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L6 Photography Mock Exam: Secrets, Codes & Conventions Date of Exam:

LAB (5 hours on Monday 23rd April 2018) LDC (5 hours on Tuesday 24th April 2018) top 8 students on register only (Surnames A - R) LDC (5 hours on Wednesday 25th April 2018) bottom 9 students on register only (Surnames S - Z) LEF (5 hours on Wednesday 25th April 2018) Final deadline for the whole project for all students: Thurs 10th May 4.00 P.M. Specific exam information now on slide 3 (timings / rules etc.)


The Index Exam information: page 3 Individual Project Requirements: pages 4 & 5 Uploading Order: Pages 6 - 9 Help with Task 4: pages 10 & 11 Help with writing annotations: pages 12 & 13 Information on where to find artist analysis question: page 14 Week by week breakdown: pages 15 - 17 Definition of ‘Secrets, ‘Codes’, ‘Conventions’: page 18 Suggested Starting Points from Exam Paper: page 19 Different types of Secrets: page 20 Different types of Codes: page 21 Different types of Conventions: page 22 Suggestions for artists from the exam paper: pages 23 & 24 Assessment Sheet: page 25 Explanation of Assessment Objectives (Levels 3, 4 & 5): pages 26 – 28 Evaluation Questions & Example answers: pages 29 & 30 Artists photographs linked to the theme of Secrets, Codes 7 Conventions: pages 31 -

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EXAM INFORMATION Start Date: Monday 5th February 2018

Deadline for whole project: Thursday 10th May 2018

Where to go / sit: Go to M104 at 8.45 to be ready for a 9.00 A.M. start. You will be asked by the invigilator to either stay in M104 or go next door to M103. You will not sit next to anyone you know. Morning Session: 9.00 -12.00

Lunch time: 12.00-1.30

Afternoon Session: 1.30 – 3.30

Rules: No talking to anyone for any reason except the invigilator / no phones (some students will be asked to submit phones to the invigilator at the start of the session – based on levels of phone addiction already witnessed in class – you know who you are!) no music, no headphones, no Youtube etc. (unless you are editing your own film with a soundtrack.). No food or drink unless bottled water. No staying in the exam room over lunch

What you can do in the 5 hour exam (these are just suggestions – you can come up with alternative ideas)

• • • •

A series of prints (which would be shown in an empty gallery - you can find an image of the gallery before you start the exam) A zine of your work (you can create the empty zine template before the exam) A commercial brief (advertising campaigns or posters etc.) Gifs / films etc.

Finally

If you cannot remember how to do a particular technique such as a Layer Mask etc. You can write out the order of the different stages on your SWAY (in list form) before the exam and refer to it. Remember you will not be able to 3 watch tutorials or ask the invigilator for help during the exam hours (although you can during the lunch time).


All the individual Requirements for this Project

(this is the minimum, you should aim to do more for higher grades) Task 1: Write in the title of the project: L6 MOCK EXAM PROJECT 2018 – SECRETS, CODES & CONVENTIONS Task 2: Initial written brainstorm - (you can brainstorm either 1, 2 or all three themes). Write in bullet points – NO DRAWN BRAINSTORMS Task 3: Upload 4 photographs by 4 different photographers that is inspirational to your starting ideas. Write the names of the artists underneath and a couple of sentences about why you find them interesting or inspirational. Task 4: Write about what type of ‘Secrets’ or ‘Codes’ or ‘Conventions’ you are intending to explore. Write an in-depth paragraph about the ideas you have in relation to the specific aspect of the theme that you are intending to explore and what personal connections you have to that idea. Find 3 – 4 non artists links (with at least 1 image from that link) that connect to your ideas. (Further explanation and help regarding this task is on the slides 10 & 11). Include a paragraph of response to what you have found out about through that link. Task 5: Take 1st set of initial photographs (photo-shoot 1) Task 6a: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then Task 6b: edit a minimum of photos from photo-shoot 1 Task 7: Write Post Annotation paragraph/s and Application Annotation paragraph/s (Help with annotations is on slide 12 &13) Task 8: Write Artist Analysis 1 (linked to the experimental photographs that you are working on next) Task 9a: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then Task 9b: create a set of developmental / experimental images Task 10: Write Post Annotation paragraph/s

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Task 11: Write Artist Analysis 2 (linked to next initial set of photographs (photo-shoot 2)

Task 12: Take 2nd set of initial photographs (photo-shoot 2) Task 13a: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then Task 13b: edit a minimum of 8 photos from photo-shoot 2 Task 14: Write Post Annotation paragraph/s and Application Annotation paragraphs Task 15 : Write Artist Analysis 3 (linked to the experimental photographs that you are working on next) Task 16a: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then Task 16b: create a set of developmental / experimental images Task 17: Write Post Annotation paragraph/s

Task 18: Complete written brainstorming ideas for what to doing 5 hour exam and annotate thoroughly. Task 19: Find 4-6 artists’ photographs that inspire your final set of photographs for the exam. In the box underneath, write the name of each artist and write a couple of sentences about each photo explaining why it is inspirational to you. Task 20: Write Artist Analysis 4 (closely linked to the type of editing / experiments that you are aiming to do in the 5 hour exam Task 21: Take the last set of photographs ready to use in the 5 hour exam Task 22: Final preparations for the exam (last minute organisation, trying out last minute experiments etc.) Task 23: Create Final Outcomes (prints, Gif, Zine etc.) in the 5 hour exam.

Task 24: Complete final End of Project Evaluation

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UPLOADING ORDER OF THE PROJECT Headline Post: L6 PHOTOGRAPHY MOCK EXAM PROJECT – SECRETS, CODES & CONVENTIONS

Headline Post – BRAINSTORM OF IDEAS Text Post - Upload the brainstorming ideas (Task 2) Headline Post – INITIAL INSPIRATIONAL ARTISTS Image Post: Upload 4 photographs by 4 different photographers that is inspirational to your starting ideas. Write the names of the artists underneath and a couple of sentences about why you find them interesting or inspirational (Task 3) Headline Post – INITIAL IDEAS AND NON-ARTSIST LINKS Text Post – Upload paragraph of initial ideas, then underneath the non-artists links you have found (articles etc. You will need to put in links to Youtube for bits from films or music videos etc. Remember to include still images if you can (Task 4) And write a paragraph of response. (Task 4)

Headline Post – INITIAL EDITED PHOTOGRAPHS Text Post: Pre-annotation (Task 6a) Photo Post: Upload a minimum of 8 edited photographs from photo-shoot 1 (Task 6b) Text Post: Post annotation and Application annotation paragraphs (Task 7) Headline Post Artist Analysis on (Insert name of artist that you are analysing) Photo Post: Place in the photograph by the artists that you are discussing

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Text Post: Write in the questions and answers for the analysis (Task 8) Headline Post: EXPERIMENTAL IMAGERY Text Post: Pre-annotation (Task 9a) Photo Post: Upload a minimum of 8 edited developmental / experimental images based on edited photos from Photo-shoot 1(Task 9b) Text Post: Post annotation and Application annotation paragraphs (Task 10) Headline Post Artist Analysis on (Insert name of artist that you are analysing) Photo Post: Place in the photograph by the artists that you are discussing Text Post: Write in the questions and answers for the analysis (Task 11) Headline Post – INITIAL EDITED PHOTOGRAPHS Text Post: Pre-annotation (Task 13a) Photo Post: Upload a minimum of 8 edited photographs from photo-shoot 1 (Task 13b) Text Post: Post annotation and Application annotation paragraphs (Task 14)

Headline Post Artist Analysis on (Insert name of artist that you are analysing)

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Photo Post: Place in the photograph by the artists that you are discussing Text Post: Write in the questions and answers for the analysis (Task 15)

Headline Post: EXPERIMENTAL IMAGERY Text Post: Pre-annotation (Task 16a) Photo Post: Upload a minimum of 8 edited developmental / experimental images based on edited photos from Photo-shoot 2(Task 16b) Text Post: Post annotation and Application annotation paragraphs (Task 17) Headline Post: WRITTEN BRAINSTORM Text Post - Upload the brainstorming ideas for the 5 hour exam (Task 18) Headline Post – INSPIRATIONAL ARTISTS FOR THE EXAM Image Post: Upload 4-6 photographs by 4 photographers that is inspirational to your ideas for the final exam set of photographs. Write the names of the artists underneath and a couple of sentences about why you find them interesting or inspirational (Task 19) Headline Post Artist Analysis on (Insert name of artist that you are analysing) Photo Post: Place in the photograph by the artists that you are discussing Text Post: Write in the questions and answers for the analysis (Task 20)

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Headline Post – EXAM OUTCOMES Photo Post: Upload all Final Outcomes completed during the 5 hour exam Headline Post – EVALUATION Text Post: Write in Evaluation Questions & answers

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What to write for Task 4 (Non-Artists Links) For the purpose of explaining this task to you, I’ve used the theme of ‘Addiction’ (that an U6th student did a couple of years ago). Once you have selected either ‘Secrets’, Codes’ or ‘Conventions’, then select a specific topic within that theme. So for the purpose of the example below, if the overall theme is Addiction, then the specific topic within that theme is ‘Gambling’ because Gambling Addiction is one small topic within the larger theme of ‘Addiction’.

Step 1: Write a paragraph about the reasons why you wanted to research that specific topic – i.e. you have read an article in a magazine or on-line, or you have watched a television programme, or it is a topic discussed in one of your other A Levels (sociology, psychology, media etc.)

Example: I became really interested in the topic of gambling after watching a ‘Panorama’ documentary on the effects

of gambling on the children of addicted gamblers. It was a really thought-provoking documentary and it really made me think about how the gamblers knew that they could lose their homes and family because of their addiction, but were powerless to stop it. It surprised me how many of them seemed to lead perfectly normal, everyday lives on the surface, yet kept their gambling addiction a complete secret. I never really thought that much about gambling before watching this documentary and it inspired me to explore my own thoughts and opinions about gamblers and whether I feel sorry for them or whether I feel angry at them for ruining the lives of their innocent families.

Step 2: Research the internet and find a couple of articles related to the underlying concept or ‘issue’ linked to your

theme. Try to ensure that you add in the URL address, the name of the person who wrote the article and any extra information (see below). Example: In an internet article found on: http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/keyword/online-gambling I found

this quote about how internet gambling is a potential serious issue for young people in Canada. It is based on an article written by Tara Elton-Marshall, scientist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, Canada. 10


Step 3: From the articles you have found, only include the most important paragraph (or two paragraphs at the most) and highlight sentences that you find particularly interesting or important (see example below):

Step 4: Write your response to this article (see example below) Example: I found this article very informative because when I watched the documentary, it didn’t really focus on teenagers, but instead

on much older people who owned houses and had children. I didn’t really associate problem gambling with teenagers but now when thinking about it in more depth, I suppose that on-line gambling might appeal more to teenagers because it is on-line and teenagers might just see it as another activity that do on-line as opposed to having to go to a specific location such as a book makers or a casino. Also they don’t have to actually carry cash because the gambling site would just be linked to their bank account on-line. 11


What to write in the annotations

What you are doing in the annotations is communicating to the reader / examiner what your intentions are regarding your creative work and then what you think about the work you have created and what you have learnt from doing it. What we don’t want to see is a list of things that you did in order i.e. ….. then I took photos of some kittens and after that I edited them using Viveza, and then I printed them out and then I sewed into them … etc. NO – DON’T DO THIS!

Annotations are usually divided into 3 different sections. Section 1: Pre Annotation: In this section, you will write about what you are intending to do in your next set of photos and why. Also what you are hoping to achieve in your set of photographs (you write this in future tense i.e. I will / I intend to / my aim is etc.) Example: ‘In the next set of photographs, what I am hoping to focus on are the objects that are associated with gambling, such as dice and poker chips. I’m planning to take these objects in a dark studio with a spotlight on the objects themselves because I want to create an atmosphere similar to a ‘poker night’ venue. Also I want to suggest a feeling of uncertainty into the photographs through the surrounding dark, negative space in order to symbolise the uncertainty of the future of many gamblers’.

Below this bit of writing, you place you set of photographs, then in the post below that, you write Section 2. Section 2: Post Annotation & Evaluation: In this section, you reflect on the work you have just completed (you will write this in past tense i.e. I did / I completed / I am happy / etc.) Try to focus on the reasons why you think this. Example: ‘Upon reflection, I am happy with the quality of my photographs. Technically the photographs were successful, they are clean and sharp and I believe that in most cases, the composition within them are in dramatic and quite dynamic. Looking at the photos now, II don’t think that I used a wide enough range of objects in my photo-shoots and as a result there is not enough variation in the scale of the pieces. I think that editing them into more muted colours worked well though because it kept the viewer’s interest on the selection of objects as a whole and not draw attention to the bright red sections of the poker chips and red cards.’ 12

Below this bit of writing you place Section 3 (see next slide)


Section 3: Application Annotation: In this section, you will write in what you intend to do in the next set of photographs or experiments (you write this in future tense i.e. I will / I intend to / my aim is etc.) Example: ‘Moving on from this set of photographs, I think that what I intend to do next is to symbolically show how gambling addiction has the potential to wreck people’s lives. My ideas for this is to print out some of the photographs and experiment with a couple of different art-based techniques in order to ‘wreck’ the photographs. I have been researching the work of Lucas Simoes who burnt his photographs and at the moment I think that I will start with this technique and see what creative results I can achieve.

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Help with writing the artist analyses

In this project, you will all be writing different types of artist analyses and therefore you will be answering different sets of questions. The questions have been divided up into 5 different categories: Set 1 - Portraits Set 2 - Landscapes & Architecture Set 3 - People & Fashion Set 4 - Objects Set 5 - Creative (experimental / abstract etc.) Please find the appropriate sets of questions in one of the 5 booklets on www.cathavering.tumblr.com

Example of the Landscape & Architecture Booklet on the right. Please follow instructions inside

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Week by week breakdown

This is the minimum, you should aim to do more for higher grades Week 1 (Feb 5 -9):

What you do not complete in class time, you complete as homework

Task 1: Write in the title of the project: L6 MOCK EXAM PROJECT 2018 – SECRETS, CODES & CONVENTIONS Task 2: Complete an Initial written brainstorm Task 3: Upload 4 photographs by 4 different photographers that is inspirational to your starting ideas. Write the names of the artists underneath and a couple of sentences about why you find them interesting or inspirational. Task 4: Write about what type of ‘Secrets’ or ‘Codes’ or ‘Conventions’ you are intending to explore. Write an in-depth paragraph about the ideas you have in relation to the specific aspect of the theme that you are intending to explore and what personal connections you have to that idea. Find 3 – 4 non artists links (with at least 1 image from that link) that connect to your ideas.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Half Term:

Task 5: Take 1st set of initial photographs (photo-shoot 1) and catch up on any missing tasks from 1 – 4

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Week 2 (Feb 19 - 23):

Task 5: Take 1st set of initial photographs (photo-shoot 1) Task 6: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then edit a minimum of 6-8 photos from photo-shoot 1 Task 7: Write Post Annotation and Application Annotation paragraphs (Help with annotations is on slides 7 & 8) Task 8: Write Artist Analysis 1 (linked to the experimental photographs that you are working on next)

Week 3 (Feb 26 – Mar 2): Enrolment week – no formal lessons

Work independently to catch up or try to get ahead by taking independent photo-shoots (studios will be open)

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Week 4 (Mar 5 – 9):

Task 9: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then create a set of developmental / experimental images Task 10: Write Post Annotation Task 11: Write Artist Analysis 2 (linked to next initial set of photographs (photo-shoot 2)

Week 5 (Mar 12 – 16):

Task 12: Take 2nd set of initial photographs (photo-shoot 2) Task 13: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then edit a minimum of 6-8 photos from photo-shoot 2 Task 14: Write Post Annotation and Application Annotation paragraphs Task 15: Write Artist Analysis 3 (linked to the experimental photographs that you are working on next)

Week 6 (Mar 19 – 23): Working Under Timed Assessment Conditions

Task 16: Write Pre Annotation paragraph/s then create a set of developmental / experimental images Task 17: Write Post Annotation these experimental images

Week 7 (Mar 26 – 29):

Task 18: Complete brainstorming ideas for what to doing 5 hour exam and annotate thoroughly. Task 19: Find 6-8 artists’ photographs that inspire your final set of photographs for the exam. In the box underneath, write the name of each artist and write a couple of sentences about each photo explaining why it is inspirational to you. Task 20: Write Artist Analysis 4 (closely linked to the type of editing / experiments that you are aiming to do in the 5 hour exam Task 21: Take the last set of photographs ready to use in the 5 hour exam 16


……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………................ Easter (2 weeks): Task 21: (If not taken last week) Take the last set of photographs ready to use in the 5 hour exam Catch up with any missing tasks from Task 1 – Task 20

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Week 8 (Apr 16 – 20):

Task 22: Final preparations for the exam (last minute organisation, trying out last minute experiments etc.)

Apr 23 – 27

Exam Week 1:

May 1 – 5:

Exam Week 2

Task 23: Create Final Outcomes (prints, Gif, Zine etc.) in the 5 hour exam. Task 24: Complete final end of project evaluation

Complete any missing tasks, add extra tasks to potentially gain extra marks

May 8 – 12: Exam Week 3 Complete any missing tasks, add extra tasks to potentially gain extra marks

FINAL DEADLINE: THURS MAY 10th

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Definition of Secrets * something that is kept or meant to be kept unknown or unseen by others * something that is not properly understood; a mystery * not a commonly known method of achieving something

Definition of Codes * (noun) a system of words, letters, figures, or symbols used to represent others, especially for the purposes of secrecy. * (verb) convert the words of a message into a code so as to convey a secret meaning.

Definition of Convention: • The way in which something is usually done or carried out (that is the expected way)

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Suggestions on the exam Paper (P) means that the things mentioned can be physically photographed as objects or locations * rules, rituals, etiquette, procedures, conformity, oppression * masks (p), disguises, camouflage, costumes (p) * oceans (p), forests (p), caves (p), smog, night * hieroglyphs, codes, Braille, runes (p), fonts * single-celled organisms, parasites, cocoons (p), shells (p), dens (p) * the Underground (p), tunnels (p), cracks (p), catacombs (p) * magic, theatre (p), espionage, Bletchley Park * lies, deceit, tragedy, romance * exploration, discovery, archaeology, metal detecting * science, knowledge, astronomy, space exploration * diving, caving, orienteering, cellars * hide and seek, pass the parcel, gambling dice (p)

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● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Different types of secrets: Secret codes and/or signs and/or signals Secret places (tunnels, caves, passages, houses, etc.) Secret doors, gates, openings, portals, etc. Secret committed crimes (famous London crime scenes etc.) Secret objects Secret connections Secret/undercover/”underground” organizations Secret languages Secret lives and/or secret families Secret relationships Secret governments Secret hideouts or hiding places Secret rituals and habits Secret services Secret agents/spies Secret wealth and/or property Secret transport routes/passages Secret knowledge Secret personalities and/or identities Secret deeds Secret feelings, thoughts and/or opinions Secret plans, dreams, wishes, or hopes

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Different types of codes: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

DNA / Genetic code (family genes – similarities – twins etc). Enigma code (historic) Classify information Communication QR Codes Symbols Layering / Revealing / Arrange Signalling Semaphore Braille (books, pavements, etc.) Morse code Hacking Radio Hieroglyphs

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Different types of conventions: • The rules of conventional photography (composition, rules of third) – breaking the rules • Conventional behaviour (queuing, waiting your turn, • Unconventional • • • • • • •

Unconventional landscapes Unconventional families Unconventional behaviour Unconventional ‘weddings’ Unconventional fashion photographs Unconventional faces Unconventional mixture of objects in a ‘still-life’

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General Information from the actual AS Exam Paper The pleasure derived from unravelling mysteries and discovering hidden secrets has always fuelled human imagination from the very beginning of civilisation. This has often inspired artists, designers and craftspeople to create artefacts that intentionally conceal objects or messages. These messages may be conveyed in many diverse ways. Some examples include subtle symbolic objects in the background of paintings or drawings. Secret symbols were often carved into objects or places to protect them from evil spirits or to indicate that the owner belonged to a cult or sect. Dan Brown’s novel The Da Vinci Code had great fun playing with the idea of secret messages contained within Leonardo da Vinci’s painting The Last Supper. Whilst the suppositions made in this novel are generally accepted as fictitious, it is well known and documented that many artists throughout history have used symbolism within their work to convey secret and powerful messages. An excellent example of this is Viktor Vasnetsov’s Knight at the Crossroads, which superficially appears as a nostalgic romantic image but is actually full of contemporary political comment. More recently, artists such as Gilbert and George, Louise Bourgeois, Ai Weiwei and Michelle Possum Nungurrayi have embraced the use of metaphor and symbolism in their work. Artists and designers have frequently broken the established conventions of their respective disciplines. The stereotypical depiction of women in the art world has been challenged by artists as diverse as Manet, Paula Rego and the Guerrilla Girls. Codes and metaphors have been a consistent element in graphic design where subliminal messages are used to influence the judgement of consumers. Photographers often use image manipulation techniques of software programmes to distort and encode their imagery to add elements of mystery and surrealism. It could be said that every work of art contains two messages. There is the obvious one that the artist wants you to perceive, but also a hidden one subliminally reflecting the artist’s personality through their chisel marks or brushstrokes. However, many secrets in works of art will remain as permanent mysteries, as the long deceased artists left no written records of their intentions. The cave paintings at Lascaux in France continue to evoke intrigue and speculation as to the purpose of their imagery. Sitting on a beach looking at the debris thrown up on the shoreline can evoke the imagination, as the flotsam and jetsam give tantalising glimpses into the secret life of the many alien creatures that lie hidden below the waterline. Any walk through urban or rural landscapes will yield secret places hidden from normal view, such as side alleys, garages and mews or the inside of hollow trees and caves. These can contain unusual forms and provide powerful visual imagery for artists seeking inspiration. 23


Photography information from the actual AS Exam Paper The starting points in this paper may help you form ideas. You can follow them closely, use them as a source of information or produce your own individual response to the theme. Please read the whole paper as any section may provide you with inspiration. The group photo has powerful underlying conventions, whether a family portrait or of a gathering of friends. These reflect codes of behaviour that shift over time. Trish Morrissey gently subverted the ritual of the family holiday photo in her 2005-7 series of photographs called Front, often swapping clothes and taking on the role of the mother in semi- formal gatherings staged on beaches in Britain and Australia. Tom Wood, Elaine Constantine, Brassaї and Malick Sidibé have explored similar territory, recording social gatherings. Diane Arbus, Sally Mann and Nikki S. Lee have taken photographs that challenge and question the normal conventions of such images. In The Road to Mecca, Maha Malluh mixes signs, symbols and conventions from the present and the past to illustrate the modern experience of the Hajj or journey to Mecca. She uses her children’s toys and the design of the Kiswa as a background, visually unified by the darkroom process of photograms. Many contemporary photographers, such as Garry Fabian Miller, Susan Derges and Adam Fuss, mix conventions and visual codes. Isa Genzken challenges expectations of traditional photographs in her work, by combining photography and sculpture. Paul Seawright, Simon Norfolk and Willie Doherty record places that bear secret histories or subtle evidence of conflict. In her series Mothers and Frida, the Japanese photographer Ishiuchi Miyako took pictures of the secret history imbued in the possessions left behind after a person’s death. Her work shows a continuing obsession with the traces we leave behind, both as individuals and as a society. The photographer Diane Arbus wrote ‘A picture is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.’ This could equally refer to Maya Deren’s and Alexander Hackenschmied’s 1943 film Meshes of the Afternoon, which used innovative techniques such as slow motion, repetition and jump cuts to build a sense of a dream interacting with reality. In the film objects seem to have a mysterious and secret significance, known only to the dreamer. It has influenced other filmmakers such as David Lynch in Twin Peaks. Dreams and surreal imagery have also inspired other photographers and filmmakers such as Jerry Uelsmann, Madame Yevonde, Lara Zankoul, Wes Anderson and Matthew Barney.

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Level 3 (Emerging Competent Ability) C/D Grade Descriptive words & phrases: deliberate, methodical, predictable, broadening, flashes of consistency, emerging individuality, some reflection, plays safe, contextual references explored but lacks relevance, adequate control over formal elements, pursues aims and makes progress.

AO 1: Developing ideas & artist analyses

You will have a definite and solid creative idea that is linked to the theme and you will pursue this idea all the way through the project to the exam outcomes. This idea will probably be a very ‘safe’ and quite ‘literal’ (straightforward not imaginative). The idea will develop in a step by step way (each step being a small move forward with no sudden flashes of inspiration). You will have completed most of your analyses but you will not have answered the correct questions in enough depth, the links between the artists’ photos and your idea will be superficial (no depth), the analyses will not really focus on the intentions of the artists and there will be a lack of quotes.

AO 2: Experimenting with resources & refining work

You will experiment with techniques you know and are reasonably competent in using (although these techniques might not be the best ones to select in relation to your idea). Your experiments will be very predictable, although every now again you will show hints of being more creative & imaginative with the materials. The quality of your work will improve gradually as you proceed through the project.

AO 3: Quality of your recording (quality of the photographs) & quality of your reflections (annotations and decisions made as a result of those reflections).

You will be able to handle the formal elements (composition, exposure, focusing) in a reasonable way but there will be dips in quality. You will demonstrate that when you do get it right, you can get it right for a few photographs, not just 1 or 2. You have reflected on your work and there will be evidence of this both in your practical work and in your annotations. You will have mostly completed the annotations but it feels as if you are just ‘going through the motions’ as opposed to using them to really reflect upon in order to improve your work.

AO 4: Quality of the final outcomes & the links between the outcomes and selected artists

Your final exam outcomes will be predictable (taking into account what you have completed so far in the project) and your linking artists are present but links between the photographs and your work will be either irrelevant or superficial.

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Level 4 (Competent & Consistent Ability) B/C Grade Descriptive words & phrases: relevant, appropriate, individual, purposeful, focused, thorough, demonstrates intentions, contextual references and reflections informs journeys, sufficient control over the formal elements, realises some aims and initiatives.

AO 1: Developing ideas & artist analyses

You will have good and individual creative ideas that are linked to the theme and which you will have considered in some depth. You will pursue these ideas with a strong creative intention through the project to the exam outcomes. These ideas will probably have some literal elements but also touches of individuality. You will have completed most of your analyses and you will have answered the set questions in enough depth demonstrating some well-considered links between the artists’ photos and your idea. In the analyses you will really try to answer the questions in some depth and there will be enough quotes, which you have mostly used to back up your points.

AO 2: Experimenting with resources & refining work

You will experiment with techniques you probably know but you will make sure that they are completely relevant and appropriate to your concept (idea). Your experiments will be very purposeful and you will learn from them and move on to trying something a bit more creative & imaginative with the materials. The quality of your experiments will be consistent throughout the project and you will make steady progress with your handling of the materials.

AO3: Quality of your recording (quality of the photographs) & quality of your reflections (annotations and decisions made as a result of those reflections).

You will be able to control the formal elements (composition, exposure, focusing) in an appropriate and consistent way with only 1 or 2 dips in quality. You will be able to reflect on the quality & direction of your work and there will be clear evidence of this in both your practical work and in your annotations. You will be able to take the annotations quite seriously and think about the progress you have made and how to improve your work in the next stage of the project.

AO4: Quality of the final outcomes & the links between the outcomes and selected artists

Your final exam outcomes will be a solid and effective response to your original intentions. Your linking artists will be present and the links between the artists’ photographs and your work will be purposeful and relevant.

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Level 5 (Confident & Assured Ability) A/B Grade Descriptive words & phrases: diverse, effective, coherent, imaginative, informed, some perception, satisfies creative intent, engaged, exciting, refined, contextual references inspire creativity, consistent control over the formal elements, realises aims.

AO 1: Developing ideas & artist analyses You will have a range of exciting and imaginative ideas that are linked to the theme in a creative and slightly abstract way which you will have seriously considered. You will pursue these ideas in a focused and sustained way all the way through the project to the exam outcomes. You will have completed all of your analyses and you will have answered nearly all the set questions in good depth demonstrating perceptive links between the artists’ photographs and your ideas. In the analyses you answer the questions in good depth and there will extensive use of very relevant quotes, which you have used to effectively back up your points. AO 2: Experimenting with resources & refining work You will experiment with a number of well- considered yet exciting techniques which can border on the ‘cutting edge’. Your experiments will be sustained and pushed as far as they can and you will learn from these experiments. The quality of your experiments will be consistent throughout the project and you will make exciting progress with your handling of the materials. Your work will improve in quality as you progress through the project. AO3: Quality of your recording (quality of the photographs) & quality of your reflections (annotations and decisions made as a result of those reflections). You will be able to control the formal elements (composition, exposure, focusing) in a consistently controlled, yet very perceptive way with no dips in quality. You will be able to reflect on the quality & direction of your work with perceptive insight and there will be clear evidence of this in both your practical work and in your annotations. You will write your annotations in good depth and really examine and constructively criticise the progress you are making and how to improve your work in the next stage of the project. AO4: Quality of the final outcomes & the links between the outcomes and selected artists Your final exam outcomes will be an exciting and imaginative response to your original intentions. The links between the artists’ photos and your work will be effective, coherent and perceptive.

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Project evaluation Questions Answer the following questions in this order * Do you think that your photographs in the prep work (shoots 1 & 2) are effective and of good quality? * Do you think that you really pushed your creative boundaries in your ideas and experiments for the prep work? * Are you happy with the final outcomes during the 5 hour exam? Do you think that you took enough creative risks or did you play it a bit safe? Please give reasons to back up your answer. READ EVERYTHING BEFORE YOU START WRITING This has been written from a point of view of a student who did a project on how people portray different emotions through their faces and bodies

Please note down every time that I have used the word ‘because’. Every time I’ve used the word ‘because’ it’s means that I have to give a reason for my opinion after it - this is important. Also provide an honest and balanced opinion on what you have done. This is also important! Do you think that your photographs in the prep work are effective and of good quality? On the whole I’m quite pleased with the photographs for my project because the composition in most of them have been really carefully considered and I believe that they created a strong visual impact on the viewer. I’m a bit disappointed with the contrast in some of the profile portraiture photographs because I feel that they were too flat and did not highlight certain areas and features that I wanted the viewer to be drawn towards. However I was able to correct this slightly on Photoshop, although I didn’t really want to change them away that much from their original appearance. I was far happier with my later shots of hands because I feel that I managed to use the lighting correctly and achieve a strong contrast in my work. Also I decided to really experiment with my angles because I wanted to achieve a slightly distorted look which would break up the connections between the different body areas.

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Do you think that you really pushed your creative boundaries in your ideas and experiments in the prep work? I think that I struggled a little bit at the start because I didn’t really have a clear direction about where I was going with my work, but once I had decided what sort of look I was after in my imagery, I then began to settle down and really consider what techniques might best work to achieve what I wanted. I think that my idea of combining close-up imagery of skin with different facial features really worked well because the unusual combination that I experimented with took the photographs out of the ordinary and gave them an unsettling appearance. Looking back, I think that if I had cut out the mouth section in my earlier photographs and positioned them onto models and then re-photographed them; then I probably could have produced imagery which was more unsettling and unusual. Perhaps if I had created masks from these photographs, then I could have used the models in an outside environment, which would have brought a new dimension into my work. However, I believe that given the time and the constraints I faced, I believe that on the whole my experimentation was successful because I was able to develop my imagery a long way from the starting point, and because I always looked for different ways to push my imagery forward by re-photographing my photographs. Are you happy with the final outcomes during the 5 hour exam? Do you think that you took enough creative risks or did you play it a bit safe? Please give reasons to back up your answer. I think that on the whole, my final pieces really reflected the level of experimentation I was constantly doing in my project, and I believe that they really represented what I wanted to do creatively with this theme. I think that if I had more time, then I would have felt confident enough to work on a bigger scale, and combine different materials together. I think that if I had explored more ideas, then I could have produced a more diverse range of final pieces because I would have had the experience of combining different conceptual elements together. I think that my digital editing skills really helped me to highlight certain areas within my final pieces, so as to draw the viewers’ attention to them, and I think that using digital editing really enhanced the quality of my imagery, especially the strong contrast between light and shade.

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Examples of photographers who have taken photographs which link in some way to the themes of either ‘Secrets’ or ‘Codes’ or ‘Conventions’ to be used for general inspiration. Please note that you will be required to research into the artists & photographers / look for interviews etc. if you want to write an analysis on any of these photographs or other work by these artists and photographers in order to double check what they themselves have said regarding the meaning of their work. The examples below are just examples – they are there to encourage you to think about what type of subject matter / issue / aesthetics you want to pursue. You do not have to select anything or anyone on the slides below to research further – however please have look through them to see if you can find any inspirational ideas within them.

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Secrets: hidden under Layers

Mimmo Rotella

Frederic Lezmi


Secrets: Hidden imagery / revealed imagery / destroyed imagery

Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin


Secrets: Secret destinations

‘The Island of the Colorblind’ Sann De Wilde

Gregory Crewdson


Secrets: Hidden information that the general public are unaware of (animal testing in cosmetics products etc.

Ulrich Hoppe

Secrets: A camera taken apart

Todd McLellan


Secrets: Secret areas within photographs - camouflage

Cecilia Paredes

Sandy Skoglund


Secrets: Fooling the viewer into thinking that something is one thing, when in fact it is another

Francoise Delfosse: Ice caves (but actually the inside of plastic bags)

Noemi Goudal: Structure on a beach that is in fact completely 2D and created from photocopies


Secrets: Secret Identity

Elle Moss


Secrets: Secret Identity

Michael Farrel

Sirkka-Lisa Konttinen


Secrets: bits of visual information are missing or hidden

Brett Canet - Gibson


Secrets: things that can only be seen clearly through a magnifying glass or microscope

Diana Hobson

Secrets: hidden images through photographic techniques such as focusing / bokeh etc.

Brett Canet - Gibson


Codes: Braille

Field of Vision Bernard Weil, Chief Photographer/Multimedia

Bo He


Secrets: past events (secret information)

Coralie Kraft

Shimon Attie


Codes: Family Genes (DNA)

Ulric Collette

Bobby Neal Adams


Coding – colour coding

Jolanta Mazur

Nick Frank


Codes: genetic codes in nature (humans / animals / plants etc)

Rob Wilkinson

Doris Mitsch


Conventions: Unconventional Landscapes

Jan Dibbetts

Mark Dorf


Conventions: The conventions of ‘assemblage’

Conventions: Breaking the conventions of good composition

Deanna Lawson – Assembled Histories

Brett Canet-Gibson


Conventions: Unconventional weddings / brides

Caryn Drexl

Conventions: unconventional way of displaying objects

Kenji Shibata


Conventions - Unconventional Portraits

Luke Stephenson

Conventions: Conventional objects used in an unconventional way

Henrik Kerstens


Conventions: Unconventional cosmetics advertising photographs

Kenji Toma

Dennis Pedersen

L6 photography mock exam 2018  
L6 photography mock exam 2018  
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