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Program Sampler

Š2010 Catapult Learning

CL10156


Confidentiality Statement

This information is confidential and proprietary to Catapult Learning™. No part of this booklet may be reproduced or utilized in any form without written permission from Catapult Learning™.


AchieveEnglish™ Abstract Catapult Learning has developed an English as a Second Language (ESL)/English Language Development (ELD) program, focusing on

developing language proficiency in

English language learners as well as improvi ng overall academic achievement. The program is based o n solid edu cational research and effective instructional

practices for English

language learners. Instruction is delivered in a small group environment. The K-5 program addresses the needs of students whose secon d language acquisition falls within any of the five stages of second

language acquisition (preproduction, early

production, speech

emergence, intermediate fluency and advanced fluency) and the 6-12 program a

ddresses

the needs of students whose secon d language acquisition falls within four stages of second language acquisition (preproduction, early production, spee ch emergence, and inter mediate fluency). This program is based on the Eng adopted by many states which

lish Language Proficiency (ELP) standards

address English literacy skills, including phonemic

awareness, decoding, vocabulary and comprehension skills that English learn ers must acquire in order to become proficie nt in the EL A content st andards. The AchieveEnglish™ Program emphasizes authentic communication as well a s grammatical accuracy. Students learn to communicate in social settings and develop academic language proficiency, a critical ingredient for academic success. AchieveEnglis h™ is designed for small group settings with a 6:1 student-teacher ratio. Materials include a Teacher Guide and Resource Book, St udent Resource Books, picture dictionaries, concept cards, thematic pictur e cards, a literacy libra ry, an Anthology of Reading Selections, a nd other ancillary materials such a

s Student Testers and

Student

Writers. Lesson Focus All of the lessons emphasize the four step s in skill de velopment: 1) model behavior o r demonstrate skill; 2) provide for guided practice; 3) provide for independent practice; and 4) provide for delayed practice. There are a variety of activities utilized to accomplish the lesson objectives. Teachers model target words and language forms. Students are asked read, write, and demonstrate comprehension

to say,

of the targ et words and forms to ensure AchieveEnglish™


understanding of vocabulary and grammatical concepts. Le ssons include visual, oral, tactile, and kinesthetic reinforcement. There are also many opportunities for repeated and monitored oral reading. To ensur e ongoing p ractice for students, lessons consistently review earlier learning and newly learned language is reinforced throughout instruction. In addition, lessons provide a f ocus on academic lan guage. Academic skills (e.g., dictionary use

and critical

thinking) are integrated into the lessons as well. The types of activities that are used during instruction help students build skills that will ensure their success in mainstream classrooms. The overarching goal is for students to become more effe ctive and efficient learn ers in the classroom. Overview of Services Catapult Learning will create and staff a classroom within a scho ol that will ad dress the English language improvement of students. Objectives The objectives of the AchieveEnglish™ Program can be summarized as follows: 1)

To assist students in improving their social and academic vocabulary.

2)

To enable ESL students to perform tasks relat ed to content reading, writing and speaking within grade level and school expectations.

3)

To provide students

with the skills and str

ategies needed to improve thei r

understanding of English and t o make them more conf ident and successful learners. Assessment and Instruction A brief placement test may be administered at the beginning of the pr ogram to assess ea ch student’s language proficiency level and determine where in struction should begin. A normreferenced language proficiency assessment may also be a dministered to measure listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, and determine a baselin e score. This assessment is readministered as a post-test at the end of the program to

determine growth in language

proficiency.

AchieveEnglish™


Attributes Key Features

AchieveEnglish™ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

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Grades and Subjects Served Communication

Program Management Materials Used in the program

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Small group ESL/ELD instruction in groups of 6 students Incorporates listening, speaking, reading and writing Uses research-based strategies that enhance English language acquisition and proficiency in English language learners 60-minute sessions at least two times per week is recommended ESL/ELD materials which address the needs of students whose second language acquisition falls within any of the five stages of second language acquisition: preproduction, early production, speech emergence, intermediate fluency and advanced fluency Lessons emphasize the four steps in skill development: 1) model behavior or demonstrate skill; 2) provide for guided practice; 3) provide for independent practice; and 4) provide for delayed practice. Initial testing to appropriately place students in the program as well as periodic and final assessments to measure students’ growth. Initial and ongoing communication with classroom teachers Parent Involvement Kindergarten – Grade 12 ESL/ELD Communication with principal Communication with parents Two-Way Communication forms used in conjunction with classroom teacher to identify classroom content vocabulary and provide extra classroom language support Comprehensive supervision is provided in support of teaching and program excellence via staff training and on site monitoring Catapult managers visit classrooms weekly/bi monthly Teacher Training Manual Teacher Guide for grade levels K-5 as well as ancillary program materials such as picture/concept cards, student resource book, ESL picture dictionary, and literacy library Teacher Guide for grade levels 6-12 as well as ancillary program materials such as Student Reader, Student Writer, Student Tester, picture dictionary, and literacy library

Reporting

ƒ ƒ ƒ

Qualified teachers Experienced, local supervisors Support from Regional Education Quality Team Clerical support During school Before and after school Summer Ongoing Staff Development Cycle of Supervision Quality Assurance Review each year Overall Program Evaluation which includes Student Achievement Information and Surveys of principals, teachers, parents Student Progress Reports Comprehensive End-of-Year reports District and/or state required reports

Funding

ƒ

Federal and State Funding, other

Staffing

Scheduling Quality Control

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AchieveEnglish™


AchieveEnglish Lesson Design (K-5/6) Lesson Component

Timing

Welcome

5 minutes

Presentation

10 minutes

Practice

15 minutes

Apply & Extend

15 minutes

Classroom Connection

10 minutes

Closure

5 minutes

Daily Performance Assessment

Description Teacher welcomes students, distributes materials and takes attendance. Teacher introduces students to the target vocabulary and concepts that will be presented in the lesson through theme pictures. Practice activities provide guided practice of the words and concepts introduced in lesson. Target vocabulary is reinforced using the chapter pictures cards and activity pictures. Students practice target language forms (e.g., songs, chants, poems). Students complete tasks that build upon the target vocabulary and language functions and forms they have been learning. Extension activities include use of graphic organizers, looking up target vocabulary in the Picture Dictionary, using target words orally in sentences, and written application activities. Teachers reinforce key vocabulary and/or themes from classroom (as indicated on Two-Way Communication Form). Students review and create concept cards. If time, students can complete “Sponge Activities� from the end of each chapter. Students verbalize what they learned.

After each session, teachers assess student performance using the Lesson & Performance Tracking Tool

All the lessons in the AchieveEnglish program emphasize the four steps in skill development: 1) model behavior or demonstrate skill; 2) provide for guided practice; 3) provide for independent practice; and 4) provide for delayed/extended practice. The 4th lesson in every chapter is a literature-based lesson. These lessons expose students to various genres of literature through teacher read-alouds, develop students’ language skills, and connect ideas in text to their background knowledge.


AchieveEnglish Lesson Design (6-12) Lesson Component Welcome Warm Up

Connect

Extend

Classroom Connection Closure Daily Performance Assessment

Timing

Description

Every class period for 3 minutes

Teacher welcomes students, distributes materials and takes attendance.

Occurs over multiple 60-minute class periods. # of class periods indicated in the lesson plan Occurs over multiple 60 minute class periods. # of class periods indicated in the lesson plan

Teacher introduces students to the target vocabulary and concepts that will be presented in the lesson through use of familiar processes, phrases, and sentences, to teach students to communicate needs orally. Students locate key facts in graphics and text, and participate in group discussions. Students receive oral directions with visual support to create an assessment portfolio. Review topics covered in previous classes. Introduce new information and have students brainstorm ideas and concepts orally. Teach and practice new grammatical concept. Engage students in pre-reading, reading and post-reading activities and check student comprehension.

Occurs over multiple 60-minute class periods. # of class periods indicated in the lesson plan

Review topics covered in previous classes. Students continue with tasks that build upon the target vocabulary and language functions and forms they have been learning. Extension activities include use of graphic organizers, delivering oral presentations, writing letters, describing and evaluating personal preferences and using social and academic vocabulary in context etc.

Every class period for 5 minutes

Teachers reinforce key vocabulary and/or themes from classroom (as indicated on Two-Way Communication Form). Students review and create concept cards.

Every class period Students verbalize what they learned. for 2 minutes After each session, teachers assess student performance using the Lesson & Performance Tracking Tool

All the lessons in the AchieveEnglish program emphasize the four steps in skill development: 1) model behavior or demonstrate skill; 2) provide for guided practice; 3) provide for independent practice; and 4) provide for delayed/extended practice. The 4th lesson in every chapter is a literature-based lesson. These lessons expose students to various genres of literature through teacher read-alouds, develop students’ language skills, and connect ideas in text to their background knowledge.


AchieveEnglish Sample Lesson

Beginning Level Grades K-5


Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2004, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Carousel of IDEAS, 4th Edition, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Chapter 5: The Food We Eat Target Vocabulary Words & Phrases Carousel Nouns

orange potato apple pineapple carrot onion lemon banana grapes pear tomato

Adjectives

hard soft round thin long rough smooth

Prepositions/ Prepositional Phrases

Pronouns

Social Greetings and Phrases

Do you like ____?

Other

food fruit vegetable grocery store produce like bunch the crop farmer and recipe ingredient

Content Emphasis: Science—types and benefits of fruits and vegetables; Social studies—food production and distribution, vegetables and fruits grown and eaten by the Iroquois Indians

Reading Selections: Suggested literature book: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle; Chart: “Our Favorite Fruits”; Role play: “May I Help You?”; Nonfiction article: “The Iroquois Indians’ Vegetables and Fruits”; Reader’s theater: “Let’s Make a Fruit Salad”

Enriching the Classroom Environment: Set up a display showing a produce stand or grocery store produce section. If possible, bring in real fruits and vegetables for students to see, smell, feel, and taste.

Assessing Student Progress: Before beginning each lesson, review the key objectives on the chart on pages 262-263. These key objectives also are listed in the “Observing Student Progress” section of each lesson. At the end of each lesson, complete the Unit 2, Chapter 5 Evaluation Checklist for each student. CHAPTER 5 The Food We Eat

261


262

1

UNIT 2 My Larger Community

Listening, Speaking, Reading & Writing

Listening, Speaking, Reading & Writing

Listening, Speaking, Reading & Writing

2

3

4

Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (the) Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal communication: other (the) Respond orally to simple questions with complete sentences Orally describe location of objects Participate in a role play Complete written sentences identifying the location of objects Point out book features such as cover, title, author, and illustrator Make predictions Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions Orally identify characters and settings in simple literary texts using words or phrases Retell simple stories using words, phrases, or nonverbal communication (e.g., physical actions, drawings, matching, pointing)

5.3.1 5.3.2

5.4.1 5.4.2 5.4.3 5.4.4 5.4.5

5.3.3 5.3.4 5.3.5 5.3.6

5.2.6

5.2.3 5.2.4 5.2.5

Continued on next page

Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (like) Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (like) Use common social greetings and phrases (Do you like _____?) Orally express likes and dislikes Respond to simple directions and questions using physical actions and other nonverbal communication (e.g., matching, pointing, drawing) Respond orally to simple questions with words or phrases

5.2.1 5.2.2

5.1.5 5.1.6 5.1.7

5.1.3 5.1.4

5.1.2

Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, food; other (food, fruit, vegetable, grocery store, produce) Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel nouns, food; other (food, fruit, vegetable, grocery store, produce) Respond orally to simple questions with words or phrases Respond to simple directions and questions using physical actions and other nonverbal communication (e.g., matching, pointing, drawing) Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce phonemes: beginning sound /l/ Orally give and respond to commands Categorize foods

5.1.1

KEY OBJECTIVES1

Each lesson contains additional integrated skill objectives, but the focus of each lesson is on the key objectives. Most key objectives are reinforced in subsequent chapters and units.

Listening & Speaking

SKILL EMPHASIS

1

LESSON

Unit 2, Chapter 5 Overview

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. Š2004, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Carousel of IDEAS, 4th Edition, a Ballard & Tighe publication.


newspaper liquid starch grocery bag chart paper pocket chart paintbrushes

5.6.1

Listening, Speaking, Reading & Writing

6

manila folders box crayons scissors hole punch small balloons

5.5.1 5.5.2 5.5.3 5.5.4 5.5.5 5.5.6 5.5.7

Reading & Writing

5

Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (bunch) Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (bunch)

KEY OBJECTIVES

small bowl construction paper craft materials magazine pictures of fruit green pipe cleaners glue/paste

platter of real fruits and vegetables role play props (e.g., grocery bags, play money) tempera paint in various colors (including brown)

Chapter Materials Checklist:

5.6.3 5.6.4 5.6.5 5.6.6 5.6.7

5.6.2

foods (or pictures of foods), including meat, dairy, and produce real or plastic fruits and vegetables related to target vocabulary

Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: adjectives (hard, soft, round, thin, long, rough, smooth); other (and, recipe, ingredient) Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjectives (hard, soft, round, thin, long, rough, smooth); other (and, recipe, ingredient) Understand how to use coordinating conjunctions (and) Orally describe foods Write descriptive sentences in the present tense following a model Read a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions Write ingredients and directions for a recipe with assistance

Read simple words in stories, songs, or games; identify target vocabulary Orally describe people, places, and/or things Relate sounds to letters: l Produce uppercase and lowercase graphemes legibly: l Make predictions Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (crop, farmer) Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (crop, farmer) 5.5.8 Read a short nonfiction article and answer factual comprehension questions in writing 5.5.9 Participate in a discussion about food production and distribution

5.4.6 5.4.7

SKILL EMPHASIS

4 (continued)

LESSON

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. Š2004, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Carousel of IDEAS, 4th Edition, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

CHAPTER 5 The Food We Eat

263


Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2004, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Carousel of IDEAS, 4th Edition, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

LESSON 1

Establishing an Instructional Base Line You will need: Chapter 5 PRE-TEST • Write today’s date on the board. • Begin each lesson by greeting students: Hello. How are you today? Indicate the correct response: I am very well, thank you. • Connect students’ prior knowledge to the new content they will be learning. Say: Today we are going to talk about food. This morning I had two bananas and an apple for breakfast. (Show students two bananas and an apple.) Who had breakfast this morning? Raise your hand if you had breakfast this morning. What did you have for breakfast? Call on student volunteers. Tell students that they are going to learn more about food, but first, you want to find out what they already know about this topic. Give each student a copy of the Chapter 5 PRE-TEST. This will serve as a base line assessment for this chapter. Show students where to write their names and the date. Read the directions and review the sample item for each part of the test. Make sure students know what they are to do. Reassure students that all they have to do is their best and not to worry if they don’t know the answers.

Lesson 1 Presentation

You will need: THEME PICTURE #8 (“A Grocery Store Produce Area”) Chapter 5 PICTURE CARDS TEMPLATE S (“The Food We Eat”) Chapter 5 ACTIVITY PICTURES

• Write the words food, fruit, and vegetable on the board. Show students a variety of foods or pictures of foods, including meat, dairy products, and fruits and vegetables. Point out that all these things are called food. Then place them in food groups. Tell students that meats are in one food group, dairy products are in another, and fruits and vegetables are in their own food group. Put everything except the fruits and vegetables away. Tell students that this chapter is about fruits and vegetables. • Display THEME PICTURE #8 (“A Grocery Store Produce Area”). Tell students: These people are at a grocery store. They are in the produce section. Fruits and vegetables are sometimes called produce. Write the words grocery store and produce on the board. Raise your hand if you have been to the grocery store. Raise your hand if you have been to the produce section. Hold up each PICTURE CARD, one at a time, and name the fruit or vegetable (e.g., This is a lemon.). Have students repeat each sentence after you, and then call on a student to point to the corresponding fruit or vegetable in the theme picture. Remember to limit the number of words or concepts introduced at one time. • Give students a copy of TEMPLATE S (“The Food We Eat”) and have them paste the cover on a manila folder. Have students write their names and the date on the cover. Students can decorate this cover with pictures of fruits and vegetables. This folder will serve as a portfolio container for the work they complete in Chapter 5.

264

UNIT 2 My Larger Community


Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2004, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Carousel of IDEAS, 4th Edition, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Practice

LESSON 1

• Hold up THEME PICTURE #8 and say: Where are the carrots? Point to the carrots. Where are the bananas? Show me the bananas. Who is holding the oranges? How many oranges is the girl holding? What color are the lemons? What color are the tomatoes? … and so forth. Theme Picture #8

A GROCERY STORE PRODUCE AREA

• Put the PICTURE CARDS and an empty box on a table and call on students to follow these commands: Put the onion in the box. Put the lemon next to the carrot. Take the onion out of the box. Put the pineapple behind your back. Put the apple beside the banana. Put the pear, grapes, and tomato in a row. Continue as desired. • Introduce the /l/ sound to students. Say: What sound do you hear at the beginning of the word lemon? That’s right. You hear the /l/ sound. What other words begin with the /l/ sound? [look, library] Does anyone’s name begin with the /l/ sound? Give students whose names begin with the /l/ sound a chance to say their names. Tell students: I’m going to say three words. I’m going to repeat each set of words two times.

CHAPTER 5 The Food We Eat

265


LESSON 1

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2004, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Carousel of IDEAS, 4th Edition, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

When I finish, I want you to tell me the word that begins with the /l/ sound. Listen carefully. rice, laugh, pear left, room, stomach head, jellybean, leg tardy, late, absent little, big, funny

Apply & Extend • Place real or plastic fruits and vegetables in a grocery bag. Have students close their eyes, reach in, find one, and guess what it is. Have them pull it out to check the accuracy of their prediction. • Tell students that they are going to be the teachers and you are going to be the student. They are going to tell you what to draw and you will draw it on chart paper. Write the following models on the board:

Draw one carrot. Color it orange. Draw three apples. Color them red.

Place the PICTURE CARDS on a table. Students are to take turns choosing a picture and giving the command. They should give commands following the model for either the singular (“Draw one carrot. Color it orange.”) or plural (“Draw three apples. Color them red.”). Follow students’ commands by drawing the appropriate fruits on chart paper. Next, organize students into pairs and have each student give commands to his/her partner. The receiving partner should draw the appropriate picture on a piece of paper. Circulate around the room and help students as needed. • Tell students that they are going to organize fruits and vegetables into categories. Place plastic or real fruits and vegetables in a basket or box. Have students sort the fruits and vegetables. Students are to take turns choosing one item out of the basket and placing it in the “fruit” pile or the “vegetable” pile. When a student puts a food in a pile, have him/her make a statement following this model: Apples are fruits. Carrots are vegetables. Point out that students should use the plural form of the nouns when making these statements.

266

UNIT 2 My Larger Community


Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. Š2004, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Carousel of IDEAS, 4th Edition, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

LESSON 1

Involving Family Give each student the Chapter 5 ACTIVITY PICTURES to take home. Tell students they are to go on a fruit and vegetable hunt with their parents or other family members. They should look at home or in a store for fruits and vegetables. They are to color all the fruits and vegetables that they saw at home or at the store. Allow time in class for students to share their pictures before they place them in the Chapter 5 Portfolio.

Observing Student Progress Do students meet these KEY OBJECTIVES ‌  Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, food; other (food, fruit, vegetable, grocery store, produce)  Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel nouns, food; other (food, fruit, vegetable, grocery store, produce)  Respond orally to simple questions with words or phrases  Respond to simple directions and questions using physical actions and other nonverbal communication (e.g., matching, pointing, drawing)  Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce phonemes: beginning sound /l/  Orally give and respond to commands  Categorize foods  Complete assignments neatly, accurately, and on time

CHAPTER 5 The Food We Eat

267


AchieveEnglish Sample Lesson

Early Intermediate Level Grades 6-12


Language Level: Early Intermediate

L: 2, 4, 6, 15 S: 1, 3-4, 78, 11, 14 R: 7, 11, 13, 17 W: 8

Language Objectives

Requesting and sharing information: WHquestions, sentence structures (e.g., What food group did you read about? We read about grains.) Naming people places and things: Nouns (e.g., pyramid, grains, oils)

Language Functions & Forms

316318

Page

314

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Chapter 9

routine information.

Early Intermediate ELLs often use

memorized phrases, groups of words, and formulaic sentences to communicate

1. Review with students how to take notes on a given topic; have students sort foods based on oral descriptions and visual support. 2. Have students read simple passages independently and share and request information. 3. Show students how to use a standard dictionary to find the meaning of unknown vocabulary. Homework Observing Student Progress

WARM-UP (1 Class Period)

Resources Needed: Champion Reader; Champion CD-ROM; Champion Writer (Activity 89-92); Champion Audio CD; pictures or samples of foods from each food group; four sample food labels; chart paper/pens/pencils/paper

Approximate Teaching Time: 6 (50-minute) class periods

CHAPTER 9: LET’S EAT! Lesson 3: MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise


L: 7, 15 S: 1, 8-9, 11, 20 R: 1, 7, 910, 30, 35 W: 2-3, 7, 17, 19, 22

Language Objectives

L: 2, 4, 7, 15 S: 1, 3, 11, 14 R: 2, 7, 13, 17-18, 3132, 34, 37 W: 8, 22-23

Language Objectives

Describing actions: Future tense (e.g., I am going to eat more grains.)

Language Functions & Forms

Language Functions & Forms

319321

Page

318319

Page

Lesson 3

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. Š2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

315

Note: This lesson deals with diet and lifestyle, including physical activity. Be sensitive to students who have issues with weight and keep an eye out for any student who is making fun of another. Emphasize that it is important to be respectful to all people and treat others the way that we want to be treated. If you notice any problems, speak with students individually.

1. Review homework and topics covered in the previous class session. 2. Use graphic organizers to compare/contrast information; have students describe differences over time based on information from charts. 3. Have students connect information on socially related topics to examples and describe future actions. 4. Have students express opinions on current events and read own writing aloud; emphasize appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression. Homework Observing Student Progress

EXTEND (2 Class Periods)

1. Review homework and topics covered in the previous class session. 2. Engage students in a pre-reading activity to anticipate content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection; point out text features. 3. Read the text; have students listen for a specific purpose (e.g., to gain information about the 2005 food pyramid). 4. Check student comprehension. 5. Have students connect information from text to self and collect information and complete interactive activities on a pre-selected web site. 6. Have students read and identify a few specific facts in consumer documents. 7. Have students label a diagram and provide details and make generalizations related to data presented in charts. Homework Observing Student Progress

CONNECT (3 Class Periods)


Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

MyPyramid

316

Chapter 9

2. Have students read simple passages independently and share and request information. Organize students into six teams. Assign each team a group (e.g., grains, vegetables, fruits). Print 4-5 copies of Guide 20 (located on the Champion CDROM). Cut apart the sections and give the students on each team a copy of their section (i.e., all the students on the grains team should get a copy of the section on grains). Have students read their passage independently and then discuss it with their team members. Circulate around the class and help students with any

Place a collection (and/or pictures) of food items/oils in a box. Be sure to have at least two examples from each food group. Place six signs—one for each group—in various parts of the room. Have students, one at a time, pick out a item/picture from the box. The student should show the item to the class and name it; help students as needed. Then the student should walk toward the sign where the item belongs. If the class believes the student is heading in the right direction, they should clap their hands. If they think the student is heading in the wrong direction, they should remain silent. Guide students as needed. Once the student is next to the correct sign, have him/her make a statement following this model: __________ is/are in the _________ group (e.g., apples are in the fruit group). Continue until all items have been sorted.

pyramid represents a different food group: orange for grains, green for vegetables, red for fruit, yellow for oils, blue for milk, and purple for meat and beans. I will repeat this information: orange for grains, green for vegetables, red for fruit, yellow for oils, blue for milk, and purple for meat and beans. Have students compare their notes with a partner and fill in any missing information. Then ask questions about the information you presented: What is the 2005 food pyramid called? [MyPyramid] What does this pyramid replace? [the food pyramid of 1992] What is a new part of the pyramid? [physical activity] What group does each color in the pyramid represent? [orange for grains, green for vegetables, red for fruit, yellow for oils, blue for milk, and purple for meat and beans]

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Have them take out a piece of paper and pen so they can take notes. For a refresher on how to take notes, review “Good Notes = Good Grades” in Unit 1, Chapter 1 of the Reader. Ask: Who can draw a picture of a pyramid on the board? Draw or have a student draw a pyramid on the board. What shape is a pyramid? Yes, a pyramid is a three-sided shape; it is in the shape of a triangle. Review the elements (i.e., lines and points) that comprise a triangle. Then read the following information aloud, slowly: This is the 2005 food pyramid. It replaces the food pyramid of 1992. The 2005 pyramid is called MyPyramid. The MyPyramid symbol shows the amount of foods from each food group that you should have. Physical activity is a new part of the pyramid. Each color in the

Copyright © 2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From the Champion of IDEAS program. Permission is granted to reproduce this page for one teacher’s classroom only.

Guide 19

1. Review with students how to take notes on a given topic; have students sort foods based on oral descriptions and visual support. Display Guide 19 (located on the Champion CD-ROM) on a transparency or projector. Tell students that you are going to explain the chart to them.

WARM-UP (1 Class Period)


Lesson 3

317

Assign each student one or more of the more difficult vocabulary words from the reading. Ask students to find or create a picture to show the meaning of their word. Allow time in class for students to share their picture definitions.

At Home

Review with students the various features in the standard dictionary you are using. Point out that verbs are listed in the dictionary without the word to in front of them. As a class, look up the first five words together. Then assign each group 3-4 words to look up and write down the definition. Review all the definitions as a class and help students understand the meaning of each word. Point out root words (e.g., detail, detailed; moderation, moderate).

NOUNS: government, pyramid, diet, lifestyle, slogan, symbol, variety, moderation, proportionality VERBS: to replace, to emphasize, to represent, to release, to recommend, to contain ADJECTIVES: physical, smart, detailed, main, gradual

3. Show students how to use a standard dictionary to find the meaning of unknown vocabulary. Introduce students to the more difficult vocabulary words they will encounter in the reading, “MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise.” Explain to students that sometimes important information includes unfamiliar vocabulary words. Information related to health is especially important, so students need to learn ways to understand what they read. They have learned many ways to comprehend new words—using a bilingual dictionary, using a picture dictionary, using root words and affixes, and using context clues. Today they will use a new tool—a standard dictionary. Organize students into small groups and give each group a standard dictionary. Write the following words on the board:

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Members of the first group should ask these questions to the second group. Members of the second group should answer. Then teams should switch roles. When both teams have requested and shared information, switch pairs until all teams have shared with each other. Ask students questions about what they learned: What are some examples of grains? What are some examples of vegetables? What are some examples of fruits? … and so forth. Then ask students: In addition to the six food groups, there is another part of MyPyramid. What is it? [physical activity] That’s right. Physical activity is also part of the food pyramid. Physical activity simply means movement of the body that uses energy. Walking, gardening, climbing the stairs, playing soccer, and dancing are all examples of physical activity. To be healthy, MyPyramid says your physical activity should be moderate or vigorous and add up to at least 30 minutes a day. Who can tell me in their own words what this means? Ask student(s) to paraphrase this idea to demonstrate comprehension. What kinds of physical activity do you do? Allow students to share with the class.

• What other information did you learn about this food group? • We learned __________.

• What are some examples of foods in this food group? • __________ and __________ are examples of foods in this food group.

• What group did you read about? • We read about __________.

unfamiliar vocabulary. Next, have teams share their information with other teams. Pair two teams together. The first team should request information from the second team; write the following questions and answers on the board:


Unit 3  Chapter 9

 This is the 1992 food pyramid.

318

Chapter 9

Review students’ predictions about the meaning of each major heading. Have students modify their predictions as needed. Introduce Activity 89 in the Writer and review the directions. Complete the example as a class. Have students complete the

Example: Comprehension Question: What is the main purpose of MyPyramid? Answer: to help Americans live longer, better, and healthier lives; “The main purpose of MyPyramid is to help Americans live longer, better, and healthier lives.”

4. Check student comprehension. Tell students: I am going to read questions about the story. I want you to answer the questions. Read each Comprehension Check question and call on student volunteers to answer. When a student provides the correct answer, ask him or her to read the sentence that contains the answer.

3. Read the text; have students listen for a specific purpose (e.g., to gain information about the 2005 food pyramid). Without stopping, read the entire selection aloud twice or have students listen to the Champion Audio CD. Then read the text again; however, this time stop after each sentence and have students repeat each sentence after you. Read the text a fourth time, but for this reading stop at high frequency sight words, target vocabulary, and more difficult words students have been learning. Encourage students to supply the missing word. Give students time for paired reading. Remind students to raise their hands if they have any questions.

what each heading means and record their predictions on chart paper or a transparency. Then say: Let’s look at the charts on page 92. Read the captions aloud. Ask: What shape is a pyramid? [triangle] Call on students to give as much detail as possible about the two food pyramids shown on page 92. Continue reviewing and reading the captions of the other graphics and pictures associated with this reading.

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Let’s pre-read pages 92-95 together. Let’s start with the title. Point to the title. What is the title of this reading? [“MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise”] What do you think this article is about? Read the major headings aloud or have a student volunteer read them. Ask students to predict

92

 This is the 2005 food pyramid. Each color represents a different food group: orange for grains, green for vegetables, red for fruit, yellow for oils, blue for milk, and purple for meat and beans.

pyramid called MyPyramid. The main purpose of MyPyramid is to help Americans live longer, better, and healthier lives. MyPyramid replaces the 1992 Food Guide Pyramid. MyPyramid gives people a guide to improve their diet and lifestyle. MyPyramid provides information about healthy eating and fitness. The MyPyramid symbol represents the amount of food people should eat from each food group. It is important to make smart food choices in every food group, every day. Physical activity is a new part of the symbol.

In April 2005, the U.S. government released a new food

MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise

2. Engage students in a pre-reading activity to anticipate content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection; point out text features. Ask students to take out their Reader. Say: Open your book to page 92.

1. Review homework and topics covered in the previous class session.

CONNECT (3 Class Periods)

Determine whether students mastered the language objectives covered in this section. (See page 314.) Review concepts and give students more practice as needed and then continue with the next section.

Observing Student Progress


Lesson 3

Have students share their completed Activity 91 with a family member or friend and explain the various parts of the food pyramid. Students should ask the family member or friend if he/she learned anything new. Have students share their experience with the class.

319

2. Use graphic organizers to compare/contrast information; have students describe differences over time based on information from charts. Draw a Venn diagram on the board as shown below:

1. Review homework and topics covered in the previous class session.

EXTEND (2 Class Periods)

Determine whether students mastered the language objectives covered in this section. (See page 315.) Review concepts and give students more practice as needed and then continue with the next section.

Observing Student Progress

At Home

help. Once all students have completed the worksheet, have students provide details and make generalizations related to the data. Provide models and ask questions to help guide them: The pyramid tells us that we should have more grains than oils. It also tells us that we should do physical activity every day. What else does the pyramid tell us? Encourage students to provide as many details and make as many generalizations as possible. Provide corrective feedback as needed.

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

7. Have students label a diagram and provide details and make generalizations related to data presented in charts. Organize students into pairs. Give each pair the following colored markers or pencils: orange, green, red, yellow, blue, and purple. Introduce Activity 91 in the Writer. Review the directions with students. Make sure they understand that they are to color in the bands of the pyramid and then create a key to show what each color represents. Do the first one as a class so students have a model to follow. Students can refer to their Reader for

6. Have students read and identify a few specific facts in consumer documents. Show students some examples of food labels. Pass them around the class and give students a chance to look at them. Have students refer to page 95 of their Reader and read the text and review the graphic independently and silently. Ask: Why is it important to read food labels? [they tell us what is in the food; we need this information to help us make good choices] Introduce Activity 90 in the Writer and review the directions. Have students look up any unfamiliar words on the food label in a bilingual dictionary. Have students complete the worksheet with a partner. Review the answers with the class.

5. Have students connect information from text to self and collect information and complete interactive activities on a pre-selected web site. Have students turn to page 95 in their Reader. Read “Make Connections” aloud and then call on a student volunteer to read it. Organize students into pairs and have them discuss the questions. If possible, have pairs visit www.mypyramid.gov and complete the interactive activities and/or downloadable worksheets. Preview this web site beforehand and direct students to resources appropriate for them. Call on pairs to share their experiences and results as well as their responses to the “Make Connections” questions with the whole class.

remainder of the worksheet individually; they can use their Reader for reference. Review the answers with the class. Have students take turns asking the questions they wrote to the class.


320

Chapter 9

4. Have students express opinions on current events and read own writing aloud; emphasize appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression. Tell students you want them to complete a paragraph about diet and exercise in American society. Introduce Activity 92 in the Writer and review the directions and the vocabulary (e.g., problem, solution). Make sure students understand what they are supposed to do. Explain that there aren’t any right or wrong answers; they are to fill in the blanks with their opinions. They can write as much or as little as they want. Circulate around the room and help

3. Have students connect information on socially related topics to examples and describe future actions. Ask students to think about the eating habits and physical activity of their family members and friends. Can you think of someone who eats a healthy diet and does the right amount of physical activity? Have students share information about people they know who eat well and exercise. Encourage them to provide as many details as possible, including what the person eats, how often the person eats, what kind of exercise the person gets, and how often the person exercises. Then ask students to think about people they know who do not eat a healthy diet or do physical activity: What could they do to improve their diet and lifestyle? Have students share their ideas with the class. Ask students to think about their own lives: How can you improve your diet and lifestyle? Tell students that you want them to think of four things they are going to do—or not going to do— in the future to improve their diet and lifestyle. Provide this information about yourself first to give students a model to follow: I am going to eat more vegetables. I am not going to eat doughnuts for breakfast. I am going to take a walk during my lunch period. I am going to ride my bicycle on the weekends. Write your statements on the board. Have students write their four ideas for improvement on a piece of paper. Students may read their ideas aloud; however, emphasize that students don’t have to share if they don’t want to. Have students put their papers in the chapter portfolio.

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Remind students that their paragraph should include a topic sentence, details, and a conclusion. Have students put their paragraphs in their chapter portfolio.

Food Pyramids The 1992 and 2000 food pyramids give people guidelines to live healthier lives. Both pyramids include five food groups and oils. The 1992 pyramid shows pictures of food, but it does not include physical activity. The 2000 pyramid does not show pictures of food. It does include physical activity. It also shows that people should eat foods from all food groups and oils. We are learning more about food and fitness all the time. There will probably be a new pyramid in the future. The food pyramids are guides to help people live healthier lives.

Have students copy the Venn diagram on their own piece of paper. Remind students that a Venn diagram is used to compare and contrast information; the information in the overlapping part of the circles is shared by both items being compared and the information in the portions of the circles that don’t overlap is unique to each item. Have students turn to page 92 in their Reader and review the two food pyramids. As a class, complete the Venn diagram. Once the Venn diagram is complete, ask students to describe the similarities and differences between the two pyramids (e.g., both are in the shape of a pyramid; both represent the food groups; 1992 shows horizontal bands while 2005 shows vertical bands; 2005 shows physical activity while 1992 does not; 1992 shows visuals of foods while 2005 does not). Ask: Why do guidelines change over time? Can you think of other examples where guidelines have changed? Do you think there will be a new food pyramid in the future? Why or why not? Give students an opportunity to share their ideas with the class. Have students write a short paragraph comparing and contrasting the two pyramids. Provide a model for students to follow:


Milk

Oils

Meats and Beans

Have students place their charts in the chapter portfolio.

Grains Vegetables Fruits

Lesson 3

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. Š2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Determine whether students mastered the language objectives covered in this section. (See page 315.) Review concepts and give students more practice as needed and then continue with the next section.

Physical Activity

Have students make a list of all the food they ate that day and any physical activity they did. Have students organize this information in a chart such as the one shown below:

Observing Student Progress

•

At Home

students as needed. When students are finished, have them read their writing aloud. Reinforce appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression. Remind students that it is okay to correct errors when reading aloud. Provide corrective feedback as needed.

321


Guide 18

Smallest

Smaller

Small

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

MyPyramid

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From the Champion of IDEAS program. Permission is granted to reproduce this page for one teacher’s classroom only.

Guide 19

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Copyright © 2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From the Champion of IDEAS program. Permission is granted to reproduce this page for one teacher’s classroom only.


Guide 21

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From the Champion of IDEAS program. Permission is granted to reproduce this page for one teacher’s classroom only.

OILS: Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature. Oils come from many different plants and from fish. Examples: canola oil, corn oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil

MEAT AND BEANS: Meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds are considered part of this group. Most meat and poultry choices should be lean or low fat. Fish, nuts, and seeds contain healthy oils. Choose these foods frequently instead of meat or poultry.

MILK: All fluid milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group. Foods made from milk that keep their calcium content are part of the group. Foods made from milk that have little or no calcium (such as cream cheese, cream, and butter) are not included. Most milk group choices should be fat free or low fat.

FRUITS: Any fruit or 100% fruit juice is part of the fruit group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried. They may be whole, cut up, or pureed. Examples: apples, bananas, oranges, and grapefruit

1000 500 0

VEGETABLES: Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice is a member of the vegetable group. Vegetables may be raw, cooked, fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated. They may be whole, cut up, or mashed. Examples: spinach, carrots, green beans, and potatoes

WA

GRAINS: Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain is a grain product. Examples: bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas, and grits

MT OR

Food Groups

MILES

AK

NH VT ME ND

MN

MA RI NY MI WI

ID 500 250

IA NE NV

UT

SD MILES

IL IN OH CO CA

OK

CT PA NJ DE MD KS

MO

WV VA NC SC KY TN

HI

GA

AL NM AZ

WY 0

LA MILES

AR

MS TX 400 200 0

N FL

Midwest West

Northeast Southeast Southwest

Guide 20

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From the Champion of IDEAS program. Permission is granted to reproduce this page for one teacher’s classroom only.


MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise In April 2005, the U.S. government released a new food pyramid called MyPyramid. The main purpose of MyPyramid is to help Americans live longer, better, and healthier lives. MyPyramid replaces the 1992 Food Guide Pyramid. MyPyramid gives people a guide to improve their diet and lifestyle. MyPyramid provides information about healthy eating and fitness. The MyPyramid symbol represents the amount of food people should eat from each food group. It is important to make smart food choices in every food group, every day. Physical activity is a new part of the symbol.

 This is the 2005 food pyramid. Each color represents a different food group: orange for grains, green for vegetables, red for fruit, yellow for oils, blue for milk, and purple for meat and beans.

92

 This is the 1992 food pyramid.

Unit 3  Chapter 9

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. Š2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.


What Does the Pyramid Tell You? Gradual Improvement Eating a healthy diet and becoming physically fit do not happen overnight. MyPyramid emphasizes gradual improvement. The slogan, “Steps to a Healthier You,” means that you should take small steps each day. Taking these steps will improve your diet and lifestyle.

Proportionality Activity You should be active. The person climbing the steps represents physical activity.

You should eat more of some food groups than others every day. The different widths of the bands represent this idea of proportionality. For example, you should eat more grains than oils on a daily basis.

Moderation

Variety

You should not eat too much of any food. The food group becomes narrower as it goes from the bottom to the top. This represents moderation.

Every day, you should eat foods from the different food groups as well as oils. The color bands represent the variety of foods you should eat.

MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise

93

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Advice for Healthy Living For advice on how to eat healthier and become physically fit, go to www.MyPyramid.gov. This web site provides advice on how many calories you need every day. The web site also gives suggestions for making smart food choices. MyPyramid.gov Features • MyPyramid Plan—This plan gives you an estimate of the kinds of food you should eat. It also tells you how much food you should eat from the food groups. • MyPyramid Tracker—This tracker examines your current diet and physical activity. • Inside MyPyramid—This feature gives you detailed information about every food group. You can go to  www.MyPyramid.gov to get advice on eating and exercise.

94

Unit 3  Chapter 9

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Food Labels It’s important to read food labels. The label contains information about serving size, calories, and nutrients. See #1-4 and #6 on the sample nutrition label below. The label also contains information about Daily Values (DVs) for 2,000 and 2,500 calorie diets. See #5 on the sample label below.

1

Start Here

2

Check Calories

3

Limit these Nutrients

5

Quick Guide to % DV - 5% or less is Low - 20% or more is High

4

The U.S. government recommends that people eat foods from six different groups—grains, vegetables, fruit, oils, milk, and meat and beans. Do you eat foods from each group every day? Do you exercise every day? How can you improve your diet and fitness? Visit www.MyPyramid.gov for advice.

Get enough of these Nutrients 6

Footnote

1. What is the main purpose of MyPyramid?

3. What food group does orange represent in MyPyramid?

2. What does MyPyramid replace?

4. What can you find at www.MyPyramid.gov?

MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise

95

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Date: ________________________

Reading Comprehension DIRECTIONS: Read each question. You may consult “MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise” in the Champion Reader to help you answer the question. Fill in the circle next to your answer.

Example: In what year did the government release the food pyramid called MyPyramid? 1992  2000  2005

Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!

Activity 89

1. What is the main purpose of MyPyramid?  to help Americans live longer, better, and healthier lives  to help Americans to exercise more  to help Americans eat more grains 2. What does the green band in the MyPyramid symbol represent?  grains  fruits  vegetables 3. How is proportionality shown on the MyPyramid symbol?  by the person climbing the steps  by the different widths of the bands  by the different colors of the bands 4. Where can you find advice on eating and exercise?  www.MyPyramid.gov  www.foodpyramid.gov  www.foodguidance.gov 5. Which of the following does a food label NOT tell you?  calories  cost  serving size Now you write one question and answer about the information in the article. QUESTION: _________________________________________________________________ ANSWER: ____________________________________________________________________

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.


Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!

Activity 90

Date: ________________________

Reading Food Labels DIRECTIONS: Study the food label. Then complete the information below.

Clam Chowder Soup g = grams mg = milligrams

NUTRITION FACTS SERVING SIZE 1 CONTAINER Amount Per Serving Calories 110

Calories from Fat 50

% Daily Value* Total Fat 6g

9%

Saturated Fat 1g

5%

Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 5mg

2%

Sodium 980mg

41%

Total Carbohydrate 12g

4%

Dietary Fiber 4g

16%

Sugars 1g

Protein 3g Vitamin A 0%

Vitamin C 0%

Calcium 2%

Iron 6%

*Percent daily values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Name of food: _________________________________________________________________ Serving size: ___________________________________________________________________ Calories: ______________________________________________________________________ Total fat in grams: _______________________________________________________________ Cholesterol in milligrams: _________________________________________________________ Sodium daily value %: ____________________________________________________________ Dietary fiber daily value %: ________________________________________________________ Protein in grams: ________________________________________________________________ Percent daily values are based on a _________________________________________ calorie diet. Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.


Date: ________________________

MyPyramid DIRECTIONS: Color the bands of the MyPyramid symbol. Create a key to show what each color represents. Refer to pages 92-93 of the Champion Reader for help.

Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!

Activity 91

Key:

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.


Fact or Opinion?

Date: ________________________

Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!

 fact opinion

Pineapples are delicious.

 opinion

G fact

10. Celery and carrots are vegetables.

G opinion

 fact

9. Fresh ingredients make food taste better.

G opinion

 fact

8. Homemade bread is better than bread you buy at the store.

 opinion

G fact

7. A clock tells the time.

 opinion

G fact

6. Some people wear an apron when they cook.

Reading Comprehension

Date: ________________________

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

answers will vary ANSWER: ____________________________________________________________________

answers will vary QUESTION: _________________________________________________________________

Now you write one question and answer about the information in the article.

5. Which of the following does a food label NOT tell you?  calories G cost  serving size

4. Where can you find advice on eating and exercise? G www.MyPyramid.gov  www.foodpyramid.gov  www.foodguidance.gov

3. How is proportionality shown on the MyPyramid symbol?  by the person climbing the steps G by the different widths of the bands  by the different colors of the bands

2. What does the green band in the MyPyramid symbol represent?  grains  fruits G vegetables

1. What is the main purpose of MyPyramid? G to help Americans live longer, better, and healthier lives  to help Americans to exercise more  to help Americans eat more grains

Example: In what year did the government release the food pyramid called MyPyramid? 1992  2000 G 2005

DIRECTIONS: Read each question. You may consult “MyPyramid Promotes Healthy Eating and Exercise” in the Champion Reader to help you answer the question. Fill in the circle next to your answer.

Activity 89

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

_____________________________________________________________________________

answers will vary OPINION: ___________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

answers will vary FACT: _______________________________________________________________________

Now you write one fact and one opinion.

G opinion

 fact

5. People are exhausted after parties.

G opinion

 fact

4. Parties are fun.

 opinion

G fact

3. You can cook hamburgers on a barbeque.

G opinion

 fact

2. Pie is a good dessert.

 opinion

G fact

1. Apples and bananas are fruits.

Example:

DIRECTIONS: Read each sentence. Decide if it is a fact or opinion. Fill in the circle next to your answer.

Activity 88

Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!


Reading Food Labels

Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!

Dietary Fiber 4g

Iron 6%

Calcium 2%

% Daily Value*

MyPyramid

Date: ________________________

= fruit

= vegetables

= grains

= meat and beans

= milk

= oils

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Key:

DIRECTIONS: Color the bands of the MyPyramid symbol. Create a key to show what each color represents. Refer to pages 92-93 of the Champion Reader for help.

Activity 91

Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

2,000 Percent daily values are based on a _________________________________________ calorie diet.

3g Protein in grams: ________________________________________________________________

16% Dietary fiber daily value %: ________________________________________________________

41% Sodium daily value %: ____________________________________________________________

5mg Cholesterol in milligrams: _________________________________________________________

6g Total fat in grams: _______________________________________________________________

110 Calories: ______________________________________________________________________

1 container Serving size: ___________________________________________________________________

clam chowder soup Name of food: _________________________________________________________________

*Percent daily values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Vitamin C 0%

Vitamin A 0%

Protein 3g

Sugars 1g

4%

16%

Totall Carbohydrate 12g

2% 41%

Sodium 980mg

5%

9%

Calories from Fat 50

Cholesterol 5mg

Trans Fat 0g

Saturated Fat 1g

Totall Fat 6g

Calories 110

Amount Per Serving

SERVING SIZE 1 CONTAINER

NUTRITION FACTS

Clam Chowder Soup g = grams mg g = milligrams

Date: ________________________

DIRECTIONS: Study the food label. Then complete the information below.

Activity 90

Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!


Unit 3: Daily Life • Chapter 9: Let’s Eat!

Activity 92

Date: ________________________

Diet and Exercise DIRECTIONS: Fill in the blanks with your opinions. There are no right or wrong answers.

In America, diet and exercise are ___________________________ __________________________________________________________. A lot of people in America eat __________________________________ __________________________________________________________. I think ________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________. A lot of people in America think exercise is ___________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________. I think ________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________. The most important thing about diet is _______________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________. The most important thing about exercise is ___________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________. One problem with diet and fitness in America is ________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________. A solution to this problem is _______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________.

Copyright ©2007 Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Reproduced by Catapult Learning with permission from Ballard & Tighe, Publishers. ©2007, Ballard & Tighe, Publishers, a division of Educational IDEAS, Inc. From Champion of IDEAS, a Ballard & Tighe publication.


AchieveEnglish Sample Forms


Grades 6-12

Uses verbs, nouns, adjectives Follows outline to create a draft Writes expository compositions Uses the writing process to write short paragraphs Edits and revises writing with teacher assistance

WRITING

Produces common English phonemes clearly Uses common English morphemes when reading Uses context to understand unknown words Uses knowledge of affixes and roots to understand words Reads simple paragraphs and passages independently Recognizes idioms, analogies and figures of speech in text Recognizes that some words have multiple meanings Identifies main idea, details, facts and opinions, and cause and effect

READING 1st

2nd

3rd

QUARTER 4th

___ _

DATE

___________________DATE_________

___________________DATE

___________________DATE________

OTHER

Listens attentively Asks and answers questions Visualizes, draws or constructs figures described orally Asks and answers questions using phrases or simple sentences Shares and requests information Follows oral directions Locates information on maps or graphs based on oral descriptions Comprehends simple statements and questions on social & academic topics Asks questions and exchanges information with peers Brainstorms ideas based on illustrations of issues that effect everyday life Restates/ describes current/past events Sequences steps when problemsolving or starting something new Paraphrases or retells instructions, assignments or stories in sequence

LISTENING AND SPEAKING

M – MASTERY ~ Student has demonstrated mastery of the objective at the instructional level. S – SIGNIFICANT PROGRESS ~ Student has demonstrated significant progress toward achieving the objective. P – PROGRESS ~ Some progress has been noted. N – NO PROGRESS ~ This objective has been addressed, but no progress has been noted. T – TO BE ADDRESSED ~ This objective has not yet been addressed.

ASSESSMENT KEY

1st

2nd

6-08

3rd

QUARTER 4th

Student _______________________________ Grade _____ School _____________________ Catapult Learning Teacher ______________________

ACHIEVE ENGLISH EARLY INTERMEDIATE LEVEL PROGRESS REPORT


Catapult Learning Teacher Recently Taught English Language Objectives Listening and Speaking Skills:

Reading and Writing Skills:

Classroom teacher: Please check this box if you would like to meet with me.

Catapult Learning Teacher Classroom Teacher Recently Taught English Language Key Content Vocabulary Objectives To Be Taught Listening and Speaking Skills: Content Area:_______________

Content Area:_______________

Classroom Teacher Signature:

Reading and Writing Skills:

Classroom teacher: Please check this box if you would like to meet with me.

White Copy: Diagnostic Portfolio Pink Copy: Classroom Teacher Yellow Copy: Catapult Learning

White Copy: Diagnostic Portfolio Pink Copy: Classroom Teacher Yellow Copy: Catapult Learning

6/08

Please return top two sheets of this form by _____________________. 6/08

_________________________

Classroom Teacher Signature:

Content Area:______________

Please return top two sheets of this form by _____________________.

___________________________

Students:

Students:

Classroom Teacher Key Content Vocabulary To Be Taught Content Area:______________

Catapult Learning Teacher ___________ Classroom Teacher ______________ School __________________________Grade ____ Date _____________

Two-Way Communication Form

Two-Way Communication Form

Catapult Learning Teacher ________________ Classroom Teacher _____________ School __________________________Grade _____ Date ________________

Classroom Key Vocabulary

Classroom Key Vocabulary


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Achieve English – Early Intermediate Level (Grades K-5/6) Student Name: ______________________________ School: __________________

Grade: ________

Directions: Record the date each lesson was taught. Record an “A” if student was absent. Assess performance each session by recording a “3”, “2”, or “1” to the left of each objective. 3 = Proficient (student demonstrated competency in the objective with little teacher support) 2 = Basic (student demonstrated understanding of the objective with teacher support) 1 = Below Basic (student demonstrated little understanding of the objective taught and is dependent on teacher support and guidance) A percent (%) correct score should be recorded for each Chapter Test.

Unit 3 Chapter

1

Lesson

SKILL EMPHASIS

1

Listening & Speaking

2

Listening, Speaking, Reading & Writing

3

Listening & Speaking

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Reading & Writing

6

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

Score: _____%

KEY OBJECTIVES

DATE COMPLETED

__ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, occupations; other (occupation, job) __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel nouns, occupations; other (occupation, job) __ Ask and answer questions using phrases or simple sentences __ Orally describe occupations __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, occupations __ Answer questions using phrases or simple sentences __ Execute oral directions __ Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce phonemes: ending sounds /t/ and /r/ __ Label target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, occupations __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: commands (Turn around., Knock on the door., Walk slowly., Walk fast., Say your name quietly/loudly.); other (left, right) __ Read a story with the class and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Orally relate a story to personal experience __ Orally identify basic sequence of events in a story __ Listen to and recite a poem __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Orally identify characters and settings using simple sentences and vocabulary __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (first line, second line, third line) __ Orally describe people’s feelings and own feelings __ Follow a model to write sentences using the present tense and adjectives that describe feelings __ Write brief narratives using a few standard grammatical forms __ Label target vocabulary: adjectives (happy, sad, angry, hungry, sick, surprised, thirsty, tired) __ Orally express preferences __ Execute oral directions __ Provide explanations to support decisions __ Edit writing for basic conventions (e.g., capital letters, periods, and question marks) __ Read own writing aloud Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 1. Page 1 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Chapter

2

Lesson

1

Listening, Speaking

2

Listening, Speaking

3

Listening, Speaking

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Reading & Writing

6

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

3

SKILL EMPHASIS

Score: _____%

1

Listening, Speaking

2

Listening, Speaking

3

Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Reading & Writing

KEY OBJECTIVES __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, clothing and accessories other (clothing accessories) __ Ask and answer questions using words, phrases or simple sentences; use the present progressive and subject pronouns __ Execute multi-step oral directions __ Participate in a role play __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (corner, center, middle, bottom, top, side) __ Answer questions using phrases __ Orally describe location of people and objects __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (season, fall, summer) __ Orally describe characteristics of the four seasons __ Label target vocabulary : Carousel nouns, clothing and accessories __ Make predictions __ Orally identify characters and settings using simple sentences and vocabulary __ Orally identify the central problem in a story and it’s solution __ Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce short vowel sounds __ Relate sounds to letters: a,e,i,o,u __ Distinguish initial, medial, and final sounds in single-syllable words __ Use a dictionary to look up words __ Complete a chart

DATE COMPLETED

__ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: adjectives (new, old, pretty, ugly); other (opposites) __ Ask and answer questions using phrases or simple sentences __ Draw a picture and write a simple sentence related to a topic Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 2. __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, numbers 21-100 __ Execute oral directions __ Use numbers to estimate quantities __ Use numbers 21-59 to count objects and record data __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel nouns, numbers 21-100 __ Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce phonemes: ending sound /ee/ __ Retell sounds to letter: y __ Complete mathematical word problems with a group __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (calendar, month, date, today, yesterday, tomorrow) __ Read a calendar and answer questions using words of phrases __ Create a personal calendar and label it with personal events and holidays __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (money, coin) __Use knowledge of numbers to add coins of various denominations __ Write simple sentences answering questions __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: adjectives (hot, cold); other ( temperature, thermometer, degrees, Fahrenheit, Celsius) __ Demonstrate understanding of how to read a thermometer __ Read a nonfiction article about temperature with the class and answer factual comprehension questions in writing

Page 2 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Chapter

Lesson

Chapter Test

4

Score: _____%

1

Listening & Speaking

2

Reading & Writing

3

Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

5

SKILL EMPHASIS

Score: _____%

1

Listening & Speaking

2

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

KEY OBJECTIVES

DATE COMPLETED

Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 3. __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel nouns, farm animals; other (farm) __ Ask and answer questions using phrases or simple sentences __ Execute multi-step oral directions __ Listen to riddle and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using a one- or two word response; write original riddle __ Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce phonemes: short and long vowel sounds; ending sounds /p/ and /g/ __ relate sounds to letters: a,e,i,o,u; p, g __ Use singular and plural forms of nouns; recognize irregular plurals (e.g., sheep/sheep) __ Label target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, farm animals __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: adjective (medium-sized); other (feather, fur, hard shell, scales __ Orally describe animals in term of size, color, covering, and other attributes __ Read fact-based questions and respond to questions in writing __ Express a preference in writing __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases and sentences __ Orally identify characters and settings using simple sentences and vocabulary __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: adjective (light/dark); other (day, night) __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjective (scared, excited, sleepy, lazy) __ Use context clues to identify missing words __ Read a story with the class and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Orally relate story to personal experience using simple sentences Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 4. __Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, food adjective(healthy) __ Execute multi-step oral directions __ Use singular and plural forms of nouns (s, es) __ Categorize foods using a Venn diagram __ Participate in a class discussion on healthy foods; share personal experience __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: adjective (sweet, salty, sour); other (pyramid, nutrition) __ Understand and use exclamations __ Orally describe the taste of foods __ Use facial expressions and body language to express likes and dislikes __ Read and identify the food groups in the food pyramid; categorize foods

Page 3 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Chapter

5

Lesson

3

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

6

Chapter Test

6

SKILL EMPHASIS

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing Score: _____%

1

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

2

Listening & Speaking

3

Listening & Speaking

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

Score: _____%

KEY OBJECTIVES __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjective (delicious); commands (come back., don’t run., get in line., be quite.) __ Understand how to form contractions __ Identify punctuation: apostrophe and exclamation point __ Read sentences and supply missing punctuation mark (period, question mark, apostrophe, or exclamation point) __ Read a fictional short story independently and answer written comprehension questions __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (seed, sprout, plant) __ Orally identify characters and settings using simple sentences and phrases __ Put stages of plant growth in a sequence __ Read riddles and respond in writing by answering factual comprehension questions __ Read and follow steps to conduct an experiment __ Participate in a class discussion about preferences __ Write simple sentences describing foods __ Read own writing aloud __ Listen to and recite a chant __ Identify and produce rhyming words __ Identify punctuation marks and contractions __ Write a chant following a model and read it aloud

DATE COMPLETED

Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 5. __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel nouns, meals; other (morning, afternoon, when) __ Relate sounds to letter: ch __ label target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, meals __ Orally describe actions using the present progressive __ Explain preferences in writing by completing simple sentences __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: adjectives (clean, dirty); prepositions (before, after) __ Ask and answer questions using phrases and simple sentences __ Match antonyms (opposites) __ Participate in a role play __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjectives (bigger/biggest, small/smallest) __ Use comparatives and superlatives in speech and in writing __ Participate in a class discussion on meals, including food/drink, time, place, etc. __ Categorize foods and “create” a healthy meal (using pictures and drawings) __ Follow a recipe with the class __ Read and answer questions about a graph __ Orally identify settings and characters using simple sentences and vocabulary __ Use the content of a story to draw logical inferences __ Put events in a sequence __ Use articles (a, an) __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication (some, menu) __ Share personal experiences related to a topic __ Participate in a role play Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 6. Page 4 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Chapter

7

Lesson

SKILL EMPHASIS

1

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

2

Listening & Speaking

3

Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Reading & Writing

6

Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

Score: _____%

KEY OBJECTIVES __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, alphabet; other (English, alphabet, initials) __ Demonstrate comprehension of initials as a means to abbreviate names __ Listen attentively to presentation of a concept (illuminated manuscripts) and make an illuminated letter __Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: preposition (through) __ Execute oral directions __ Match uppercase and corresponding lowercase letters __ Demonstrate understanding of when to use uppercase and lowercase letters __ Put words in alphabetical order __ Identify vowels and consonants __ Identify words that contain the same short or long vowel sounds __ Use a phonetic pronunciation guide and pronunciation key __ Look up words in a dictionary __ Point out book features such as cover, title, author, and illustrator __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Demonstrate understanding of adjectives used in a story through pantomimes and sample sentences __ Read letters and words on sign __ Understand how signs and symbols express ideas __ Write simple sentences using key words __ Understand and follow steps in the writing process (brainstorm, organize, write, review and correct, rewrite) __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (word, sentence, paragraph) __ Follow a model to independently write a short descriptive paragraph on an assigned topic __ Edit writing for basic conventions (e.g., capital letters, periods, questions marks)

DATE COMPLETED

Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 7.

Unit 4

1

1

Listening & Speaking

2

Listening & Speaking

3

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

__ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, occupation; adjective (busy); other (not) __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel; nouns, occupations; adjective (busy); other (not) __ Ask and answer questions using phrases of simple sentences __ Participate in a class discussion about the ease/difficulty of jobs __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communications: Carousel nouns, occupations __ Ask and answer questions using phrases or simple sentences __ Execute oral directions __ Orally describe occupations and actions using a coordinating conjunction (and) __ Write simple sentences using possessives __ Label target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, occupations __ Read a nonfiction article about the U.S. president independently and orally respond to factual comprehension and critical thinking questions __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (responsibility)

Page 5 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Chapter

1

Lesson

4

Reading & Writing

5

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

2

Score: _____%

1

Listening & Speaking

2

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

3

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

6

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

3

SKILL EMPHASIS

1

Score: _____%

Listening & Speaking

KEY OBJECTIVES __Point out book features such as cover, title, author, and illustrator __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Identify and produce rhyming words __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjectives (friendly, noisy); other (experience, most, least) __ Read help wanted ads with the class and answer factual comprehension and critical thinking questions in writing __ Provide oral explanations to support decisions __ Use common social greetings and phrases (What do you do?)

DATE COMPLETED

Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 1. __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, clothing and accessories; adjective (special); other (pair) __ Execute multi-step oral directions __ Answer questions using words, phrases or simple sentences __ Read a chart and answer questions using words, phrases, or simple sentences __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (there is/there area) __ Identify the number of sounds and letters in words; identify words with similar vowels sounds (loo/) and structures (silent “e�) __ Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce phonemes: onset /sl/ __ Relate sounds to letters: sl __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (was wearing/is aring/is going to wear) __ Answer questions using the past and present progressive tense and the future tense __ Write simple sentences answering questions __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension and critical thinking questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Orally identify settings and characters using simple sentences and vocabulary __ Orally relate story to personal experience using simple sentences __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communications: pronouns (his, her) __ Use possessive pronouns (my, your, his, her) __ orally describe clothing and accessories using descriptive adjectives and possessive pronouns __ Follow directions to conduct a science experiment with the class __ Record data and conclusion of a science experiment __ Participate in a class discussion about science experiments Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 2. __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: Carousel; nouns, ordinal numbers __ Execute multi-step oral directions __ Answer questions using words , phrases of simple sentences

Page 6 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Chapter

3

Lesson

2

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

3

Listening & Speaking

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

4

SKILL EMPHASIS

Score: _____%

1

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

2

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

3

Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

KEY OBJECTIVES __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, ordinal numbers __ Recognize, identify, and pronounce phonemes: /th/ __ Relate sounds to letters: th __ Read a graph and answer questions using words, phrases, or simple sentences __ Write priority order of items taken on a trip __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjectives (few, several, many) __ Ask and answer questions using words, phrases, or simple sentences __ Label target vocabulary: Carousel nouns , ordinal numbers __ Write birth order of family members __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension and critical thinking questions __ Orally identify settings and characters using simple sentences and vocabulary __ Orally relate story to personal experience using simple sentences __ Put events in a sequence __ Write a friendly letter __ Orally describe a sequence of actions performed on a daily basis using the habitual present tense __ Understand and use commas __ Write a logical sequence of actions required to achieve a desired outcome

DATE COMPLETED

Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 3. __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, animals; adjectives (wild) other (stripe, habitat, desert, forest, Arctic) __ Understand presentation of a science concept: animal habitats __ Read a nonfiction article about animal habitat independently, respond orally to factual comprehension questions, and participate in a class discussion about habitat __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: prepositions (near, far, alongside, toward) __ Use singular and plural forms of nouns; recognize irregular plurals (e.g., wolf/wolves) __ Execute multi-step oral directions __ Recognize, identify, and correctly pronounce phonemes and onsets __ Read a story with the class and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: other (because, continent, grassland, mammal, path) __ Understand how to use coordinating conjunctions (because) __ Make predictions __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Orally identify characters, setting, and main events of the plot __ Complete simple sentences using key words to identify the sequence of a text read aloud __ Retell a story in sequence

Page 7 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool Chapter

Lesson

5

Chapter Test

5

Reading & Writing

Score: _____%

1

Listening & Speaking

2

Reading & Writing

3

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

5

Reading & Writing

Chapter Test

6

SKILL EMPHASIS

Score: _____%

1

Listening & Speaking

2

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

3

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

4

Listening, Speaking Reading & Writing

KEY OBJECTIVES __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (fact, opinion) __ Follow a model to independently write a short descriptive paragraph on an assigned topic __ Label target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, animals

DATE COMPLETED

Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 4. __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, food __ Execute multi-step oral directions __ Categorize foods based on categories such as meals, color, food pyramid groups, countable/uncountable __ Ask can/may questions __ Orally express likes and dislikes __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: other (but) __ Understand how to use coordinating conjunctions (but) __ Write sentences using contractions __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: pronouns our, their) __ Use possessive pronouns (my, your, his, her, our, their) __ Write simple sentences following a model __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Orally identify characters, setting, and characters using simple sentences __ Draw inferences about text __ Label target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, food __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjectives (crunchy, sticky); other (was/were not eating) __ Use common social greetings and phrases (Can you come over for__?, Please pass the ___., What are you going to have?) __ Identify foods that meet criteria (e.g., hot, cold, sweet, etc.) Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 5. __ Listen attentively to presentation of target vocabulary: Carousel nouns, body parts __ Categorize body parts by location __ Participate in a class discussion about health concept: skin and eye care __ Orally describe actions using the present progressive __ Recognize and demonstrate comprehension of target vocabulary through verbal and nonverbal communication: adjectives (high, low,); prepositions (across, against); other (forward, backward, I searched high and low., You are under his thumb., He has thick Skin., She didn’t raise an eyebrow)) __ Identify opposites orally and in writing __ Recognize and understand idiomatic expressions __ Read and write safety rules for home __ Use common social greetings and phrases (Be careful., Are you okay?) __ Make predictions __ Listen to a story and respond orally by answering factual comprehension questions using short phrases or simple sentences __ Orally identify relationships between text and personal experiences using simple sentences Page 8 of 9


Lesson and Performance Tracking Tool

5

Chapter Test

Reading & Writing

Score: _____%

__ Orally describe functions of body parts __ Follow a model to independently write a short descriptive paragraph on an assigned topic __ Edit writing for basic conventions (e.g., capital letters, punctuation spelling) __ Read own writing aloud with some pacing, intonation, and expression __ Complete written sentences using target vocabulary Demonstrate understanding and application of target vocabulary and key objectives presented in Chapter 6.

Page 9 of 9


AchieveEnglish Teacher Observation Form Teacher Name __________________________________ Date: _____________ School/Site _____________________ City/State__________________ Time/Length of Observation __________ Supervisor __________________ REQM_________________ Observed by ____________________ 3 = Exceeds Expectations 2 = Meets Expectations 1 = Does Not Meet Expectations Directions for Scoring: Mark a 3 in the appropriate column. Shaded cells are not applicable to be scored for those criteria. Total the “3s” in each column. Add the number of “3s” together (=A). Add the number of “3s” plus blank, unshaded boxes together (=B). Express as a fraction. Divide A/B to get the total percentage. A score of less than 80% in any section requires a follow-up observation [on that section] within 2 weeks.

SECTION 1: Instruction 1. Instruction began on time (within 5 minutes of scheduled start time). 2. Teacher followed program lesson design. 3. Teacher provided sufficient wait time for thoughtful student responses. 4. Teacher used effective questioning techniques. 5. Classroom Connection Activity was completed 6. Session ended on time with appropriate closure. 7. Teacher used required program materials during lesson.

3

2

1

Scoring Totals

SECTION 2: Student Management/Motivation 1. Students were actively engaged in instruction. 2. Behavior management was evident. 3. Student/Teacher interactions were positive. 4. Class rules and consequences were posted. 5. Teacher utilized space and furniture effectively to create an environment conducive to learning. 6. Teacher interacted with students individually as needed.

/ 3

2

1

Scoring Totals

SECTION 3: Record Keeping 1. Lesson & Performance Tracking Tools were complete AND up-todate, including required rubric scores and attendance documentation. 2. Group Diagnostic Portfolios contain up-to-date 2x communication forms, LPTTs for each student, QIA Group profile, IPT Oral Group List, and IPT student Placement Chart for Carousel or Champion (Where applicable). 3. Student Portfolios exist for every student and contain appropriate materials. 4. Classroom Connection Concept Cards are being maintained for every student.

Key 1/7=14% 2/7=39% 3/7= 43% 4/7=57% 5/7=71% 6/7 = 86% 7/7=100%

Key 1/6 = 17% 2/6 = 33% 3/6 = 50% 4/6 = 67% 5/6 = 83% 6/6= 100%

/

3

Scoring Totals

2

%

%

1 Key 1/4 = 2/4 = 3/4 = 4/4 =

/

25% 50% 75% 100%

%

1

Copy this observation. Give one copy to Teacher. One copy to the supervisor and one copy to REQM.

9/08


AchieveEnglish Teacher Observation Form Areas of strength are:

Specific recommendations for improvement are:

Follow-Up Observation Required? YES ___ NO ___

Observation discussed with Teacher on _______. Observer Signature ______________________ Teacher Signature __________________________________

2

Copy this observation. Give one copy to Teacher. One copy to the supervisor and one copy to REQM.

AchieveEnglish Preview Book  

Contains samples lessons and an abstract of Catapult Learning's Achieve English Program.

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