages 22-64 enter the state

&

Top Industries in New Hampshire & Mean Annual Wage12 Office & Admin

Food Service

Production

78 people ages 22-64

with bachelor’s degrees leave making a net gain of 8 degrees per 100

From 2010 to 2020, total employment in NH is expected to grow by 10.4%, an estimated increase of 662,146 to 730,710 jobs. Projected growth for the U.S. is 14.3%13.

$38,330

Construction jobs are expected to grow 25%, with over 5,300 jobs added.14

$21,990

Education, Training & Library

An estimated one out of every nine workers will be in the healthcare field.15

$47,520

Over the next 10 years, nearly 66% of job opportunities in NH will come from replacing retirees or those who changed careers.16

$35,760

Healthcare Management

$66,039 $68,064

The Future of Jobs

$34,620

Sales & Related

Graduate or Professional Degree

$77,070 $106,490

By 2018, 64% of Hew Hampshire’s jobs will require post-secondary education.17

Our Childrens’ Health Children and Teens Overweight or Obese19

26% 31%

Low Birth Weight Rate20

7.1% 8.1%

2008 teen birth rate per 1,000 births21

7.1% 8.1% OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 8


OUR VISION FOR EDUCATION IN THE GRANITE STATE FOUR VALUES

One of the most important things we have done as a state is to anchor the change we seek against our values. These four values are what we collectively need to be aiming towards, supporting, designing, innovating and measuring to create the learning New Hampshire wants and needs.

1 2 3 4

Our children deserve a personalized, competencybased learning environment that lets them move on when ready.

Our educators deserve and need high quality, ongoing support.

Local is our driver of change. Our communities must be the leaders of the transformation we seek.

We need a seamless system of collaboration amidst the stages of a person’s life— starting from early childhood to K-12, post-secondary and our workforce.

The future of personalized, competency-based learning in New Hampshire. Deputy Commissioner Paul Leather talks about the next steps on the competency journey.


Watch Fred Bramante talk through the history of competencies.

VALUE ONE: EMBRACING COMPETENCY Our children deserve a personalized, competencybased learning environment that lets them move on when ready. Competency-based learning fundamentally shifts the learning experience. From a policy standpoint, it means that our schools are not bound by the Carnegie Unit to illustrate student learning. What does that look like? In a traditional, Carnegiebased environment, a student might receive a D in middle school language arts—that D could mean many things: perhaps the student missed a lot of class because of family trouble and therefore didn’t hand in classwork or homework and that lowered their grade significantly; or maybe they really struggled with an element of literacy and writing. That student might have mastered some components of the class, but the D doesn’t leave much room for understanding the student’s proficiencies and barriers. With that grade, the student would still transition to the next level of

Leaders talking about their what excites them/vision for future learning in NH

learning, increasing the chances he or she would potentially fall farther behind. If the purpose of school is to ensure students learn what they need to succeed in life after they leave our classrooms, then moving kids on when they aren’t ready doesn’t make much sense. Nor did it make sense for us to not clarify the specific learning outcomes of the course and whether a student met them. With all of this in mind, we’ve flipped the traditional model so that mastery was the goal and time was the variable. Learners’ questions change from: “Am I passing?” To “How do I show mastery?” Building from this core vision, we have prioritized moving to competency-based learning system-wide as our goal to prepare each student for success in College, Careers and Life.

The History of Competencybased Learning In TKTK, we came together as a state under the leadership of former Governor John Lynch and former Education Commissioner Lyonel B. Tracy and decided to look closely at how we were designing our schools and why. Like many educators across the country, we had become frustrated

with the inflexibility and often illogical conditions we had created that seemed to inhibit rather than enable student learning. We asked ourselves some challenging questions, including: what role time was playing in the school day and year; how do we define a learning experience; how could we better connect learning in the classroom to the real-world experience students yearned for; and how could we truly design a system that was centered on student rather than adult needs. After constructive debate and conversations, we moved to revise the Minimum Standards for School Approval to better reflect the schools of the future we wanted. These standards included many shifts that fundamentally changed the landscape of school, two being:

 ove from traditional M Carnegie Unit grading system to competency-based grading. The revised standards required that all of our high schools transition from a Carnegie-unit system that awards student credit for learning based on time spent in a course of study to true mastery of learning.

OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 10


• Extended

The Role of a Networked State in Helping Us Get There In 2012, NHDOE fundamentally redesigned how the state supports New Hampshire educators. Rather than offer a one-size fits all approach to professional development, the state shifted to the logic of demand-driven networks, to help support both improvement and innovation. Click here to read more. >>

Learning Opportunities: Students are able to show mastery of learning through outside-theclassroom experiences. What

this meant in practice is that a young woman engaging in an internship at a local tech company, in which she has to propose and design mockups for an app to solve a problem for her community would be able to use that learning experience to count towards her graduation credit. No longer are we siloing learning—just like adults, who have the opportunity to learn in their jobs, communities, families, etc.—our students deserve that same opportunity. The future of personalized, competency-based learning in New Hampshire. Deputy Commissioner Paul Leather talks about the next steps on the competency journey.

VALUE TWO: SUPPORTING EDUCATORS All educators deserve and need high quality, ongoing support Network theory lives in the belief that relationships between educators; between professional learning coaches and schools; and between students and teachers are powerful ways to transport knowledge. Rather than continue to support districts in solely 1:1 environments, which is both less sustainable and no longer models quickly evolving ways we work, it has been a goal to harness the power of the group through strong, well organized topical networks that align to the overarching goals of change in our state. As educator and researcher Alan Daly, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Diego, and a champion

of network theory says, “Social network theory posits that the structure of social relationships may influence the direction, speed, and depth of organizational change.” These professional learning networks were built in direct response to the needs of our schools. Within the networks, each led by talented experts (either NHDOE staff or local/ regional/national partners), participants are connected to each other, to meaningful content and to learning experiences. All of our networks not only exist within face-to-face workshops, meetings and sessions, but also on our online platform, The New Hampshire Network—making this a state-wide move to blending and individualizing our professional learning supports. This platform, which is housed in our myNHDOE Single Sign On system, is the virtual space to connect all of our educators and schools. We currently have TKTK users actively engaged in the platform through online discussions, designing and taking learning paths, sharing resources, utilizing the calendar, building their own personal connections and favorite libraries. This approach has increased the communication and collaboration across our state, which is a core tenet of the transformation we seek. The platform and network strategy continues to evolve and iterate to meet the needs of all our educators.

VALUE THREE: LOCAL DRIVES CHANGE Our communities must be the leaders of the transformation we seek“Live Free or Die”—New

Hampshire’s well-known state motto, dating from General John Stark’s words in 1809—continues to mean something important in this state, as evidenced by the long tradition of


local control with strong communitybased governance of the state’s public schools. In that context, there is the need for real, genuine and continuous engagement to ensure that stakeholders feel like participants in driving transformation efforts. Therefore, all major efforts for change pass through extensive dialogue with leaders from throughout the state. One example of this is TKTK. We may move slower in moments but without consensus, we cannot be successful.

VALUE FOUR: INTEGRATED LEARNING ECOSYSTEM We need to create a seamless system of aligned collaboration across Early Childhood, K12, Postsecondary and Workforce Development In New Hampshire, we are clear that the K12 system cannot exist in a vacuum. We have a strong belief in the need for a more seamless approach across these sectors to more effectively support student learning. Gone are the days of silos—that was a luxury in an era of greater resources.

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It also isolated promising practice and hindered the linkages needed to foment change within each of the systems. We also believe that deeper collaboration can propel our state’s economic development.

Cick to learn more about STEAM Ahead

OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 12


PROGRESS ON THE GROUND As evidenced by our values, there are a number of key efforts underway in this state to bring about the transformation we all seek. Given all of the moving parts afoot across our state, we have often struggled to provide an organizing framework against which all the pieces make sense as part of a broader fabric. Absent that coherence, it can feel like an array of unconnected initiatives.


After working through a number of different homemade and “store-bought” frameworks, Harvard professor and education scholar, Richard Elmore’s instructional core struck us for its clarity, reason and simplicity. The instructional core, as Elmore designed, is made up of four components: meaningful content and skills, student engagement, instructional quality and rich tasks. Elmore’s theory of change is that true transformation of student learning and performance is only possible if you are impacting those four levers. Put differently, what is being taught (the curriculum) and how you’re assessing it, students’ experiences with the learning, the excellence of the teachers and the relationships between educator and student are the most critical elements in moving the needle forward. We have begun to apply Elmore’s core as the lens for how we make system-wide decisions, analyze their relevancy and assess their success. The beauty of this framework, though, is its flexibility and inclusive discipline—it helps us be more mindful in our support and celebration of the models that will build New Hampshire’s transformation. Continue through this section to read and watch how our schools and SAUs have shifted learning.

“BECAUSE AT THE END OF THE DAY EDUCATORS ARE DOING THE MOST IMPORTANT CHALLENGING AND ESSENTIAL WORK IN A DEMOCRACY.” – GOVERNOR MAGGIE HASSAN

Meaningful Content Meaningful content—what is taught, why it’s emphasized and to what depth—is all embodied in meaningful content. New Hampshire schools are emphasizing a rigorous curriculum and many have adopted the New Hampshire College and Career Ready Standards, which shifts curriculum from a broad focus to a deep one. Science, technology, engineering and mathematics are particularly critical to New Hampshire’s future since many of the states 21st century jobs are in this sector, and that emphasis on STEM is reflected in districts from around the state, as well as being able to think critically, collaborate, read, write well and thoughtfully. Watch these districts stories on their path to ensure all courses are designed with meaningful content and purpose.

Meanigful Content Skills

Rich Tasks

Student Engagment

Instructional Quality

Instructional Quality Instructional quality is a core element to our education system. In this video hear from a range of districts from across our state that have empowered and supported their educators to facilitate rich learning experiences in their classrooms.

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OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 14


Student Engagement Student engagement—the extent to which students feel connected, interested, motivated and empowered to dig deeper, learn more and push themselves to the next level of knowledge—is a key component to how these New Hampshire schools assess their impact. There isn’t one path to cultivating high levels of student engagement, but what all the SAUs here have in common is an unwavering effort to ensure learning is relevant and that the young people in front of them experiencing and creating knowledge each day.

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Rich Tasks

Technology’s Role

“The task predicts performance,” writes Elmore. Considering Bloom’s Taxonomy, if you design assessments focused on low-level recall you will receive low-level learning. As a state, we’ve amplified our effort to support all educators in designing rich tasks through our journey with competency-based learning and the performance assessment network, hear some of our schools and SAUs stories here.

Technology is not the shining suit of armor or the savior of all our education challenges, but it’s certainly critical in enabling conditions of success and expanding the opportunities of our educators and learners. Listen to how some SAUs have applied technology as a disruptive innovation in their environments.

Cick to hear audio clips


TITLE FOR INFOGRAPHIC

4,869 total teachers

209,495 total students

$53,702

185,278 public 4,358 academies/JMA 1,169 charters

average teacher salary

465

public K-12 schools (including charters)

12.3:1

studnet/teacher ratio

~$2.76B

total expenditures

$15,758 per pupil

OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 16


REFLECTIONS ON WHERE WE ARE AND WHERE WE NEED TO GO

FROM OUR EFFORTS TO DATE, WE ARE LEARNING A GREAT DEAL. SOME OF OUR KEY LESSONS INCLUDE: While policy is essential, it is insufficient by itself. The policy change paves the way for the possible, which is only attainable through the hard work of supporting practitioners.

Local is not only a core value but a necessary lens here. As we signaled earlier

in this document, the only way change can be successful is through real, ongoing engagement with our local education and community leaders.

Talented partners are a driving force. Capacity and resources are always limited. We have chosen to make targeted investments in an array of local and national partner organizations. This has been a significant boost to our efforts and these

groups have provided much needed capacity and expertise

Doing more with less. In New Hampshire, as a relatively small state and seemingly homogenous state, we have not received significant outside investment to support our transformation. Therefore, we have needed to be strategic with where we chose to invest time and limited resources. This also prompts a series of trade-offs. Maintaining balance in a complex environment. At any moment, we are torn

between a range of high priority issues and crises and remaining laser-focused on our core values.

The field needs greater coherence. Despite our best efforts, we are not yet at a place where we are as consistent or focused in our message.


CHALLENGES AND QUESTIONS AS WE MOVE FORWARD Bureaucracy is a challenge. From procurement to messaging to customer service, we are challenged by being an organism that is not built to be nimble and promote/reward risk taking.

Navigating a Shifting Accountability System. We

are working closely with the United States Department of Education based on our state’s value system to support all students reaching competencies at their own pace and moving away from a punitive system to a system of recognition. We are building a system of autonomy, trust and local responsibly that emphasizes competent and confident students emerging from our education system. One of the biggest challenges facing us as a state is that the system we are building is in stark opposition to the

Federal approach to accountability that is more focused on punishment than reward and focused on students at the grain size of cohort instead of individual on a timeline of annual versus every day. When you build an approach that is moving away from the designation of a fifth grader altogether, and federal reporting requires the performance of fifth graders, you have a disconnect.

How We’re Supporting the Next Phases of this Transformation As we develop our next accountability system we will be requesting the ability to pilot collaboratively developed innovative practices in college and career readiness and in performance assessment of competency education.

• Assessment and accountability is in transition (toward CBE) as we determine whether we will seek another ESEA Accountability Waiver. • Teacher/Leader Pipeline at a time when teachers’ role/profession is changing TKTK. • Building buy-in and ownership. Change is challenging TKTK.

OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 18


MEASURING SUCCESS As a system, in service of this broad vision and these foundational values, we have designed a set of milestones at which we are aiming because we are certain that our system is not currently tracking and managing all of the right things. And, to paraphrase the old business leadership adage, what gets measured gets attention. Therefore, it’s critical that we begin tracking a small number of new measures over the coming years in the spirit of transparent learning to fuel the dynamic transformation of our system. This is a huge undertaking and it will take time. Therefore, we need a way to keep score, track our activities and have some way of knowing whether or not each element and the overall effort is working. That will enable us to scale up efforts that are proving successful, and to scrap/tweak/invent new in other places. • Student outcomes data- including both academic measurements, as well as other non-cognitive measures of students growth • Number of fully competency-based schools and districts • College persistence rates, including clarity around key attributes that contribute to college persistence • Postsecondary training completion rates and how that translates to employment data • Explicit alignment and collaboration among ECE and K12 and between K12 and P2/ WFD, including accountability to same/similar metrics on either side of these critical student transitions


OUR STORY OF TRANSFORMATION 20


CLOSE (reinforce action-oriented transformation with commitment to transparency and collectively moving our state forward against an explicit change manage strategy + transparent learning agenda)

Other final sections: Thank you to all collaborators—a page that lists out all the collaborators who participated in the videos and the making of the piece.

End Notes from page 6 Leather, Paul. “NH School Approval Standards: Next Steps.” SmartEDU. Web. <http://smartedu.org/nhsaa/ custforms/cia/2013%20Curriculum,%20Instruction,%20 and%20Assessment%20Conference/Paul%20 Leather%20-%20New%20School%20Approval.pdf>.

1

2

Ibid.

3

Ibid.

4

Supporting Student Success: The Promise of Expanded Learning Opportunities., Dec. 2010. Web. <http://www. ncsl.org/documents/educ/1101studentsuccess.pdf>. Council of Chief State School Officers, National Conference of State Legislatures, and National Governors Association Center for Best Practices. Supporting Student Success: The Promise of Expanded Learning Opportunities., Dec. 2010. Web. <http://www.ncsl.org/documents/ educ/1101studentsuccess.pdf>.

[1] 

Ibid. Council of Chief State School Officers, National Conference of State Legislatures, and National Governors Association Center for Best Practices.

5

[1]

Leather, Paul. “NH School Approval Standards: Next Steps.” SmartEDU. Web. <http://smartedu.org/nhsaa/

custforms/cia/2013%20Curriculum,%20Instruction,%20 and%20Assessment%20Conference/Paul%20 Leather%20-%20New%20School%20Approval.pdf>. Zuliani, Ivana, and Steven Ellis. The New Hampshire Extended Learning Opportunities Evaluation: Final Report of Evaluation Findings. Rep. University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute, May 2011. Web. <http://www.education.nh.gov/innovations/elo/ documents/evaluation.pdf>.

[1] 

http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED544499.pdf

[1] 

http://www.education.nh.gov/data/documents/

[1] 

dropouts07_08.pdf http://www.education.nh.gov/data/documents/ dropouts08_09.pdf

[1] 

Zuliani, Ivana, and Steven Ellis. The New Hampshire Extended Learning Opportunities Evaluation: Final Report of Evaluation Findings. Rep. University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute, May 2011. Web. <http://www.education.nh.gov/innovations/elo/ documents/evaluation.pdf>.

[1] 

http://www.education.nh.gov/teaching/documents/ phase1report.pdf [1]


IBC


BACK COVER

New Hampshire Story of Transformation  

New Hampshire is transforming its K-12 education sector, leveraging new technologies to become a model of next generation learning. Read abo...

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