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St. Augustine’s Culture & Lifestyle Magazine

Volume 8 Issue 7 | JULY 2014

oldcitylife.com

Play Ball

the other fountain of youth

White Gold

searching for scallops

Summer Fun

hop up on a SUP


Volume 8

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Issue 7

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2014

Castaway Publishing, Inc PO Box 35 St. Augustine, FL 32085 904.461.6773 OCL@castawaypublishing.com Lura Readle Scarpitti

Managing Editor editor@castawaypublishing.com 904-325-5930

Brian Hornung

Contributing Art Director brian@rockitinteractive.com

Diana L. Garber

Ad Sales Director oclads@castawaypublishing.com 904-679-1550

LeeAnn Kendall

Advertising Sales • Public Relations Ad Representative ads@castawaypublishing.com 904-501-3917

Voted St. Augustine’s Best “Every Year” 15 Years in a Row!

Distribution

Warren Macbeth Christianne Macbeth Truett Yarbrough John Dattoma Publication Distribution Service Dominion Distribution

Old City Life Magazine publishes 12 issues annually subscription $19.95 | 12 issues

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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the publisher. All material is compiled from sources believed to be reliable, published without responsibility for errors or omissions. Castaway Publishing, Inc. assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photos.

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D

ear Readers,

letter from the editor

It’s been a year ago this month that Castaway Publishing took over Old City Life Magazine. What a year it’s been! We here at the magazine are still overwhelmed at all of the, for lack of a better word, love, that this community has shown for the publication as we have gone forward. It’s that love that keeps us striving to make OCL a true representative of the diverse, eclectic and dynamic world it is a part of. We’ve been able to tell some amazing stories; highlight wonderful talents in the arts and more; profile people from all walks of life that this city can be proud of; expose the hidden gems here and around the state; give a little of its history, and give you the lowdown on all the fun things there are to do within the borders of St. Johns County...and we haven’t even scratched the surface yet! This month is no different. We introduce you to a group of competitors who take their passion for the game of softball VERY seriously (“The Boys of Summer,” page 16); let you in on the real reason that Jack Johnson decided to bring his only Florida Show to the Amphitheatre (“Reuse, Reduce, Recycle,” page 32); take you on a journey to Homosassa Springs and Crystal River at the perfect time of year-scalloping season (“Road Trip,” page 35), and update you on how Ned Pollack is doing after suffering the damages of a early morning fire to his US1 South restaurant (“Joy of Cooking,” page 63). Plus, we shine the spotlight on Flagler College graduate and former resident Frank George, who has gone on to make a name for himself as one of the best prosecutors in the Orange/Osceola State Attorney’s office. His expertise, dedication and talent landed him in the middle of one of the most notorious trials in recent history-the Casey Anthony murder trial. But his part in that trial is the least of this outstanding individual’s story. Learn why starting on page 10 (“From Dormroom to Courtroom”). A big shout out goes to Ed Taylor whose photos made our cover two times in a row! I can’t say enough about this extremely talented photographer’s eye...the images he records just jump off the page and we are so fortunate to have him as one of our go-to guys. The Summer is in full swing and you’ve got no excuse-get out there and enjoy it. When we say “SUP,” we’re not asking “What’s going on?” We’re telling you to get out there and enjoy one of the fastest growing sports in the area (on page 24) and then call your nearest surf shop (it’ll be hard not to). Enjoy the fireworks on the bay front (best place to see them ANYWHERE in the state!!!), have a safe holiday...and don’t forget the sunscreen. :~)

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4 letter from the editor 6 from our mayor 15 downtown 21 history 29 community 32 event 43 taste 52 recipe 55 people 57 living 69 poetry 72 calendar 75 giving 78 on the town

contents

on the cover “Fireworks over Matanzas” has become one of St. Augustine’s signature events. Each 4th of July over 40,000 spectators gather to enjoy one of the best fireworks displays in the Country. Photo by Ed Taylor

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from our mayor

The Pope, the King…… and all of us local folks!

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ell, as you have read, (and if you haven’t, then keep reading!), Bishop Felipe Estevez of our own St. Augustine Diocese gave me the go ahead to formally invite Pope Francis to St. Augustine in 2015! Wow, what a day that would be for our little town! We are not a major city but our claim to fame is of being the first Parish in the New World; the official birthplace of Christianity (specifically, Catholicism). So, for our newcomers, the spot is marked by the 208 foot, 70-ton Giant Cross for all to see from a distance! The tentative plan of the visit would be something like this: a helicopter into our area, a transport to the Mission Nombre de Dios with its Great Cross, then to the Cathedral Basilica, and if time permits, hopefully a stop at the St. Francis House (they will probably never have any more fundraising problems after that day!). As for the Cathedral, a capital campaign just kicked off for the first major renovation since the 400th anniversary in 1965. Our entire City should be excited to make sure it’s finished way before Pope Francis arrives in September of 2015! I would just as soon not have “His Eminence” walk under the scaffolding of the new choir loft that might lag behind if funds are short (even though I understand he is very polite and humble and probably wouldn’t mention it at all!). But we would know! So let’s all dig deep and get this done ahead of schedule!! If for some reason he is unable to personally make it, due to an unforeseen circumstance or act of God, a Legate (someone appointed by the Pope himself) has already been chosen (I believe it is Cardinal O’Malley) so we will definitely have high level representation from the Vatican! Now let’s explore the visit of the King, shall we? King Juan Carlos of Spain has had an invitation for our 450th Anniversary for several years, even when we weren’t sure of our plans! We just wanted him to know he was invited! A complicating matter with the health of King Juan Carlos has recently become an issue, but in the last six months I have been confident that we would indeed have a visit from the Spanish Royal Family, specifically, Prince Felipe, the King’s son. And here is how this will happen: An international organization exists called the U.S/Spain Council. (Google it-you will be impressed!) Our 450th Federal Commission (who is working on several initiatives, even without federal funding) waded in to try and arrange for the US/Spain Council to meet in St. Augustine in 2015. Commission member (and good friend) former Florida Governor and US Senator Bob Graham, because of his close relationship with US Senator Tim Kaine from Virginia, this year’s Council Chairman have been instrumental in the planning. When Sen. Graham

By Joseph L. Boles Jr.

asked Sen. Kaine about the possibility of having the meeting here, Sen. Kaine responded “Great, let’s make it happen!” That is a very short explanation for what it has really taken by Dana Ste. Claire, and his 450th office, to pull it off. It is a really big deal, because it brings 250 members, national and international, with their traveling companions, families, staff, etc. It also guarantees us the Prince of Asturias, who always attends and opens the session at the beginning. Voila! Instant Royal Family! The Prince and his wife are this generation’s Royals in Spain in much the same way as Prince William and Kate Middleton are in the UK! But the new development is this: King Juan Carlos just abdicated his throne so Prince Felipe will now become King Felipe, so we will have a brand new King coming for his inaugural visit to see the Nation’s Oldest City. Imagine, the Prince of Asturias, turned King of all Spain coming to the Asturian-founded town where we will all be here to greet him! So it’s not just the tons of people coming to celebrate our once-every-50-year event (which they will) and it’s not just the tons of economic impact on our area (which there will be) and it’s not just the star power that comes with the entertainers, luminaries, academics, preservationists, artists, celebrities etc. (and they will come), it’s much more! A visit from Pope Francis, the most rapidly revered servant of God, throughout all social and religious groups worldwide, will have a lasting effect on our community forever! To have a “new generation” King from the country of our discoverers, from the city of Aviles, will let the world, as well as our own Nation’s people know that St. Augustine is actually ground zero of the American melting pot in 1565-not Jamestown 42 years later! But from 2015 on, if all goes as planned, all of us from St. Augustine, whether in town or out, will be able to let our hearts swell up with local pride saying that “I am from St. Augustine, and let me tell you the incredible things that are happening in ‘My Town’!” ………..and as your Mayor, that makes me proud beyond belief!

Mayor Joe Boles

OCL

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10

Flagler Focus

By George, I think he’s got it!

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Boys of Summer You’re never too old to PLAY BALL

24

What SUP

No surf, no problem. Summer Fun

35

Road Trip

Scalloping in Homosassa and Crystal River is fun for the whole family

61

Joy of Cooking

From the ashes, Ned Pollack brings a local favorite back to life

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Photo by Georgia Gayle Nick 8

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from DORM R O O M to

COURT RO O M

Flagler Alum Frank George’s Journey

S

itting at the courtroom table as a member of the three-person Casey Anthony prosecution team, the last thing on Frank George’s mind was the historical city an hour and a half northeast of Orlando, where he began his higher educational experience almost two decades before. The Flagler College Alumnus was getting ready to question a string of witnesses who had been around a young woman when her daughter was allegedly kidnapped by a fictitious nanny. His job: demonstrate that the complete lack of change in her behavior, continuing to party and carry on as if nothing was wrong over the 31 days when her daughter was supposedly missing (and then found to be deceased), pointed to her guilt in taking her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee’s, life. (more })

story by Leigh Palmer freshman photo courtesy of Flagler College trial Photo courtesy of the Orlando Sentinel cover photo: Ed Taylor

Flagler Focus 10

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“You don’t know what it is, you don’t know what it means, until you’re gone...”

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The New Jersey high-school senior, weighing the options after graduation, never dreamed this is where he would one day end up-a key figure in one of the most sensational trials of the past decade-the Casey Anthony murder trial. He was just trying to figure out what the next chapter of life would be-and that pointed to college. Frank’s discovery of Flagler was the opposite of sensational. In fact, it was plain and simple, and it landed him in the middle of our historic city at a small 1982 college in what was once a grand resort hotel. “Everyone (colleges from around the country) had these big glossy, color brochures and here’s this little one among them and it got my attention. It was all in black and white except for this one aerial of the school that had the Lions Bridge, the Castle, and the school. I’d never seen anything like it...not like there’s a lot of Spanish architecture here in New York.” “It seemed very personal. It was near a beach. It just looked good.” After much consideration, Frank eschewed schools where he had already been accepted (University of Southern California, Boston University and Fairfield University)and decided to head to sunny climes south for the next chapter of his life. “I got to my room, put my stuff down and looked around...I was in a hotel room with an iron claw-foot tub and sink over-looking the pool (this was before the renovation of the rooms) and I just thought ‘I’m here.’ I was instantly relaxed...My

freshman year was one of the best years of my life.” In his sophomore year, keeping a promise he had made to his parents, he transferred to a bigger school, American University, in the heart of the Nation’s Capital. But Flagler, and St. Augustine, had gotten under his skin. “It was so big, so anonymous. I missed knowing my teachers...I just didn’t feel connected...I missed the lifestyle I had adopted and didn’t know it,” and so, back to Florida it was. Back where he felt he belonged for his junior and senior year, Frank graduated with a degree in History from Flagler in 1987. Law school being the next chapter, he found himself in Lansing, Michigan, which taught him one thing for certain: he’d rather sweat, than freeze, to death. After passing the Florida Bar in 1991, he was back in St. Augustine: the little town he had found himself in all those years before. Now, he was commuting 60 miles each day to his first position in the Florida Criminal Justice System: that of Public Defender in Palatka, Florida. Ask any person who has ever worked as a PD and they will tell you; it’s thankless work which can lead to eventual burnout. “Even though there were opportunities to help people, there were truly awful people who did incredibly horrible things to others. I represented them the best I could, but after awhile, decided I simply did not want to work on that side of the aisle anymore...I applied at the State Attorney in Orlando and was promptly hired.” That was in 1996, and it was there that Frank found his calling. “I learned that this was where my heart was...in prosecution, that was where my talent lay.” Starting off in the Traffic division, Frank advanced through the ranks, trying felony cases just over a year later and making charging decisions in Intake within two.

L to R: Casey Anthony Prosecutors Linda Drane Burdick, Jeff Ashton, Frank George

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From there, he was to transferred to Sex Crimes/Child Abuseone of the most challenging units in the office. Eventually he advanced to Lead Attorney of the Career Criminal unit and was assigned to Homicide full time after the Casey Anthony trial. These days, he is one of five Trial Unit Directors in the office, supervising 22 attorneys and approximately 20 staff members. Why the success? As he puts it, “The measure of a good prosecutor is trial work. You get a reputation as someone who won’t be intimidated. If I rose quickly, it was because I was willing to fight the good fight in trial.” All of which landed him at the courtroom table where we found him at the beginning of this story. It was simply a child neglect case when his supervisor, Linda Drane Burdick, lead prosecutor on the Casey Anthony case “asked me if I wanted to join her for the first bond hearing. I agreed and the next three years were spoken for.” As Drane Burdick remembers, “When the bond hearing for Casey Anthony was set in front of (Judge) Stan Strickland, I didn’t hesitate to ask Frank to sit with me. He knew Judge Strickland well...(Strickland) respected Frank’s opinion.” Drane Burdick was hesitant to comment for this story because, as she puts it, “Mr. George’s life and career are so much more than his role in the trial.” Frank’s stellar reputation in the criminal justice system is a testament to that statement. The bulk of his 23-year legal career has been dedicated to serving the public and he is held in the highest regard by his colleagues and adversaries alike. Drane Burdick, now the Chief Assistant State Attorney in Orlando, concurs. “He has the right temperment, unparalleled people skills and the legal background...I had been Frank’s supervisor in the past and had seen how much of a natural he was in trial.  He has an innate ability to connect with everyone-especially jurors.  When he speaks to them, they listen with rapt attention as he is a great storyteller.  We used to comment that no matter how poorly the witnesses testified or how little evidence a case actually had, if Frank could get to closing argument, he always had a shot at a successful outcome!” Unfortunately, the Anthony case was one of the few that didn’t end with the usual successful outcome. When the notguilty verdict was handed down, naturally, the entire team was stunned (“I could feel the blood rushing to my head,” he recalls of that moment). Three years later, Frank has moved on from this landmark case (“It was the case of a lifetime. Would I want to do it again? No, I don’t think so.”) and has decided to write that next chapter in his story, that of Judge. This spring, he launched his campaign for a seat on the Orange/Osceola bench. In his opinion, “It’s the next logical move in my public service career.” As for St. Augustine, and Flagler College, it’ll always have a place in Frank’s heart. “I took my daughter on a carriage ride when we visited up there in 2007, 20 years(after I received my degree)-to see it as an adult. I had been gone for 10, 15 years but I still knew where everything was. Downtown hadn’t changed at all. You feel like it’s always going to be the same no matter how much time passes. That was nice.” As with so many people, the town had snuck up on him. “You don’t know what it is, you don’t know what it means, until you’re gone...I could see myself retiring, buying a beach house and spending my time between Orlando and St. Augustine.” The Old City could only be so lucky. volume 8

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JOSEPH L. BOLES JR. ATTORNEY AT LAW

ELDER LAW GENERAL PRACTICE • WILLS • TRUSTS & ESTATES • PROBATE AVOIDANCE & ASSET PROTECTION • MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY • REAL ESTATE • BUSINESS LAW “FREE WILLS FOR OVER 65”

NO CHARGE FOR INITIAL CONSULTATION

Joe Boles Attorney at Law Mayor, City of St. Augustine Chairman, Council on Aging

19 RIBERIA STREET • ST. AUGUSTINE

904-824-4278

OCL

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View from the “Porch”

R

downtown by Irene Arriola

ecently, I went to visit some friends who had returned to living on Water Street after a 10-year adventure in Vilano. Enjoying a glass of wine with them on the porch after a brief rain shower, I turned my head to look at the Matanzas River in their backyard and there it was: a double rainbow spanning the distance from where the inlet meets the ocean to the north across the Bridge of Lions to the south! We scrambled out to the dock and started taking photos in all directions. I don’t know when I’ve seen the city look prettier, bathed in that golden light that occurs after a gentle rain in early evening. The rainbow split the sky into two distinct colors as the blue horizon slowly broke through the passing storm clouds and it was a remarkable sight. We regularly hear how St. Augustine made this list or that one for the best place to retire, to visit, to see Christmas lights, but recently we had the opportunity to hear about the people and organizations recognized for their contributions which go to make our city special and make us proud. Bravo to all the recipients and thank you for your hard work.

Preservation and Special Projects Planner from the Planning and Building Department. She was nominated and chosen to be a member of the Board of Directors of the Florida Historic Trust for a term of three years. I’m not much of a football fan but the Jaguars are tops in my book! Not only has the team’s foundation funded a second summer season at the Willie Galimore Center Community Pool which will run through September 1st but is also donating $5,000 to cover the cost of electrical service for the Lincolnville Farmer’s Market which runs from noon to 4 every Sunday. If you haven’t been down to see the renovated pool, you need to check it out. It’s beautiful, it’s free and it’s fun to get your exercise under the summer sun and, If you go on Sunday, you can get your shopping done at the market. By the time you read this column, the 24th season of the Concerts in the Plaza will be well underway and there is no better place to be every Thursday evening at 7p.m. than settled in your chair listening to a great local band every week through Labor Day. The concerts are free and afterward you can wander over to your favorite

At its 36th annual conference, the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation gave out 28 awards and 7 were handed out to projects in St. Augustine and out of 13 awards at the Outstanding level, 5 went to St Augustine, so it was a day brimming with honors and recognition. The Avenida Menendez Seawall and Promenade Rehabilitation project, the Visitor Information Center’s orientation video, and “Journey – 450 Years of the African-American Experience” were all lauded. The St. Augustine Art Association’s “Art y Facts of Drake’s Raid” was recognized, as was Flagler College’s restoration and rehabilitation of the Solarium at the Ponce de Leon Hotel, which is now home to the college. The college also took home a Meritorious award for the architecture and decoration of the Ponce de Leon Hotel. Both The Ice Plant and the St. Augustine Distillery were honored for their preservation efforts at 110 and 112 Riberia Street. A hearty congratulations goes to Jenny Wolfe, our own Historic

eatery or watering hole and end the evening on a sweet or savory note. Thanks to Ripley’s and the St. Augustine Municipal Marina, the 2014 summer season of Movies by the Bay will be showing free movies every Wednesday at 8:30p.m. on the lawn next to the minigolf course. Bring your own chairs and, if you’re feeling lucky, get a round of mini-golf in beforehand. Ripley’s recently renovated the course so you can get your game on. Kudos to the St. Augustine Amphitheatre and its crew for the recent acknowledgement of their positive economic impact on our county. This wasn’t news to all of us who are regulars, but it’s nice for the team to hear the stats that bear out what we already know. It’s summertime, it’s hot and you won’t get there any faster so just enjoy the scenery.

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THE “BOYS” OF

SUMMER & the “Not-So-Little-Anymore” League

by Charlie Seraphin photos by Addison Fitzgerald


sport

T

his year marks the 75th anniversary of Little League Baseball, an institution formed in 1939 to allow youngsters to play organized baseball with uniforms, standardized rules, and umpires. 1939 was also the year that Dick was born. He’s a second baseman. Dick used to play centerfield, but bone spurs in his shoulder keep him from throwing over the top, so now he plays second base (where he can throw side-arm to first) or he pitches. In slow-pitch softball, throwing underhand doesn’t put much stress on Dick’s shoulder. (more })


St. Augustine’s Senior Softball League is no ordinary softball league. The “boys” who play range in age from 48 to 75 (although there is no upper age limit), and to a man, the desire to compete overshadows the gray hair under their caps. Their faces are intense and purposeful, and there’s a sparkle in every eye. If you want to feel good about yourself, and about a group of guys who are passionate about playing softball, head over to Treaty Park any Wednesday evening and take in a game or two. Don’t be concerned about the plethora of knee braces or a pitcher wearing a face mask and shin guards. While their legs don’t move as fast as they once did, and their arms have lost much of their elasticity, their faces still reflect the determination, satisfaction and disappointment of competitive athletes. Senior softball in St. Augustine is connective tissue linking aging bodies with ageless hearts and minds. “We all remember what it was like to compete on a relatively high level. Most of us played Little League, many of us played in high school, and some played in college,” says league co-founder Ron Davidson who helped form the league twelve years ago. “I’ve been playing for 42 years.” Davidson worked with co-founder Rick Johnson to create the local league. “We have quite a few players who come down from Jacksonville because they don’t have a league like ours,” explains Davidson. “We started as a fifty-and-over league, but we dropped the minimum age to 48 because a lot of younger guys wanted to play in our league.” Younger players are looking for what the senior league offers: good sportsmanship, no arguing, no bad attitudes, and no illegal bats. “We try hard to win,” says Davidson, “but it’s not life or death, and after the game we’re all friends out doing what we enjoy doing, so there are no hard feelings win, or lose.” Dick, the second baseman, has been playing organized ball since 1945. He plays in three different leagues, the regular double-header here in St. Augustine and two other leagues further down the coast. He says he moved to Florida from Ohio because the softball season up north is too short. He wishes he could still play centerfield, but doctors told him that shoulder surgery at his age wouldn’t be a good idea. He has a little pain from the bone spurs in his right heel too, but not enough to keep him from showing up with his glove in his uniform shirt and cleats every week. So why do men in their 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s put on a uniform and take to the field? The simple answer is that it’s fun. Most of them say they can’t imagine not playing. It’s a connection to their past; to memories of better times when they could run faster, hit further and throw with more velocity. More importantly, the games provide an outlet, a chance for camaraderie with guys who share their passion. Besides, it’s a way to stay in shape doing something that they love. Spectators are witness to the passage of time as they watch the game (although the game is anything but slow). For example, fly ball to short left field. The shortstop turns and knows instantly that his legs won’t carry him fast enough to get to the ball. You know that he would have had it in his glove twenty 18

Aging bodies give way to youthful enthusiasm!

“If you build it, they will come”

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or thirty years ago, but today he just watches. The left fielder reacts quickly with his first step, but he too is moving on legs that won’t respond to his desire to fly to the ball, so the infielder moves to cover second, and the outfielder trots in to take the ball on one hop. There are lots of hits and runs in senior softball, it’s an offense-filled game. A groundball through the infield is an out only if it’s hit within a foot or two either side of an infielder. Beyond that, there are no diving stops, no fancy back-hands, no incredible plays, just a smile and a “maybe next time” look. It’s easy to see experience and knowledge of the game on their faces, but more often than not, seniors lack explosive quickness. No longer quick or fast, they play a game where anticipation based on experience is the key to their success. The centerfielder starts fast on a sinking line drive, and after five or six steps he lunges forward and makes a shoestring catch. He’s one of the younger guys, closer to fifty than sixty, and he still has pretty good reaction time. Every play, not only the athletic ones, draw praise from both teams. “Nice pitch, nice catch, great hit, and good arm” come in rhythm with “strike and ball” as the umpire calls pitches. Players on both teams compliment every play. There is no name-calling, no heckling, and there are no degrading remarks. Even though skill levels differ, the wisdom that comes with age tempers any desire to make fun of the other guy because each player knows that he is slower than he was last season and that a career ending injury is as close as the next temptation to make that dazzling play that he made so often and so easily in his youth. The game itself has some thoughtfully engineered nuances. There are two first bases and two home plates (one for the

fielders and one for the runners) to help avoid injury by collision. Each batter starts with a one ball and one strike count, to speed the game. A foul ball on the third strike is an out, each team is limited to five runs per inning, except in the seventh (last) inning when there’s no run rule, and teams have a chance to mount a comeback, even if they’re down by 20. If the game is tied at the end of seven, the team at bat starts with a runner at second, increasing the odds that at least one run will be scored. St. Augustine Senior Softball features balls and strikes and hits and outs, but its participants and fans are witness to something much bigger than baseball. This game is about Old City men showing respect for the game, themselves and one another. It’s about a tradition that’s been passed down from father to son, maybe grandfather to son, for generations. It’s about competition with a small “c” and sportsmanship with a big “S”. So if you get the urge to play softball or if you’re looking for some family entertainment on a Wednesday evening this summer, head over to Treaty Park at 7p.m. and listen to Dick and his friends chatter “Let’s go, you can do it, get a hit, need some runs.” Admission is free…but the life lessons on display are priceless. Charlie Seraphin is a local writer who played Little League, Babe Ruth League, American Legion, High School, College and Semi-pro baseball and worked professionally in the front office of two different Major League Baseball teams for ten years. He’ll begin drawing his MLB nonuniformed pension/retirement later this year. OCL


Ashley & Jared June 22, 2013

Beverly Bennett Photography

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history

St. Augustine’s Giant Cross Marks the Holy Acre After Archaeologists Uncover Structures

A

fter gazing up at the 210-ft. tall bronze cross at the Mission Nombre de Dios, your eyes lower to see stakes holding long, pink ribbons blowing gently in the wind. These stakes border long, carefully dug trenches: unmistakable signs of St. Augustine’s most recent archaeological site-the foundation of the oldest stone Catholic Church in the Nation. For decades archaeologists have unearthed many treasures, learning more about our history with each new discovery. Witnessing the current excavation on land that is referred to as the St. Augustine’s Holiest Acre is like seeing a holy city emerge from beneath the Mission site. The Moras, a couple visiting from Orlando, said, “A few years ago we came and visited The Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche, the giant cross, the religious museum and the landing of Pedro Menendez de Aviles, and now being part of the discovery of the oldest church is most exciting!”

THE DISCOVERY In 1951, Fr. Charles Spellman, the Mission’s former director, located old church ruins on the grounds. He took notes of his findings, which made their way to the Catholic archives in Mandarin near Jacksonville. Later, the archives were moved to St. Augustine and Sister Catherine Bitzer found the old field records. Knowing they were related to archaeology, she contacted the Florida Museum of Natural History. In the summer of 2011, archaeologist Dr. Kathleen Deagan was digging at the site of the first Spanish settlement at the Fountain of Youth. She followed various clues and her own instincts and moved 1000 feet to the south to the Mission Nombre de Dios. While she was surveying preliminary holes on the site, she encountered mysterious coquina and tabby walls, possibly of the old church mentioned in the archives. At the time, Dr. Deagan said, “This is an important find. Some of the church’s stones

story by Raphael Cosme photos by Raphael Cosme & Christine Cousart

showed up near the surface, and then we rescued a fragment of a 17th Century kaolin pipe at the site.” Word of such finds traveled quickly. This year, Deagan and fellow archaeologist Dr. Gifford Waters, took over the excavation with the financial support of the Historic St. Augustine Research Institute, the University of Florida, and the Florida Museum of Natural History. Additional field support came from volunteering archaeology field technician Janet Jordan and the crew from the archaeology program at the Florida Museum of Natural History. Dr. Waters explained, “We came out here and did some limited testing, just small trenches to search for the foundations that Fr. Spellman had found and we determined the rough outlines of the structure. Later we came back and excavated a three meter by three meter unit at the junction of two walls where the coquina foundations met tabby foundations. What we were able to determine at that time was that the coquina structure was placed first and the tabby structure was built sometime afterwards and we believe that it’s a possibility. The original church was destroyed in 1702 when the British raided St. Augustine and then it was rebuilt after that. We think that perhaps the tabby construction represents that rebuilding period, after 1702, in which they would’ve added it on to the original church structure and probably repaired the coquina structure that was the original church. (more })

(more })


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www.AnastasiaLaw.net

Look up at the Sky for a Surprise Visit from Santa between 4 & 6 PM

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We want to make sure to uncover a large enough portion of the foundations of the structure and we can work with the architectural historian, Herschel Shepard, to get an idea of what the building might have looked like and when it was constructed.” “Mission Nombre de Dios, was the earliest of all the Spanish missions in the area as well as the longest lasting - persisting to 1763. Governor of Florida Pablo de Hita y Salazar ordered its construction in 1677 and they described it as the largest and grandest of all the churches in the province at that time. It could hold up to two hundred souls. We can learn about the activities that went on at the Mission between the Spanish and Native Americans as well as look at how the Mission community rebuilt itself after the raids by the British. We know that all the coquina stones were removed from the original foundation and built the new church somewhere between the mission and the north field of the Castillo de San Marcos. Most of the Mission architecture in St. Augustine and throughout all of Spanish Florida, was made of wood and this is perhaps the only example we have of stone architecture associated with the Mission. It’s an incredible find that gives us insight that we would never have had before,” said Dr. Waters. THE ARTIFACTS The artifacts already recovered from the site prove that the building existed sometime between the late 17th and early 18th Century, given that most of the majolica pottery found was from Mexico City, which dominated the market for most of the Nueva España territories. Dr. Waters said, “We found a room added to the west main construction which we believe might be the friar’s residence and the pottery we found there is a type called San Agustin Blue on White. It was imported from Mexico City and we have a large portion of a plate as well as a small cup that we found in the same area. This dates to the early 1700s. What makes this artifact important is the letter ‘A’ mark on the bottom. It’s probably the pottery maker’s initial. Everything that we find gets marked with notations that let us know where in the ground it came from and we can pinpoint where different finds were on the map. The Mission grounds are one of only two locations north of the colonial city that we found 16th Century artifacts. The deposits on the mission grounds are either associated with the initial settlement of St. Augustine or perhaps when the site was abandoned and the Spanish built a casa fuerte or strong house near the location of the initial settlement.” For every excavation, the archaeologist is anxious to locate the trash deposited by the settlers. These often contain many of the site’s archaeological treasures. In regards to St. Augustine many of these deposits are sparse in content causing historians to describe is it as “the forgotten colonial town.” Part of this may be due to the import of goods being slow from Havana and Mexico (the central Spanish crown headquarters) during the first and second Spanish periods. But Dr. Waters believes that somewhere to the west of the ruins could be the 1677 well-stocked trash dump from the friars. At the time of this interview they found Native American pottery which dates to the mission period as well as Spanish majolica and olive jars. volume 8

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THE STRUCTURE According to archaeologists it will take as many as two more seasons of research to finalize a credible interpretation of the old church and surroundings. With the coquina foundations being 2 to 2 ½ feet wide it could have supported a two-story structure; however it’s more likely that the building had thick, substantial walls and not an actual second story. The tabby section that was likely built after 1702 had a much smaller foundation, only about a foot wide, which would have only been able to support a single story. It’s likely that the wall continued up to the roof which would have been of wood with palm thatch. BISHOP ESTEVEZ VISIT’S MISSION’S HOLIEST ACRE In a surprise visit to the Mission, Bishop Felipe Estevez toured the archaeological site and blessed the old church ruins even after they had been buried for centuries saying, “There is no doubt that this place is blessed by the power of God. In 1951, Fr. Spellman located the ruins of the church and now it is time to show to the world the effort of Christians colonists and how strong their devotion was to build this church around 1677.” FUTURE HISTORICAL ATTRACTION AT THE MISSION? For now, the focus has been on excavation of architectural features such as the coquina and the tabby foundations. Ultimately, the diocese would like to reconstruct a life-sized model of what the church would have looked like in the late 1600s but this will require a great deal more work in both archaeology and historical research. It is something to look forward to. Archaeologists will cover it back up at the end of the field season because they want to protect the foundation’s deterioration from the rain, the sprinklers and people walking directly upon them. But visitors can come to this site and see where the foundations were found marked clearly on the ground along with an historical interpretative sign. Some of the artifacts from this year’s excavations will be on display at the Mission’s Museum. After weeks of digging at the site, Dr. Waters believes it could be one of the best archaeological discoveries of all time in the nation. “Historically it could be comparable with the finding of the lost Virginia settlement of 1619, better known as Jamestown,” said Dr. Waters. He believes that his team has discovered the foundation of one of two possible churches or a monastery. He is confident that the structure discovered dates somewhere within that very short time period between 1677 and 1702.

Bishop Felipe Estevez blessing the Mission Site

Dr. Gifford Waters shows visitors the ongoing archeological digging

Thanks to the Mission Nombre de Dios, Diocese of St. Augustine, the Florida Museum of Natural History, Charles A. Tingley, and Kate Poage. OCL

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Dr. Kathleen Deagan makes final touches on the oldest church foundation 23


SUP

STROKE THROUGH SUMMER

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waterfront by Ed Toy photos by Addison Fitzgerald

S

tand Up Paddleboarding, or SUP for short, is one of the fastest growing watersports on the planet right now. One of the biggest reasons for the explosive growth of this new sport is that it is accessible to almost anyone. SUP can be practiced anywhere there is water, including inland lakes and rivers, intracoastal waterways, and of course, the ocean. Any person male or female, young and old, out of shape or fitness guru can enjoy stand up paddleboarding. (more })

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In the light winds and small waves typical of northeast Florida coastal waters, it is easy for most anyone with a little practice to cruise down the coast out past the surf zone. From a standing position, it is common to see pods of dolphins, manatees, tarpon and many other forms of marine life that frequent our coastal waters. Paddling down the shoreline, you might stop to say “Hello!” to sunbathers and surfers and families enjoying a day at the beach. I first got interested in SUP when I saw big wave surfer and fitness guru Laird Hamilton on the cover of the May 2002 issue of Outside Magazine entitled “Get in the Best Shape of your Life”. Laird was stand up paddle surfing in the cover shot, and the story inspired me to learn more. I picked up my first board in the winter of 2007, along with local paramedic and avid waterman David Slemp. In those days a beginning board was 11 feet long, 30 inches wide, 4 inches thick, and weighed 35 pounds, with no handle for carrying. There was no professional instruction, although a few basic instructional videos showed us how to hold the paddle, and stand on the board. We started out paddling in flat water, but quickly transitioned to paddling short distances down the beach out past the waves. The big beginner boards were difficult to turn and maneuver, so it took some time to get the timing right and start to catch waves like a surfer. In no time, we were hooked! Over the past few years, stand up paddleboarding equipment has evolved as the sport has matured. Most boards nowadays come with a handle in the middle for

Early Bird gets the offshore winds

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carrying, and are light weight, under 25 pounds. They come in different designs depending on the desired use, whether it be cruising, touring, racing or surfing. The most common design is the all-around SUP board, which range from 10-12 feet in length, 32-34 inches wide and up to 5 inches thick. These are designed for ease of use, intracoastal, river or coastal cruising for a beginner or intermediate paddler. Race paddle boards are 12 feet 6 inches to 14 feet long, 26-30 inches wide, with a displacement hull similar to a kayak made for cutting through the water. Surf style SUP boards are shorter, lighter and more maneuverable ranging from 7-to-10 feet long, 27-to-30 inches wide, and have more rocker or bottom curve to allow for sharper turns on waves. Most paddles these days are made of carbon, which allows them to be both lightweight and strong. Paddles can be adjustable in height, especially for families or couples who are going to be sharing a paddle. Most individuals who get into the sport get a fixed height paddle that is sized for their height. For racing and flat water touring the paddle can be slightly longer, around 8-12 inches above the paddlers height. For SUP surfing most paddlers prefer a shorter paddle between 4 and 8 inches above their height. If you are interested in getting into the sport of stand up paddle boarding, there are several routes you can take. The easiest way to test the waters, so to speak, is to rent a board and go give it a try yourself. Most people can stand on the board in the first few minutes, and begin paddling across the water. Easy ,right? Not so fast. Here in northeast Florida we have a variety of conditions that can create havoc when learning to stand up paddle board.

The first and probably most critical factor to take into account is wind. When you are standing on the board, your body acts as a sail, and most likely you are going to start travelling in the direction the wind is blowing. Pay attention to the wind direction and speed, and try to learn in 10 mph of wind or less. Start out paddling into the wind if possible, so that you will have an easy paddle back to where you started. The other thing to keep in mind when learning to SUP in northeast Florida is the tide. High tide is best for being able to enter and exit the water in the intracoastal, where sharp oyster beds may be covered with water. Start out on your knees near shore, and don’t stand up until you are out away from shore in deeper water. When the tide changes depending on your proximity to the nearest inlet leading to the ocean, strong currents ebb and flow. After you rent a board and decide you are interested in pursuing this new sport of stand up paddleboarding, do yourself a favor and hire a professional instructor for at least one or two lessons. You will learn proper paddle technique, turns, how to get on and off the board properly in deep water, and also valuable information about local tidal currents that will keep you out of trouble. Summer in Florida is perfect for SUP, as the light, morning, offshore winds and small surf create glassy calm conditions. It is so easy to drive onto the beach, find a nice place to park with not too many people around, unload the board from the roof, grab a paddle and a leash, and hit the ocean. Heading out through the waves is easiest on your knees at first, but once out past the waves the real fun begins as you experience standing on water! OCL

Dave Slemp, one of the local few who gets it done on a SUP when the conditions count. Hurricane Bill. Photo: Addison Fitzgerald volume 8

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community

Red Goes Green by LeeAnn Kendall

D

riving on US1, you can’t miss the red tower and the massive oak tree at the new Canan Law office on the corner of Cincinnati Avenue. What you don’t see, is how “green” the building is and the steps that Attorney Patrick Canan and his construction team took to insure its long lasting positive impact. Canan says, “I wanted to build a cool building that I was proud of and one that was green.” Nearly five feet around, the live oak has shaded this corner for somewhere between 175 and 230 years” Master Arborist, Chuck Lippi of Advanced Tree Care says, “Mr. Canan was adamant about protecting the tree during construction. To look at the tree and parking lot today, no one can tell the extra steps that were taken under his orders to protect it.” Extensive work was done using a “geo-grid stone process” that protected the roots and the tree and gave them the space needed for parking. Once the tree was saved and the design planned, choosing materials was the next big investment for Canan and the construction team of Zeke Williams, LLC and James Vose of Cornerstone Design and Construction, LLC. With green as the theme, Canan chose SIPS panels recommended by local green expert, Bob Balch. Sometimes referred to as an “insulation sandwich,” SIPS, (Structurally Insulated Panels), are made of OSB, (or Oriented Strand Board) and Polyurethane foam. Canan says, “It is so airtight, it’s like we’re living in a cooler and have to introduce air; otherwise it would be very stale.” (more })

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Patrck Canan & Zeke Williams

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Using SIPS allowed upfront A/C equipment savings and if the company’s claims are accurate, savings of 50 percent on electricity. It’s too early to tell now, but Canan says, “to put it into perspective, the old office is 2,500 sq. feet and has 11 tons of A/C and the new building is a third larger at 3,300 sq. feet and only needs a seven ton A/C system.” Other interior green choices included a “Big Ass” fan in the tower, tankless water heaters, LED lights and passive lighting. On the south side of the building, “Sail Shades” keep the cars and the side of the building looking and feeling much cooler. Williams says, “We reused whatever we could. The way I judge a job is by how much trash leaves a site, and on this job, we had none hardly, we used the smallest dumpsters.” From conception to completion, Canan’s project proves that you can preserve nature, restore historic property and build efficiently. Williams has worked with Canan on other projects and has been involved on this one from initial design through to final problem solving. He says, “Patrick had the vision and he didn’t cut corners. He had a green ideal and saw it through. That’s a testament to his character. He was a good leader and we were a good team.” Patrick Canan’s contributions to St. Augustine are vast. Of the many things that he gives to this community as a long time attorney, a devoted husband and father, an elected School Board member and a contributor to many boards and organizations, saving this 200-year-old live oak and being a forerunner in investing in green construction, could be one of his biggest and most long lasting gifts to St. Augustine. As Chuck Lippi says, “This tree should continue to provide benefits to the property, the community and the environment long after we are all gone.”

OCL


As Jack sings...

event

“Reuse, reduce, recycle” story by Ryan Murphy • photos by Madi Mack

A

s each year passes, St. Augustine grows in its reputation as a culturally diverse and musical landscape. Last year, we experienced a slew of amazing events here in our community including the Mumford & Sons “Gentlemen of the Road” festival. With many of these events and with each artist that visits our great city, we gain fresh perspectives and unique insights. This past spring, our community was once again positively impacted when Jack Johnson chose St. Augustine to be his only Florida performance. Not only was this a great feather in St. Augustine’s musical cap, it was also an opportunity to learn more about sustainable and forwardthinking ways to truly “green” a facility such as ours. At the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, we are proud of our naturally beautiful outdoor landscape and our extremely conscientious approach to reducing our impact on our surroundings. However, when the chance came to really ramp up our efforts to align ourselves with the greening initiatives that Jack Johnson’s tour required, we were happy to rise to the occasion. For this show in particular, we were in conversations with Jack Johnson’s management to ensure that we were the appropriate venue for the show and that we could meet all of the tour’s “greening initiative” requirements. Many of these initiatives were ones we already had in place including active and informative recycling programs, donation of leftover food items from catering to local shelters and energy efficiency practices such as using compact fluorescent light bulbs, etc. However, many of the tour’s greening initiatives were new, forward-thinking and exciting to put into place at the Amphitheatre. Some of these items were the installation of Water Refill Stations throughout the venue to encourage the use of reusable water bottles, composting of all appropriate scraps, responsible waste management practices beyond recycling, Carbon Neutral Offset evaluations and offsets, and a partnering effort with many of the local eco/ conservation based non-profit organizations. The fruits of our labor were indeed appreciated as Jack Johnson’s crew spent the day prior to the show touring the venue and many parts of St. Augustine. Several crew members remarked about how refreshing it was to be at a venue that was beyond the corporate cookie-cutter mold and proactively looking at the future. As with most artists that visit our beautiful city, the tour left with an amazing impression of all that we do as a community to not only rally behind the great art and artists that are coming here, but the thoughtful way in which we have all come together to bring this town that many more steps into the future. We should all be proud.

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road trip

Scallop Hunting & Sightseeing

Homosassa Springs & Crystal River

I

n recent months, we have taken you along on some short road trips intended to introduce you to a few enjoyable destinations that lie just over the horizon and beyond the Old City limits. This month’s trip will be longer, but certainly as rewarding for the entire family Homosassa Springs and the Crystal River area lie 129 miles southwest of St. Augustine. The trip can be made in about two and a half hours. There are a couple choices in routes but we prefer the scenic trip through the Ocala National Forest and the city of Ocala itself on Highway 40. West of Ocala drivers will take FL 200 through Hernando then west again on 419 to Grover Cleveland Boulevard for the remaining stretch right into the idyllic fishing and scalloping village of Homosassa Springs. The 2014 Scalloping Season begins June 28th and runs through September 24th. If you’ve never tried scalloping before it’s a great way to cool off and beat the summer heat. Scalloping is an enjoyable outing for the entire family, and let’s not forget

article by Bill Kenyon photos by Michelle Zielecki

that Gulf scallops are delicious fare for the table as well. Although there was a time when most of Florida enjoyed scallop harvesting, there are only three major areas for scalloping left in the entire state: Port St. Joe in the Florida Panhandle; Steinhatchee in the Big Bend area; and our destination today, Homosassa Springs and Crystal River in Citrus County. Coastal development, along with increased population and lesser water quality, has played a major role in dissappearing scalloping grounds elsewhere in Florida and. Scallops must have very clean water and grass beds to populate, grow and thrive. Thankfully, our destination continues to possess the necessary ingredients for a thriving scallop population. If you are between 16 and 65 years of age, you’ll need a current saltwater fishing license to collect scallops unless you are fishing (scalloping) with a for-hire vessel/guide that holds a valid vessel license. If you don’t haul your own boat, you’ll need one to get out to the scalloping grounds. Boat rentals are available (more })

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at most marinas, but many have restrictions on how far the rental boats are allowed to travel. Before you book your rental, make sure that you are allowed to take it to the scalloping grounds, which are about six to ten miles from the bay front in Homosassa Springs, through scenic mangrove islands to the edge of the Gulf. On our last two trips, we hired Captain Rick Burns of Reel Burns Fishing Charters. Rick’s prices are reasonable, his boat large enough to accommodate the whole family and he is a long-time Homosassa resident and fisherman. Captain Rick knows where the scallops are. Scalloping basically consists of donning a mask, fins and snorkel and diving down in shallow water, typically five to ten feet and collecting the little creatures from the grass beds on the bottom. The catch is easy, but searching for the little shells in the swaying seagrass is a bit like a scavenger hunt. Recreational harvesters are limited to two gallons of whole scallops or one pint of scallop meat, per person, per day. In addition, no more than 10 gallons of whole scallops or a half gallon of meats may be possessed aboard any vessel at any time. Known as the “White Gold of the Gulf,� scallops and their harvest are big money to little Homosassa and Crystal River and the waters and town get crowded during season. Make your reservations early, and if you are not familiar with the water, we highly recommend hiring a local guide, at least for your first trip. Now, about the lovely town of Homosassa Springs which is our destination. Homosassa Springs is a small town, with a population of around 12,000 residents. It is extremely charming and reminds one of another time in Florida when life was much simpler. Traffic is minimal (more })

Monkey Island

Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

Underwater treasure hunt

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Property Management Citrus County LLC

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Why vacation in one?

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and the people are extremely warm and friendly. There are a number of lodging opportunities with a wide array of unique amenities. On our first visit we stayed at Plantation on Crystal River, up the road and located directly on King’s Bay. With all the amenities of a major resort including golf, worldclass dining and a spa, Plantation on Crystal River is the perfect place for visitors to access nearby scalloping grounds (through the Plantation’s Adventure Center and Dive Shop where you can bring your own boat or set up a guided scalloping tour) and also the shopping, dining and golfing opportunities of neighboring Homosassa and Crystal River. As part of their two-night Scalloping Package they’ll even prepare your scallops for you which is a real treat after you’ve spent the day out on the Gulf. You can’t go wrong with the Plantation. We highly recommend a stay here. Homosassa Riverside Resort, which literally sits on the banks of the Homosassa River, offers boat tours and rentals, a full bar and restaurant with live music most nights and a view of one of Homosassa Springs most unique residential communities, “Monkey Island”, which sits in the middle of the Homosassa river and is inhabited year-round by a small family of monkeys. You can get an up-close look and take pictures from a boat or you can see Monkey Island from the Riverside Resort grounds or from the aptly named onsite lounge, “The Monkey Bar.” If you want to be close to the water and the scalloping grounds, Riverside Resort is the perfect place. Another option is MacRae’s of Homosassa, complete with tiki bar, boat ramp, bait and gift shop. The Shed at MacRae’s offers spacious seating at the bar, by the dock or around the dance floor. A summer on-shore breeze and a cold beer will keep you refreshed while listening to live music here. One of the most unique places to stay in the Homosassa area is not in Homosassa at all; well, at least not on the mainland. Tarpon Key Lodge is about as unique a destination as you’ll find anywhere in North Florida. The Lodge is a three-bedroom home situated on its own private island with boat dock, fish cleaning facilities, satellite TV with radio, and full and first class amenities of every kind. It is located six miles from downtown Homosassa Springs on the rim of the Gulf of Mexico, minutes to the best scalloping grounds in Florida. Tarpon Key is only accessible by boat, so plan on bringing yours or hiring a local guide for this service. The Lodge boasts some of the best sunsets this side of Key West from its wide wrap-around porch, large enough for plenty of guests. Just bring your food and beverage, everything else is here. Our favorite thing about Tarpon Key Lodge is the rate card. Obviously a destination of this kind is in high demand, so book early, but you’ll find Tarpon Key Lodge a bargain for an experience of this kind. Go to www.tarponkeylodge.com for more information. One cannot visit the area without a trip to Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. A 45-foot-deep natural spring is the centerpiece of this more than 210 acre park, located on US 19 in Homosassa Springs. The springs are the headwaters of the beautiful Homosassa River that flows nine miles west into the Gulf of Mexico. Saltwater and freshwater fish are attracted to these natural springs with their constant, yearround temperature of 72 degrees. A floating underwater observatory inside the springs allows the visitor to view fish volume 8

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and manatee at close range. The park is one of the best places in the state to view manatees, some of which are treated and/or rehabilitated at the park before being released into the wild. Dining choices in Homosassa are varied from the downhome, coastal flavor of the resorts on the Homosassa riverfront to West 82 Bar & Grill at the Plantation, to a variety of familiar chain restaurants back out on Hwy 19. If you’re in the mood for something different and a bit on the wild side however, we have to tell you about Neon Leon’s Zydeco Steakhouse. Named after and owned by the family of the late Leon Wilkeson of Lynyrd Skynrd fame, this funky dinner spot serves up the most authentic Cajun fare you’ll find this side of Baton Rouge with an atmosphere and live entertainment to match. They will also cook your catch for you at Neon Leon’s, again, great after a hot day out on the water. We always have a ball at least one night at Neon Leon’s when we are in the area. We should mention that the 1st Annual Homosassa Scallop Festival will be held Friday-Sunday, August 1st through the 3rd on the grounds of the West Citrus Elks Lodge. There will be food, live music, a classic car show and more. For more information call 352-795- 3149 or go to www.citruscountychamber.com There is much more to see and experience in and around the Homosassa Springs/Crystal River area. We’ve touched on a few of our favorites but your own exploration will lead you to many more surprises. This road trip will wind down with another scenic drive home. We’ll leave early and go the take the long way home though next month’s road trip destination, Florida’s one and only mountain, Mount Dora.

Neon Leon’s Zydeco Steakhouse

OCL

Scallop Ceviche Yields 6 full portions or 24 hors d’oeuvres 1 lb. Fresh scallops 1 cucumber, peeled, seeded, ¼” dice 1 medium red onion, finely diced (1/8”) 12 grape tomatoes, sliced crosswise (1/4”) 1 clove garlic, minced 1 jalapeño or serrano pepper, trimmed, seeded, finely diced (1/16”) 1 ripe avocado, peeled, seeded, diced (1/4”) ½ c. minced cilantro Zest of 1 lime ¼ c. lime juice ¼ c. extra virgin olive oil Juice of 1 orange 1 Tbsp. white balsamic vineger Kosher salt and white pepper to taste 2 heads Belgian endive, trimmed and separated 1. Remove “foot” from scallops, this is the connecting piece of flesh, it has a slightly different texture than the muscle. Carefully dice scallops into ½” pieces if they are large, or slice into thin discs if they are small. 2. Combine all ingredients, except for the endive, in a glass, ceramic, or stainless steel bowl. 3. Cover airtight and marinate for at least 30 minutes. 4. Using a perforated spoon, add a scoop of the ceviche to the ends of endive and serve cold.

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Summertime Activities

body

Can Stretching Make a Difference? by Kim Miller

W

hatever your chosen summer activity is: running on the beach, playing tennis with friends, surfing the ocean waves, playing a round of golf, warming up prior to summertime play can improve your chosen activity’s level of fun, . What Is Dynamic Stretching? Dynamic stretching is a kind of stretch that uses the momentum of movement to complete its extension of the muscle groups.  Specifically dynamic stretching is a series of movement-based exercises that prepares the body for the same movements that are implemented in sports and physical exertion. What is Static Stretching? Static stretching is a method of stretching a muscle beyond its normal limits, then holding the stretch for anywhere between a few seconds and a few minutes.  Its goal is to gradually increase stretching ability and lengthen muscles. The stretches can be performed and modified according to flexibility. Controversy Regarding Static and Dynamic Stretching In the past, it was the practice for those in sport and vigorous physical activities to undertake static stretching before exercise. However, research concluded several years ago that dynamic stretching increases range of movement, blood and oxygen flow to soft tissues prior to exertion much more efficiently and safely than static stretching.  Many savvy coaches and sports trainers are aware of the role dynamic stretching plays in improving performance, level of fun, and reducing the risk of injury. According to Todd Ellenbecker, Director of Sports Medicine for the ATP World Tour, the use of static stretching prior to match play may hinder performance. He tells us, “Research studies have shown that static stretching has been found to produce a short-lived decrease in muscle performance.  For example, if someone does static stretching with their legs, he may not have explosive jumping ability for up to an hour after he does that stretching. With dynamic flexibility, you don’t have that loss in muscle strength.”  There’s a Place For Static Stretching Do not give up static stretching all together though. While a dynamic warm up is recommended before playing most sports, static stretching still has an important place in a person’s chosen sport or activity.  It is an important technique to increase range of motion around joints, but needs to be used at the right time. The best time to implement static stretching is right after you are done playing your sport. Right after a workout is prime time for helping flush out the inflammatory responses that are set into action physical activity, or simple daily tasks the next day, more difficult. Static stretching far outweighs dynamic stretching because it is most effective for bringing the muscles and tendons back to their normal range of motion and resiliency after hard play. Its restorative powers makes us better, more resilient players enabling us to play more often, with less muscular pains, and with a higher degree of power gained through better range of motion ( ROM) than our non-stretching counterparts. Contrary to popular belief, when we feel stiff and achy after playing, the belief that we are simply experiencing “getting old pains,” is simply not true. Hard play sports and athletics, extremely high intensity play and just really giving it our all will cause our muscles to tighten up, stiffen up, and have limited ROM. When some people exclaim, “I am getting old,” may really be a case of   “I am playing with a high level of intensity.” My best advice - keep it going, but stretch afterwards and mix in high intensity play with more moderate and low key play throughout the week to keep you feeling fresh and injury free. volume 8

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WEDDINGS & EVENTS 904-217-0077 • Treasuryontheplaza.com info@treasuryontheplaza.com


A Black Fly affair Bringing the love of fishing, great food, and a great story together.

by Shana London & Bill Kenyon photos by Tammy Harrow

I

met Vaughn Cochran many years ago when he and his wife Jean operated a small fly fishing shop and art gallery on Aviles Street called “Blackfly Outfitter.” I liked him immediately. Vaughn was a man of many stories: stories of growing up in St. Augustine but leaving for Key West as a young man where he worked as a fishing guide and artist and ended up playing in a certain Margaritaville band. Stories about exotic locales in the Bahamas and South America and the people he’d met and the experiences along the way. Much has been written about Vaughn in various publications. In fact, some of those I’ve written myself. Today however, Vaughn and his wife Jean and their partners Mike

Hyatt and Doug Bunnell are crafting a new story-one with roots in those exotic locales but which is being told here in St. Augustine. That story is Blackfly The Restaurant, and it’s quickly becoming a bestseller. Mike Hyatt met Vaughn Cochran in much the same way I did. Mike, an avid fisherman from Midland Texas, had moved to St. Augustine with longtime partner Cindy Stangby after being introduced to the area by friends Doug and Charlene Bunnell. Like many others, Cindy and Mike had explored the rest of Florida but they really liked the size, history and cosmopolitan feel of the Old City. They bought a home and, (more })

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with a long history in the restaurant business, began looking for opportunities here. They bought the old La Parisienne restaurant on Hypolita Street and immediately started renovations. A few weeks later in 2007, Collage Restaurant was born. Since that time, Collage has won numerous awards and is recognized as one of the top restaurants in Northeast Florida. One day as he was strolling downtown, Mike Hyatt wandered into that small fly shop and art gallery on Aviles Street. No doubt he was intrigued as anyone by the story-telling adventurer behind the counter, Vaughn Cochran. A friendship ensued yet, as is with most stories like this, neither knew at that time how bright their future together would turn out to be. It was during this time that the “Blackfly” name was on its way to becoming an internationally recognized trademark and brand-its humble beginnings starting in Vaughn Cochran’s meager fly shop, then his art gallery and apparel line. What came next however, would literally put the Blackfly name on the map. Blackfly Lodge, one of the world’s great fishing destinations would be born in the Abaco Islands of the Bahamas. The complete story of Blackfly Lodge can be saved for another chapter, but the resorts unparalleled offering of virgin fishing grounds and first class amenities made the resort in Schooner Bay an immediate hit with serious fly fishermen from around the world. With the ongoing success of  Hyatt’s Collage Restaurant in St. Augustine and the continued growth and recognition of Cochran’s Blackfly name in its various forms, the two friends and entrepreneurs decided to bring their love of fishing, great food, and a great story together. Partnering with  the  Bunnells  they  launched the Blackfly Restaurant on Anastasia Island in 2012. The restaurant succeeded in bringing the Blackfly name full circle and back to St. Augustine, much like Vaughn Cochran himself. Overhead hang vintage fishing rods, certainly with their own stories to tell, most from Vaughn’s own collection but some donated from friends he met along the way. Cochran’s paintings and murals adorn the walls and enhance the tropical feel of the place. Blackfly is casual, yet elegant, with just the right mix of fun and sophistication while keeping true to the fly fishing theme of the Bahamian Lodge that shares the name. When we sat down to eat dinner with Hyatt and Cochran, it was immediately apparent that not only would we be trying delicious food, but that we would get the rare experience of eating with people to whom food is a personal thing. Each dish, each ingredient, each wine is created from a memory, a recipe from family, or a moment that brought meaning to the men who bring the menu of Blackfly to life. What’s more, this is no ordinary Florida tourist food we’re talking about. Yes, many of the dishes found on the menu are familiar to the eye, but they are far from familiar to the palate, and we mean that in the most delightfully surprising way. After speaking with chef Matt Duley about what dishes were most popular and easy to share, the table decided on a round of appetizers and some wine to get the evening started. We enjoyed Authentic Bahamian Conch Fritters, Shrimp Fried Rice, Spicy Sriracha Shrimp and Butter Poached Maine Lobster Tail. The Conch Fritters were unlike any I have tried in all my years living and dining in Florida. The outside was perfectly crunchy and gave way to a smooth and delicate interior filled with sweet conch that was seasoned to let the flavor of the seafood shine. The recipe for the conch fritters comes from the grandmother 44

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of the lodge manager Clint Kemp at Blackfly Lodge, whose family settled in the Bahamas in the late 18th century, making these the most authentic fritters you will most likely every taste stateside. The fried rice was spicy enough to tingle but mild enough to allow the mixture of sweet and savory come through and compliment the flavor of the shrimp. The rice was cooked perfectly – slightly sticky and full of flavor. The Sriracha shrimp were served in a robust sauce made of toasted garlic and sriracha butter. It first reminded me of a buffalo shrimp, but with more depth. The butter poached lobster was the shining star of the first round of food. The twist of poaching allowed the lobster to absorb some of the subtle creaminess of the butter without overwhelming the seafood. The lobster was perched on a sweet sea of corn chowder and finished with chimichurri. For our main dishes we chose the Maine Lobster Mac and Cheese, the Grilled Scottish Salmon, grilled Mahi, the Seared Sea Scallops, and the grilled Flat Iron Steak. The Mac and Cheese took advantage of the flavorful lobster claw meat and was just cheesy enough to set off the sweetness of the lobster. The Salmon was cooked perfectly and served with fried rice (the same yummy rice that the shrimp fried rice was served on) and a Yuzu Datil BBQ sauce that was unexpected and delicious. The Mahi was very good, but the star of that dish was the tomato- bacon compound butter, which in and of itself was reason enough to go back for seconds. The Sea Scallops was the dish I was most excited to try, and I was not disappointed. The Scallops are served over a parmesan risotto and finished with coconut curry sauce. Every aspect volume 8

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of this dish is perfection. The scallops are seared, locking in the subtle flavor. The risotto is warm and creamy enough to spread slightly when it hits the bowl, but holds enough to add substance, and the curry sauce is a complex in the way that only a truly good curry can be. It is all at once sweet and spicy, then mellow and savory. As we were finishing the main dishes, Vaughn asked me about my experience with fried shrimp in St. Augustine. I answered honestly and said it is a meal I will order if I happen to find myself at certain seafood restaurants, but not something I really seek out. He then insisted that I try theirs. Though I told him I couldn’t fit one more bite in, he was vehement that I take one taste. When the plate got to the table, I could tell these shrimp were different just by looking at them. They are bigger than any I have seen served as a fried shrimp dinner, but what’s more is they simply taste amazing just on their own. No special sauce or seasoning needed. With nothing more than a whisper of breading and sprinkle of salt, they are simply delicious. The sauce that goes with them is very good, don’t get me wrong, but it was the first time I tasted a shrimp that could be enjoyed all by itself. We finished our meal with dessert. Carrot cake, a brownie with coconut covered ice cream, and the chef ’s own take on strawberry cheesecake were on offering. All three were worth overindulging, but being the chocolate lover that I am, I was more than happy to finish off the brownie. Wine ended the meal, and we were lucky to have Mike make excellent suggestions for which ones to try. With this story goes great wine. You’ll find an extensive selection in all price ranges from all over the world here. In (more }) 45


fact, over 100 brands are available in the new “wine room” which can store over 1,100 bottles at 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The room was constructed by partner Doug Bunnell and has become the focal point of Blackfly’s main dining area, surrounded by Vaughn’s art and a shimmering divide between the dining areas. It adds charm and character to the warm and inviting space. Happy Hour here is quickly becoming an afternoon ritual for Anastasia Island residents, with familiar faces enjoying craft beers and specialty cocktails as the workday winds down. The restaurant also boasts a new addition – the Shores Room. An event space with the seating capacity of 40, it’s the perfect (and also hard to find) size for meetings, special occasions, event, wedding receptions and parties. The room has the same warm, tropical feel as the rest of the restaurant, with the added benefit of providing privacy and a private bar. Hosting an event here means you also get all the options of the Blackfly menu. Blackfly is more than a restaurant, and it is more than a brand. It is a family. It is the creation of people who are passionate about what they love, and about bringing it together to share with others. Great food and great wine are just the beginning. Blackfly is the kind of restaurant that begs to be experienced with friends, old or new. It is a place for the community to gather and enjoy the company of others who love to share in the experience of sharing a meal and good times. OCL

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Dining Guide Symbol Key Beer and Wine breakfast Courtyard/outdoor Dancing Dinner Entertainment Full Liquor Bar Happy Hour Kids Menu Late Night Menu Lunch Organic Ingredients Parking Party/Banquet Facility Raw Bar Reservations Required Sunday Brunch Take Out Tiki Bar Waterside Dining

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n Amici

1915 A1A South • Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)461-0102 • amicistaugustine.com Amici is one of the true Italian restaurants in northeast Florida, where ambience and cuisine are authentically Italian. Vito Arena has been sharing his family’s old-world legacy of remarkable Italian dishes to fall in love with, while he and his sister, Benedetta make each dining moment and private party unforgettable. It is no wonder that Amici has been voted “Best Italian Restaurant” consecutively, year after year by the residents of Saint Augustine.

n The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse

102 San Marco Avenue • Saint Augustine (904)824-7211 • raintreerestaurant.com Enjoy casual dining at its finest at The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse, recognized nationally and internationally as one of Florida’s top destination restaurants. The Raintree is renowned for consistent, award-winning menu, wine list and full bar served in the warm, intimate atmosphere of a restored 1879 Victorian home with live music in our courtyard.

n The Reef Restaurant

4100 Coastal Highway • Saint Augustine (904)824-8008 • thereefstaugustine.com The Reef, originally called Comptons, was built by the Usina family on a beautiful piece of oceanfront property in tranquil North Beach, three miles north of the Usina Bridge, on land owned by the family for generations. Comptons opened in 1989 and enjoyed great success for the next ten years. It closed in 1999 due to the ill health of Mr. Compton and hurricane damage. The Reef was opened in 2002, under the direct ownership of the Usinas. Since that time the restaurant has worked hard to produce fine food and beverages, professionally served, all accompanied by unsurpassed views of the magnificent Atlantic Ocean. It has steadily built a reputation as one of the most popular dining destinations in Saint Augustine.

Conrad’s Specials

Zarzuela Seafood Clams, Mussels, Shrimp Scallops and Codfish Served in a Lobster sauce $23.95

Seafood Carbonara Prosciutto, Green Pea, Bacon, Shrimps and Scallops served in a White Alfredo Sauce $19.95

4010 US1 South South--St. St.Augustine, Augustine,FL FL 4010 US1 794-9440 www.conradssteakhouse.com 794-9440 ••www.conradssteakhouse.com

n South Beach Grill

45 Cubbedge Road • Saint Augustine Beach (904)471-8700 • southbeachgrill.net “Fresh local seafood and aloha service since1997” This popular restaurant is one of only three direct oceanfront eateries in Saint Johns County. While the oceanfront location is unique, one thing that sets the restaurant apart is the absolute resolve to source and procure 100% fresh fish. All fish arrives at the restaurant “on loin” where it is skillfully skinned, weighed and cut into fillets. The promise of fresh is evident not only in the fish selection but across the entire seafood menu as well. South Beach Grill is open 7 days a week. Lunch 11a.m.-4:30p.m., Dinner from 4:30p.m. to 9:30p.m., serving breakfast Saturdays & Sundays from 7:30-10:30.

n Sunset Grille

421 A1A Beach Blvd • Saint Augustine Beach (904)471-5555 • sunsetgrillea1a.com Most Award Winning Restaurant in Saint Augustine Beach, 29 time winner of The Great Chowder Debate. Have won Awards for our Datil Pepper Wings, Baby Back Ribs, Coconut Shrimp, Crab Fondue, Lobster Ravioli, Shrimp and Grits and Brownie Volcano Dessert. Our Key West atmosphere and kids menu makes us fun for the whole family. Celebrating our 22nd Anniversary!

n The Tasting Room

25 Cuna Street • Saint Augustine (904)810-2400 • thetastingroomfl.com A contemporary Spanish restaurant. Vibrant splashes of art complement a colorful array of “Tapas,” delectable little dishes designed for sharing and socializing. Iberianaccented entrées infused with fresh, local flavor and created with ingredients imported directly from Spain sail hot to your table. From curvy sofas cozying up to a Flamenco red fireplace, award-winning Wines lining an entire wall, and live Latin music nights, The Tasting Room is fueled by a passion for authentic Spanish food and wine. Reservations are not required, but recommended. Courtyard Dining, Private Dining Room available that seats up to 20. For more information please email us or call, make online reservations at tastetapas.com. 48

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n Conrad’s Steakhouse

4010 US1 South • Saint Augustine, Florida (904)794-9440 • conradssteakhouse.com Conrad Martin, from Spain, was recently voted one of the best chefs in America. Conrad’s Steak House is known for its outstanding service and generous portions, along with keeping a Spanish flair in Conrad’s cooking. Conrad’s paella and codfish in green sauce are delicious. The restaurant also offers chicken, seafood, pastas and salads. Conrad is in the kitchen, Mary, his wife, controls the front of the house. This “gem” of restaurant is a “FEAST OF QUALITY AND TASTE” with great food and hospitality. Lunch every weekday 11:30a.m.-2p.m. • Dinner every night, 5pm-9pm Closed Tuesdays.

n 386 A Fusion of Fine eating

5949 N. Oceanshore Blvd. • Palm Coast, FL, 32137 (386)246-0070 • threeeightsix.com Nestled among the majestic oak trees in “The Hammock” alongside scenic A1A, lies 386, A Fusion of Fine Eating. Residing in a building reminiscent of “Old Florida”, 386 embodies the local spirit while invoking a worldly feel with cuisine. The menu boasts a fusion of American favorites from East to West, local fresh seafood in Southern favorites like shrimp-n-grits, aged steaks as one would find in the West, and scallops recalling time spent on the North Eastern shore. The menu is complimented by a wide selection of wines from around the globe and a generous selection of beers on tap. 386 is the realization of a dream for a husband and wife team who are committed to serving the freshest of ingredients and living by the motto “do the right thing” for our patrons. Experience Palm Coast’s very own culinary escape

n Blackfly The Restaurant

108 Anastasia Blvd. • Anastasia Island (904) 201·6300 • blackflytherestaurant.com If you’re looking for a seafood restaurant in St. Augustine, Blackfly is one of St. Augustine’s newest and most unique seafood restaurants. Having opened in June of 2012, Blackfly has won favors with the local community and tourist alike. We’re known for our daily fresh fish specials, brick oven pizza plus steak, chicken, chops and pasta. The well-stocked bar is a great place to relax with friends. The dining room features the art of partner Vaughn Cochran and a 1,000 bottle temperature controlled wine room. The Shores Room with its own private bar can accommodate parties of up to 40. Open for dinner Tuesday to Sunday. .

n Hurricane Patty’s

69 Lewis Blvd. • Off U.S. I at Oyster Creek Marina (904) 827-1822 • hurricanepattys.net Only minutes from downtown off of U.S. Highway l, Hurricane Patty’s serves lunch and dinner daily overlooking the water. Enjoy nightly themed specials throughout the week, featuring drink and dinner specials and live entertainment featuring a wide variety of seafood, steaks, pork chops, chicken, pasta, awardwinning chowder, and, for lunch, sandwiches, salads, and burgers. Full bar and Happy Hour daily 3-7 p.m. Housed in one of St. Augustine’s oldest structures-a renovated 1800s fish dock and warehouse, Hurricane Patty’s feature views of the surrounding marshes, marina, and St. Augustine skyline.

n Donovan’s Irish Pub

7440 US-1 North • Saint Augustine (904)829-0000 • donovansirishpub.com “If you walk in as a stranger, you will leave as a friend.” Stop in for an Irish feast of genuine Irish recipes, award-winning desserts, lunch and dinner menus, signature dishes, weekly specials, a vast selection of wines and beer and much more. Customers enjoy our surrounding TVS or hanging out in the adjoining Danny’s place for a game of pool or darts. Conveniently located near the World Golf Village, on US 1. We’re open 7 days a week from 11a.m. to 11 p.m.

SERVING DINNER Tuesday - Saturday 4:30 - 9:30 Sunday Brunch 10:00 - 2:00 LOCAL SEASONAL SUSTAINABLE

AVAILABLE Vegetarian Options Gluten Free Pastas

n Fratelli’s

415 Anastasia Blvd. St. Augustine, FL 32080 904-819-1760 We are proud to offer Saint Augustine our fresh from the source, and made to order cuisine. We feature traditional Italian comfort foods, along with lighter, and healthier dishes. Here at Fratelli’s, we use the finest imported products, local sustainable meats, seafood, and vegetables.It’s our commitment and responsibility to provide fresh and authentic Italian food. We lay the foundation for a romantic Italian dining experience.  Who are you treating tonight?.

Fratelli's Authentic Italian American Cuisine Chef Owned & Operated Culinary Institute of America Graduate Chef Tiago

904.819.1760

415 Anastasia Boulevard Just over the Bridge of Lions from Downtown volume 8

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n DOLCE Café

210 St. George St. St. Augustine, FL, 32084 Trying to accommodate everybody’s needs, DOLCE Café has something to offer for everybody, the locals and tourists, big and small and everybody who is up for something delicious. GLUTEN FREE Crepes, Gourmet organic coffee, french pastries, desserts, gourmet ice cream, real fruit smoothies, milkshakes, fresh deli sandwiches and many more. When in the St. Augustine area, come visit our landmark and café. Sip the atmosphere of old world continental coffees and savor the smell of our freshly baked crepes. Open 8a.m. - 8p.m.

n Captain’s BBQ

5862 N. Oceanshore Blvd.Palm Coast, FL 32137 (386)597-2888 Offers some of the best TRUE SOUTHERN BBQ, we only use the best quality meats and ingredients. Our meats and side dishes are slow cooked in our special wood burning smoker. Although smoking is a very slow, time consuming process it is worth every second. The result is moist, juicy meats, infused with a delicious smoked wood flavor. Come try Captain Chris’s almost famous Ribs, Chicken, Pulled Pork, Turkey Breast and Brisket which are available daily with exciting additions of daily specials. All of our side dishes are homemade, Macaroni Salad, Sweet Corn Bread, Baked Beans and Cole Slaw. on beautiful and scenic A1A at Bing’s Landing in the Hammock of Palm Coast. Captains BBQ is also accessible by water (29.615°N 81.205°W) just south of channel marker red “108” captainsbbqbaittackle.com

Join us on the water Drinks, Food & FUN!

.com

Our New Sunday Brunch 10am - 1pm includes, Prime Rib, Crablegs, Shrimp, Unlimited Mimosa’s and more

Hurricane Patty’s

69 Lewis Blvd St. Augustine 904.827.1822

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Not the only water view in town...

...simply the most spectacular

904-824-8008 4100 Coastal Highway St. Augustine, FL 32084 thereefstaugustine.com

J oin u s at the Beach! Casual Oce a n ffrr o n t Dining L unch & D i n n e r Eve Everyday B r eak ea k f a s t o n t h e We Weekends

4 5 Cub b ed g e R o ad Cre sce nt Be ach, F L 9 0 4 . 4 7 1 . 8 7 0 0 • so u t h be ach gr ill. net volume 8

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Fresh Seafood, Wild Game Exotic Specialties Offering Daily Chef’s Specials

Lunch: Tues-Sat: 11-3 Dinner: Tues-Thur 5 - 9 Fri-Sat 5 - 10 Open Holidays! Sun 5 - 8 Sunday Brunch 10-3

904.824.3282 • 58 Charlotte Street www.LaPentolaRestaurant.com 51


by Chef Sheery Gaynor photos by Tammy Harrow

Independence

Day Cookout

T

his is a favorite dry rub recipe from my Uncle Larry that never disappoints. The sweet potato salad compliments and balances the spicy and savory meats. The trifle dish is light and fruity and goes over well in the summertime. Plan ahead when making Bavarian cream as the pastry cream must be cooked and cooled in advance. Cake must be baked and berries macerated, so that once the Bavarian cream is made, trifle dish can be filled while cream is soft, then set inside the dish or glass. Allow at least 4 hours for the trifle to chill and set before serving.


recipe Uncle Larry’s Dry Barbeque Rub

2 HEAPING TABLESPOONS BLACK PEPPER 4 HEAPING TEASPOONS SALT 1-1/2 HEAPING TABLESPOONS GARLIC POWDER 1 HEAPING TABLESPOON RED CAYENNE PEPPER 3 HEAPING TABLESPOONS CHILI POWDER 4 HEAPING TABLESPOONS PAPRIKA 1 HEAPING TEASPOON GROUND CUMIN SEED Mix all ingredients well. Rub on ribs, meat and/or chicken at least couple of hours prior to cooking. This mixture is a dry barbeque rub and will make a crust on the meat – sealing in all juices when grilling. The dry rub works well on beef or pork ribs, chicken and chicken wings and can be grilled or smoked. Be sure to cook foods to a safe internal temperature, at least 140˚F for beef and pork and 165˚F for poultry. When smoking, slow and low is the general rule, smoke at 250˚F for 4-6 hours.

Red, White, and Blueberry Trifle

2 quarts strawberries, trimmed and sliced 2 pints blueberries 2 pints blackberries, split lengthwise ½ c. confectionery sugar Juice of 1 lime 1 – 10” white cake 2 oz. flavored liqueur, such as Grand Marnier, White Chocolate Godiva, Framboise (optional) 8 c. Bavarian cream (recipe follows) 1. Macerate strawberries with ¼ c. powdered sugar and juice of ½ lime in one bowl. 2. Macerate blue and blackberries with remaining sugar and lime in separate bowl. 3. Crumble white cake in trifle dish, glass, or individual dish; drizzle with liqueur if using. 4. Layer strawberries over cake, reserving a few for garnish. 5. Add a layer of Bavarian cream. 6. Add another layer of crumbled white cake and drizzle with liqueur, if using. 7. Layer blueberry/blackberry mixture over cake. 8. Add final layer of Bavarian cream. 9. Decorate with reserved strawberries.

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Sweet Potato Salad

3 sweet potatoes, peeled, diced, and boiled (or baked in skin and then peeled and diced) 4 stalks celery, diced 1 red bell pepper, diced 1 yellow bell pepper, diced ¼ red onion, finely diced 4 boiled eggs, diced 1-2 Tbsp. creole mustard 1 – 1&1/2 c. mayonnaise 4 Tbsp. finely sliced chives Salt, white pepper, and tobasco to taste Mix all ingredients and season. Greek yogurt or sour cream can be substituted for all or part of the mayonnaise for a lighter version.

Bavarian Cream

Pastry Cream 2 eggs 2 c. milk 4 oz. granulated sugar 1 oz. cornstarch ¾ tsp. salt 1 tsp. vanilla extract or ½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise 2 oz. unsalted butter Bavarian Cream pastry cream ¼ c. Grand Marnier 3 sheets or 1&1/2 tsp. gelatin 3 c. heavy cream 2 oz. granulated sugar Pastry Cream 1. Scald milk, with vanilla bean if using whole bean 2. Combine eggs, sugar, cornstarch (and vanilla extract if using) with a whip. 3. Temper hot milk into egg mixture, mixing constantly. 4. Return mixture to saucepan; and, stirring constantly, bring to a boil. 5. Immediately remove from heat, add butter and stir until melted. 6. Cool in a shallow dish, covering custard directly with plastic wrap to avoid a skin from forming. 7. Cool overnight or at least 4 hours. Bavarian Cream 1. Whip heavy cream with granulated sugar until very soft peaks form (slightly under whipped), reserve. 2. Bloom gelatin in cold water. (soak the gelatin in water until soft) 3. In a large stainless steel bowl, warm Grand Marnier over double boiler. 4. Add bloomed gelatin to warm Grand Marnier and mix with whip until completely dissolved. 5. Add ½ cup pastry cream to Grand Marnier and mix over heat until homogenous. 6. Remove from heat and mix in remaining pastry cream until smooth. 7. Fold in whipped cream, adding in thirds, until cream is completely incorporated; do not over mix or cream will be grainy. 53


After 27 years, we are moving to 3550 US 1 South (1/4 mile South)

• Quality Auto Repair Since 1987 • Free Shuttle Service • Triple AAA Approved • Master ASE Technicians • 2 Year – 24K Mile Warranty

SERVICING FOREIGN & DOMESTICS www.sargeantservicecenter.com

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people

Spicing Up Downtown!

A few words with Colleen Messner

C

olleen Messner is the owner of the two downtown locations of Spice and Tea Exchange of St. Augustine. O.C.L. sat down with Colleen to learn more about this fascinating woman. Bobby Crum: Tell us a little about yourself and how you came to St. Augustine? Colleen Messner: I grew up in suburban Philadelphia and graduated from Ursinus College in Marketing/Finance.  I have held many corporate positions in Pharmaceuticals, Auto and Banking. I was on a trip to visit a friend in Jacksonville, FL in 1999 and fell in love with St Augustine. In 2002, I left Philadelphia. The time came for a change, so I changed my latitude, which changed my attitude: the rest is history!   BC: Buying, selling and trading spices has a long and exotic history. How did you get into the business and what excites you about it? CM: I was the youngest of five children so I had the opportunity to help my mom cook. She was an amazing cook. Being from a Slavic background, there was always a large amount of food preparation and eating. For me, cooking was adventurous and fun. Bob and I have always done up a lot of tasty dishes together.  I got into the business from friends that I met in Florida and they thought I would be a great person to own and run the business.  This was a huge 360-degree change for me! I had found some great people to help us! Today I continue on my journey to spice up each person, one at a time!

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story by Rev. Bobby Crum photos by Christine Cousart

BC: As a downtown business owner, what do you enjoy most about the city? CM: I love everything! It’s a beautiful, peaceful, happy town with a lot of great people, especially all the business owners and the togetherness of the community!   BC: So how does one add a little spice to their life (I’m sure you haven’t heard that one before)? CM: Come in to the Spice & Tea Exchange and follow your way to flavor! That is how one can add spice to their life!   BC: What is your favorite spice, blend or recipe? CM: Bay Leaf is my go-to spice, great for soups, stews, and roasted veggies!  My favorite spice blend is our Signature Blend made with local datil peppers-yum. My favorite recipe is making my own dishes from scratch- PRICELESS!   BC: What are some things you do in the community and what motivates you to be involved? CM: I volunteer with the Sea Turtle Patrol on Crescent, Summerhaven and Marineland beaches. I’m an Advocate for the Homeless Coalition, Advocate for Farm to Family, Ambassador for St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce, and serve as Director for the Historic Council for the SJC Chamber. These are just a few of the organizations that I am involved in. I have a passion for life, passion for food and a passion to help others. Keep It Spicy! OCL

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Romance & Adventure! Enjoy the beauty of our historic waters on your Private Sunset Sail! • Captained charters • ASA Sailing Classes • Sailboat Rentals • Small boat Sailing Club • Sail time Memberships • Fleet of 22 to 49ft !

St. Augustine Sailing Enterprises www.sta-sail.com • 904.829.0648

3076 Harbor Drive, Camachee Cove Yacht Harbor St. Augustine, FL 32084 photo: Addison Fitzgerald

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SaintAugustineLiving home

Family Vacation Beach House in Crescent Beach Boasts Contemporary Style

“W

e’ve been coming to St. Augustine every July for about 30 years,” said the homeowner of this spacious contemporary home on the Intracoastal Waterway in Crescent Beach. “We would rent a condo for the month every year and we just kept coming back.” This Valdosta, GA-based family allowed us to feature their spacious contemporary home built for their family comprised of a husband, wife and three grown children. “St. Augustine is very family oriented with lots of things to do,” the owner explained. “In 2005, we bought a condo on the beach and a few years later we saw a lot for sale on the Intracoastal and purchased it.” In 2012, they built their dream vacation home, which holds four bedrooms and five bathrooms for themselves and three grown children. The master bedroom and bathroom are downstairs, as well as one guest room and another bathroom. Outside, there is a large covered porch that runs across the back of the house with an outdoor kitchen, a pool and a spa. Upstairs are two bedrooms with bathrooms in addition to a large bonus room and a deck that overlooks the water of the beautiful Intracoastal Waterway where there is a dock with two boat slips on the property. “The upstairs area can be closed off when we don’t have guests,” the owner said.

story by Barbara Hunt Hanrahan photos by Justin Itnyre

“Intracoastal Dream House” “We’ve been coming to St. Augustine every July for about 30 years”

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The home features an open floor plan with a large kitchen and bar that overlooks the family room. The kitchen is decorated with glass tile backsplash and outfitted with stainless steel appliances and a beverage center which includes a wine cooler and an ice machine. Smokey Mountain Cabinets are credited with the design. “You can see the kitchen is out of a magazine. They can build anything, you dream up. They are the best”. The family room features a large coral stone contemporary gas fireplace and handscraped engineered hardwood floors, which expand throughout the home as well. Eightfoot French doors open to the back porch from the living area. The glass tile featured in the kitchen also graces the upstairs bonus room and the master and guest bathrooms.  “I’ve been working with Interior Designer Debi Hanks, ASID, the owner of d. Hanks Design/dhd HOME  over the past year,” the owner elaborated. “She has helped me in decorating our contemporary style home from choosing the furniture to selecting the window coverings. We enjoy entertaining our family and friends here.” 

OCL

Hand Crafted Solid Wood Custom Cabinetry

"If you can dream it, we can build it."

Custom Wine Cellars • Kitchens • Vanities • Mantles Entertainment Centers • Offices • Closets Large selection of Stock Cabinetry to meet your needs 3-D Design • Lifetime Guarantees • Family owned and operated www.SmokeyMountainCabinets.com I 103 East Lake St. • Palatka, FL 32177

386.325.1677

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neighbors

The Joy of

Cooking story & photos by Susan Johnson

H

e’s said it before and he’ll probably say it again: “I’m just a guy who loves to cook.” We get it. But he’s a bit of an urban legend so there has to be more to it than that. “There’s no real secret to success,” he says. “ It’s hard work. And it’s never about the business or the building. It’s always about the people.” For instance: one day, a nurse calls up and orders a pastrami sandwich for a patient. Ned gets a lot of special orders but this one was just a sandwich. Nothing unusual. Except Ned sees the order, recognizes the name and calls the nurse back. Says, “I know this guy and he’s very fussy about his pastrami. He doesn’t want anything on it, not even the mustard...just pastrami and rye. Not toasted. Would you check with him? I wanna be sure he gets what he wants.” Ned Pollack started doing what he loves back in the ‘70’s at Chiccallini’s Pasta Palace in Athens, Ohio. “It was a little Italian joint, a lunch and dinner place. My first one.” Next came St. Augustine and the Malaga St. Depot, Gypsy Cab Company and South Dixie Gypsy. Then, a 2001 move to Hendersonville, N.C. that spawned a Gypsy sister. “North Carolina was great but I missed St. Augustine and all of my friends here so much that I couldn’t wait to get back.” Just over four years ago, Ned’s Southside Kitchen became Pollack’s sixth restaurant venture. Before long, it turned into a local family hangout. Ned’s wife, Marta, says family life is one of the most gratifying aspects of living here. “Having a family business is a different mindset. We’ve been in the community for years and Ned’s served generations of locals. Some who used to come in the other places with their parents when they were young had started coming into the new place with their children...and grandchildren!” “My original plan was to have a TV in my kitchen on U.S.1 South and do a little cooking for my friends. Turns out I have a lot of friends so it became a bigger operation.” Those friends packed the place almost every night. “We opened up a little drive-through window and that really caught on. Food is ready in10 minutes and no one has to get out of their car.” On Friday, March 28th, that drive-thru, along with the rest of the building, were heavily damaged by an early morning electrical fire and subsequent smoke damage which resulted in Pollack having to close the doors until further notice. “One of my guys was just showing up for work and couldn’t even see inside because of all the smoke. He called the fire department. Thanks to that phone call and the quick response, things were not as bad as they could have been.” But “not as bad” was bad enough. (more }) volume 8

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“Being in small business is next to impossible these days, even when things are going well. However, it became a way of life for me and my family. I expect to just move on and do my job. We have a lot of friends rooting for us and we really love our customers, so as long as we continue to serve good food and give good service, we should be alright.” The first thing Pollack tried to do after hearing the news was to stay calm. “I learned that you can be numb, depressed and shocked and still be functional.” The second thing he did was to call Wayne Howell and Doug Wiles. “They were extremely helpful and were able to advise me on things that I had absolutely no prior knowledge of at all.” He laughs. “Things like bridge loans.” Dealing with the national insurance companies was a much more frustrating experience. “I thought they would do whatever they could to help a guy get back in business as quick as he could. But I was wrong. It took over a month to even get access to my building again. Tom Petty got it right about the waiting. And I am an incredibly impatient person.” “I’m so grateful for all of the support and good wishes that we’ve been getting. A lot of us independents go way back. We’ve all been friends for years. I remember when Lorna McDonald and her family would come into the Depot for breakfast!” His overriding concern was for his employees. “All of them out of work overnight. They all have bills, some have kids, some are in school.” Offers of temporary employment came in almost immediately. “I’ve known Ned since the Malaga Street Depot days and have great respect for a man who has brought so much to our community,” says Lorna McDonald from The Raintree. “We currently have two of Ned’s wonderful employees, Hannah and Joe. They will be missed when The Southside Kitchen reopens but I look forward to him getting back to doing what he loves most, the restaurant business!” “People think it’s easy. It’s not easy. I love what I do but I’ve learned over the years that sometimes the good stuff can be so subtle you can almost miss it. The really good stuff is in the relationships that have built up over the years with my vendors, my staff and my customers. That’s as good as it gets-when my dining room is full of friends.” David Mariotti, owner of Mariotti’s Laundry & Dry Cleaners, is a friend who knows about catastrophe firsthand. “Back in 1985, our building burned to the ground and a lot of folks helped me out.” He says it’s the little things that can make a big difference during the rebuilding process-like office supplies. “Nobody ever thinks about all the tape, paper, pencils, paper clips and other administrative staples that it takes to run a business. All that has to be replaced.” He continues, “Another thing is equipment. Costs for just about everything have doubled or tripled since Ned first opened four years ago. I plan to help out any way I can. A lot of small businesses don’t come back from something like this, but he will. Ned doesn’t think there’s any other option. “What else am I supposed to do? You can’t just walk away. I have obligations, bills, mortgages, taxes, payroll, you name it. And where would I go? What would I do? It’s my building, so I’ll do it again. Back to my original plan...and (smiling) hope I still have all my friends!” Before the fire, Ned had been looking forward to spending a little more time with those friends – and his family. Marta’s parents live nearby, his mom is in Jacksonville volume 8

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and, between them, he and Marta have four children - and five grandchildren! Just a few weeks after the fire, he celebrated his 64th birthday. The irony of that is not lost on him. Life changed in the course of one short hour, all his previous plans were put on hold and now he’s starting over. But he seems more philosophical than bitter. “You just have to get over it and move on. Do what you have to and stay with it. You have to be pro-active because you’re the one who has to push things along. No one else will do it.” That said, it’s still all about the people. “We feel blessed to have so many people wishing us well” says Marta. “Every good thought moves us in a positive direction.” “I remember one Sunday at the Malaga St. Depot. It was 33 years ago, the gas went out and the place was packed. I said, ‘I quit. I’ve had it. I don’t want to do this anymore.’ Everyone looked up from their breakfasts. Someone said, ‘what’s his problem?’ Somebody else said, ‘Shut up and cook.’ They all kept eating and Gary from the gas company was there within 15 minutes. Life goes on.” It’s taking a lot longer than fifteen minutes this time but this too will pass, life will go on and Ned’s Southside Kitchen will be back. Until then, “If someone really needs a Southside Burger, just call the house, wait 10 minutes and pull up in the driveway. Ned will run out with it.” Thanks, Marta. We might just do that!

OCL

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worship Abbey of Castle Otttis (Ah-tis) (Interdenominational) Prayer on Sunday Mornings Adults and Mature Children only Vilano Beach | 824.3274

Chapel of Our Lady of La Leche (Catholic) 8:30am, 5pm, Holidays 8:30am, 3pm 27 Ocean Avenue | 824.2809 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Call for Services 500 Deltona Blvd | Shores | 797.4412

Anastasia Baptist Church Sunday 9:30am Contemporary 11am Traditional 1650 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.2166

Christ Our Savior EV Lutheran Church Christian Formation 9am Divine Service 10:30am (deaf interpreted) 21 Milton Street | Uptown | 829.6823

Anchor Faith Church (Word of Faith) Sunday 11am, Wednesday 7:30pm 1764 Tree Blvd | St Augustine | 797.6363

Church Of Christ Sunday Bible Class 9am Sunday Worship 10am, 6pm, Wed 7pm 2900 Lewis Speedway | 824.1800

Ancient City Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Sunday 10:45am, 6pm Wed 6:30pm Bible Study and Prayer 27 Sevilla Street | Downtown | 829.3476

Church at Vilano (Baptist) Bible School 9:30am, Sunday 10:30am Wednesday Prayer and Bible Services 7pm 121 Meadow Ave | Vilano Beach | 827.0477

Berea Seventh Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:15am, Worship 11am Prayer Meeting 7:30pm 151 M L King Ave | Downtown | 824.9145

Community Bible Church Equipping Hour (classes for all ages) 9:30am Fellowship Worship Service10:30am Wed (school schedule) Word of Life Clubs, ages 4 thru High School, Bible Study 6:30pm 3150 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.3875

Bethany Baptist Church Call for Services 5465 CR 208 | Bakersville | 824.5169 Bethel Baptist Church Call for services 222 Riberia St | Downtown | 824.5304

Corpus Christi Catholic Church Daily Mass Mon-Sat 9am • Sat Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Mass 8:30am, 9:45am & 11:00am 6175 Datil Pepper Rd | Shores Area | 797.4842

Bible Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am & 5pm 2485 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.3999

Congregation Sons of Israel (Jewish, Conservative) Services Friday 7:30pm & Saturday 10am 161 Cordova St | Historic District | 829.9532

Bridge of Life Christian Center (Full Gospel Assembly of God) Sunday Worship 10:30am Wed 6:30pm Bible Study Lewis Point Plaza | 797.0669

Crescent Beach Baptist Church Sunday School Bible Fellowship 9:30am Worship 11am, Sunday Worship 6pm 885 SR 206 E | St Augustine | 794.7777

Cathedral-Basilica Parish (Catholic) Saturday Vigil Mass 5pm Sunday Masses 7am, 9am &11am, 5pm Daily Mass 7am Monday - Saturday 38 Cathedral PL | Historic Distict | 824.2806

Dawson Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Sunday School 9:30am, Sunday Worship 110am, Bible Study Wednesday 7pm 225 N Orange St | St. Augustine | 824.8049

Celebration Church-St Augustine 10:30am Sundays St. Augustine High School Auditorium Childcare and Youth Services are provided 3205 Varella Ave | 737.1121 | celebration.org Center for Spiritual Living Call for Services 1795 Old Moultrie Road | 825.3600

Family Worship Center (Christ Centered Worship) Sunday 10am, Thursday 7pm 2040 SR 207 | 819.9970 First Church of Christ Scientist (Christian Science and Reading Room) Sunday School and Service 10am Wednesday Service 5:30pm 2555 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.8882

First Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:45am Monday Word and Action Bible Study 6:45pm Wednesday Prayer Service 12 noon 89 St Francis Street | Downtown | 824.6590 First United Methodist Church Sunday 8:15am & 11am - Traditional Worship Sunday 9:30am - Contemporary 118 King Street | Downtown | 829.3459 Grace United Methodist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 8:30am, 11am Junior Church during 11am Carrera St at Cordova St | Downtown | 829.8272 Good News PCA (Christian) Sunday Worship 9am & 10:30am Nursery provided for all services 1357 Wildwood Drive | 819.0064 Heritage Baptist Church Bible Fellowship 9:30am Sunday School 10am Sunday Worship 11am & 6pm Wed 7pm prayer meeting 1480 Wildwood Dr | 824.8888 Hineni Messianic Fellowship (Messianic - Jewish & Non Jewish Believers) Friday Shabbat 7:30pm Tuesday Bible Study 7:30pm 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 827.9731 Holy Cross Charismatic Orthodox Sunday 10am 110 Masters Drive | 810.0535 Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of St Augustine 2940 CR 214 | 829.0504 Homeport Christian Church Sundays 9am Traditional 10:45am Contemporary Wednesday 6:30pm 5605 US 1 S | St Augustine South | 797.8921 Hurst Chapel AME Church (Methodist) Call for Services 28-1/2 Bernard St | Downtown | 824.0500 Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall South Cong.- Sunday 4pm & Thur 7:30pm North Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Wed 7:30pm East Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Thursday 7:30pm 735 Kings Estate Rd | 797.7599 Lighthouse Church of God Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening 6pm, Wed Evening 7pm 1230 Kings Estate Road | 797.6996

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Mc Dowell Baptist Church 16 Bayview Drive | St Augustine Call for Services 829-8388 Memorial Lutheran Church of the Martyrs Sunday School Sundays Traditional 8am Contemporary 10:30am 3375 US 1 South | 797.4377 Memorial Presbyterian Church Sunday 8:30am Informal, 9:30am Church School 10:50am Pipe Organ Prelude, 11am Worship 36 Sevilla St | Historic District | 829.6451 Mill Creek Baptist Church Sunday Bible Service 10am, Sunday Worship 11am, 6:30pm, Wed 7pm 6019-A State Rd. 16 | Mill Creek | 940.3130

Saint Photios National Shrine (Greek Orthodox) Monday - Saturday, Sunday Service Friday 11am 41 St George St | St Augustine | 829.8205 San Sebastian Catholic Church Saturday Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Masses 8am,10am, 12 noon Spanish Daily Mass 8am Tues - Friday 1112 SR 16 | 824.6625 Seventh - Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:30am, Worship 11am 555 State Road 16 | St Augustine | 824.5855 Shiloh Baptist Church Call for Services 271 West King St | Downtown | 824.3913

1475 Old Dixie Highway • St. Augustine Tabernacle Baptist Church Call for Services (904) 824-1672 280 Duval St | aigFuner DowntownalHome.com | 829.2041 www.Cr

Temple Bet Yam (Jewish Reform) Services First and Third Friday 7:30pm 2055 Wildwood Rd | St Augustine | 819.1875 The Village Church (Interdenominational) Bible School 9:00am Services 9am & 11am, Children’s 11am Adult Bible Study 10am, Youth 5pm 4225 Pacetti Rd | World Golf Village | 940.6768

Miracle Center Ministries (Non-Denominational) Sunday 10:30am 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 824.9673

Saint Augustine Shores United Methodist Church Sunday School 10am, Traditional 9am Contemporary 11am 724 Shores Blvd | St Augustine Shores | 797.4416

Moultrie Baptist Church Sunday School 9:45am Service 11am, 6pm, Wed 6:30pm 3699 US 1 S | Moultrie Creek | 797.9005

Saint Cyprian’s Episcopal Church Sunday Holy Eucharist 10am Third Sunday 5:30pm 37 Lovett Street | 829.8828

New Life Baptist Church Call for Service Times 346 Varella Avenue • Near SR 16 | 823.9537

Saint Francis In-the-Field Episcopal Church 9am, Sunday 10am 895 Palm Valley Rd | Ponte Vedra | 543.0112

Turning Point at Calvary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:40am Worship 9:40am, 11am, 6pm 3500 SR 16 • 829.9795

New Saint James Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am 135 Rodriquez Street | 824.6500

Saint Luke AME Church African Methodist Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 11am 694 W Pearl St | Downtown | 824.6120

Unitarian-Universalists Fellowship of St. Augustine Sunday 10:30am 2487 A1A South | St Augustine | 471.2047

Saint Mary’s Baptist Church Call for Services 69 Washington St | Downtown | 824.1314

Wards Creek Baptist Church Sunday Services 7am, 10:45am 7pm Home Bible Studies Wednesday Youth 6pm - Service 7pm 7730 County Rd 13 N | Wards Creek | 522.0128

Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church Saturday Vigil 4:00pm Sunday masses 8am, 10am, 12 noon Daily mass Tue 8:15am, Thurs 8:15am 5950 SR 16 | 824.8688 Pentecostal Fellowship Center Church Sunday Schoool 10:00am Worship 11am, 6pm | Youth Thursday 5:30pm 1065 Kings Estate Rd | Kings Estates | 797.6040

Saint Paul AME Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship Services 10:45am Bible Study Wednesday 6pm 85 ML King Avenue | 829.3918

Trinity Episcopal Parish Holy Eurcharist 7:30, 9am Family Service & 11:15am Wednesday 10am Holy Eurcharist and Healing Service followed by Bible Study 215 St. George St | Historic District | 824.2876

Zion Baptist Church Call for Services 94 Evergreen Ave | St Augustine | 826.1424

Pilgrim Church (United Church of Christ) Service Sunday 10am 5880 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.5187 Radiant Family Church Sunday Worship 10:45am, Wednesday 6:30pm 1515 CR 210 | 808.7390 Saint Anastasia Catholic Church Saturday 4pm, Sunday 8am & 10:30am Daily Mass 9am Monday-Friday 5205 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.5364

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Hookey Hamilton

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A Treasure of a cover

I

t’s no surprise that last month’s cover of Old City Life created a bit of a buzz-that sort of ambitious panoramic cover photo encompassing the back cover, front cover AND the inside “gate fold” had never been attempted on, or in, any Ancient City publication. What I didn’t expect was how much of a buzz it was going to create! All month long I’ve had people pulling me aside and asking “How did you guys do that?!” So, instead of repeating the story 20,000 times, I thought “What better way to tell this ‘cover story’ than in the pages of the magazine itself ?” When the idea was first presented, we realized it was going to be a bit of an undertaking but I knew that, with the right people involved, it could be pulled off, and beautifully at that. Treasury on the Plaza is a stunning venue and we had been working on getting a story written about how it all came together when I got the call from an interested party suggesting this cover. From there, things just fell into place. It took little convincing to get Brenda Bushell, a partner in the business, who is beyond proud of their new venture, on board. Once that was confirmed, who to get as the photographer? That was a no-brainer. Ed Taylor, whose July 4th, 2013 fireworks photo graces this month’s cover, is one of the most talented and meticulous shooters in the St. Augustine area. We knew that to capture the very essence of this grand space, he was our guy. But we couldn’t just set the camera up, point, click and get outta there. The space needed to be presented in all it’s glory and that takes a LOT of effort and that’s where a group of extremely talented and experienced professionals come in. Lindsay Olin, owner/operator of Coastal Celebrations was thrilled to coordinate and handle the decor for this ground-breaking effort. “It was an honor to be asked to be a part of this photo shoot,”

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by Lura Readle Scarpitti

Ollin says. “We really enjoyed styling the space. The architectural details and neutral colors are so refined that the space complements any decor design a bride walks in with. It’s truly a beautiful, very sophisticated space.” Lindsay was also our beautiful “bride” on the back cover, made even more stunning in a Daniel Thompson Gown, with hair and makeup by local stylist Amanda Hopcroft. Her “groom” (“No,” to answer the many questions, “they are not married in real life.”) was resplendent in a tux courtesy of the Wedding Authority. Amy Armstrong, of The Conservatorie Floral and Event Design was happy to be involved as well. She is as big a fan of Treasury as is Olin. “We are so thrilled to have another venue in town as beautiful as The Treasury and absolutely loved being a part of this shoot with all the talented vendors.” St Johns Illumination provided the ceremony backdrop and the icing on the cake (pun intended): Sweet Weddings contributed...the cake! The combined effort took weeks of planning and countless hours of questioning whether we could achieve the desired effect. Even when designing the layout, I had my doubts it was going to live up to our high expectations. But Brian Hornung, OCL’s megatalented art director made it sing, and when the magazine arrived to our warehouse on June 3rd, we were all blown away. It was beyond anything I had imagined it could be-one of our best covers to date (and that is saying something). So a huge “Thank you!!!” goes out to everyone who participated and donated their hard work, talent and time. We couldn’t have done it without ya!!!

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Poetry

Independence By Ann Kiyonaga-Razon

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a word of heft perhaps evoking images of governmental documents which further emerging democracies freedom from repression self governance all marvelous associations regarding that relative expression of independence but for this one it is about Moksha sanskrit word describing the transcendent inner freedom that can come to maturity even behind prison walls it is an emancipation from inner repression a return to Nisarga the natural state wherein our primary identity resides in pure awareness in that great inner freedom independence indeed a word of heft

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Ancient City Poets by Chris Bodor

Furniture & home Décor

T

his month’s poem, by Ann KiyonagaRazon, speaks on the theme of independence. Celebrating our independence is more about fireworks and sparklers. We all have the freedom of choice. As poets and poetry lovers, we can choose to climb on our soap box and sing out our thoughts and our fears. During the month of July may our words of independence reverberate though out the mountains and the valleys, far and near. Soon, Florida will have its own literary magazine. The international publication is based in St. Augustine and it will be called AC PAPA, which stands for Ancient City Poets, Authors, Photographers, and Artists. The publisher of the project, Poet Plant Press, will be collecting poems, personal essays and book reviews though out the month of July. To have your work considered, please send an email to acpapalitmag@gmail.com. The inaugural issue will be available in November and will feature a haiku section edited by Michael Henry Lee, an article on the poetry scene that once flourished in downtown St. Augustine at Backstreets Cafe, as well as poems and essays from some of the best writers that the Nation’s Oldest City has to offer. On Sunday July 27th, join the Ancient City poets for an afternoon of poetry. Poets and poetry lovers are invited to Plant-APoem with the Ancient City Poets at The Gallery Café of St. Augustine (1974 US-1 S, in the old Staples Plaza). Please resister at the door at 1:45p.m.. There is a small $10 charge to cover the cost of endless coffee and sweet treats. The hour long workshop begins at 2:00p.m. Then, travel a short way up US-1 for “St. Augustine Speaks,” a community open mic gathering held at City Coffee Company (1280 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd, near Village Inn). Share a poem or two with a warm and supportive crowd, our just listen and soak in the spoken word scene. The readings are held on the last Sunday of each month. They start at 3:00p.m. and are held “renga style” with no emcee or signup sheet. The event concludes when all presenters have had an opportunity to share. For more info please go to the Ancient City Poets official website www.bodor.org .

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NORTH of The Plaza 1. LOVE’S ART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE 2. TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE 3. ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105 4. METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET 5. HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET 6. THE STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET 7. #7 ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

SOUTH of The Plaza 8. GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET 9. BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET 10. PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET 11. AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET 12. GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET 13. JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET 14. AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET 15. PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET 16. ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET 17. LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1 18. GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET 19. GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY: 49 KING STREET 20. SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET 21. ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET

Art Galleries of St. Augustine is an association of many diverse and eclectic galleries located in the city. From local artist owned businesses to exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer collections of local, regional, national and facebook.com/artgalleriesofstagustine international artists.

EAST of Downtown 22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH: 370-A A1A BEACH BLVD. 24. ISLAND FRAMERS AND GALLERY: 4106 A1A SOUTH

The ART GALLLERIES of St. Augustine is an association of the many diverse and eclectic art galleries located in the nation’s oldest city. From local artist-owned businesses to elegant exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer outstanding collections of local, regional, national and international artists.

WEST of The Plaza 25. LIGHTNER MUSEUM: 75 KING STREET 26. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM: 48 SEVILLA STREET 27. 130 king fine art: 130 KING STREET 28. BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY: 137A KING STREET. 29. space:eight: 228 W.KING ST.

FIRST FRIDAY 5-9 PM On the first Friday of each month the galleries offer new art exhibits and lively receptions to the public. Start your FREE self-guided tour at any of the Art Galleries, most within walking distance to each other. Hop aboard the FREE Art Walk trolley that runs throughout downtown. For more info, visit us www.ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

NORTH OF THE PLAZA 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

LOVE’S ART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE   ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105   METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET    HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET THE STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET  ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

SOUTH OF THE PLAZA 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET  AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET  ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET . LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1  GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET   GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY:  49 KING STREET SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET    ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET 

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22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH:370A  A1A BEACH BLVD.

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FACEBOOK.COM/ARTGALLERIESOFSTAUGUSTINE


GALLERIES

11C Aviles Street • 904.823.8608

904.826.8530 • flagler.edu/crispellert

904-825-4577 • ButterfieldGarage.com

904.827.9997 • simplegestures@live.com

ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

904.342.2186 • GeorgiaNickGallery.com

904.824.6322 • metalartzgifts.com

P.A.S t . A Art Gal l er y

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904.824.0251 • pastaartgallery.net

904.829.5003 • NeffJewelers.com

904.827.1899 • ArtfullyGraceGallery.com

904.829.6880 • grandbohemiangallery.com

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904.540.3661 • facebook.com/starvingartiststaug 71


July Sunday

Monday

Tuesday St. Augustine Distillary Tour

01

112 Riberia Street 10 am - 6pm thecivicassociation.org

06 First Sunday: St. Augustine Vintage Car Tour of Mission Nombre de Dios 21 Orange Street staugustinevintagecartours.com

13

2nd Annual St. Johns Business Network Charity Golf Tournament Royal St. Augustine 9am - 2 pm bettygriffinhouse.org

American Idol Live!

27

08

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys 23 Orange Street

St Augustine, FL 7pm

14

Lighthouse Dark of the Moon Tour St. Augustine Lighthouse StAugustineLighthouse.org

15

Historic Spanish Ships in St. Augustine St. Augustine City Marina 10 am - 6 pm elgaleon.org

21 Art & Merchant Walk

The Downtown Bazaar

A1A Beach Blvd. 5 - 7 pm

Colonial Quarter 6-10 pm thedowntownbazaar.com

28

Lost Ships Tour at the St. Augustine Lighthouse

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 7:30 pm staugamphitheatre.com

Reservations are required St.AugustineLighthouse.org

First Sunday: 03 St. Augustine Vintage Car Tour of Mission Nombre de Dios

Lighthouse Dark of the Moon Tour

21 Orange Street staugustinevintagecartours.com

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Colonial Quarter 6-10 pm thedowntownbazaar.com

20

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 7 pm staugamphitheatre.com

Fall Out Boy Concert

The Downtown Bazaar 07

04

St. Augustine Lighthouse StAugustineLighthouse.org

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys

22

29

23 Orange Street

St Augustine, FL 7pm

05

St. Augustine Distillary Tour 112 Riberia Street 10 am - 6pm thecivicassociation.org

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City Calendar 2014 For a complete listing of area events, go to OldCityLife.com

Wednesday

Thursday

02

Music By the Sea Concert Series

09

St. Augustine Municipal Marina FREE Every Wednesday June 11-Aug 13 830pm facebook.com/saintaugustineripleys

Music By the Sea Concert Series

16

Concerts In the Plaza

23

Concerts In the Plaza

St. Augustine Municipal Marina FREE Every Wednesday June 11-Aug 13 830pm facebook.com/saintaugustineripleys

Plaza De La Constitucion 7-9pm plazaconcerts.com

Music By the Sea Concert Series

Gavin DeGraw and Matt Nathanson Concert

27 30

St. Augustine Beach Pavillion 7-9pm thecivicassociation.org

Movies by the Bay

10

Plaza De La Constitucion 7-9pm plazaconcerts.com

Concerts In the Plaza

St. Augustine Municipal Marina FREE Every Wednesday June 11-Aug 13 830pm facebook.com/saintaugustineripleys

04

1st Friday Artwalk, Downtown St. Augustine

11

El Gale贸n Visits St. Augustine Tour a full-sized replica of a 17th century Spanish galleon 111 Avenida Menendez 10am-6pm

17

18

Historic Weapons Demonstrations at Castillo de San Marcos 10:30 am - 3:30 pm nps.gov

24

Jon Legend Concert

25

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 7:30 pm staugamphitheatre.com

31

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 6 pm staugamphitheatre.com

06

Saturday

Fireworks over the Matanzas, Downtown St. Augustine

Plaza De La Constitucion 7-9pm plazaconcerts.com

St. Augustine Beach Pavillion 7-9pm thecivicassociation.org

Movies by the Bay

World Golf Village 03 Fireworks, Dinner, and a Movie World Golf Village 5:30 pm worldgolfhalloffame.org

St. Augustine Beach Pavillion 7-9pm thecivicassociation.org

Movies by the Bay

Friday

1st Friday Artwalk Downtown St. Augustine 5 - 8 pm

Sunset Celebration at Vilano Beach Town Center

05

Vilano Beach Town Center 3 pm vilanobeachfl.com

Sunset/Moonrise

12

at St. Augustine Lighthouse 8 pm staugustinelighthouse.org

Old City Farmers Market

19

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 8:30 am - 12:30 pm

Bridge of Lions 5K Run, Downtown St. Augustine

26

Sara Bareilles Concert, St. Augustine Amphitheatre

01

Dirty Heads and Pepper Concert

02

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 6 pm staugamphitheatre.com

August oldcitylife.com

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Dolphin Safari & Scenic Tour Pontoon Pub Crawl Sunset Cruises (BYOB) Private Charters Visit our website for convenient online booking and to learn more about your captain and cruise package Use discount code "OLD CITY" for any tour.

WWW.JAXWATERTOURS.COM

Facials Clinical Skin Care Spa Manicures & Pedicures Individual & Couple's Massages Body Treatments Hair Salon Bridal Packages Gift Cards Top quality, custom work that comes to your door at affordable prices

Gift Cards Available!

Custom Drapery • Shades Blinds • Shutters • Custom Bedding

904.471.8027

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Cheryl Rounds O'Steen

904.824.6220 • 800.824.9899 I 9 Sanchez Avenue • St. Augustine, FL

www.windowcoveringsandmore.com

smallindulgencesdayspa.com volume 8

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giving

The Road That Leads To ARC story by Susan Johnson

S “

he wins who calls herself beautiful and challenges the world to change to truly see her.” That’s a quote from a book called “The Beauty Myth” by Naomi Wolf. But the same sentiment is put into practice every day at a truly beautiful place called The ARC of the St. Johns. Neal Benson jokes that it was a Christmas card that started him on the road to The ARC. “I was traveling a lot and, at 55, I got a wake up call. I received a holiday card from an employee of the Delta Airlines Crown Room on Concourse D in Cincinnati, Ohio. “ Benson laughs. “You’re not supposed to know those guys. Way too much travel.” But then the conversation gets serious. A tragic accident involving his daughter almost 10 years ago kept him on that road. “It became personal for me and for my family. It completely redefined our lives.” Benson now says it’s that kind of personal connection that allows some people to understand more readily than others the unique challenges facing those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (I/DD), and brings many of them down that same road: the one that leads to The ARC of the St. Johns. Kathy Jackson has been the Executive Director of The ARC of the St. Johns for 30 years. “This is not a career, it’s a way of life. My first two weeks were extremely tough. It wasn’t until I changed my thinking and realized that most of my barriers were due to miscommunication – on my part – that I really began to ‘get it.’ That shift in perception brings to light the beauty that is The ARC.” Most residents in St. Johns County think The ARC is a day facility for developmentally challenged adults. Not true. “The ARC is not simply a facility,” explains Benson. “The Arc is about Mike and the look in Mike’s eyes when he accomplishes a task. The ARC is about Karen. And Charles. And Amy. The ARC is about more than 200 people of all ages, from birth through senior adulthood. It’s about learning new skills and being exposed to different life choices. The Arc is not just for the participants but also for our community. We are a beautiful place full of beautiful people and we want everyone to know and understand what we do here.” What Are They Doing Out There? I took a tour and can tell you one thing for sure. They are definitely doing more than you could ever imagine! Even the smallest detail is designed to provide stimulation for the population that they serve and help participants to better manage and control their life challenges. The ARC envisions a day when all people with I/DD can participate as contributing members of their communities. Towards that end, they work together to offer growth and educational opportunities that foster respect, ensure human rights and help those with I/ DD achieve their full potential. They nurture, they teach, they motivate, they guide and they advocate. “A lot of doors are volume 8

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purposely closed to us, mostly because of misunderstanding,” Jackson says. All of us, including those with I/DD, are a normal part of the reality of life. We want to help others see that.” I Am The ARC Toward that end, The ARC of the St. Johns has begun an awareness campaign called “I am the ARC”. This friend-raising (NOT fundraising) campaign launched on Independence Day and targets a specific population – us! Because, as Neal Benson said before, “ The ARC is not simply a facility. The ARC is about Mike and Karen and James and Eleanor.” Speaking of Eleanor – there was a time when everyone thought Eleanor couldn’t write or even learn to write. But when “Miss Ellie” came to ARC, that presumption changed. The folks at The ARC thought a little differently. They thought maybe Miss Ellie deserved the chance to learn to write. Turns out she can. I know because I saw it happen and believe me, it was a beautiful sight. It also turns out that Neal Benson and Kathy Jackson are right. The ARC really is about us. “I am The Arc.” If that’s a bit difficult to see right now, call Neal Benson, take a drive down Inman Road and let him show you around. You might start to see things differently. And that’s the real beauty of The ARC of the St. Johns! Neal Benson can be reached by phone at (904)333-3638 or via email to nbenson@arcsj.org. . This story came about because Herbie Wiles Insurance cares about our community, supports Epic Behavioral Healthcare and would like you, our OCL readers, to be aware of resources that can enhance your lives and the lives of your loved ones. 75


GARDENING

H

by Kimberly Leonardi

ello, summer! Most of the winter annuals have withered by the wayside at this point, although you may be able to salvage Geraniums until fall if they are tucked away in a shady area. But there is good news! Even though the winter annuals are toast, other flowers are beginning to bloom. Sometimes people assume that flowers can’t thrive in our humid, hot summers. If that’s you, I would be more than happy to give you a few suggestions! As an added bonus, all of the plants listed below use water frugally, so your water bills won’t be through the roof. Okay, it’s time to take note: Zinnias are colorful, easy to grow, and attract birds and insects, including butterflies and hummingbirds. Swallowtail, Monarch, Painted Lady, and other butterflies enjoy the flowers’ nectar. Hummingbirds eat up the tiny insects drawn to the flowers. Sparrows, Goldfinches, and other birds gobble the Zinnia’s seeds.   Another flower you can try your hand with is Vinca, which thrives in hot, dry, or humid climates. Glossy green leaves cover a bushy, heavy flower. The best part of a Vinca? Deer do not eat them (and you thought it was impossible to have flowers in a deer zone)! My third suggestion is the Sweet Potato Vine, which has tuberous roots with a trailing habit, which makes them ideal for containers or hanging baskets.   The Summer Snapdragon (Angelonia) had to be included.  This plant looks like a mini Snapdragon or Delphinium: showy, tall spikes and blue, purple, pink or white flowers. The spikes appear on top of the plants, which makes them an excellent bedding plant—but they also do well in containers. Rose Moss is a Florida favorite because it is very tolerant of summer heat. It is a low-growing succulent plant that comes in an array of bright and intermediate shades of red, rose, pink, orange, white, and yellow. There are also single or double-flowered varieties available. If you’re looking for something with more salt tolerance, and can be grown in sandy conditions, consider the Blanket Flower, Gazania and Dune Sunflower. These are nice colorful choices for ocean-side neighborhoods! With the typical amounts rain in our location, expect excessive weed growth this time of year.  If you scout your beds regularly for weeds, and control them early, they won’t overtake the garden.  In addition, keep your mulch at least three inches thick to help moderate ground temperature for plants (it also helps smother out weeds).  Just like peanut butter and jelly, weeds and pests go together—so be vigilant for piercing, chewing, and sucking insects in the garden as well, and eradicate! Enjoy your summer, enjoy the kiddos and enjoy the outdoors with the kiddos! Until next time, Happy Gardening! 76

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Beauty Appliances

Great Gift Ideas

Flamingo Travel

Certified Sandals Specialist Full Service Luxury Travel Agency 2730 US 1 South, Suite A St Augustine, FL 32086

904-461-4333

Dee Lexandra, PhD, MSW, LCSW

Certified Addiction Professional & Parent Coordinator

Our Special Sandals Presentation has been changed to October 6th. Attend and receive a Sandals gift.

904-461-4333

Lynne@cruiseflamingotravel.net

Practicing more than 25 years! Specialties: Relationships, Recovery, Military & Life Changes S.E.A., LLC, Individual, Couple & Family Therapy 88 Riberia Street Suite 140 St Augustine, 32084

904-302-7303

Client Centered Solutions Lead to Positive Change!

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ock group Boston played in front of large crowd on June 7 at the St. Augustine Amphitheater. Concert-goers enjoyed tailgating in the parking lot before the concert started. The fun continued as fans of all ages entered the show and rocked out to classic Boston hits.

Photos by: Justin Itnyre

On the Town

R

T

he Conservatorie Floral & Event Design held their “In Full Bloom” event on June 17 in celebration of their new store. Guests experienced the flowery-decorative space as they enjoyed food, drinks live music and even some discounts. To top of the gorgeously decorated event, guests were able to enjoy live screen printing of exclusive designs.

On the Town

Photos by: Justin Itnyre

Photos left to right - Caitlin Carlton, Lindy Smith, Jenn Whalen • Dana Goodsen, Kelly Hite, Amanda Hopcroft • Risa Iyobe, Joseph & Christina Mills, Lindsay Webb • Jenna Thorpe, Dawn Wallace • Laurel Baker, Terra Yarbrough, Heather Neville • Tommy Davis, Kyle Whalen, Brian Washington • Meghan Fretto, Mary Joy Freto, Jessica Nogowski • Deborah Eby, Kathy Newman, Emily Anderson, Stacy Marks

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Photos by: Lura Scarpitti

on the town CATHOLIC CHARITIES

B

ishop Felipe J. Estévez performed the Blessing at the Catholic Charities New Offices in the A.D. Davis Building at 3940 Lewis Speedway, St. Augustine, FL 32084, Thursday, June 5 - 5:30 PM to 7:30. Supporters from several counties turned out for the dedication and blessing and tour of the offices and the new food pantry. “The mission of Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Saint Augustine is to provide services to anyone in need, regardless of race or religion; to advocate justice, human dignity and quality of life; and to call all people to join in these efforts; thereby reflecting the compassion of God in Christ.”

Photos left to right - Alvin L. Moser, Olga P. Lara-Moser • Cheryle Reese, Marilyn Beach • Daniel & Eddie Creamer • David Hoak, Carol Stone • David Hoak, Becki Yanni, Jane Faybik • Elizabeth & Brian Schoonover • Marcelle Gallucci, Julie Creamer • Mary Edda Day, Lisa Cornish • Mary Kelley-Kryzwick, Elizabeth Schrum, Carey Cramer, Owen Schrum • Laura Hickey, Bishop Estevez, Carolyn Wixted • Pennie Nakashima, Tonya Creamer • Melissa Nelson, Nancy Nichols • Peter Smith, Joyce Speichert, Mary Kelley-Kryzwick

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Photos by: Lura Readle Scarpitti

on the town CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GOLF

T

he St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce held their annual Golf Classic on Tuesday, June 10 at the Palencia Club. Those in attendance had the opportunity to birdie their way through the afternoon while participating in the on-course party holes, a best dressed golfer contest and have a chance to win one of the many raffle prizes. The tournament was followed by the award ceremony where the winners were recognized for their golfing achievements while enjoying a hors d’oeuvres reception.

Photos left to right - Pat & Jay Kane, Colleen Messner, Bob Griffith • Ben Stamps, Cory Mara • Colleen Messner, Melissa Mezick, Christina Berger, Tammy Sharpe, Dan Hubley • Dan Hubley, Gary Hiatt, Bob Tackett • Rob McGee, Travis McGee, Donna Jimmerson, Josh Jimmerson • Benjamin Brown, Rep. “Doc” Renuart • , Isabelle Rodriguez, Corinne Howard & Lucia Miller • Michele Oliver, Sandy Kavanaugh & Alex Mairone • Jane Hire, Art Wildblood, Kathleen Wildblood, Randy Brunson • James Whitehouse, Dan Abel, Bill McClure, Brian Bateman • Barry McDonald, Greg Lecker, Perry Kenney, Jay Nettles • Ken DiFiore, Chris Austin, David Groleau • Dan Able, Bill McClure, Greg Voss • Rob Matthews, Caroline & Bruce Hallett 80

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Photos by: Lura Readle Scarpitti

on the town ROCK-N-ROLL BASH

B

ozard Lincoln Ford was transformed into a rock-and-roll concert venue for the 4th Annual Rock and Roll Bash held May 24th, 2014 at the dealership. This rockin’ event, which benefitted The Boys and Girls Clubs of Northeast Florida, The PLAYERS Unit, had well over 300 in attendance and raised over $61,000 from ticket sales, a “text” silent auction, and poker tournament.

Photos left to right - Zach & Missy Rowe, Henry & Cindy Rowe • Michael Lugo, Chris Forest • Mike & Cheryl Osteen, William Regan, Ross & Melinda Truog • TJ Sartiano, Clay & Megan Nettles, Bo & Amanda Strange • Kristy Forrester, Stephanie Lugo, Kathy Forrest • David Upchurch, Letti Bozard • Donny Russo, Ricky & Kathy Goodwin, Cedric Mincey • Ryan & Virginia Hinkley, Rob & Suzanne Hinkley • Chris Condon, Michael & Brooklyn Clams, Bobby Rice • Donnie & Toni Douglas, Doug & Bruna Roddy • Alan & Lauren Hine, Jenny Burnett, Vicky Alvarez • David Fridell, Paul Marrile, Frank & Ronette Waycaster • Kim O’Connell, Rocky Platt, Sabrina Hines, Susan Timmons, Jonesy Scott volume 8

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contributors Joseph L. Boles, Jr. moved to Saint Augustine with his parents in 1967. He graduated from Saint Augustine High school in 1970 and went on to the University of Florida, where he earned a degree in Law and a degree in Design. He has seven wonderful children and a beautiful wife named Jane. He serves as Mayor of the City of Saint Augustine and is also a member of Memorial Presbyterian Church. His hobbies are golfing, fishing and painting.

Tammy Harrow is an avid world traveler, photographer and writer. She loves to journey around the globe searching for beauty and inspiration. She has created portraits throughout the US. Since relocating to St Augustine, Tammy has expanded into commercial photography and has a special place in her heart creatively photographing culinary dishes for local restaurants. She has a degree in Journalism, is nationally published and has trained with some of National Geographic’s top photographers.

Sherry Gaynor is a Certified Executive Pastry Chef (CEPC) and Certified Culinary Educator (CCE). She is a long-time resident of Saint Augustine and serves as a Chef Instructor for First Coast Technical College who is assigned to teach at Florida School for the Deaf and Blind. Sherry is from New Orleans, attended culinary school through Delgado Community College’s apprenticeship program and recently acquired her bachelor’s degree in Career and Technical Education: Workforce and Program Development, from the University of West Florida. She was recently awarded Teacher of the Year 2013-14 Ashley Bates is a professional writer and social media manager. An Orlando native, Ashley graduated from the University of Central Florida. and then moved to Saint Augustine from Gainesville, Ga. She got her start in journalism writing sports articles for The (Gainesville, Ga.) Times and moved onto writing arts and entertainment, food and religion features. She was lucky enough two receive two awards from the Georgia Press Association for “Writer of the Year” in religion reporting. Today her hobbies including spending time with family and enjoying good food and wine. 

Originally from Hagerstown Maryland, Justin Itnyre’s photographs have been featured on several covers of local magazine Old City Life. His architectural photography has been published in Homes & Land Jacksonville Magazine, Unique Homes, and the book, Historic Sites of St. Augustine and St. Johns County. Internationally arete images hit the press for Volvo Powertrain, New Beauty Magazine, and Blue Green Corporation. www.justiniphoto.com

Raphael Cosme earned a Master Degree in Archaeology from the Center of Advance Studies of Puerto Rico and later a degree in communications and public relations. In 1978, he discovered the Ponce de Leon site in Puerto Rico. He is specialized in Museum Management Collections from the Smithsonian Institution. A historian who has written hundreds of articles about Pre-Columbian and Spanish Colonial Art, moved from the Old San Juan, Puerto Rico and has found in Saint Augustine the mirror of his Spanish heritage. He and his wife Perla have three children: Angela, Samantha, and Raphael, Jr.

Eddie Toy grew up in Melbourne, Florida enjoying the state’s wealth of watersports opportunities on the Indian River and adjacent Atlantic Ocean beaches. Upon moving to St. Augustine in the fall of 2001 he fell in love with kiteboarding, and more recently stand up paddle surfing. Eddie is a freelance website developer, kiteboarding and stand up paddle boarding instructor, and works in the evenings at Ripe Bistro.

Susan Johnson has been a resident of St. Augustine for over 30 years. She is a freelance writer whose work has been published in a variety of local and national newsmagazines. She the recipient of the 2011 Outstanding Media Award, the 2012 Quality Senior Living Award for Media Vision and the 2011, 2012 and 2013 Constant Contact All Star Award for Exceptional Content. Susan is the proud parent of three wonderful young men (Peter, Daniel and Herschel) and her hobbies include photography, exercise and music. Contact via email to sznjohnson1@yahoo.com

Barbara Hunt Hanrahan is a writer/journalist/editor as well as a nurse. Barb earned her Master of Arts Degree in Communication from Emerson College in Boston, her Bachelor of Science Degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, and her Nursing Certification from First Coast Technical College. She has been a writer/journalist/editor for 20 years. She also teaches and coaches group exercise classes, gymnastics and horseback riding. Following a faith filled life is her greatest passion in life.

Viviana Rojas Heil, a freelance graphic designer born in Bogota, Colombia, came to the US on a tennis scholarship. She graduated from Flagler in 2008 in Graphic Design and fell in love with Saint Augustine although she misses the mountains, family and food. She is also Head Coach Junior Tennis Instructor at Atlantic Beach and Tennis Club and Translator for Bricks 4 Kidz. She lives in Saint Augustine Beach with husband, Warren, and their beautiful boxer, Mario.

Shana L. London is a graduate of the University of North Florida, with a BA in English. She has an affinity for travel and food writing, having spent the last 15 years travelling the globe with her family, visiting over 30 countries to taste the cuisine and enjoy the local culture. Originally from Jacksonville, Florida, she now lives in St. Augustine Shana is working on her first cookbook, and enjoys cooking, travelling, and spending time with family.

Chris Bodor moved here in 2003, after working in New York

Colleen Messner, owner of The Spice and Tea Exchange of Saint Augustine, is a Director on the Historic Saint Augustine Area Chamber of Commerce, Director in Saint Johns Business Network, Advocate with Home Again Saint Johns & Homeless Coalition, and the Sea Turtle Patrol. Contact her at 826.3770 to blend-up a special seasoning that you would enjoy.

Bobby Crum resides in Saint Augustine with his wife Patty and two children. He is the Worship & Teaching Pastor at Anastasia Baptist Church and has served there for 18 years. Bobby loves the beach, gardening, guitar, SUP’ing and family time.  He has served on various community boards over the years and is currently a member of the Saint Augustine Rotary Club.

Kim Miller has been in the health field her entire adult life. A full-time personal trainer and wellness coach, she holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Health and Physical Education, certified as a personal trainer through the American Council on Exercise and a certified wellness coach with Wellcoaches. She is owner of Bodysmart Inc, and blogs on health and wellness on her Bodysmart Fitness Through The Ages site bodysmartinc.com or 904.501.6002.

Captain Don Combs has fished from coast to coast, the Bahamas, Mexico and Australia and has won over 300 fishing awards. He is the Founder and managing partner of C&H Lures, Inc. He has written articles for Salt Water Sportsman, Big Game Journal, and Marlin Magazine, and has been the guest speaker at events from California to New Jersey traveling with the Saltwater Seminar Series. Don has made three instructional videos that were voted some of the best in the inductry. He competed in the SKA Pro Division and was sponsored by Fountain Power Boats, Mercury Motors, Lowrance Electronics, & Ford Motor Company.

Rick McAllister spent 20 years in the corporate world of New York City, a year on a Congressional program in the U.S. House of Representatives, has owned several small businesses, managed and taught scuba diving in the Florida Keys and most recently was an assistant at World Golf Village. Throughout this varied career and travels around the world, Rick has developed and honed his photographic and writing skills. A Vietnam Vet, he continues to enjoy traveling, kayaking, golf and time with his daughter Lauren and her family in New Jersey. Rick’s photography can be seen atfotowurks.com and he can be contacted or at 904.501.7777.

City for ten years. He received the Board of Education Creative Writing Award from Weston (CT) High School in 1985 and had his first poem published nine years later. A founding member of Ancient City Poets, a group that has been holding poetry reading in the Nation’s Oldest City since August, 2009, Chris runs his own book imprint, Poet Plant Press, with his wife Mary Beth. Their latest title is Florida Speaks, featuring thirty writers musing on the Sunshine State.

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Kimberly Leonardi and her husband Kevin have run Leonardi’s Nursery for more than twenty years and strive to give back to the community that has supported Leonardi’s for the past 48 years. They are members of the Florida Nursery Growers Association and the Florida Native Plant Society. Please feel free to send any questions or comments to leonardisnursery@msn.com.

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Old City Life - July 2014  
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