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For Saint Augustine, About Saint Augustine, By Saint Augustine

Volume 7 Issue 7 | DEC. 2013

Small Town to Big Stage Preston Pohl on “The Voice”

A Pretty Cool Place

A trip inside the “ICE PLANT”

‘Tis the Season Holiday recipes

It’s Better to Give....

Local holiday shopping guide

oldcitylife.com


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Castaway Publishing, Inc PO Box 35 St. Augustine, FL 32085 904.461.6773 OCL@castawaypublishing.com

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North Saint Johns County Ad Representative oclads@castawaypublishing.com

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Voted St. Augustine’s Best “Every Year” 15 Years In A Row! volume 7

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Letter from Lura

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ear Readers,

For many, myself included, this time of year always seems to be a time of reflection; of flipping through the pages of the last 365 days to think on the good, the bad, the happy, the sad (you knew that was coming, didn’t you...). Personally, there have been a lot of changes; a lot of firsts. I moved (with, of course, my husband and two children); competed in my FIRST triathlon (Sprint distance-and have done two since) which has always been a distant dream for me; my kids and I got to see the Saint Augustine bayfront from the deck of a sailboat for the first time (I got my first shot as pilot too!); courtesy of St. Augustine Sailing, who graciously took us out for an evening photo shoot to accompany a stunning feature showcased in our first Old City Life magazine (under Castaway Publishing). That afternoon was perfect; you couldn’t have asked for a more lovely day. The picture that accompanies my letter came from that evening-guess you can tell that I had a horrible time (not). My job bites (again, NOT!). Something else, ...something else.... Oh yeah, I took on the editorship of Old City Life-how could I forget that! You’ll probably get tired of hearing it, but every day, EVERY minute I spend putting this publication together about Saint Augustine and for Saint Augustine, is an absolute joy. I truly have a love affair with this town (but don’t tell my husband-he’s under the impression that he and the kids are the only ones that have my heart). The city scored a lot of firsts too, and it was hard to miss the biggest, and most obvious one: we hosted about 25,000+(or more) people for our first grand-scale music festival...and the sky didn’t fall down. In fact, we raised the roof, and the bar for what our “sleepy” little city can do. As a whole, the Gentleman of the Road Tour was a big success. Yes, there were gripes here and there, and yes, next time we’ll do better (to be brutally honest, I thought we did pretty darn well for our inaugural event). Experiencing GOTR first hand, I have to say that I was pretty darn proud of what my hometown was able to bring together-I think a lot of people out there feel the same way. Enough of the past...on to the future, OUR future, which continues to get brighter and brighter with each new dawn. Change is inevitable (as my first boyfriend’s mom used to say “Everything changes; nothing ever stays the same-for good or bad, you can always count on that”). I think it’s safe to say that you’ve already seen a lot of changes in Old City Life. Well, get ready because there’s a LOT more in store. I’m not going to let the cat out of the bag here, but there is a big one, HUGE even, right around the corner. Look for it when our January issue hits the streets. Safe to say, I’m pretty pumped about it! I don’t have to tell you, the holidays here are beyond special. There’s so much to see and do and experience. My advice: get out and about, enjoy the spirit of the season, Saint Augustine style. Be safe, be happy, just...be, here, in the Old City.

11 from our Mayor 15 home 19 beauty 24 people 26 body 28 art 30 music 32 & 76 business 38 taste 53 history 40 poetry 56 calendar 58 dance 64 gardenng 68 rroad trip 70 event 72 community 81 travel 82 finance

contents oldcitylife.com

Volume 7 Issue 7 | DEC. 2013

Small Town to Big Stage Preston Pohl on “The Voice”

A Pretty Cool Place

A trip inside the “ICE PLANT”

Tis the Season Holiday recipes

It’s Better to Give....

Local holiday shopping guide

St. Augustine’s Culture & Lifestyle Magazine

on the cover

Till next month! Lura Readle Scarpitti Managing Editor Old City Life Magazine

4 letter from the editor

OCL

On the Cover: A sleigh doesn’t work well on water. Just another reason the Holidays in a coastal town are different than Holidays elsewhere. Thanks to Ocean Extreme Sports and Dr. (Santa) Christopher Zub for making that point so well.

Photo by Addison Fitzgerald


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Saint Augustine Living

A pictorial tour of one of our city’s finest homes

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Holiday Shopping Guide

Why leave town? See what our local merchants have to offer this Holiday Season

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Legacy Family

Two generations of the Abare family leave their mark on Saint Augustine

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What’s old is new

The Ice Plant is causing quite a stir downtown

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Food and more food

Saint Augustine locals share their holiday recipes with you


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seen rian Wilson along with guitarist Jeff Beck brought good times and surf music to the St. Augustine Amphitheatre on October 3rd.

Photos by: Bill Kenyon

Photos Left to Right: Andrea Marquis, Steve Bew • John and Victoria Moreno • Ellie & Ken Barrett • John and Marsha Toth • Walt and Jessica Kulwicki, Cindy Mathena • John and Robin Hoffman • Clint Tyrell, Beverly Mayhew, Neil Mayhew, Debbie Roberts, David Roberts • Patti Miller, Dave and Judy Tillis

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At attention for the Mayor’s countdown to flip the switch ON for the Nights of Lights Photo: Glenn Hastings 8

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events

Nights of Lights!

by Mia Bain

Saint Augustine’s Nights of Lights is one of the best in the world, but where did Holiday Lights start?

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yearly tradition in the nations oldest city is the Nights of Lights. During this holiday celebration, the city is transformed with over two million little white lights that illuminate plaza and many of the buildings in the historic area of Saint Augustine. Saint Augustine has received many distinctions during the Holiday Season: • The American Automobile Association (AAA) selected Saint Augustine as one of the twelve best locations in the United States and Canada to experience holiday cheer. • National Geographic magazine named Saint Augustine’s Nights of Lights one of the 10 best locations in the world to see holiday lights in 2011 & 2012. • Coastal Living Magazine selected Saint Augustine as one of the Top 10 Holiday Celebrations. But, where did holiday lights start? The idea of outdoor lighting displays came from lights on Christmas trees. Records show that the first to decorate Christmas trees with lights were the Germans. You’re probably wondering how it got over here to the United States and how it evolved to the decorations that we see today. It’s a very interesting chain of events. In 1846, Queen Victoria of England and her German Prince, Albert, were illustrated standing with their children around a Christmas tree with handmade decorations and candles. Victoria was quite popular with her subjects and what was done at court immediately became fashionable. Not only in England, but also in the American society as well. During the 1880 Christmas season, Thomas Edison, a friend of Henry Flagler, introduced the first outdoor electric Christmas light display to the world. This display was set outside of his laboratory, which sat near a railway. This was the first official outdoor Christmas display that was not a lighted Christmas tree. Two years later an employee of Edison, Edward Johnson, created the first string of Christmas lights, and in 1890 the strings of lights were mass-produced and sold in department stores. It wasn’t until after the turn of the 20th century that these strings of lights became more affordable so that the average household could use them. Until that time only office buildings and department stores were lit for the holidays.

Holiday Happenings in Saint Augustine! Nights of Lights: November 23 – January 31. The lights will be turned on during a ceremony in the Plaza de la Constitucíon on November 23, at approximately 6:30pm by city officials and former Saint Augustine mayors. Candlelight Tours of Villa Zorayda: Offered on select evenings during the Nights of Lights starting November 29. The museum is beautifully decorated for the holidays with a spectacular Christmas tree decorated in the colors of the Zorayda – red and gold – located center stage in the Court of Lions. Refreshments of cookies and punch are served at 6:00pm and the tour begins at 6:30pm. Please check the website for dates available. http://www.VillaZorayda.com Saint Augustine Christmas Parade : December 7. The 59th Annual Christmas Parade has grown to be one of the largest parades 10

in north Florida. Starts 10:00am at the Mission of Nobre de Dios and continues through the downtown streets of historic Saint Augustine. Pictures with Santa follow at the Plaza de la Constitucíon. The 39th British Night Watch Parade: December 7. Join in this unique Public Participation Parade, where everyone is encouraged to join in and march behind the British Redcoats as they secure Saint Augustine. This parade winds its way through the streets of the city and concludes at the Government House with Muskets firing Volleys of Joy, followed by Christmas Caroling in the Plaza.

45th Annual Garden Club Christmas Tour of Homes:

December 8. Visit six private homes in the Historic Downtown dating from the 1800’s. The eye-catching seasonal decorations and floral arrangements throughout this walking tour will be composed of natural materials, designed and hand-crafted by members of The Garden Club of St. Augustine, to support the decor of the individual home they grace. http://www.gardenclubofstaugustine.org Regatta of Lights: December 14. Annual holiday parade of motorized vessels – sailboats, trawlers, shrimp boats and many other vessels all-a-glitter with brilliant lighted displays ranging from patriotic to whimsical.  Awards will be made for the best theme, most colorful, best in class and best overall.  Beginning at 6 p.m., the boats will light up Matanzas Bay between the Bridge of Lions and Castillo de San Marcos.  The Regatta of Lights is hosted by the St. Augustine Yacht Club. http://www.sayc2000.com 19th Annual Bed and Breakfast Holiday Tour: December 14 & 15th. The two-day tour invites you to experience “Christmas Around the World” at 24 inns throughout the historic Oldest City. Twelve inns on each day of the tour create entertaining decorations and scenes based on the culture, history or holiday traditions of colorful places from Spain to Germany to Ireland - and perhaps some imaginative places that may surprise you! In addition to the decorations, each inn is paired with a distinguished Saint Augustine restaurant or other culinary partner offering savory nibbles, sweet treats and other refreshments.  The self-guided tour is easily navigated on foot, but a special tour shuttle also will offer transportation along the tour route. This always sells out. Be sure to get your tickets at http://www.staugustinebandbtour.com

A Fabulous way to Tour Saint Augustine during the Holidays is with Food! If you’re looking to try some of the many wonderful restaurants in Saint Augustine, we’ve got just the way for you to do it. Try the St. Augustine Food Tour, a unique and memorable experience of delicious tastings throughout the historic district of Saint Augustine. You’ll also learn some of the Christmas food customs of times gone by. These fill up fast as they only allow 12 persons maximum for this wonderful tour. Book online or by phone. 904-392-7137 http://www. StAugustineHistoricTours.com OCL

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from our mayor THE ST. AUGUSTINE NIGHT by Joseph L. Boles Jr.

Twas the Night Before Christmas and all through our town the lights were twinkling like stars all around. Lots of creatures were stirring but not dogs, cats or rats. Twas a million holiday tourists, how about that! They come to St. Augustine all to see what a top ten world destination could possibly be! The children were dazzled just looking around. The parents were thrilled with the wonderland they had found. They saw visions of incredible places to eat. They heard music, singing and dancing in the streets. Some were day trippers that go home after dark, but many stay over to stroll through our park. Some are here when the Nights of Lights blaze, joining thousands and thousands that celebrate that day. We hope they all come in this time of Winter. We want them to shop, drink and all stay for dinner. The moon light is perfect for leisurely strolls along the bay while Cathedral bells toll. While I was walking this night with my lovely bride Jane we suddenly saw something slightly insane! I rushed on ahead, (Jane got a little bit scared) when I was confronted by a manly ghost with a beard. We stood on the bayfront right next his boat. It was full of soldiers and I took note.. They all carried swords and knives and guns but I did not feel threatened by these strange ones. The ghost with the beard he started to speak. It was about that time my knees felt weak! He was dressed as a solider from 1565 and I could tell in a wink that this guy’s not alive! With a flash of awareness I called out his name. “Why you’re Pedro Mendenez of Aviles fame!” He bowed and smiled and said, “That is true.” Then he said, “My men and I have come to see you.” “Please show us around this town that I founded we must wait for the tide, our boat is now grounded.” So Jane and I and nine Spanish ghosts went all over town with us as their hosts! We rode carriages, trains and trolleys around seeing the sights of this beautiful town. We saw Pirates and Conquistadors and Soldiers galore. Toured the Colonial Quarter and the Castillo (“the Fort”). We climbed the Lighthouse with its breathtaking view and we were very hungry and we knew what to do. We ate fried shrimp and all types of seafood. They toasted each bite with wine and “Salud!”. They ate steaks and burgers, pizza and wings. Then had pastries, cakes and chocolaty things. We toured museums, galleries and shops till they called a halt, “We’re all about to drop!” “The tide has turned so we must be on our way but, Mayor, you must be so proud of this place!” So, I shook his hand, (a firm grip for a ghost) and he said, “What I appreciate most is that St. Augustine is such a welcoming place.” “Thank you Mayor for the smile on your face!” He gave my wife, Jane a kiss on both cheeks and turned to his men and he began to speak, “Let’s return to our glory for now we can rest as I have confirmed that St. Augustine in all of heaven is truly the best!”

St. Augustine’s

#1 STATION Join us weekdays 7am - 9am

GOOD MORNING ST. AUGUSTINE

HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE volume 7

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2014

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$2999 $2999 down, down, must must qualify qualify for for owner owner loyalty loyalty or or competitive competitive rebates, rebates, taxes, taxes, tag, tag, title, title, and and $699 $699 dealer dealer fee fee are are extra extra

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Photos by: Melissa Roby

seen

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he St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce held its Annual Dinner and Business Leadership Awards ceremony October 16th. Adam Shockey, owner of Tour St. Augustine and St. Augustine City Walks, was recognized as the SJC Chamber Member of the Year. The Fred Schroeder Economic Development Council member of the year was awarded to Christine McGlade from Northrop Grumman, Marty Lewis, with Money Pages, was honored with the Gene Morse Ambassador of the Year award. volume 7

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Photos left to right - Brian Carson, Randy Swift, Regina Ballard • Anna Lebesh, Melanie Brown, Alain Hentshel • Allison Roberts, Paula Holanchock, Richard hardy, Laura Stevenson Dumas • Chris & Laura Smith, Stan Taylor, Lynda Yesse • Cindy & John Stavely, Lura Readle Scarpitti • Cyndi Stevenson, Greg McLeod • Darby Brower, Sandy Kavanaugh, Jared Rice • Dr. Gregory & Isabell Oxford, Suzanne Brown • Jeff & Marci Norton, Ron Avery • Phil McDaniel, Tracy & Mark Litzinger, Len Weeks • Suzie Curtis, Juanita Wright • Vanessa Soloman, Amy Gilland-Mitchell • Memory Hoopkins, Lon Stafford • Mandee McAloon, Jeff Bell, Kim Barnes, Tito Smith 13


Saint Augustine Living Mathis Home

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hat’s my little Irish Pub, I call it, “ Jane Mathis gestured to the luminous wooden wet bar in the corner of her spacious living room. “We kind of have an underlying Irish theme going on here because I am Irish. My mother was the only member of her family born in the United States. The rest of her family was all born in Ireland.” From the moment I arrived at Mathis’ Low Country style home in the Anastasia Island community of Pelican Reef, the essence of “classic meets open–air Florida” became etched in my mind. The home’s sleek and classic lines combine with the Key West feel, blending soft Irish greens and woods and a hint of Cape Cod shingled siding, all trimmed in a clean and crisp white frame. The inviting and open silver aluminum- roofed front porch is surrounded by classic squared architectural lines, including a tall, square turret punctuated with small square windows suggesting an almost lighthouse- style effect in keeping with an island theme. Classic landscaping with indigenous Florida plants, shrubs and trees encircle the home, blending it in with the marsh and wetlands within which it stands. As Mathis welcomed me at the full-length window-flanked front door, I was immersed in the luminous dark wood-floored foyer and regal wooden staircase that ascended the turret and lead upstairs to the second floor. The ceiling of the turret is made of an artisticlooking signature distressed wood that looked very unique. “The ceiling in the master bedroom matches it,“ Mathis told me as she lead me into the large living room where the wet bar stood. “This living room is designed for entertaining, which

story by Barbara Hunt Hanrahan photos by Justin ItNyre

Pelican Reef Low-Country Home Beams with Celtic and Classic Beauty

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I do quite a bit of, “ explained Mathis, a realtor. Filled with antiques as well as classic-style furniture, including a black Steinway baby grand piano, the room gives forth a warm feeling with its fireplace and green, gold, and warm neutral hues. Windows are everywhere, providing an open feel as one takes in the breathtaking views. “Tara Regan was my decorator,” Mathis explained as she led me into her spacious kitchen. “She helped me with everything and has taste beyond belief.” “This is the kitchen, which I am really, really thrilled with”, Mathis told me with pride. “We spend a lot of time in here.” Dark wood glass-paned cabinets contrast with light granite countertops and beautiful, intricate tile and woodwork that exhibits a unifying theme in the decorating scheme of the living room. The focal point is the enormous middle island, with the same dark wood cabinets, crowned by an expanse of cream, beige and light caramel-colored marbled granite. “This big island has been a great place,“ Mathis added. “We eat here, do projects here, wrap gifts here, have meetings here…everything happens here.” The 3800-squarefoot home also includes an expansive, custom-appointed laundry room, large pantry, and matching Butler’s pantry between the kitchen and formal dining room. The square formal dining room is classic, yet comfortable, showcasing a large round dark wooden table that can seat up to ten people. “The round table is the best thing I did because when I have dinner parties nobody is left out of the conversation,” Mathis explained. Celtic knots in the woodwork of the table carry the Irish flavor into the dining room, and a sleek crystal chandelier gleams over the table. A modern and unique paned-mirror crowning a chest of drawers reflective of the table’s design and an antique China cabinet also compliment the terra cotta and gold colored room. Down the hall, Mathis leads me to the “fun room”, as she calls it, for “just relaxing and being casual.” It is decorated as a family room, with a sofa, chairs, end and coffee tables and an entertainment armoire housing media equipment. She shares an added bonus-”This room has its own one-car garage and separate entrance to it, making it a perfect guest room or mother-in-law suite.” Built in 2008, the three-bed, three-bath house, designed by local architect Les Thomas and built by local contracting company, John 16

Valdez and Associates, Inc., also boasts a huge back porch that lines the entire back of the home and wraps around one side. Complete with an outdoor summer kitchen and built-in grill, the easternexposure, wooden back porch has both covered and open areas that all blend into and provide amazing views of the marsh and wetlands surrounding the property. “I also do a lot of entertaining out here. It is just a beautiful place to be.” Preparing to take me upstairs, she shares a unique surprise feature of her home. “There is an elevator. As a matter of fact, let’s take that upstairs. I don’t use it much right now,” she told me, “maybe just when I have my arms full of laundry or to move a big suitcase up or downstairs.” The second floor houses Mathis’ study/office and master bedroom. The black furniture is classic yet modern and neutral and gold hues are present in the décor. “I have a balcony out here with a table and chairs so I can do work outside,” Mathis adds. Entering the 20x20 foot Master suite, I was met with the feeling of Old Ireland once again as I took in the classic and antique style furniture in the sitting area in front of the “aim and click” fireplace. “No ashes to cleanup. No fuss, no muss.“ Beautiful built-in armoires encompass the television/media center and a morning kitchen/

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kitchenette area complete with a coffee maker and refrigerator. “I don’t need a lot of dressers because I have these wonderful built in cabinets,” says Mathis...and a large walk-in closet. And, of course, another balcony off the bedroom. The roomy Master Bath’s centerpiece is an antique-looking, free-standing whirlpool bathtub. Dark and light contrast once again with classic dark woods and light tiles and countertops. A large modern glass-enclosed shower and darkwood custom cabinetry tie it all together. As we ended our tour and descend the staircase down towards the front door, I looked around at the breathtaking decor one more time. Mathis shares “I built this home for myself and I’m not planning on going anywhere. I am just crazy about it.” OCL

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The El Pescado Billfish Tournament was held October 17-19th off Saint Augustine and is North Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most celebrated blue water event. The tournament benefits the Monique Burr Foundation for Children, a non-profit organization founded in 1997 by Edward E. Burr in honor of his late wife, Monique Burr, a longtime advocate for abused children.

Villa Zorayda Museum Candlelight tours of the Villa Zorayda Museum are offered on select evenings during the month of December. The Villa is beautifully decorated for the holidays with a spectacular Christmas Tree decorated in the colors of the Zorayda - red & gold- located center stage in the Court of Lions. Over 100 candles are aglow as our docents lead by candlelight for your tour of this historic former home. Reservations required. For more information:

www.villazorayda.com â&#x20AC;˘ 904-829-9887

Candlelight Tours

83 King Street in historic downtown St. Augustine 18

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beauty

AN UPLIFT, NOT A FACELIFT!

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s the holiday season approaches, most people like to give and receive special gifts. One gift that may be greatly appreciated is a non surgical facial rejuvenation procedure called Ultherapy. Ultherapy is a new type of procedure that uses ultrasound and the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own natural healing process, to lift, tone, and tighten loose skin on the brow, neck, and under the chin.The only FDA-cleared procedure to lift skin on these hard-to-treat areas, Ultherapy uses the safe, timetested energy of ultrasound to stimulate the deep structural support layers of the skin- including those typically addressed in a surgical facelift -- without disturbing the surface of the skin. With Ultherapy, there is no downtime, no foreign substances, no radical change, just a healthy revving-up on the inside for a natural, noticeable effect on the outside. You can go about

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by Dr. Douglas Johnson

your day after a single, 60-190 minute in-office procedure. Results will unfold over the course of 2-3 months and some patients have reported continued improvement for up to 6 months, including lifting and tightening of the skin in the areas treated. Ultherapy has proven to be an inviting alternative for those who are not yet ready for surgery. The use of Ultherapy in conjunction with many other non-invasive and minimally invasive procedures can rejuvenate ones appearance without downtime. Ultherapy offers significant and satisfying nonsurgical results, making it appealing to a wide range of adults looking to exert some amount of control over their skin as it ages, particularly those who may not be ready for an invasive brow lift or face lift. Whether you are between surgeries, using a non-invasive treatment regimen or looking for an entry-level way to put collagen in the bank as â&#x20AC;&#x153;skinsuranceâ&#x20AC;?, Ultherapy is a great option.

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HOLIDAY Shopping Guide Accents On Gifts

Fudge Buckets Fudge Buckets has two locations in downtown St Augustine. Offering incredible gift ideas for all budgets. From $3.99 individual Fudge Buckets to our Grande gift bucket (with a lb of fudge & 2 lbs of pistachios!) Gift certificates available for fudge/ice cream and for  Sand Castle Cafe restaurant. 40 Charlotte and 3 Cordova. St. Augustine, FL 32084 904-342-7571 or visit: www.fudgebuckets.com or Fudge Buckets on Facebook

Discover the Lampe Berger secret for an exceptional Christmas! Choose from over 55 fragrances to cleanse, purify and perfume your home. Accents On Gifts (accentsongifts.com), a local favorite since 1997, features unique gifts and accessories including Uno de 50 jewelry, Beaucoup Designs, Nora Fleming Collection, and more. Closed: Sunday 4102 A1A South St. Augustine Beach 1-866-244-8328

The Surf Station Give the gift of SURF. Stoke the surfer in your life this holiday season with a year of waves. The 2014 Surf Station Surf & Tide calendar features photos of local surfers in St. Augustine and beyond. $ 11.95

DHD Home DHD Home offers a wide range of gifts for the holidays. For under $30, check out their irresistible scented candles. Illume candles come in beautiful and unique containers, a variety of distinctive fragrances, and are crafted with a soy-based, all natural blend of coconut wax, beeswax and essential oils.  All of the beautiful containers are designed with re-purposing in mind.

Flagler Legacy Deck your coffee table with a piece of history – the Hotel Ponce de Leon: Architecture & Decoration by Thomas Graham & Leslee F. Keys depicts the elaborate architectural composition of the Hotel Ponce de Leon, the first resort hotel developed by Standard Oil co-founder Henry M. Flagler. Available at Flagler’s Legacy, 59 St. George St. ,St. Augustine or visit legacy.flagler.edu 20

shop online: www.surfstationstore.com 1020 Anastasia Blvd, St. Augustine 904-471-9463

Lightner Museum The Cameo is a two thousand year old art form. This Cameo is sculptured and hand-crafted from a conch shell in Torre del Greco, Italy. Cameos come in many sizes, shapes and settings.  Each piece is a one-of-a-kind heirloom and signed by the artist.   Congratulations to Jenny Burnett (featured) for being crowned 2013 Junior Service League Society Queen. 904-824-2874 www.lightnermuseum.org

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Harry’s Seafood • Bar • Grille The Biggest Deal Ever...is BACK!! For every $100 in gift cards purchased receive a FREE $30 gift card. You can also purchase online with free shipping at hookedonharrys.com. Promotion valid from November 1 December 24.

Peterbrooke Chocolatier Santa is coming to Peterbrooke Chocolatier Anastasia Island! See Santa on Saturday, December 14th from 11-4.  Celebrate the holidays with Peterbrooke and Santa with free photos.  Make memories and browse our wonderful selection of baskets, stocking stuffers, party platters and creative offerings to meet every budget. We welcome large corporate gift orders and ship right from the store. Whether you are naughty or nice, come sample some of our hand-dipped delights while you shop! Peterbrooke Chocolatier Anastasia Island 1011 A1A Beach Blvd., #3 St. Augustine 904-471-2830

Alligator Farm Give the gift of adventure this holiday with the St. Augustine Alligator Farm’s zip line attraction, Crocodile Crossing. Coast through the tree tops and conquer aerial obstacles on either the Nile or Sepik course. Or, keep your feet on the ground and experience the zoo year-round with annual passes! www.alligatorfarm.com, 904-824-3337

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Datil B. Good Handcrafted Datil Pepper Sauce Spice up someone’s life this holiday season with the hottest gift you’ll ever give! Our award winning “Datil B Good” hot sauces are made from locally grown Datil peppers. One taste and they’ll love it! Hot Shot Bakery and Cafe is located at 8 Granada Street.  904-824-7898

Salt-Free Water Treatment Give the gift of Eliminating Heavy Bags Of Softener Salt, while solving the financial and maintenance burden of hard water. The innovative, AQUAlytic USA processor will provide 20+ years of maintenance-free hard water treatment. ◊ Protects expensive water using appliances (Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Washing Machine) ◊ ChemicalFree and EnvironmentallyFriendly. Call Today 1-877-7311540

High Tide Gallery LLC Peggy Clark’s beautiful “Ocean Heirloom Lace” pottery is pressed with antique lace before the firing, which gives each handmade piece an old-fashioned nostalgia with modern functionality. Oven, microwave, dishwasher safe. Gorgeous scalloped shapes with coastal turquoise glazes: platters, plates, bowls, vases, trays & more. $8$38. The perfect gift. 51 Cordova Street # A & B, St. Augustine, FL 32084 904-829-6831 SHOP ONLINE: www.StAugustineArt.net

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H.W. Davis BRIGHTON your holidays by giving her the perfect gift from the H.W. Davis Co., the oldest & largest upscale handbag, clothing, sunglass, shoe, sandal & apparel department store in the area. We specialize in Brighton jewelry and we’ve been serving St. Augustine customers since 1894!  Come celebrate our 119th anniversary at our newly renovated twin St. George Street stores! Free gift wrap with all purchases! 152 St George St, St Augustine, FL 32084‎ 904-829-3742 904-824-8876

The Market on Granada & Claudes Chocolates Two local businesses combining their talents to create “A Gourmet Specialty Shop”. Shop local for your holiday gifts.  Create a custom Gourmet Basket featuring Claudes handmade Belgian chocolates with a bottle of boutique wine or a custom gourmet basket of local food items.  Gift certificates are available for that discriminating person in your life.  Free customer parking in rear.  6 Granada Street St Augustine, FL 32084 904-823-9704

The Refinery Athletic Club LuLi’s Cupcakes Desserts are the finishing touch to a wonderful meal. They are the last impression - the grande finale of any event.  LuLi’s Cupcakes takes pride in providing our customers with delicious, freshly baked confections for any occasion.  We offer custom cakes, cupcakes, french macaroons, gluten - free options, cupcake gift jars and many other homemade treats.  This year, bring one of our beautiful holiday cakes to your next gathering and put a smile on everyones faces.  Choose from any of our sixteen flavors and let us provide you and your guests with the ultimate comfort food experience.  At LuLi’s Cupcakes, we’re not just about making the best treats possible, we’re also about making the best memories too! 82 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine 904-824-5280 www.luliscupcakes.com

Olde Towne Toys As seen on “Live with Kelly & Micheal” the award winning YBIKE Explorer is without a doubt the “coolest, baddest” kids go kart and is a thrill for kids ages 5 – 10.  Purchase at Olde Towne Toys at 113 King St., St. Augustine along with other cool gifts!  www.OldeTowneToys.com  Open Daily! 22

Give the gift of fitness, wellness, and relaxation! The Refinery offers a large collection of cardio and weight training equipment, newly remodeled facilities, heated outdoor swimming pool, personal training, massage therapy, saunas, steam rooms, game courts, and more! With a Refinery Gift Certificate, they can have it all! The Refinery Athletic Club & Wellness Center 1045 Anastasia Blvd. St. Augustine, FL 32080 904-471-4300 www.refineryathleticclub.com

Nettles Jewelry Celebrate each precious memory with Pandora jewelry. Come by and see our incredible selection in our new 3,600 square foot showroom. We have over 20 designer lines guaranteed to make this a holiday season to remember. Nettles Fine Jewelry is located at 1811 US 1 south in the Marshall’s Plaza.

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The Slammer & Squire The King & Bear Give the gift of a memorable golf experience this holiday season! Buy a round of golf at the Slammer & Squire for only $100 or at the King & Bear for only $125. Visit www. golfwgv.com/ OnlineProShop to purchase your rounds of golf today!

Blue Water Jewelers Spoil the ones you LOVE this holiday season! Christmas is about the “perfect” gift. Giving the gift that someone would never purchase themselves, but they have always wanted. Jewelry is special because it speaks is so many languages. It creates memories. Jewelry is sentimental, not because of the cost, small or large, but because of the feeling it creates when you give it.   Blue Water Jewelers www.bluewater-jewelers.com 500 Anastasia Blvd, St. Augustine 904-829-5855

First Coast Opera VIP Tickets to First Coast Opera Opera’s Greatest Hits on January 25. 2014 Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College, or A Gershwin Evening on May 16, 2014 Trinity Hall at Trinity Episcopal Parish Reserved seats for the performance, meet & greet the singers Call 904-417-5555 www.FirstCoastOpera.com.

Sterry Piano Co. Quality & Personal Care are the hallmarks of Sterry Piano Company. Whether restored or reconditioned we recreate the Master Craftsmanship instilled into each piano.  A Piano for every budget includes first floor local delivery, matching bench, home tuning & our service warranty.  1333 Old Dixie Highway St. Augustine SterryPiano.com 904-829-9829

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Ocean Extreme Sports Ocean Extreme Sports is a full service kiteboarding and Stand up paddle board  store offering top notch service, selection and pricing. Since  1999 we have been one of North America’s largest stocking kiteboarding dealers. Stand Up Paddle lessons tours & rentals also available. www. oceanextremesports.com 3930 A1A South, St. Augustine

Serenata Beach Club How Going to the Beach Should Always Be! Relax with family and friends at our private beach club. Give the gift of membership for year-round sun filled days at the beach or at our beautiful swimming pools. Serenata Beach Club 3175 South Ponte Vedra Boulevard Ponte Vedra Beach 904-823-3368 www.serenataclub.com

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Leading with Excellence:

by Rev. Bobby Crum

Dr. William Abare, President of Flagler College

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r. William T. Abare, Jr., is in his 43rd year at Flagler College and his 13th year as President. Prior to assuming his position as the institution’s chief executive officer, Dr. Abare served as the Executive Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs for 12 years. He began his tenure at Flagler in 1971 as Director of Admissions and assumed responsibility for student financial aid in the late ‘70s. Q: How did you end up in Saint Augustine? A: (Former president and current Flagler Chancellor) Bill Proctor was looking for a Director of Admissions, and he contacted John Mitchell, my former boss at Mercer University, to ask for help in identifying a person to fill that position. John recommended me for the position and persuaded me to accept the offer to become the Director of Admissions at Flagler. I was the first person that Bill Proctor hired as he began his 30-year tenure as president of Flagler College. Q: What do you find most rewarding about being a college president? A: Without a doubt, the most rewarding aspect is having the opportunity to lead and influence the direction of an institution whose mission is to educate men and women, to inspire them and motivate them to reach their own potential, to transform their lives and prepare them for meaningful careers or for further education, and to enable them to assume positions of leadership in their communities. It is also rewarding to work with trustees, administrators, faculty, and staff who are dedicated and committed to accomplishing the College’s mission. Q: What are the accomplishments that make you the most proud? A: There are many accomplishments that have occurred during the past 40-plus years. There are five that I am particularly proud of. First, achieving our goals in admissions and fundraising, increasing our endowment, and maintaining our strong financial position. Second, increasing the quality and the number of full-time faculty and establishing a Faculty Senate. Third, constructing new facilities needed to accomplish the College’s mission and goals, completing the restoration of the Hotel Ponce de Leon, having it designated as a National Historic Landmark, and maintaining our commitment to historic preservation. Fourth, moving from the NAIA to the NCAA Division II and enjoying our competition in the Peach Belt Conference. Fifth, observing the success of our students and our alumni. Our Society of Management teams winning ten national case competitions; our SIFE/Enactus teams winning three national championships and representing the U.S. in the World Cup competitions; our students developing an online Civil Rights Library that draws attention to the significant role that the City of St. Augustine played in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Q:  Henry Flagler’s former Hotel Ponce de Leon celebrated its 125th anniversary this year. How important a figure was he not only for St. Augustine, but for the entire state? A: Henry M. Flagler forever changed the landscape of Florida when he chose St. Augustine as the site for the Hotel Ponce de Leon, the first of his many luxury resorts that spanned the entire east coast of Florida. If not for Mr. Flagler, the State of Florida would not be what

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it is today. Q: You recently won the 2013 Community Service Award from Caring Hands – Caring Community. Can you talk about why community service has been so important to you? A: My wife, Susan, and I have been a part of the community for more than 42 years. We both believe that we have a responsibility to contribute in some way to the betterment of our community through some form of volunteer service or financial support. I am particularly proud of the fact that I was the charter president of the St. Augustine Little League and played a part in the development of that organization. We are both active in Memorial Presbyterian Church, and we enjoy participating in a wide variety of activities and events in our community.

OCL

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William Abare III

legacy by Rev. Bobby Crum photo by Christine Cousart

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ill Abare Jr. is a tough act to follow. Just imagine being his namesake. Even so, Abare Jr.’s son, Bill Abare III is determined to make his own mark. His competitive spirit, which he seems to have inherited from his dad, has helped him to just that. One of the Managing Partners of Kresge, Platt, and Abare, his firm is one of the top CPA firms in the area. OCL - How long have you lived in Saint Augustine and where did you go to school? I was born in Macon, Georgia. We moved here when I was 2 in the summer of 1971. I graduated 5th in my class from St. Augustine High School in 1987. After 2 years of college, I played baseball for the Toronto Blue Jays from 1989-92. After leaving the Blue Jays organization, I came back home and graduated from Flagler College, cum laude, with a degree in Accounting. I received my Masters of Accountancy from UNF in 1997. OCL - Tell us about playing professional baseball? It was an amazing experience. Playing with great players, traveling all over, living on peanuts, it was a great time. I earned MVP honors while playing in a winter league in Venezuela. After a few years of living on the road and eating in waffle houses, I was ready to come back to Saint Augustine. The whole experience was amazing and I learned a lot about competing, dealing with success, adversity, and growing up. OCL - What are your favorite things about the Oldest City? I love the tight knit community. I can go to all parts of town and it’s accessible. The people are wonderful. Saint Augustine is a great town to have children and raise a family. We enjoy traveling, but every time we come back it feels right here, this is home. We love the local establishments. This is not a big city and we like it that way. Our family is here and we live 5 minutes from the beach. It’s great! OCL - Tell us some of the things you are doing in the community? I’ve been fortunate to serve on the board of directors for wonderful local organizations such as: Epic Community services, the Council on Aging and the United Way of Saint Johns County. I’m currently serving on the board with the Salvation Army. A lot of my time now is plugged in to sports groups with my kids (St. Augustine Little League, Ancient City Soccer and the YMCA.), playing basketball in the local leagues, and doing all kinds of other family activities. I want to be focused on being with my kids and I can do that by coaching and being involved. OCL - What are some things you have learned from your dad? Dad sets a high standard that is difficult to follow. I get my competitive spirit from him. Dad is honest, caring and selfless. He is very demanding of himself and has a passion for excellence. Extraordinary results seem to always follow and surround him. He also has a very strong work ethic. My dad has been committed to Flagler for over 40 years and works as hard as anyone there. He has a deep sense of caring for the community. Like him, I’ve learned to truly value the people that I spend time with, both in and out of work. Dad is a strong family person, a characteristic that I admire very much.

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body

Get Your Mind Straight And Enjoy The Season by Kim Miller

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taying active and eating moderately during the holidays is a challenge for most of us. Enjoying family, friends, and fine foods while maintaining fitness and weight goals is best achieved through proper planning.  The holiday season, with its emphasis on beautiful caloric rich foods and drinks places us in high risk situations for continuing healthful living. No need to worry though. A little perspective can go a long way in helping us balance a great time with family and friends while still taking control of our health. The key is in not being too hard on ourselves, while still recognizing the need to take action. Stay Organized and Thoughtful.  We tend to think that others are more disciplined in integrating healthy behaviors, but in reality, they are just more organized and thoughtful. Have a plan and tell yourself that you are in training for a new skill. As you improve at organizing yourself and projecting possible barriers, the newly learned skills will come naturally. Keeping healthy and maintaining your weight during the holidays will get easier with each passing festive season. Stay Focused.  It’s easy to rationalize unhealthful behaviors while shopping, cooking and enjoying festivities with friends and family. Recognize this type of thought process as destructive, and replace those thoughts with visualizing the people you admire who have mastered healthy skills. Know that it is within your reach to enjoy the camaraderie of the holiday season while maintaining your health. Take an attitude that others are doing it and so can you! Stay Honest.  Certain events during the holidays will inevitably occur that you cannot control. Recognize and identify these events. This is no time to indulge in self-berating behaviors. Conversely, many events will be within your control, and will directly correlate to decisions that empower you to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Visualize  Ask yourself how you want to feel after the holiday season has ended. It’s true, gyms are crowded with new members after the 1st of the year and we assume it is because of well thought out New Year’s resolution planning.  The truth is, many people go to the gym in January because they have under-exercised and over-indulged in food and drink during the holidays. They are feeling out of control.  Tell yourself that it does not have to be this way. We can enjoy the holidays, make workouts and or walking/jogging programs a priority, and try various foods that our friends, families and favorite restaurants have to offer in moderation. Take control this holiday season! Get back to the basics of what an increasingly growing number of savvy people consider the cornerstone of living well – a healthy long life enjoyed with family and friends!

Art Galleries of St. Augustine is an association of many diverse and eclectic galleries located in the city. From local artist owned businesses to exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer collections of local, regional, national and facebook.com/artgalleriesofstagustine international artists.

NORTH OF THE PLAZA 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

LOVE’S ART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE   ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105   METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET    HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET THE STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET  ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

SOUTH OF THE PLAZA 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET  AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET  ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET . LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1  GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET   GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY:  49 KING STREET SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET    ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET 

EAST OF DOWNTOWN 22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH:370A  A1A BEACH BLVD. 24. ISLAND FRAMERS AND GALLERY: 4106 A1A SOUTH

WEST OF THE PLAZA 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

LIGHTNER MUSEUM: 75 KING STREET CRISP-ELLERT MUSEUM: 48 SEVILLA STREET 130 king fine art: 130 KING STREET BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY: 137A KING STREET. space:eight: 228 W.KING ST.

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historiccoastarts.com

Nurturing & Encouraging Artistic Excellence

Historic Coast

Arts

Imagine Fine Art Printing 125 B King Street, St. Augustine, FL 32084 Phone: 904.874.7729

57 Treasury 144 King Street, St. Augustine, FL 32084 Phone: 904.827.1707

Hookey Hamilton Photography 11B & 11C Aviles St, St. Augustine, FL 32084 Phone: 904.728.4957 Email: hookey@hookeyhamiltonphotography.com Web: hookeyhamiltonphotography.com Weddings should be fun, Nature beautiful, and Precious moments caught forever. Discover Hookey Hamilton, Fine Art and Portrait Photographer.

Aviles Gallery 11-c Aviles Street St. Augustine, Fl 32084 Phone: 904.823.8608

Butterfield Garage Art Gallery 137 King St # C, St. Augustine, Fl 32084 Phone: 904.825.4577 Email: info@butterfieldgarage.com Web: butterfieldgarage.com Amiro 9C Aviles Street St. Augustine, FL 32084 Phone: 904.824.8460 Web: amiroartandfound.com

Joel Bagnal, Goldsmith 11 Aviles Street, St. Augustine, Fl 32084 Phone: 904.614.4706 Email: jbagnal@joelbagnalgoldsmith.com Web: joelbagnalgoldsmith.com Commemorating lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special occasions and relationships with custom designs in precious metals and gemstones. Complete client design and production involvement (online gallery, design sketches, conference calls and production progress images) by email from any location. volume 7

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Rock ‘n’ Roll with a Splash of Color The Art of Marty Balin

by Ashley Bates

I I’ve been painting since I was young... selling my artwork in shows. I actually did that before I played music.....

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t’s not every day that a Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee graces downtown Saint Augustine, belting out rock hits. In September, art enthusiasts at the First Friday Art Walk had the chance to see just that when Marty Balin, of famed Jefferson Airplane, came to town. But when Balin made his appearance at the art walk in September, it was to showcase his art work, not his music. Even though many of us know Balin for his historic rock hits, like “Hearts”, “Atlantic Lady”, and “Volunteers,” he was a painter long before he began recording hit songs. Actually, Balin got his start painting when he was a child and says painting was his first artistic expression. “I’ve been painting since I was young...selling my artwork in shows. I actually did that before I played music,” said Balin, who has lived in Tampa for the last 20 years. Balin’s full art collection, featuring rock legends, many of whom Balin knew personally, can be found at 130 King Fine Art Gallery in downtown Saint Augustine. According to Sue Balin, Marty’s wife, the First Friday appearance in September was such a success, that he will be returning with more paintings and new music on Dec. 6 for the next First Friday Art Walk. You wouldn’t be too surprised at what images Balin portrays in his artwork--rock legends from years past, including several paintings of the Grateful Dead’s lead singer Jerry Garcia, the queen of rock Janis Joplin, The Door’s Jim Morrison and Elton John-all grace Balin’s canvases. Balin said he chooses specific musicians from certain time periods to relive a personal memory. “Really, it’s a way for me to go back to those memories, like when you see a picture,” said Balin, who has been known to journal while painting to jot down special memories. When asked what his favorite pieces in his own collection are, Balin explains that the French Le Pétomane pieces are his favorites. Le Pétomane was a French entertainer from the Belle Époque era (French for “Beautiful Era”). The cabaret Moulin Rouge in Paris, also became famous during that time. “I just love the idea of the Moulin Rouge, the top hats, the colors,” Balin said. The bright, whimsical colors can be seen in his Le Pétomane pieces complete with carousels, elephants and of course the French entertainer Le Pétomane. The whimsical nature of Balin’s artwork could be attributed to where he was raised as a young boy. Balin was born in Cincinnati but grew up in the San Francisco area, which is where he found his calling to rock music by none other than pop music legend Johnny Mathis. It has been said that Balin was one of the musicians that catapulted San

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Francisco onto the music scene in the 1960s. Balin formed Jefferson Airplane in the summer of 1965, in San Francisco, as a folk-rock group, but the band later came to be known in the psychedelic scene, scoring a gold record with their 1967 second album, “Surrealistic Pillow.” Balin wrote hit songs for the band including “Comin’ Back To Me,” “Plastic Fantastic Lover” and “Share a Little Joke.” Later, in the early 1970s, Jefferson Starship was formed by several members of the original band Jefferson Airplane. Balin and Jefferson Airplane were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, with the likes of David Bowie, Pink Floyd and Gladys Knight & the Pips, to name a few. “Rock and Roll will never die; good music will always be around,” commented Balin on the evolution of modern rock music. He continues to record his brand of rock ‘n’ roll in the studio and is currently recording an album at the studio in Tampa. “Currently I’m in the studio. (The album) will be Marty Balin music...I haven’t come up with a name for the album just yet.” Today some of the musicians he says are on his radar are Katy Perry and Madonna. “I guess Katy Perry is pretty good,” he said. “I was watching Madonna’s new tour on TV the other day and she’s still pretty good.” Even though Balin has enjoyed supreme success in rock ‘n’ roll, he says his greatest accomplishment is “that I’m still here today and alive.”

Brown Jerry

www.martybalinart.com Find Marty Balin’s collection at 130 King Fine Art Gallery, 130 King St., St. Augustine. 829-8280. Marty Balin’s next local appearance will be on Dec. 6 at 130 King Fine Art Gallery for the First Friday Art Walk. OCL

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Sometimes the magic that is Saint Augustine is revealed in an unusual way. by Stuart Perry Schuster

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hen Preston Pohl came here as a unknown 17-year-old, by his own ...dyslexic as a kid, account, he was still a kid. By the time he left, he found himself a national celebrity and a top 20 contestant on the NBC-TV series, “The Voice”. being right-handed Preston’s gift is his musical talent and his journey from Saint Augustine to “The Voice” is nothing short of magic. He made it to the top 20 with a distinctive meant I could watch singing style that had judge Adam Levine comparing him to Marvin Gaye. No Jimi play from a tape doubt, Preston sings in the ‘60s era soul style. His YouTube “Voice” videos capture the essence his live performance. “The Voice” judges, especially Adam and learn his songs Levine, recognized the “old soul” in Preston’s performances. He connected with live “Voice” audiences and judges contorting his body with heartfelt vocals and note for note..... gritty lyrics that somehow sound as smooth as silk. Here’s how Preston Pohl went from a two-room rented apartment next to the Conch House to national television. At 16 years of age in 2005, Preston’s rock band from Halletsville, Texas won a Battle of the Bands competition in Houston. One of the contest’s judges recruited Preston and bassist Ron McClelland to join Storyside:b, a Christian-rock band based in Saint Augustine. Storyside:b had a solid industry reputation and a charting hit record. With his parents blessing, he quit high school and found himself 1,000 miles away in Saint Augustine with only two friends. One of them was his roommate and Storyside:b’s manager (at that time), Judd White. The other was Lucino Rubino, Storyside:b’s principal singer and songwriter. Lucino (Lu) immediately took Preston under his wing like a big brother. Preston’s gifted guitar playing and soulful singing style melded perfectly with the older and more worldly Rubino. “We would play guitar and sing for hours on end when I first got to Saint Augustine. I remember having breakfast at the Raintree Restaurant the morning after my plane landed with Lu and Judd and them both saying,’OK, this is how it’s going to be, you’re a professional musician now and this is what’s expected of you,’ he said. “I grew up and came of age in Saint Augustine all at once.” Preston said. “I was 17, on my own with a job in a touring Christian rock band as my first job ever.” he said. “The first two gigs with Storyside:b were standing room only or sold out shows at the Jacksonville Landing and then a show at the Memorial Auditorium. I was like, whoa, is this what it’s always like ?”, he wondered. Storyside:b was on fire with Preston and Ron MeClelland. The band was signed to a management deal with the William Morris Agency. Toby Mac’s Gotee Records gave them a contract to record what would be their second album of original music. Eventually the band would sell more than 300,000 records.

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Preston Pohl shows “The Voice” “We hit the road on a tight budget in a van followed by an equipment truck. At the time, it was an adrenalin rush. Town after town, show to show, night after day on the road. The payoff was playing to crowds that loved us wherever we went,” he said. Sadly, in 2009 tragedy struck. Ron McClelland died suddenly on a basketball court aboard the Fascination cruise ship in the Caribbean. Preston all at once lost a childhood friend and beloved band mate. Storyside:b only did two more shows without Ron and a stand-in bass player. “We couldn’t go on at all,” he said. So Preston took some time off from his professional music career to seek solace in Ron’s passing. He relied on his strong Christian faith to survive this time, even if he didn’t go to church every Sunday. “I would wake up and pedal my bike to Anastasia Park, surf all day, and then go fishing all day the next day. I started to discover the nightlife in Saint Augustine, especially downtown. I got restless seeing all this great live, local, talent and eventually decided I wanted to be a part of it,” he said. What came next was Preston’s show band “Humanzee”. It was a pop music group that reflected Preston’s musical influences coming together as a ‘face-melting’ rock show, according to Humanzee’s Facebook page. Humanzee rocked Saint Augustine by storm in 2010 for about 2 1/2 years. Everywhere they played was sold out or standing-room-only. Scarlett O’Hara’s was Preston’s’ favorite live music venue because of it’s proximity to Flagler College across the street. By the spring of 2013, however, Humanzee played its last show in St. Augustine. “I was burnt out again; like I was after Ron’s death, overworked and way tired. I thought it was weird that I went from being unknown, popular (with Storyside and Humanzee) and then unknown again, all before I was 25 years old,” he said. A music industry connection from the Storyside:b days would provide the break Preston needed for a shot to be on “The Voice”. Erik Luftglass, a VH1 employee helped Preston land an audition for the TV show. “Erik knew about Storyside:b in its prime and he and I never lost touch. So six of us rented a Cadillac Escalade and made the trip to Atlanta for the audition with “The Voice” he said. “They asked for three songs with my guitar and vocal. I gave them Bruno Mars’ ‘Beautiful Girls’, Al Green’s ‘Lets Stay Together’ and one other. They said, ‘Fine, you’ll hear from us,’ and I thought, ‘OK, great.’” A full month went by. Nothing. Preston recalls thinking, “I probably didn’t make it,” he said. “The first time I ever forgot my cell phone I was at the Wednesday farmers market at the Saint Augustine Pier with my girlfriend. When I went home, there it was! I had a call from Los Angeles, California. It was ‘The Voice’! I’d never been so happy,” he said. Since then, Preston relocated to California to tape “The Voice”. His elimination in October was based on national voting. He held his head high on live television as the result was given by Adam Levine, eyes closed taking it all in. In a phone conversation arranged by “The Voice” in September, I told Preston he reminded me of my favorite soul singers from the ‘60s including Wilson Pickett and Sam and Dave. I told him I thought he was a throwback to the days of Stax Records and the music that came out of the Muscle Shoals studio era. I asked him about his musical influences. “My parents are of mixed race and have always been music lovers,” he said. “For as long as I can remember I was equally influenced by volume 7

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pop groups like the Eagles, Van Halen, Jimi Hendrix, Lionel Ritchie, Stevie Ray Vaughn and Motown groups like the Tempations,” he said. “I always played sports but I was small. I was on my high school football team. When I wasn’t playing sports, I was trying to get a spot as a guitar player at Church,” Preston said. He was following a good example. Preston’s parents were members of the Abundant Life Christian Church in Lamaque, Texas. The church had more than 4,000 worshipers. This wasn’t just any church band Preston wanted to be a part of when he wasn’t playing sports. In fact, his dad was a regular musician and his mom sang in the choir. “I pestered the church band’s Music Director enough and he finally gave me a spot as a 2nd guitarist. He kept telling me to ‘read charts, read music,’ but I was to busy listening to music and playing. I was just so happy to have been given a chance, all I wanted to do was play my guitar and learn the parts,” he said “The church band’s lead guitarist at the time, a middle-aged guy, encouraged and mentored me as a professional musician. I can remember being given music to listen to. Since I couldn’t read charts, it was the only way I was going to learn anything musical. In my last year of high school, I was given a lead part (on guitar) and without a doubt, I nailed it. That was it for me. At that moment I knew I could hang as a professional musician,” he said. “I have to laugh now because back in those formative days, my parents were over-protective. I had a VHS copy of Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock hidden in my bedroom closet. When my parents would leave the house, I would study it. At the time, they thought Hendrix was too weird,” he said. “I realized Jimi was a left-handed guitar player. Since I was diagnosed as dyslexic as a kid, being right-handed meant I could watch Jimi play from a tape and learn his songs note for note,” he said. Preston Pohl as “The Voice” top-20 contestant is comfortable with his lot in life right now. He’s never had unrealistic expectations about celebrity. He only wants to continue to sing, play guitar professionally and “maybe write songs to support a solo career,” he said. “Everyone at ‘The Voice’ has been as gracious and kind as can be. This experience is a dream come true that I will never forget,” he said. As for this local area, Preston said, “I’ll be back in Saint Augustine, someday, some way.” OCL

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business

Peace Love Home

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ome. It’s our sanctuary, the place we feel most comfortable, the place where we entertain our closest friends and family. We all take great pride in the décor of this most special of places. Those living in coastal areas however enjoy a unique twist on normal interior design and decoration, incorporating a love of life by the sea, the allure of the beach, the casual relaxed mood of the shore. Enter “Peace Love Home”. Saint Augustine’s newest and arguably most upscale retailer specializing in furniture, home décor, gifts and accessories. Owner and native Floridian Kelly Green spent 30 years in the mortgage banking business with a dream of owning her own boutique style furniture store in Saint Augustine. On October 15, 2013 that dream became reality as “Peace Love Home” opened with great fanfare and accolades from local residents. Located in the Cobblestone Village Shopping Center at 400 CBL Drive, Suite 101, “Peace Love Home” offers unique, one-ofa-kind items you will not find elsewhere. The inventory is extensive and includes relaxed, casual furnishings and accessories for the home or office. Ms. Green calls her offerings,  “Contemporary to Coastal” and her love of Saint Augustine is infectious. Her goals are to become very involved in the community and

leave an imprint on those that pass her way while helping her customers life live beautifully with quality style and design concepts and ideas. We found it hard to choose a favorite item to highlight here. We loved the Bogart Chairs by Cyan, the Teak Console table by Ibolilli, and did we mention their Holiday gifts and accessories? So come in, relax and explore the elegant, high quality offerings of “Peace Love Home”. Personal one-on one service is their hallmark and Kelly Green will make sure that your experience is a pleasurable one. Life truly is better, in a home by the sea. 32

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For the Love of Music St. Augustine Orchestra

by Chris Bodor

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he Nation’s Oldest City has had its own orchestra for over 52 years. The St. Augustine Orchestra was founded in 1961 by Jack Van Brederode who served as conductor for several years. Over the years, the St. Augustine Orchestra (SOA) has been fortunate to attract a series of conductors who were willing to give their time and talents on a weekly basis. The orchestra is currently conducted by William McNeiland, who has significantly improved the performance quality of the orchestra over the last few years. “I played my first concert with them in the 1940’s era band shell on the St. Augustine bay front,” recalls violinist Sarah Page, who found out about the orchestra when she moved to Saint Augustine in 1980. “The audience sat on concrete, backless benches in the open air. I felt as if I had been transported back in time.” The St. Augustine Orchestra currently calls the Lightner Museum home. With the blessings of the Museum Director, Bob Harper, the orchestra and the audiences have both enjoyed the ambiance of the “Guided Age” museum in downtown Saint Augustine. In the past, the SAO played in the Putnam County Community Center, a Methodist church in Palatka and outdoors in Palatka at the Ravine Gardens. The St. Augustine Orchestra is certainly filling a void in the area. “There are no other orchestral music groups in St. Johns County.” says Linda Masterson, Director and Marketing Committee Chair. “The Jacksonville Symphony plays in Jacksonville, but their tickets are much more expensive and their players are all paid professionals. Our organization is the only one that allows local musicians an opportunity to play and expand their skills while providing a family friendly opportunity to the community to hear orchestral music.” SAO has over fifty members whose motivation for participations is a love of music and the joy of sharing that love with the public. “Playing with SAO has enriched my repertoire and knowledge.” says double bassist Mitch Kolesaire. “I also like performing for the community, including my friends and family.” The St. Augustine Orchestra’s most recent performance was a two day engagement called “It’s About Time”, held at the end of October at the Lightner Museum and at the Christ Episcopal Church in Ponte Vedra. Audiences have seen the orchestra evolve into a first rate collection of performers. “The quality of the music has vastly improved over the

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last few years,” says Rosalie Russo, a music lover who attends many events in the Nation’s Oldest City. “It is hard to believe that the players are not professional. We are so lucky to have musicians of this caliber performing for our community.”                         Members range from 12 to 80 years of age including professionals, music teachers, business leaders, retirees, music amateurs and accomplished students. Guided by the mission to expand awareness and music appreciation, the SAO approaches it to provide quality live performances at an affordable coast to the community, to provide outreach programs to seniors and youths, as well as to offer educational opportunities to budding and prospective musicians. “The St. Augustine Orchestra is a nice blend of amateurs, semiprofessional players, music teachers” says violinist Charles Van “Over the last years it has grown in accomplishments, variety of works performed and quality of the players.” One of those players is his stand mate, 11 year old Cameron Black. The sight of young Cameron and “long-timer” Charles reading the same sheet music at a recent concert is a powerful visual reminder of how the SAO brings together all walks of life under the one united front of music appreciation. The theme for the orchestra’s upcoming holiday concert, scheduled for December 13th and 15th will be “Sounds of the Season”. The program will feature selections from “Messiah” and “The Nutcracker”. Traditional carols will be played by the orchestra’s brass section, and the orchestra will play Christmas spirituals, cowboy carols, and holiday music from operettas, musicals, and movies. Additionally, the 2013-214 performance roster has been expanded to include a special event series commemorating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act in partnership with the City of St. Augustine’s 450 years of African American Experience. The special event occurs over four days.  On February 27, Bob Moore will preview his new composition “Someday,” which marks the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. February 28, March 1 and March 2 features renowned pianist Thomas Pandolfi performing Grieg’s Piano Concerto and sharing the premier performance of “Someday”. OCL 33


Thank You to our Sponsors! Diamond Sponsors:

Gold Sponsors:

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Platinum In-Kind Sponsor:

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In-Kind:

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A1A Aleworks

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Beaches Restaurant

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Premier Sponsors:

Donovan’s Irish Pub

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Excel Roofing & Consulting

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Connect with us! ✦ HallaGalla.com ✦ Proceeds benefit the projects of the Junior Service League of St. Augustine 34

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places

ICE PLANT

What’s old is new again

story & photos by Tammy Harrow

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hen I got a call asking whether I would like to sit in on dinner and drinks at The Ice Plant, Saint Augustine’s hottest new restaurant and nightspot, with Old City Life Managing Editor, Lura Readle Scarpitti and Trish Maclemore, The Ice Plant’s mastermind, owner and manager (and former partner at the Floridian), I jumped at the chance. My curiosity about this amazing new place, which has everyone in town raving, was unbearable. Here I get to be a fly on the wall while the story of the place is being told, plus meet some of the faces behind this popular new place, like Head Chef, Josh Smith and Head Bartender, Zach Lynch, AND partake of the (delicious)fruits of their labor? “Sign me up!” was my immediate response. First off, I have to say that The Ice Plant is so much more than dinner and drinks: it’s an experience-a chance to take a step back into another time, into an era long gone. Wait staff and bartenders in 1920’s period clothing take our orders as big band melodies resonate throughout the old building. My mind easily drifts back and imagines what it might have been like a century ago. I can almost see the horse drawn carriages lining up out front. The pretentiousness one might expect with a place like this is nowhere to be found. The food is local, fresh, and very reasonably priced. While the menu is somewhat limited, there’s something for every palate. If you’re like me and have been a Floridian restaurant groupie, you’ll immediately recognize that same quality and made-from-scratch taste as you fall in love with the restaurant’s cuisine. The drink menu is much more expansive with dozens of small batch bourbons and scotch offerings, along with classic handcrafted cocktails and of course ice. We can’t not talk enough about the ice, which, for many drinks, is hand-carved and formed right before your eyes. In other words, have a little patience waiting on your order-drinks this good take time.   To avoid the crowd, we arrive in the early evening, before it gets too busy(The Ice Plant is an instant classic and is rarely “dead’ as the saying goes). After being seated in the spacious, high-ceiling dining room, Lura wastes no time in getting to the important stuff.   Lura: Ok Trish, what cocktail should I try first? Trish: What spirit do you tend to go for as far as gin, whiskey? Because I love all the drinks and they all have a place in my heart. The Vieux Carre is my favorite. It’s more of what I call a volume 7

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man drink- all liquor. It has bourbon, cognac, different types of bitters, and some other liquors. Lura: You’re a girl after my own heart. Trish: My other favorite drink, which is completely different, is called the Low Country. It’s a Gin drink made with aged Gin and comes with Fernet, an Italian liquor, it’s a digestive, very medicinal. It’s got ginger beer, cucumber and is probably the most complicated build as far as drinks go, but I think its amazing. Lura: So I drink that one and that means I’m doing something good for myself right? You did say medicinal(that drew laughs from everyone). Trish: That’s one way to look at it. Lura: I hear a lot about the Hemingway. Trish: That’s a classic and it’s been around for years. There’s a story behind a lot of the classic cocktails. Everyone knows Hemingway was a bit of a drinker who when he was in Florida tried to create his own concoctions, so this drink came about when he tried to order a regular daiquiri. The bar was out of regular sugar so he asked them to use maraschino or Luxardo, a cherry liquor to bring out the sweetness. Rumor is he would order a double at a time and he once had 16 doubles and still walked out the door. Our Hemingway is a little less sweet, it’s more

on the tart side. Lura: That’s crazy. Alright, lets just start out with those two cocktails then.    As we wait for our drinks to be delivered, I sat there taking in the surroundings. Sitting in this open, airy, warehouse-like space is, as I said earlier, a little like being transported back in time. The unfinished-looking, concrete walls, the tools of the ice-making trade hanging all around us cry out to tell the story: of the building, of the area, of the restaurant. So, naturally, that’s where the conversation turned. Lura: Ok, so tell me about this amazing building. Give me a little history. Trish: Well, this side of building was built in 1928 by Florida Power and Light to be an ice plant and that’s why the ice program is so important to us, not only because ice is important in cocktail making but it kinda re-iterates the original purpose of this building. So, 3 years ago this process all started, it took us a year to figure out how to buy the building,  a year to figure out how to lease the parking, and a year to renovate. Lura: Were you involved back then? Trish: I became involved a year ago. They planned to have this distillery, bottle shop, cocktail bar and restaurant all as one, but in 35


Florida its illegal to have ownership in all those things so once they figured out they had to separate it. Ryan (Detra), who I worked with before at Café 11, approached me. The Floridian, that I owned with a couple was doing really well and it was a good time for me to leave. Ryan had a big hand in helping me get this open. We were both here every day bidding out work, trying to stay in budget. It was crazy. We basically refinished every inch of this building. We tried to use pieces from that time period and we ended up taking a week-long salvage trip to pick up a trough sink (women’s bathroom) from Staten Island. We did a lot of research online for salvage places and went back to some of our favorite ones. We rented a 22 ft. truck and filled it. There are stories behind everything in here and I think discovering those details and understanding all the love and thought we put into this, to create the experience is something people will appreciate. We even kept the old bridge crane up and restored all these old beams(she indicates the heavy steel beams running the length of the ceiling). Lura:  Explain to us what the ice plant was. What did it mean to St. Augustine? Trish: Well the shrimping industry back in ‘20s and ‘30s was apparently huge. The Ice Plant supplied ice to all the boats and also supplied it to the trains to send to other places. We started collecting all these old ice signs from different places. There are not a whole lot of photos, at least that we can find.  Lura: Where do you see yourself in the community of St. Augustine? What do you see

this doing to the restaurant industry here? Trish: Well, one thing is bringing this old building back to life and showing that to all the locals, now I can show them what is inside and give them a glimpse of what it might have been like. Secondly, presenting what we’re doing here with the cocktails. I love the hospitality industry and that’s why I stay in it and you do create this family, this following and it’s so fun. What I’ve learned, it’s never-ending, the history behind the drinks is fascinating and I love to share that with people. I think they’re going to get hooked too. Lura: So you’re really trying to create an experience, not just a place to get a drink? Trish: It is an experience in the sense of watching the bartenders behind the bar, the care, the thought, the precise measurements and everything that goes into making a drink-the shaping of the ice, straw testing everything before they serve it to you. Also, I feel like the building creates a certain atmosphere and tells a story in itself. At this moment, the very impressive looking cocktails hit the table. Trish is right, the Vieux Carre(which I have chosen for my drink as well) is very masculine, especially with the block of ice commanding the center of the glass dominating the amber liquid of the cocktail. Trish lets us try her drink and it is deliciousdifferent, refreshing, and it smells like you just stepped into a garden. From the looks of it, I can understand why the “build” time is considerable. Lura: Oh, the cocktails are here. Wow. Trish: We create those ice spheres (in the Vieux Carre) by cutting the ice into a small block,

then putting it into this contraption that creates them. The larger piece of ice you have the less surface ratio, so it wont dilute as quickly. The ice is more dense, more pure so your drink will taste the same all the way through. Lura: Oh yum, the taste, the smell. Very aromatic. This is definitely my favorite new drink(more laughs). While we sip our drinks (Vieux Carre, by the way, also my new fave), we look over the menu. There are not a ton of items, and for good reason (which we will get to). Still, it all looks so good that we’re having a hard time deciding. Enter Josh Smith; Head Chef and genius (well, to a foodie such as myself, he is), here to help us out and talk about how he ended up in this enviable position and his philosophy behind the dishes we will soon be sampling. Josh:  I worked with Trish about 10 years ago at Café 11. We got in touch again this summer. I was looking for a change and thought this place was perfect for St. Augustine and I knew the food had to be local, made from scratch, bar-friendly, and on the scale with the drinks. I was really excited after seeing the place and talking to Trish.  Lura:   Tell me about the changing menu. Are you going to try to change it every three months? Trish:  Well, it won’t be like a 360 degree change. We’ll probably keep the favorites, the staples and just tweak them a little, the toppings stuff like that. Josh:   One of the challenges for me(regarding the menu) is talking to the farmers, suppliers, seeing what’s fresh, what’s local. We actually have a different fish every night. In the morning


I call the Seafood Shoppe and see what’s fresh off the boat. Lura: What’s your philosophy with the food, the menu? Josh:    I’ve been doing pastry for the past few years so when you do pastry you start with what you have, fresh first-strawberries or whatever fruit-so I started doing the same with savory menu. Starting with the fresh vegetables...creating combinations that people haven’t had before.  Lura: I know its hard to pick a favorite but tell me certain things you like more so than others. Josh:   I like the fact that we have a couple of things I can change all the time. Desserts change every night, market salad, the catch of the day. I can do with risotto, homemade pasta, whatever I feel like doing. Some staples...are always going to be there but there are four or five things I can change every day if I want to. It keeps things new, keeps them fresh. Trish: Our burger is really popular. We call it the money maker. It’s local grass-fed beef on a brioche bun, local cheddar, house pickles, hand-cut fries, homemade ketchup. No frozen or canned vegetables here. Everything’s fresh.

cocktails is ordered. Zach, Head Bartender Extrodinaire(and a hellion with an ice chisel) delivers them personally. Lura: I noticed on the menu there’s like 40+ whiskies. Zach: There’s actually even more than that; most all of them are small batched, trying to keep in tune with what they’re doing next door (at the distillery) so it’s really cool I can fill everyone’s needs and give them something they have probably never tried before. I don’t fall into the whole mentality of what is everyone drinking-I don’t care about the marketing, about the bottle. I care about the “juice.” I’m lucky that I have a tuned palate. I’ve been buying for different

have a cosmo-esque drink that won’t give you a hangover Lura: Explain the Proper cocktail. Zach: All-fresh, all ingredients, made inhouse, with a lot of care behind it, it’s well balanced. Really executed correctly. Lura: Some people think this is snobbery; they think drinks like this, maybe they’ve evolved to a point where mediocre is ok? Zach: I’ve been making cocktails like this for awhile and there’s no reason to think you’re better than anyone else. You can work in a club and crank out 200 drinks in an hour or take care and have people sit and enjoy their cocktails, kinda bring them on a journey.

Lura: Now, do you just let Josh have his way with the menu? Trish: Oh absolutely. I never question the specials, desserts at all. I do look at what people liked, what sold the best. But we have a good relationship and I trust him. Lura: You guys worked together once and how did you end up working together again? Trish: I approached him, I knew he was good, he was responsible. I knew he had a passion for cooking. I told him for the most part this is your kitchen you can do all the hiring, create the menu. (She turns to Josh) I’ll only say something if you’re doing something crazy. Right on cue, our waitress arrives and we get our first look at some of the delectable fare that The Ice Plant has to offer. Not surprisingly, after this happens, there is very little conversation. Lura: Oh wow, the food looks so good. We have some Bacon-Wrapped Dates in Blue Cheese Puree. This Beet Terrine, oh my God, this is so good. (Chewing sounds and happy groans soon follow.) With our bellies full, another round of volume 7

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bars and restaurants for about 8 years. Lura: How do you decide where to take someone that tells you, for instance, “I’m usually a big Cosmo fan”...what would you recommend? Zach: My mentality on cocktails is pretty much a triangle-where you have your spirit on the top-a Vodka for a Cosmo, you have acidity, sweetness bitterness, smoothness, so many different ways to build that. With most well-balanced cocktails, I try to throw my dart right in the middle. You can still taste your spirit, you can taste a little sweetness, a little acidity. I’d find something a little more fun than triple sec, like say small-batch Curacao, then depending on what we have, fresh, cranberry shrub, which is a drinking vinegar fresh cranberries macerated with vinegar and sugar, which preserves it. It’s the way they used to drink juice when the season was done. So, made my way, you’d kind of

It’s kinda cool. I love doing research on old cocktails. After our fabulous dinner and a couple of Vieux Carres, we all decided that splitting desert was the best strategy to keep our pant buttons intact-Carrot Cake topped with candied, shredded carrots so yummy that they could have just brought a big plate filled with those and I think we would have been happy. But, happily, the carrot cake was attached, and quickly devoured. Fat and happy, our Ice Plant experience was sadly coming to a close. Lura and I thanked Trish, Josh, and Zach for their hospitality, and for the great pride, thought, and care they take in crafting a memorable experience for every patron walking into this unique establishment...and then we made plans to come back the next night and start on that Whiskey list.  OCL 37


HappyHolidays! HappyH pyHolidays! HappyHolid Give Local Knowledge! Support SAiRA! Visit www.StAuGuStineReStAuRAntS.com

Celebrate the Culinary and Cultural Diversity Unique to the Area by Supporting these Independently Owned Businesses During this Holiday Season!

Contemporary Spanish Restaurant

18 Gifts ~ One Certificate. SAiRA • Saint Augustine Independent Restaurant Association is a collection of the finest, local, independently owned and operated restaurants. From casual to upscale, seafood to salads... SAiRA’s got it all!

HappyHolidays! HappyH Available Exclusively Online at • www.staugustinerestaurants.com

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Photos by: Bill Kenyon

seen

O

Photos left to right - Patti & Wayne Howell • Ted Mclemore, Patrick Canan Traci Usina, Theresa Mathis, Janet Steiner • J.L. Jacobs, Michelle & Megan Thompson, Bill Jacobs, Jake jacobs • Christy & Kevin Geddings • L. Edwin Brown, Emma Lee • Jill Johnson, Jane Ridgeley • Kathryn Vaughan, Michael Salley • Ron Platt & Collette Platt, Peggy Stephens • Dr. Phil & Vicky Topcik, Dr. Ralph & Shirley DePasquale • Shelby Miller, Jake Teeters • Bill & Sharon Miller • Rebecca & Faunce Oleary • Donna Thorp, Mary Motley, Jodi Langford

ver 250 attended this year’s Food & Wine Festival hosted by SAiRA, the Saint Augustine Independent Restaurant Association. The event was held October 6th at the COA River House. Over 100 wines and signature dishes from 17 local eateries were enjoyed. The festival benefitted THE PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP Boys & Girls Club.


food

Red Velvet Coconut Cream Cake

by Chef Sherry Gaynor

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can never make Red Velvet Cake without getting sentimental and sharing the reminiscent story of my first. In the days when my husband and I were dating, his mother was having a birthday and I was anxious to make her favorite cake, Red Velvet.  I’d never made one before; and, at the risk of showing my age, there was no internet at the time.  My high school students are always amazed at this detail, as it’s almost unimaginable anymore.  As we often wonder: what did we ever do before the internet, I can tell you in the case of seeking out a recipe, the process was much more interactive and laborious than the finger-tap-click method we now employ to find countless recipes in seconds I went to bakeries and groceries all over town asking bakers about Red Velvet recipes and found a surprisingly unanimous reply of “cake mix”.  I had no luck in searching through cook books I’d had or in any local bookstores at the time and began asking everyone I knew for a from-scratch recipe.  Luckily, a co-worker

and friend’s Grandmother had a recipe she shared with me, penciled in that perfect Grandma’s cursive, on a 3x5 index card titled “Old Mississippi State Red Velvet Cake”, which I still use today.   Red Velvet Cake was not always as brilliantly colored as we know it.  Traditionally, there was no red food coloring added; the red color was subtle and a chemical reaction from the vinegar, cocoa, and buttermilk interacting.  A company called Adams Extract Company developed a marketing strategy during the Great Depression to increase sales of their product by publishing a recipe for the dazzling scarlet cake we know today.  The cake is lovely to serve during Christmas or Valentine’s Day festivities and is typically served with a plain cream cheese icing.  If plain icing preferred, omit the coconut and coconut extract from the recipe.  Baumé syrup is used to brush the cakes to ensure moisture and enhance flavor.  I’ve added a garnish of chocolate cigarettes; thanks to the internet, instructional videos for making these abound!  

Yields 1 8” cake, 8 portions Red Velvet Cake

1/3 c. shortening 1& ½ c. sugar 2 eggs 2 oz. red food coloring 2 Tbsp. cocoa 2 7 ½ c. all-purpose flour ½ scant tsp. salt 1 tsp. vanilla 1&1/2 tsp. baking soda 1 Tbsp. vinegar 1 c. buttermilk 1 tsp. butter flavoring (optional) 1.     Cream shortening, sugar, and eggs.  2.     Make a paste with coloring and cocoa and add to mixture.  3.     Add salt and flour with buttermilk and vanilla. 4.     Alternately add soda and vinegar, don’t beat hard, just blend. 5.     Bake 30 minutes at 350˚F in two 8” pans, greased and floured. 6.     Layers may be split to make 4 layers.

Coconut Cream Icing

12 oz. unsalted butter 12 oz. cream cheese 1 & ½ lb. sifted confectionary sugar ½ tsp. coconut extract ½ tsp. clear vanilla extract 4 c. sweetened shredded coconut 1.     Bring butter and cream cheese to room temperature. Using the paddle attachment of a stand mixer, or a hand held electric mixer, combine until smooth and creamy without aerating. 2.     Add sifted flavoring agents. 3.     Incorporate confectionary sugar gradually. 4.     Add coconut only to combine, reserving 1 cup for garnishing outside of cake.

Sherry Gaynor, Certified Executive Pastry Chef (CEPC) and Certified Culinary Educator (CCE), is a Chef Instructor for First Coast Technical College who is assigned to teach at Florida School for the Deaf and Blind.

Baumé Syrup

½ c. sugar ½ c. water 1 Tbsp. crème de cacao 1 Tbsp. water 1.     Boil sugar and water. 2.     Remove from heat, cool completely. 3.     Add 1 Tbsp. water and crème de cacao 4.     Use pastry brush to apply to cakes before icing.

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Holiday Recipes Tasty treats and places to eat

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Ice Plant Roasted Butternut Squash Soup with Peanut Brittle “Dust” (Makes 4 1/2 cups or 5 7oz portions) 1 large Butternut Squash 2 large Shallots, peeled 2 cups Half and Half    Kosher Salt    White Pepper    Vegetable Oil  1 cup Peanut Brittle, chopped  1/4 cup Creme Fraiche or Sour Cream      Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.  Cut the squash in half length wise and place cut side up onto a baking sheet.  Place the whole shallots onto the baking sheet also.  Drizzle with the oil to cover and season with salt and white pepper.  Cover the squash and shallots with foil and place in the oven for aproxmently 1 - 1 1/2 hours or until fork tender.  (remove the shallots after 45 minutes)  Remove the baking sheet from the oven and let cool for 20 minutes.  Scoop the seeds out of the squash and discard.  Gently bring the half and half to a simmer in a small sauce pot.  Remove all of the roasted squash from the skin and place into a blender with the shallots and half and half.  Season lightly with more salt and pepper.  Puree until smooth.  Check the seasoning, adjusting if nessecary.  Place the chopped Peanut Brittle into a food processor and process the brittle until it forms “dust”.  (1-2 minutes)   Place the hot soup into bowls and top with the creme fraiche and peanut brittle dust.

Veuxe Carre

1oz Rye Whiskey 1oz Cognac 1oz Sweet Vermouth 1/8 oz Benedictine 4 dashes Peychards bitters 2 dashes Angustora bitters Combine over ice, stir(do NOT shake) and strain. Serve with lemon peel.

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Women’s Exchange Group Luncheon

Not the only water view in town...

Pumpkin Chiffon Dessert Makes 12 generous servings. I 3/4 cups crushed graham cracker crumbs 1 cup sugar, divided into 1/4 and 3/4 cup 1 stick butter, melted 8 oz. cream cheese, softened 2 eggs, beaten 2 sm. pkg. Jello instant vanilla pudding 3/4 cup milk 1 can pumpkin 3/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 16 oz. container Cool Whip Combine cracker crumbs, 1/4 cup sugar and butter. Press into 9”x13” pan. Combine cream cheese, eggs and 3/4 cup sugar. Beat until fluffy. Spread over crust. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes. Set aside to cool. Combine pudding and milk. Beat 1 minute. Add pumpkin and pumpkin pie spice. Beat I more minute. Stir in 1 cup of Cool Whip until combined. Spread over cream cheese layer. Spread top with remaining Cool Whip. (Courtesy: Mary Dee Stensgaard).

...simply the most spectacular

904-824-8008 4100 Coastal Highway St. Augustine, FL 32084 thereefstaugustine.com

TABERNA del CABALLO BIER CHEESE FONDUE .5 cup oil 2 cups diced yellow onion 2 cups white wine 2 1/2 cups half-and-half 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 cup grated manchego cheese 1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp cayenne pepper 2 cups light beer   On medium heat sauté onions until they begin to turn golden brown.  Add wine and reduce by half.  In a blender of food processor, blend until smooth.  Return to pot on mediumlow heat.  Add remaining ingredients stirring frequently one at a time, reserving beer.  When cheese and all ingredients are melted and smooth add beer, cook for five minutes more.  Serve with bread cubes and chorizo links.

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La Pentola MINORCAN FISH STEW Yield 2 quarts A Mediterranean style fish stock flavored with fresh fennel, tomatoes, Carrots & potatoes. The fresh seafood (lobster, shrimp, scallops and petite filets of grouper) areSimmered in the stew, then served topped with garlic Crostini and Romesco sauce (A Catalan sauce with a smooth paste consistency made of grilled or roasted,Tomatoes, toasted almonds, sweet red peppers, herbed bread crumbs, garlic, Chili powder and olive oil.) 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 leek, cleaned and diced 11/2 shallots finely diced 1/4 bulb of fresh fennel, clean and diced 1/2 red bell pepper, diced 1/2 carrot clean and diced 1/4 lb. small red potatoes, finely diced 1/2 tsp. toasted and ground fennel seeds 2 tbsp. datil pepper (optional) 1/2 tsp. oregano leaves 1/2 tsp. chili powder 2 bay leaves 1/2 tsp. thyme 11/2 cups crushed tomatoes 1 qt. fish stock 1 tsp. clam base 1 tsp. lobster base 1/3 cup orange juice 2 oz. Pernod Heat olive oil in a large stock pot, sautéed leeks, garlic, shallots and fresh fennel until slightly translucent add the crushed tomatoes and sautéed 5 more minutes, incorporate the fish stock, clam, lobster base, seasonings & the rest of vegetables bring it to a boil and reduce the heat and let it simmering for 45 minutes. Add the orange juice, Pernod and seafood and simmer 5 more minutes, Serve immediately, garnished with Crostini and Romesco sauce

Fresh Seafood, Wild Game Exotic Specialties Offering Daily Chef’s Specials

Lunch: Tues-Sat: 11-3 Dinner: Tues-Thur 5 - 9 Fri-Sat 5 - 10 Open Holidays! Sun 5 - 8 Sunday Brunch 10-3

904.824.3282 • 58 Charlotte Street www.LaPentolaRestaurant.com 44

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San Sebastian Winery Mulled Wine 1 Bottle Vintners Red 1 Bottle Port 1Mulling Spice Bag 1 Cup Brown Sugar In a crock pot or coffee urn, combine 1 bottle of Vintners Red, 1/2 bottle of Port, cup of brown sugar, mulling spice bag, and 1/2 a wine bottle of water.  Turn on the heat and allow to warm to desired temperature.  Stir early on so the brown sugar will dissolve.  Feel free to add multiple mulling spice bags for a stronger flavor, and more port or brown sugar for a sweeter batch.  Serve with a cinnamon stick.

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poetry

A Spicy Holiday Slow-Cooker Spiced Ham

Turkey with a Twist.... It’s the Holiday Season, which means it’s time for some festive eating! I know it is traditional to bake a turkey, but lets change it up this year do a turkey brine before cooking. Brining will insure a moist and flavorful turkey the whole family will rave about. Brine Ingredients: 1 container The Spice & Tea Exchange’s Bird Brine/ 1 gallon Vegetable Stock/ 1 gallon Ice Water

Preparation: Thaw turkey. Combine bird brine and stock in a large pot. Bring to a boil then remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Refrigerate up to 3 days. 8-24 hrs before serving, combine brine and ice water in a 5 gallon container. Place thawed turkey (Innards removed) breast side down in the brine. Bird should be fully immersed. Cover and refrigerate, turning bird halfway through the process. Brining time should be 8-24 hrs depending on sized of the bird. Remove bird from brine & rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard brine, then process with Herb Turkey Seasoning Blend and cook!

Pumpkin Spice Cake 1/2 tsp TSTE Brazilian Atlantic SeaSalt Petite 1 tsp Pumpkin Pie Spice Blend 2 tsp French Vanilla 2 TBS Bourbon Black Walnut Sugar 3.5 ounces applesauce baby food 3.5 ounces carrot baby food 2/3 pumpkin puree 2 TBS Vegetable oil 2 eggs 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup brown sugar 1 tsp baking soda 2 TBS margarine 1 package (3 ounces)cream cheese softened 2 cups confectioners’ sugar 1-2 tsp milk  

Deep, rich flavors in this slow cooker ham mingle while you focus your attention on the rest of your holiday cooking. The enticing aroma will be sure to keep guests anxiously awaiting. 1/4 cup TSTE Spiced Ham Blend 1 1/2 TBS Horseradish Powder Non-stick cooking spray 1/3 cup brown sugar 2 cans cola soda 5-7 lb pre-cooked ham (bone-in)

Preparation: Spray the inside of a 6-qt slow cooker non-stick cooking spray. Place the ham inside of the slow cooker and pour 1/2 can of the cola over top. Sprinkle with Spiced Ham Blend, brown sugar, and Horseradish Powder. Pour the remaining cola over top of the ham. Cover and cook on low for 7-8 hours. Verify the ham has reached an internal temperature of 145 degrees F. Remove from slow cooker. Slice and serve!

Colleen Messner is the owner/proprietor of The Spice & Tea Exchange of St Augustine, 59 Hypolita Street, and The Old Jail Location on 167 San Marco Avenue. The Spice & Tea Exchange is the place for all your holiday cooking needs!

Preparation: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F, Mix baby foods, pumpkin puree, vegetable oil, and eggs in a small bowl. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking soda, TSTE Brazilian Atlantic Sea Salt Petite, and Pumpkin Pie Spice Blend. Fold contents of the small bowl into the large bowl. Mix slowly until combined. Pour into a greased 9 x 13 pan and bake at 350 degrees F for 23-27minutes. Make frosting. Cream together the margarine and cream cheese. Add powdered sugar, French Vanilla, and milk, and beat until smooth and creamy. Add more milk based on your desired consistency. Spread cream cheese frosting on the carrot cake and add a little sparkly by sprinkling TSTE Bourbon Black Walnut Sugar on top! 46

Free Ultherapy Consultations and 20% off all Ultherapy Procedures (expires 12/31/13)

Dr. Douglas L. Johnson Board Certified Maxillofacial Surgeon Fellowship Trained in Facial Cosmetics Harbor Island Executive Center 1301 Plantation Island Dr • Suite 101 • St. Augustine

904-460-0505 • www.FloridaFaceDoc.com

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Photos by: Christine Cousart

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seen

ovember 23rd was the date of the Mayor’s Lighting of the City. This gala event is one of the most popular and glamorous of Saint Augustine’s Holiday festivities. Proceeds from this annual Holiday celebration go to fight homelessness in St. Johns County. This years’ recipient of proceeds was Home Again St. Johns, founded in 2008 coordinates providers, government, individuals, community and faith based organizations to resolve homelessness issues in St. Johns County. 48

Photos left to right - Melissa Mezick and Colleen Messner • Cynthia Searle and Kris Phillips • John and Cindy Stavely, Mayor Joe and Jane Boles • Mark Bailey, ?????, Alicia Bailey • Alexa McCondichie, Michael Ingram, Ilan and Bruce Wolffberg • Kevin and Wendy Nettles • John and Sally Brady, Betsy Kuhl, Ed and Cathy Thompson • Kathy Young, William and Tara Regan, Matt and Alyson Baker • Bill and Linda Young, Lura and Tony Scarpitti • Louise Nelson, Catherine McGarvy, Susan Graff • Bill & Kim Smith • Allison Cunningham, Kelly Bradford volume 7

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Lighting Up the Ancient City

Mayor Joe Boles Illuminates the History Behind the Gala That Sets the City Aglow by Lisa Farese

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ayor Joseph Boles, Jr. smiled and retrieved a picture of his daughter Hayley from his office in a reenactor dress as he reminisced about the first time he attended the Nights of Lights Grand Illumination in St. Augustine. It was twenty years ago, the first Nights of Lights celebration, and his children sold white candles in baskets, symbolic of the tradition of celebrating the holiday season with a single white candle in the window when St. Augustine served as the capital of Spanish La Florida. The Nights of Lights, steeped in tradition, saw early growth under the direction of former mayor Len Weeks and, with continued community support and direction by Boles, has seen even more growth. In fact, for the last two consecutive years, National Geographic has named St. Augustine one of the top 10 places in the world to view holiday lights. Additionally, the celebration was named one of the top 100 events in the U.S by the American Bus Association as well as being dubbed one of AAA’s top 12 places in the U.S. and Canada to experience holiday cheer, according to the St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors and Convention Bureau. “Year after year, we become more and more well-known for our lights,” said Boles. “Our city has continued to welcome and attract people who have an appreciation for the holiday season.” It is no surprise that, 13 years later it, would be a group of reenactors, similar to those his children dressed as, who inspired his contribution to the Nights of Lights as mayor with the addition of the Mayors’ Holiday Lighting. One group originally used the Government House courtyard to host a wine and cheese gathering. As mayor, Boles remembered this when it came time to name who would light the tree and lights for the holiday season. “I thought, let’s have a party,” said Boles. Coincidently, the same time the planning of the first Mayors’ Holiday Lighting was underway, The St. Frances House was working to relocate their facility, and an anonymous donor agreed to match up to $30,000 if raised at the event—the framework was in place. Today, the event is kicked off with a rooftop champagne toast to corporate sponsors for their gracious donations at the Lightner Museum. The group is then led to the Government House for a cocktail reception. It is from the King’s Balcony at the Government House, which overlooks the Plaza de la Constitución, that Boles and fellow mayors such as former mayor John Bailey who

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“flipped the switch” for the 400th anniversary of St. Augustine at the Nights of Lights, welcome guests and prepare for the lighting of the tree and downtown lights. Once the city is left aglow, the group of approximately 300, clad in festive holiday attire, is led back to the Lightner Museum by a fifer drummer for a reception catered by The Casa Monica and complete with a silent auction, credited with raising half of the charitable donations at the event each year. Behind the scenes, Jane Reynolds Boles, chair; Wanda Bray, city coordinator; and volunteers Tara Regan, Kerrie Hartley and Kathi Young make the event shine. “They are the ones who really put it all together,” said Boles. This year, Bill Lennon and Len Weeks, credited with bringing Nights of Lights to our community, are slated to brighten the city’s darkened sky with the symbolic switch that marks the commencement of the Nights of Lights celebration and Light-Up! Night. And, yes, despite the term “switch”, the entire city is not wired to a single switch due to the technical complications of such an endeavor. “The countdown is a symbolic switch,” said Boles. “It’s not hooked to one switch, but we don’t tell anybody.” The Nov. 23 event will also mark the lighting of the tree in the Plaza de la Constitución. This year, a family is scheduled to light the tree, which is a departure from previous years. Boles said he received a letter from 16-year-old Matthew who is enchanted with the Nights of Lights and asked if he could be a part of the celebration in some way. Delighted to help, after all this was the first letter he has received with such a request, Boles invited the Conner family to join the mayors on the Kings Balcony and to light the tree. Individuals on whom the

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mayor has previously bestowed the privilege include Otis Mason, the first elected African-American school superintendent. With the tens of thousands of visitors who travel to our historic city for the Nights of Lights celebration, according to the St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors and Convention Bureau, the events and celebrations aren’t the only bright spots in this undertaking. The money raised from the Mayors’ Holiday Lighting also goes back to the community. For the past two years, Home Again St. Johns has been the benefitting charity; previously donations had been given 50

to the St. Frances House. Both are local organizations that work to provide aid to the more than 1,400 homeless individuals in this community. “As long as I am mayor, the money raised [from The Mayors’ Holiday Lighting] will go to a homeless cause,” said Boles. Home Again St. Johns works to link the various services the homeless population may need to create a continuum of resources. “For example,” said Boles. “If a homeless person is trying to get their medications straight for a bi-polar condition, and their main concern is getting something to eat, it is going to be late in the day before they have time to think about their medications.” In addition to collaborating with providers, the government, community members and numerous faith-based organizations, the charity has plans to create a one-stop center for the homeless in the community. According to David Hoak, executive director of Home Again St. Johns, the organization has just submitted drawings for the pre-application review process and will be preparing for planning and zoning approval early next year. “We want this project to be a community project,” said Hoak. “We are getting a positive response, so I think we will have a lot of success with that.” And despite the obvious benefits of supporting such an organization, Boles feels it is particularly important at this time of year. “Everything associated with the holiday time talks about family and home, and a lot of people just don’t have a home,” he said. “A lot don’t even have family because if they did, they just might have a place to go.” All told, the Mayors’ Holiday Lighting, since its inception, has raised more than $110,000, which has gone back to these homeless charities that align with Boles’ vision of the holiday season. Beyond charitable donations, the Nights of Lights, and even the Mayors’ Lighting, have another economic benefit to the downtown community—a benefit illuminated by the white candle tradition. There is much symbolism surrounding the Spanish tradition of the single white burning candle in the window, and it is said, among other things, it is a welcoming gesture. This gesture, brought to life today in our friendly city, welcomes tourists and locals alike, bringing an economic boost to businesses downtown. Juanita Schreiber, H.W. Davis Clothing and Shoes store manager, has seen this firsthand. “It brings a lot of people into town, and we get a lot of business from it,” she said. She also noted that it’s not just tourists who have been in during the Nights of Lights, but also many local residents. In fact, she has already seen numerous ladies in to purchase new, dressier attire for the Mayors’ Holiday Lighting. Dave Chatterton, general manager of Old Town Trolley Tours, agrees. “I’ve been here for 20 years and previously there was no business this time of year, especially at night,” he said. “Nights of Lights has been a boom for most businesses.” When asked if he has seen growth in the number of residents and visitors taking part in the Nights of Lights over the years, he said, “absolutely.” So while Boles often marks the Nights of Lights celebration with the gathering of his family who come together each year for a carriage ride through the city with hot chocolate in hand, the more than 3 million white lights that glisten in the city he calls home, bring awe to visitors, warmth and hope to the homeless, growth to our businesses, and pride to our community with a flip of the switch—symbolic as it may be. So, as the city embarks on its 20th Annual Nights of Lights celebration, it is hard to imagine the light of this tradition ever going out—10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2,1… “Nights of Lights is the simplest, single activity we do that brings the most interest and return on happiness,” said Boles. “I encourage everyone to come down and walk around.” OCL volume 7

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history

Saint Augustine Historical Museums

story and photos by Raphael Cosme

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hy does Saint Augustine have the oldest historical museums in Florida? The answer goes back 500 years ago when Juan Ponce de Leon landed somewhere close to Saint Augustine’s shores, named the land Florida, and claimed it for Spain. This event leaves us with the first unique historical landmark and exhibits at the Fountain of Youth. According to John Fraser, President/General Manager of the Fountain of Youth Archaeological Park in Saint Augustine, there were many historical events that occurred at this particular site that triggered the first tourism industry for Saint Augustine more than one hundred years ago. “The first European to set foot in the United States occurred at this site on April 3rd, 1513. Juan Ponce de Leon came ashore and landed at this site and his crew placed twentyseven coquina blocks to mark the historical landing. It was not until 1909 that this cross was fully uncovered by John Henry Lee, and later workers at the site found the spring close alongside the cross. The cross remains today in the area where it was originally discovered and the building around it is named the Springhouse at the Fountain of Youth,” said Fraser. In the beginning of the 20th Century, the Fountain of Youth ignited a new tourist interest that attracted visitors from the entire nation. In 1985, archaeologists located the first Spanish settlement established in 1565 by the explorer Pedro Menendez de Aviles. By 1995 the Fountain of Youth transformed the site into a modern attraction with 15 acres of exhibits, landmarks and a Ponce de Leon statue. This year, for the Florida 500th Commemoration the site was enriched with new historical exhibits including the Reconstructed First Mission of Nombre de Dios, originally built in 1587, an expansion to the Timucuan village of Seloy, a large open-air Events Pavilion and the archaeologicallycorrect outlines of the 1565 Menendez settlement.  Website: www.fountainofyouthflorida. com  Phone (904) 829-3168.  

Zoryada Museum

Colonial Quarter Saint Augustine

Located in the heart of the St. George pedestrian street, is a journey through centuries of Saint Augustine’s rich history with exciting activities where visitors can take part in a musket drill, with live firing demonstrations, and a cannon drill. They can also dig into archaeological evidence where one of Saint Augustine’s elusive first wooden forts likely stood, observe a 16th century boat project and blacksmithing through the ages, and witness historic preservation at work, in the original 1740’s de Mesa-Sanchez House from Native Americans and Minorcans to the Spanish, British and African-Americans. At the east end of the Colonial Quarter visitors can climb up the interpretative 17th Century watchtower for a stunning view of the Castillo de San Marcos and the Bayfront. Website: www.colonialquarter. com  Phone (904) 342-2857 volume 7

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Government House

The Government House Museum reopens after a year of remodeling the building and upgrading the exhibits with the new First Colony Our Spanish Origins exhibit featuring the stories of the early Spanish settlement in Saint Augustine during the Spanish Florida occupation. The exhibit is a forty - minute tour of four centuries of Saint Augustine’s history, displayed in high technology on the first floor of the earliest documented building site that was the residence of Governor Gonzalo Mendez de Canzo in 1598.   Dr. Kathleen Deagan has been working on the Government House exhibit with her colleagues at the University of Florida. They have selected the objects that are on display, written all the labels and the script. It’s been designed to present early Saint Augustine’s history from archeology, from the things ordinary people used, did and experienced. Darcie MacMahon, project director, said, “People will understand more about Saint Augustine history. Everybody knows about Jamestown and Little Rock and very few people understand that the Spaniards were here much earlier and had an enduring settlement”. One of the museum features is the Thanksgiving mural by Michael Rosato, and is titled “The First Thanksgiving, Saint Augustine, 1565”. The Government House Museum is located at 48 King Street, Saint Augustine. Website: www.staugustine.ufl.edu   

Mission of Nombre de Dios Museum

The Mission of Nombre de Dios Museum was built in 2010 as a part of the celebration of the 445th anniversary of the founding of Saint Augustine and the relocation of the casket of Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of the city. The Mission of Nombre de Dios Museum opens its doors free for visitors to enjoy one of the finest colonial religious reliquaries on display and artifacts uncovered on the mission grounds. It is located at 27 Ocean Avenue, Saint Augustine. Website: www.missionandshrine.org   Phone (904) 824-2809 Old Town Saint Augustine This complex of museums, shops, and exhibits recreates the period of 1908 in historic Saint Augustine and also serves as the main Old Town Trolley Tours. Guided tours of the Old Jail and the Oldest Store Museum, and a self-guided tour of the St. Augustine History Museum take place throughout the day. Retail shops Gator Bob’s and the Spice and Tea Exchange are both representative of the time period, and everyone on site, from Old Jail “prisoners” to “barkers” at the Oldest Store Museum, are in costume and in character at all times. Even trolley dispatchers wear authentic Trolley Conductor costumes, the most up-to-date styles of 1908!

The Old Jail Museum was completed in 1891. The jail housed prisoners for over 60 years and is one of the few surviving 19th Century jails. There you can explore the sheriff ’s quarters, prisoners’ cells, the maximum security area and the gallows where several convicts paid the ultimate price for their crimes. The Oldest Store Museum - Watch in amazement as friendly shopkeepers and snake-oil salesmen demonstrate the latest inventions for turn-of-the-century living. Meet the proprietor, Mr. C.F. Hamblen, and discover the most modern and best time-saving miracles from 1900, with over 100,000 items on display. St. Augustine History Museum - This intriguing mix of historical displays and private collections brings over 400 years of Florida history to life. Guests can visit our Spanish sunken treasure room and touch real Spanish silver, learn all about the early Timucuan Indians, visit a Florida cracker trading post, and marvel at the genius of Henry Flagler – oil baron, railroad magnate, and father of Florida. Website: www. 54

Mission of Nombre de Dios Museum

trolleytours.com Phone (904) 829-3800  

Spanish Military Hospital Museum

On the oldest street in the Continental United States, Aviles Street, you’ll find the hidden treasures of the Spanish Military Hospital Museum. Explore an authentic reconstruction of a Military hospital that stood on this site during the Second Spanish Colonial Period, 1784-1821. Travel back in time as our fully guided tours demonstrate “cutting edge” colonial medicine. The museum includes a collection of antique surgical instruments. Learn how medicines were made in colonial times using plants and herbs grown in their garden, and an apothecary’s garden where you can appreciate herbs which are still used in medicines today. The museum holds a tapestry of medicine which displays how Spanish physicians wove together knowledge from Europe and Africa to achieve an astonishing survival rate. It is located at 3 Aviles St., Saint Augustine. Website: www.spanishmilitaryhospitalmuseum.com Phone (904) 342-7730  

St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum

The St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum offers an educational, exciting, and timber-shivering museum experience that transports you and your family back in time over 300 years to Port Royal, Jamaica, at the height of the Golden Age of Piracy. It has a unique collection of authentic pirate artifacts coupled with elements of interactive technology that reveal a scintillating historic adventure through the Golden Age of Piracy and the lives of the era’s most infamous pirates. With the “please touch” and audio-animatronics of a theme park coupled with the provenance of a museum, guests undertake an awesome pirate journey both above and below deck filled with compelling lore, surprising facts and an abundance

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of sensory perceptions. Although Blackbeard, Captain Kidd and Black Caesar were known to have buried treasure during their careers, tales of treasure maps and lost fortunes are probably not true. Most pirates squandered their booty as soon as they set foot on land. Among more than 800 museum-quality artifacts, threaded through the storyline is the original journal of Captain Kidd’s last voyage, the only authentic pirate treasure chest in the world that originally belonged to Captain Thomas Tew and the oldest pirate Wanted Poster for the capture of Captain Henry. It is located at 12 S. Castillo Dr., Saint Augustine. Website: www.thepiratemuseum.com Phone (904) 819-1444

St. Photios Greek Orthodox National Shrine

Called “The Jewel of St. George Street” just steps from Saint Augustine’s historic city gates, the St. Photios Greek Orthodox National Shrine, an institution of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, is dedicated to the first colony of Greek people who came to America in 1768. The Shrine consists of exhibits depicting the life of early Greeks in America and the development of the Greek Orthodox Church in America, and the St. Photios Chapel. A special audio/visual tape, “Our Plymouth Rock,” when viewed creates a pictorial highway that transports you from the shores of ancient Greece to America. It tells the story of 500 Greek immigrants who came to America as indentured servants with Andrew Turnbull’s New Smyrna expedition - finding themselves in a hostile and unknown land. The magnificent St. Photios Chapel is unique in the Western Hemisphere. It is filled with exquisite Byzantine style frescoes of many apostles and saints of the Christian church. Adding vibrant luster to these extraordinary examples of the centuries old Byzantine art is an abundant use of twenty - two karat gold leaf on the highlights of the frescoes. The St. Photios Greek Orthodox National Shrine is located at 41 St. George St., Saint Augustine. It is open Monday through Saturday 9:00-5:00; Sunday, 12-6. Website: www.stphotios.com Phone (904) 829-8205    The Lighter Museum In the 19th Century developer Henry Flagler built the Alcazar, one of the few majestic hotels that later became the Lighter Museum. Relics of America’s Gilded Age are elegantly exhibited on the museum’s three floors. Furnishings, mechanical musical instruments and other artifacts give you a glimpse into 19th century daily life. The Lighter collection includes beautiful examples of cut glass, Victorian art glass and the stained glass work of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Located in the semi-subterranean ground floor was the world’s largest indoor swimming pool of the day measuring 120 feet long by 50 feet wide, with a depth of 3 to 12 feet. The Lighter Museum is located at 75 King St. in historic downtown Saint Augustine. Website: www.lightnermuseum.org Phone: 904-824-2874  

The Lightner

VILLA ZORAYDA

Originally built in 1883 as a winter residence by Bostonian Franklin W. Smith, this spectacular Moorish Revival Style home incorporates the beautiful architectural details of the Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain. Franklin Smith was the innovator of the poured concrete and coquina construction that is seen throughout many of the buildings in Saint Augustine today. The Villa has had a colorful past including private home, restaurant and club, speakeasy and gambling casino. In 1933 it opened as a museum which it remains to this date. Outstanding features of the museum include it’s original art and antique collection, beautiful inlaid furniture, hand pierced brass lamps throughout and an ancient Egyptian rug over 2400 years old! Enjoy state-of-the-art audio guided tours which run continuously throughout the day in English, Spanish and French. Located at 83 King Street in Historic downtown Saint Augustine. Website: www.villazorayda. com Phone: (904) 829-9887   Thanks to St. Augustine Historical Society and Kate Poage, for your support in writing this article. OCL

Oldest House

The González-Alvarez House is the oldest surviving Spanish Colonial dwelling in Florida. The site has been occupied since the 1600’s and the present house dates to the early 1700’s. Since 1892 visitors have toured the house to see evidence of the Spanish, British and American occupations of Saint Augustine and to learn how the residents lived. In 1970 the U.S. Department of the Interior designated the house a National Historic Landmark. The museum complex, owned and operated by the St. Augustine Historical Society includes Florida’s Oldest House, two museums, a changing exhibition gallery, an ornamental garden, and a museum store. It is located at 271 Charlotte St., Saint Augustine. Website: www.staugustinehistoricalsociety.org Phone: (904) 824-2872

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SEE THE LIGHT

On the Mainstage DECEMBER 13-JANUARY 5

MYK)

A Comedy/Mystery by Ken Ludwig

DECEMBER Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy 01 Holiday Revue St. Augustine Amphitheatre 8PM 904-471-1965 staugAmphitheatre.com

Hanukkah In the Plaza 02 Plaza de la Constitucion, Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine 6:15 p.m 904-521-8664 www.ChabadSAugustine.com

45th Annual 08 Garden Club Christmas Tour of Homes 12-5PM christmastourofhomes.com The St. Augustine Ballet presents Nutcracker Tea

Charlie Brown Christmas 09 with David Benoit FREE performance, 7PM St. Augustine Amphitheatre staugAmphitheatre.com

15

View the newly restored Solarium at 3 p.m. in the Hotel Ponce de Leon, also known as 400 Rotunda

74 King Street • 3PM legacy.flagler.edu

22 St. Augustine Community Chorus Celtic Christmas Sing Along FREE Performance St. Augustine Amphitheatre 5PM staugAmphitheatre.com 29

GIVE THE GIFT OF THEATRE VARIOUS SEASON SUBSCRIPTION PACKAGES AVAILABLE! 904-825-1164 GALA tickets on sale BEST OF LIMELIGHT’S CELEBRITY CABARET FEBRUARY 1, 2014

11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine 904.825.1164 | limelight-theatre.org FACEBOOK | TWITTER | YOUTUBE

03

(904) 396-4435. bgcnf.org Hotel Ponce de Leon 10 125th Anniversary Community Lecture

“Edith Wharton’s The Custom of the Country: Money, Power and the ‘New Woman in the Gilded Age”

74 King Street•ponce125.com

600 Palencia Club Drive, 1 & 4PM

www.saintaugustineballet.com Holiday Solarium Tea

Boys & Girls Clubs of Northeast Florida Holiday Toy Drive Through Dec. 1o

16 The Eight: Reindeer Monologues at The Raintree Restaurant Dec 15-22 102 San Marco Ave • 6PM raintreerestaurant.com “ Watercolors of the World” by Brad Bennett-Exhibit

23

Jacksonville Symphony 17 Orchestra Holiday Pops Concerts Dec. 18-19, 7:30pm Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College emmaconcerts.com

Nights of Lights

24

The St. Johns Cultural Council is pleased to present the Fine Art of Brad Bennett on display in the Rotunda Gallery at the St. Johns County Administration Building. stjohnsculture.com

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Beach Blast Off 2014

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St. Augustine Beach Pier and Pavilion beachblastoff.com

Flagler College New Year’s Eve Gala

Ring in the New Year and celebrate 125 years of the Hotel Ponce de Leon. flagler.edu/newyearseveball

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R

City Calendar 2013 Wednesday

Beach Farmers Market Saint Augustine Beach Pier Parking Lot 350 A1A Beach Blvd

Thursday

04

Luminary Night at the St. Augustine Lighthouse 81 Lighthouse Ave StAugustineLighthouse.org

“Handel’s Messiah” Ponte Vedra Concert Hall 1050 A1A North, Ponte Vedra Beach pvconcerthall.com

05

4th Annual Candlelight Tour of Villa Zorayda, 83 King Street 6:30PM villazorayda.com

11 Beach Farmers Market Saint Augustine Beach Pier Parking Lot 350 A1A Beach Blvd

18

Beach Farmers Market Saint Augustine Beach Pier Parking Lot 350 A1A Beach Blvd

25

Christmas day

12 Bachelor of Art and Bachelor of Fine Art Senior Portfolio Exhibition Crisp-Ellert Art Museum 48 Sevilla St., St. Augustin 5PM flagler.edu 19

“Annie” by Murray Middle School FREE Performance St. Augustine Amphitheatre 7PM staugAmphitheatre.com

Cookie Mania Holiday Arts 26 Camp (Ages 4-8) The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach

50 Executive Way, Ponte Vedra Beach

Beach Farmers Market Saint Augustine Beach Pier Parking Lot 350 A1A Beach Blvd

27 01

9AM stjohnsculture.com

02 Portrait & Figure Show at the St. Augustine Art Association Jan 2-Feb 2 22 Marine St., St. Augustine

Friday

Saturday

1st Friday Artwalk, Downtown St. Augustine 06 Marty Balin Performs at 130 King Fine Art Gallery

Circle of Angels benefit for Community Hospice of Northeast Florida 7-10PM

Dicken’s A Christmas Carol Dec. 6-7 Fort Menendez 259 San Marco Avenue, 7:30PM aclassictheatre.org St. Augustine Orchestra “Sounds of the Season”

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Lightner Museum 25 Granada Street

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CircleOfAngels.CommunityHospice.com

59th Annual St. Augustine Christmas Parade, Plaza de la Constitucion 10AM The St. Augustine Yacht Club’s Regatta of Lights Annual holiday boat parade St. Augusitne Bayfront

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St. Augustine Ballet Performs The Nutcracker Dec 21-22

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8PM • staugustineorchestra.org 6PM • www.sayc2000.com Limelight Theatre Presents “The 20th Annual Holiday Tour of Bed and Game’s Afoot” Breakfast Inns limelight-theatre.org staugustinebandbtour.com

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Night of Lights Boat Ride St. Augustine Municipal Marina 904-377-7245 staugustineecotours.com

27 Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug at the IMAX Theater World Golf Hall of Fame WorldGolfIMAX.com

Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College 2PM & 7PM

saintaugustineballet.com

Uptown Saturday Night

San Marco Avenue • St. Augustne

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5-9PM

Old Town Arts & Crafts Show

fine craft show featuring outstanding artists and craftsmen from St. Augustine and around the country. 10AM-5PM oldtownartshow.com

03 1st Friday Artwalk, Downtown St. Augustine

Living History Day at Fort Matanzas National Monument 8635 A1A South, St. Augustine

04

Authentically clad re-enactors will demonstrate Spanish cannons at this fortress that guarded the southern approach to St. Augustine

nps.gov/foma

08 Beach Farmers Market Saint Augustine Beach Pier Parking Lot 350 A1A Beach Blvd

JANUARY

oldcitylife.com


How to Crack The Nut by Joy D’Elia

N

o, this is not an article about cracking walnuts, pecans, or pistachios. Since 2009, Saint Augustine Ballet has produced The Nutcracker. No matter how experienced the staff, every year a series of decisions and actions must take place in a timely fashion in order to ‘Crack The Nut.’ First, you need to find a venue and we’re very fortunate to have the newly renovated Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College. Although coordinating dates and booking the theatre can be time consuming, it’s definitely one of the easier steps to accomplish. Next up, are the auditions, and all students of ballet are invited to participate. Once cast, they must commit to the weekly rehearsal schedule. This year’s cast of fifty-nine student dancers represent twenty-five schools from Saint Johns, Duval and Flagler Counties as well as homeschoolers, a dance major from Florida State University, and a student attending the prestigious Harid Conservatory, a professional training school for gifted young dancers. During the audition process, Saint Augustine Ballet’s artistic director, Luis Abella, and choreographer, Chelsea Hilding, observe the technique and skill of each dancer in order to determine casting for the show. Fortunately, The Nutcracker accommodates a wide variety of dance abilities, leaving Abella and Hilding the daunting task of matching dancers to parts. Once they finalize the cast list, the two oversee rehearsals. Although the production is over 100 years old, every year new elements are added to the production. This literally keeps the two choreographers on their toes as they teach the latest steps to the dancers. Abella and Hilding are no strangers to rehearsals. Abella spent years performing with the National Ballet of Cuba. Hilding studied dance at the Hartt Conservatory at the University of Hartford and choreographed Midsummer Night’s Dream for Saint Augustine Ballet. Professional guest artists are brought in each year to dance the principal roles. This year, two different couples will dance the roles

of the Sugar Plum Fairy and her Cavalier. Erin-Elizabeth Morton from the North Atlantic Dance Theatre will partner with Norbert Nirewicz, formerly with the Polish National Theater, on Saturday, December 21, while Arionel Vargas, principal dancer with The English National Ballet and his wife, Roberta Marquez, principal dancer with The Royal Ballet will perform on Sunday, December 22. Vargas was born in Cuba where he trained at the National Ballet School of Cuba. He has a starring role in Love Tomorrow, a new British film written and directed by Christopher Payne, produced by Stephanie Moon and the BALLETBOYZ. You can get a preview of Vargas on December 7th at 5:00p.m. and 7:00p.m. at Flagler College in the Ringhaver Student Center’s GamacheKoger Theater when Saint Augustine Ballet and Saint Augustine Film Festival screen the movie as a benefit for the Ballet. Members of the community join the multigenerational cast for the opening party scene in Act One. Returning dancers include Mayor Joseph Boles dancing with his wife, Jane. They hold the distinction, along with arts educator, Tommy Bledsoe, of having participated in The Nutcracker since 2009. Other illustrious community members showing off their dance moves are Connie May Fowler, Dolph Kiser, Dr. Todd and Katherine Batenhorst, Georgia Garrett, Tracy and Beth Upchurch, Chelsea Hilding, and Jennifer Dournaux. Reprising his role as the mischievous Uncle Drosselmeyer is Orlando Molina from the Center for Dance Education at Atlanta Ballet. Now that the stage is booked and rehearsals are underway, we’re done, right? Hardly! There are still numerous other details that need to be dealt with, including, but not limited to costuming, set design, fundraising, and publicity. Great care goes into costumes, many of which are created by two very talented women, Virginie Woodward and Alicia Young. You can find them surrounded by fabric, tulle, pins, and needles starting in August and often working until just before the curtain rises. Originally, they volunteered to do a small sewing project for the


dance

Ballet but when their expertise and attention to detail became evident, they soon found themselves in charge of costuming. Woodward, a Paris native, mother of three and French teacher at the University of North Florida, says she first learned to sew household items from her grandmother at the age of eight. Young, a homeschooling mother of six, began sewing doll clothes around the same age. She credits her sewing skills to her aunt and 4-H. Although costumes are kept and reused year after year, Young and Woodward continually repair, alter, and make new pieces because of changing body shapes and sizes of the cast. Robert O’Leary, no stranger to The Nutcracker, is Head of Scenic and Lighting Design at The Florida School of the Arts. O’Leary is responsible for creating and adding new elements and backdrops for the staging. He first met Luis Abella at Florida School of the Arts where they collaborated on productions. “I have been involved in The Nutcracker since its inception. I thought it was a wonderful cultural event to offer to the community and my home town”, explains O’Leary. “With new touches and details within the scenery and lighting added each year, we continually make this holiday tradition fresh for our returning and new audiences.” It takes a community to produce The Nutcracker. “Without strong community support, it would be hard to produce The Nutcracker each year,” say Jodi Kotrady-Hatin, marketing and sponsorship coordinator. Her seventeen years of experience in financial services comes in handy as she reaches out to local residents and the business community for help in sponsoring the Ballet’s programs. A mother of two and Director of Community Awareness at Bayview Health Care, she also makes the time to be an advocate for PKU (an autosomal recessive metabolic genetic disorder.) All sponsorship and ad money goes back into each production to help cover the costs of costuming, venue fees, scenery, props, publicity materials, and guest artists. We’re getting close to show time, but what’s a show without an audience? Publicity has to be created to build awareness of the show in the community. Potential audience members need to know not

only what’s going on, but where and how they may purchase tickets. Posters go up, flyers are handed out, publicity pieces are written and, hopefully, tickets are sold. That leaves us with many tasks that must be attended to before, during and after each performance. Without the help of volunteers who work in front of and behind the scenes, the show truly could not go on. Many are parents of dancers, some are community members who just want to help, and still others are high school students who receive community service hours. No matter how many times you produce The Nutcracker, it takes four months of hard work each and every year. The Nutcracker will be performed on Saturday, December 21 at 2:00p.m. and 7:30p.m. and on Sunday, December 22 at 2:00p.m. and 7:30p.m. in Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College. For tickets, visit www.saintaugustineballet.com or call 904-824-1746. Saint Augustine Ballet is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to creating dance opportunities for students of dance and appreciative audiences. OCL


milestone

A classic at any age.........

Ponte Vedra Inn & Club

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he stretch of Atlantic surf sitting snugly between the languid, leisurely pace of Vilano Beach to the South, and the more lively and hip Jacksonville Beach to the North, belongs to one of the most purely and unassumingly beautiful destinations in Florida – the Ponte Vedra Inn & Club. What started as a mining town turned quaint seaside village for the wealthy looking to enjoy warmer temperatures and a more laid-back lifestyle has become a lifestyle of its own. In its 85th year, the Ponte Vedra Inn & Club is not just a destination, but an oasis of choice. Whether their guests are looking to enjoy world-class dining, upscale shopping, golf on a historic course with sweeping ocean vistas, a day at a state-of-theart spa, or simply a walk on sugary sand to find their perfect seashell souvenir, the Inn & Club offers every option with a welcoming smile and a grace belonging to an era gone by. When the Ponte Vedra Inn & Club was opened in 1928, the area of Northeast Florida was forever altered by the change in social climate it brought with it. The Inn & Club we know today was first built on a stretch of swampy beach known for a ribbon of mineral rich earth running through the dunes. First founded and built as a small mining town, the area was nothing more than housing for workers, a small post office and a general store. The land was mined for minerals in support of the war effort, but was quickly purchased by developers shortly after the war ended. In the early 1920’s came the small seaside village, which attracted more and more visitors seeking refuge from colder climates or simply looking for a new vacation spot. Then came the Inn & Club - wealthy travelers came from as far as Michigan, Rhode Island and Connecticut to enjoy a beach destination in what was, only a few years prior, essentially a stretch of swamp land

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by Shana L. London

overhung by palmetto and palm trees. But what they found upon their arrival was nothing short of extraordinary. A Mediterranean inspired resort that included not only the fine dining and tropical temperatures they had expected, but also the area’s first golf course, the Ocean Course, which can still be enjoyed by guests today. The combination of affluent guests and a veritable frontier of beach resort options opened to a previously small mining town created an explosion of visitors and families looking to enjoy a new brand of lifestyle. This lifestyle has evolved over the history of the resort to now include a world-class spa which is consistently named one of the top spa destinations in the country, eight award-winning restaurants, cafes and lounges, 250 luxurious guest rooms, two 18 hole golf courses including the historic Ocean Course, shopping and of course, the sparkling stretch of Atlantic Ocean

Foundation, a few events hosted at the club each year include the St. Vincent’s HealthCare Foundation and the Pink Ribbon Golf Classic which benefits both the Baptist Medical Center Beaches and the Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. Taking even this brief glimpse into the long and rich history of the Ponte Vedra Inn & Club, in honor of its 85th Anniversary, is an exciting trip to a time when service and tradition were paramount. And seeing that history continued in our community leaves no doubt as to why the Ponte Vedra Inn & Club is, and has been for so many years, one of the premier destinations in Florida to visit and live. OCL

which plays host to the entire experience. Now under the stewardship of Herbert Peyton, who acquired the resort in 1983, the Inn & Club is especially mindful of respecting the rich tradition of the resort’s past, but also looking to its future. Guests of the resort have come to expect a level of sophistication and service that only exist in a select number of destinations around the world. Upholding this tradition is no short order, and not only does the Peyton family and the GATE Petroleum brand do this with seemingly effortless grace, but they also generously give back to the community of which the Inn & Club has become such an integral part. The Ponte Vedra Inn & Club is committed to the community through its involvement and support of many civic groups and charitable organizations. While many causes receive support through its parent company’s GATE 61


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gardening

Holiday Color P

By: Kimberly Leonardi

oinsettias! By far these are the most popular of the holiday flora, and they are a staple of holiday tradition! There are so many variations and colors of the popular plant at this point that there is certainly a variety for almost every flower fan, so whether it’s for you, or a hostess gift, make sure to get one for the holidays.  The cool weather annuals are all available in full force at this time as well.  There are petunias, pansies, snapdragons, sweet alyssum, dusty miller, dianthus and geraniums, just to name a few!   This is a wonderful time to spruce up the beds and containers with a pop of holiday color to welcome weary inbound travelers, or just to make yourself smile.  Growing your own herbs to include in your holiday meal preparation is also a

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rewarding experience. Parsley, fennel, chives, cilantro, coriander, sage and rosemary are all favorites this time of year! As our lawns transition to winter and the growth rate slows, it’s important to ensure that you’ve halted excess watering.  Your sprinklers should be set to once per week with the end of daylight savings time, keeping in mind that the lawn may not even need once per week if we get ample rainfall.  If you notice brown patch active in your lawn, this may be a sign that you are overwatering.  It’s not as simple as setting the sprinklers and forgetting them in Florida because we have to adjust for rainfall and variations in temperature.  It’s important to know how to operate your irrigation timer! Our city is so beautiful this time of year and walking downtown is extra special, added with the holiday splendor, art walks, and of course the 45th Annual Garden Club of St. Augustine tour of homes “la Navidad en la Florida” are must sees this time of year!   Hopefully you have tickets for the 12/8/13 sold out tour.   Not only is there a fantastic opportunity to see the gorgeous homes, but the gardens and cut arrangements created by artists from our local garden club circles are sure to please.  If you didn’t attend this year, make sure you get tickets early next year so you can see how the countless hours of preparation pay off!   Holidays are supposed to be a joyful time, my family and I don’t know how we’re going to wrap ourselves around this season, but it makes us mindful that there are others like us that may be struggling with loss of loved ones, or a change-of-a-life event that makes the holiday season somewhat challenging.  It’s always rewarding to help someone else over a rough patch, so maybe in the spirit of the season we can all pay it forward just a little bit more!  With that said, may you all have a safe and blessed holiday season and the happiest the New Year can bring!  Until next time, Happy Gardening!!

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Over 30 Years of Experience Serving You 24/7! Lorie A. Zemlo, Realtor®

(904) 669-1188

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holiday

Christmas Tree

Nights of Lights Christmas tree handpicked by local family

I

by Rhonda Parker

n recent years, Saint Augustine has received international accolades for its Annual Nights of Lights, selected in both 2011 and 2012 by National Geographic as one of the ten best holiday lighting displays worldwide. For us locals, the annual tree-lighting ceremony in the plaza still resonates with a special hometown charm. Visitors can be seen any December night photographing the kids around the spectacular, towering Douglas fir alight with several thousand twinkling lights. In fact, it has for years been the charge of one local family to drive each November to the mountains of North Carolina to acquire the trees that will be chosen by many for their homes. Among them will be” the “ tree for the ceremony that kicks off the holiday season for the oldest city, with the mayor’s traditional announcement of “lights on!” “This is a city with holiday traditions dating all the way back to the Spanish. We like to think of the duty of selecting the tree that will grace the central plaza of the oldest city in America as a sacred mission,” said Glenn Lightsey, who along with wife Vivian and the family has been providing local families with holiday trees for the past 36 years at their three family operated lots – located on Hwy. 16, U.S. 1 and King Street, and SR-312. Every year, Vivian helps make the final selection for the city tree in the plaza. Most likely it could be just the one she has been watching grow for several years. “She has the eye for that perfect tree,” said Glenn, explaining his wife’s integral role. “I could not do it without her. She is very attentive to detail and spots any flaws right away.”The family gets everyone into the act for the holidays – including sons Dustin, Benjamin, and daughter Cheyenne, all of whom grew up in the family business. Glenn’s father Eddie and the grandkids also help out, there’s 2 year-old Sawyer now toddling around the lot, and 8 year-old Wyatt, who has started the Lightseys’ newest tradition of choosing a Christmas tree for Palencia Elementary School, where he attends. While providing the large, spectacular trees people admire around town at Lightner Museum, Marsh Creek, City of St. Augustine Beach and the Cathedral Basilica, several local charities and churches are provided for as well. Vivian says their family never loses site of what that perfect tree means. And, for many local families, a trip to one of the Lightsey tree lots has become a part of their holiday tradition. “Holiday celebrations revolve around the tree for most families, and that is something we never forget,” said Vivian. “For us, this really is a labor of love,” Glenn explained, confessing with a shy grin, “Each year we like to stand near the tree during the lighting ceremonies just to hear people’s comments and see the joy on their faces.” The city’s Nights of Lights festivities run this year from last month’s tree-lighting to January 31. More information is available at www.nightsoflights.com.

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giving

Homegrown Hunger ............Homemade pie

by OCL Staff

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he town of Hastings, in western St Johns County, where table-flat fields produce seas of corn, cabbage, potatoes and sorghum, was conceived and created to serve agricultural interests. Henry Flagler built it, and named it after Thomas Hastings, his friend and company engineer. As the years passed, its contributions to the local breadbasket expanded to industrial scales and its farmers followed the nation’s trends into big business. Not everyone rode that bandwagon. Historically, agriculture is an industry built on low wages, hard manual labor, and nonexistent benefits, a situation which produces a bumper crop of the forgotten, disenfranchised, and dispossessed. This is the landscape Malea Guiriba discovered when she came to Hastings, and she decided she must do something about it. “No one can do everything, but everybody can do something,” is the way Malea put it when she invented the “Pie in the Sky” organization to provide food and other services to the people of Hastings who were obviously falling through the cracks of locally available social services. She began by making and selling homemade pies and collaborating with other organizations to try to fill in the gap. In just a couple of years, with help from a contingent of regular volunteers, social service agencies and civic organizations, Malea has sold more than a thousand pies and used those funds to deliver more than a million pounds of food to needy families in Hastings and throughout St Johns County, not to mention the coordination of labor and assistance efforts. Here is a sample list of past chores: •Building wheelchair ramps for elderly or disabled homeowners •Helping a family recover after a devastating fire •Providing bus tickets home for a funeral •Repairing a well pump for an elderly homeowner •Providing gas money for chemotherapy visits •Helping a man get a new set of dentures •Buying a tire for two young volunteers who regularly deliver food to the homeless •Arranging insurance for a single mom opening her own business             Written large in the Pie in the Sky mission statement is the effort to raise awareness of and celebrate the mostly unknown agricultural workers of the area. Once a year it presents the “From the Heart” event where area farmworkers are invited to an afternoon of games, dinner and entertainment, as well as a fresh change of clothes and socks, and a bag stocked with toiletries and food. “It’s always on a Sunday, the only day they don’t work, and it is our opportunity to show to these hardworking men and women that we know who they are, and we are thankful for their work and we care,” Malea said. Although some community activists might falter faced with a shoestring budget funded by pie sales, donations and small fundraisers, Malea is undeterred and works relentlessly to ensure that even the smallest contributions make a difference. She still carries with her a plastic bag with a one dollar bill and $1.26 in change, an early donation from an elderly woman who received a food delivery. “That $2.26 reminds me of how important every penny that is donated to our efforts is. That was probably the only money this woman had and she

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gave it to Pie in the Sky.” Pie in the Sky has no paid staff, so all financial contributions go directly back into the community. The organization also works with other local agencies to provide access to elderly services, housing and job assistance and health care. “It’s all the little things (they) need day to day,” Malea has said. “Most of the people we help can’t get help anywhere else.” “Malea’s determination keeps this train on the track,” said Lonesome Bert Hodge, a local folksinger who often appears in support of her fundraising projects, “I grew up around here, I have worked in the agricultural industry, I know first-hand the challenges she faces. She is the Little Engine Who Could. She always seems to find a way.” Finding a way usually includes finding someone to help her, because that is the main way one person makes a difference. She can’t do it all alone. As a truly grassroots organization, Pie in the Sky needs all the help it can get. Donations of food, time and money make real, tangible differences to the people in St. Johns County where Pie in the Sky provides assistance. And a little goes a long way. To learn more and to help please visit www.hastingspieinthesky.com. OCL

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BIKETOBERFEST

Road Trip article and photos by Rick McAllister

and Its Unique Art

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aytona Beach hosted the inaugural Bike Week on January 24, 1937, with the first running of the Daytona 200 Bike Race. It continued in its original format until 1942 when the event was halted for the duration of World War II. On February 24, 1947, the legendary race promoter, Bill France, resumed the race and the event expanded to include what has become today one of the largest motorcycle rallies in the world. Savoring its success, the Daytona Beach Convention and Visitor’s Bureau decided a similar event in the Fall would help boost the economy, and in October of 1992, The Daytona Fall Tour was inaugurated. The original event featured a 125 mile scenic ride through Volusia County, bike shows, races at the Daytona International Speedway and “Bikefest”. . . a series of activities offered by the Daytona Main Street merchants. This Fall Tour has now become known as Biketoberfest, and while not as large as the Spring Bike Week event, it still attracts thousands of bikers and visitors to this area of Florida, including an expanding presence here in St. Augustine. While some residents will complain about the “loud pipes,” most merchants will tell you that these bike events are a great boost for their respective businesses. Motorcycles and their riders have come a long way from the post-war early bike gang years and one of the most fascinating features of these 2 wheel sleds are the creative designs and art work that can be seen cruising our streets, along with the characters who accompany them, this author included..

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event

Nights of Lights, a Holiday Musical Tradition by Jim Stafford

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he Musical Elves at Eclipse Recording Studios have been very busy again this year putting the finishing touches on their Holiday Charity CD. For the 12th consecutive year they have produced a collection of music to benefit the St Augustine Record’s Empty Stocking Fund. This year’s edition is entitled “Nights of Lights, a Holiday Musical Tradition”. Creating these recordings has become a tradition, not only for Jim Stafford and the staff at Eclipse but also for the many musicians and songwriters who contribute their talents free of charge. For most people, the Holiday Season is the happiest time of the year. A joyous is time spent with family and friends full of parties, gifting and taking time off from their busy schedules to relax and reflect on all the wonderful things life has to offer. But, for too many, the season can have an opposite effect, forcing those families to reach beyond their means to provide even the most basic holiday needs. The Empty Stocking Fund was established to help those people make it through. Applicants must demonstrate their need and then they can receive money to help make the holidays happy for their families too. Those needs might be toys for young children, heat for their home or food for their table. “I ask you, what could be a better gift to receive than to know someone is waking up Christmas morning with a smile on their face, that wouldn’t have, had it not been for the kindness you showed? That’s why we do this each year,” Stafford said. That’s why dozens of songwriters and musicians have done so, too – year after year. The result has been a collection of traditional holiday favorites mixed with original compositions, many of which were written specifically for these CDs. This year’s contributors include Barry Rapp, JR Roberts, Rick “Hurricane” Johnson, Tammerlin, Ivan Smith, Big Pineapple, Ron Norris, Rick Kuncicki, Ray Kayanek, Frankie Urzetta, Dave Besley, Steve Bennett, Anastasia, Roger Genovar, Chip Huddleston “The Singing Saint Nick”, The Mac Lacy Band, Mike Hart, The Ancient City Slickers, and Jennifer Serotta. Tens of thousands of dollars have been raised to date and the tradition continues. This year’s CD will be available at Music Matters, Simple Gestures, Aimee’s Hightide Gallery, Seabridge Landing, The St Augustine Record and at Eclipse Studios. It will be available online at eclipserecording.com. There will be CD release party held at the Creekside Dinery on Dec 10 featuring many of the performers on the CD. It is truly a gift that keeps giving because you can enjoy the music year after year! For more information contact Eclipse at 904-794-1872. www.eclipserecording.com

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The St. Augustine Yacht Club’s annual Regatta of Lights is one of the season’s most popular events. This year’s Regatta is scheduled for December 14. Photo by Jackie Hird


Fiesta de Aviles Celebrating our Spanish heritage R

community article and photos by Rick McAllister

ecently, the Aviles Street Merchants Association, hosted the 4th annual Fiesta de Aviles, celebrating the spirit and the traditions of our Spanish heritage and culture. In addition, this fun event for the entire family promotes the special ambiance of Aviles Street, the oldest street in the United States. The big event on Saturday was the running of the bulls, or in our case, the running of the bull. At the sound of the horn, kids and adults alike, raced down Aviles Street against our human bull. The first dozen finishers received special gift certificates offered by various merchants and artists on the street. We are pleased to add that nobody was gored or injured by our slow moving, mechanically-assisted human bull. This fun event, included live music on Saturday, provided by Luis Mario Peral and his Latin Jazz Group, as well as by Lonesome Bert and the Skinny Lizards. Large- headed costumed characters roamed and entertained folks on the street, and artists and craftsmen displayed their wares at the Ximenez-Fatio House Museum. The next day was Sangria Sunday and many of the local merchants competed for the best sangria on the street. There were non-alcoholic sangrias as well, so everyone could taste and vote for their favorite Spanish refreshment. Music was provided by James and Sylvia Kalal. Special t-shirts were available to commemorate this fun festival. In addition to the Aviles Street Merchants Association, sponsors for the event included Southern Exposure Real Estate Services, Skinny Lizard T-Shirts, and Ripleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sightseeing Trains (The Red Trains)..

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worship Abbey of Castle Otttis (Ah-tis) (Interdenominational) Prayer on Sunday Mornings Adults and Mature Children only Vilano Beach | 824.3274

Chapel of Our Lady of La Leche (Catholic) 8:30am, 5pm, Holidays 8:30am, 3pm 27 Ocean Avenue | 824.2809 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Call for Services 500 Deltona Blvd | Shores | 797.4412

Anastasia Baptist Church Sunday 9:30am Contemporary 11am Traditional 1650 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.2166

Christ Our Savior EV Lutheran Church Christian Formation 9am Divine Service 10:30am (deaf interpreted) 21 Milton Street | Uptown | 829.6823

Anchor Faith Church (Word of Faith) Sunday 11am, Wednesday 7:30pm 1764 Tree Blvd | St Augustine | 797.6363

Church Of Christ Sunday Bible Class 9am Sunday Worship 10am, 6pm, Wed 7pm 2900 Lewis Speedway | 824.1800

Ancient City Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Sunday 10:45am, 6pm Wed 6:30pm Bible Study and Prayer 27 Sevilla Street | Downtown | 829.3476

Church at Vilano (Baptist) Bible School 9:30am, Sunday 10:30am Wednesday Prayer and Bible Services 7pm 121 Meadow Ave | Vilano Beach | 827.0477

Berea Seventh Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:15am, Worship 11am Prayer Meeting 7:30pm 151 M L King Ave | Downtown | 824.9145

Community Bible Church Equipping Hour (classes for all ages) 9:30am Fellowship Worship Service10:30am Wed (school schedule) Word of Life Clubs, ages 4 thru High School, Bible Study 6:30pm 3150 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.3875

Bethany Baptist Church Call for Services 5465 CR 208 | Bakersville | 824.5169 Bethel Baptist Church Call for services 222 Riberia St | Downtown | 824.5304

Corpus Christi Catholic Church Daily Mass Mon-Sat 9am • Sat Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Mass 8:30am, 9:45am & 11:00am 6175 Datil Pepper Rd | Shores Area | 797.4842

Bible Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am & 5pm 2485 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.3999

Congregation Sons of Israel (Jewish, Conservative) Services Friday 7:30pm & Saturday 10am 161 Cordova St | Historic District | 829.9532

Bridge of Life Christian Center (Full Gospel Assembly of God) Sunday Worship 10:30am Wed 6:30pm Bible Study Lewis Point Plaza | 797.0669

Crescent Beach Baptist Church Sunday School Bible Fellowship 9:30am Worship 11am, Sunday Worship 6pm 885 SR 206 E | St Augustine | 794.7777

Cathedral-Basilica Parish (Catholic) Saturday Vigil Mass 5pm Sunday Masses 7am, 9am &11am, 5pm Daily Mass 7am Monday - Saturday 38 Cathedral PL | Historic Distict | 824.2806

Dawson Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Sunday School 9:30am, Sunday Worship 110am, Bible Study Wednesday 7pm 225 N Orange St | St. Augustine | 824.8049

Celebration Church-St Augustine 10:30am Sundays St. Augustine High School Auditorium Childcare and Youth Services are provided 3205 Varella Ave | 737.1121 | celebration.org Center for Spiritual Living Call for Services 1795 Old Moultrie Road | 825.3600

Family Worship Center (Christ Centered Worship) Sunday 10am, Thursday 7pm 2040 SR 207 | 819.9970 First Church of Christ Scientist (Christian Science and Reading Room) Sunday School and Service 10am Wednesday Service 5:30pm 2555 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.8882

First Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:45am Monday Word and Action Bible Study 6:45pm Wednesday Prayer Service 12 noon 89 St Francis Street | Downtown | 824.6590 First United Methodist Church Sunday 8:15am & 11am - Traditional Worship Sunday 9:30am - Contemporary 118 King Street | Downtown | 829.3459 Grace United Methodist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 8:30am, 11am Junior Church during 11am Carrera St at Cordova St | Downtown | 829.8272 Good News PCA (Christian) Sunday Worship 9am & 10:30am Nursery provided for all services 1357 Wildwood Drive | 819.0064 Heritage Baptist Church Bible Fellowship 9:30am Sunday School 10am Sunday Worship 11am & 6pm Wed 7pm prayer meeting 1480 Wildwood Dr | 824.8888 Hineni Messianic Fellowship (Messianic - Jewish & Non Jewish Believers) Friday Shabbat 7:30pm Tuesday Bible Study 7:30pm 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 827.9731 Holy Cross Charismatic Orthodox Sunday 10am 110 Masters Drive | 810.0535 Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of St Augustine 2940 CR 214 | 829.0504 Homeport Christian Church Sundays 9am Traditional 10:45am Contemporary Wednesday 6:30pm 5605 US 1 S | St Augustine South | 797.8921 Hurst Chapel AME Church (Methodist) Call for Services 28-1/2 Bernard St | Downtown | 824.0500 Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall South Cong.- Sunday 4pm & Thur 7:30pm North Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Wed 7:30pm East Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Thursday 7:30pm 735 Kings Estate Rd | 797.7599 Lighthouse Church of God Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening 6pm, Wed Evening 7pm 1230 Kings Estate Road | 797.6996

Helping Families and Friends Honor Their Loved One We will assist in every aspect of the funeral or cremation service. As St. Augustine’s only full service funeral home and cemetery, we can handle all the details for you. “Four generations of the Craig family Just one call - one location!

serving the areas families”

1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com volume 7 old city life Issue 7 74


Mc Dowell Baptist Church 16 Bayview Drive | St Augustine Call for Services 829-8388 Memorial Lutheran Church of the Martyrs Sunday School Sundays Traditional 8am Contemporary 10:30am 3375 US 1 South | 797.4377 Memorial Presbyterian Church Sunday 8:30am Informal, 9:30am Church School 10:50am Pipe Organ Prelude, 11am Worship 36 Sevilla St | Historic District | 829.6451 Mill Creek Baptist Church Sunday Bible Service 10am, Sunday Worship 11am, 6:30pm, Wed 7pm 6019-A State Rd. 16 | Mill Creek | 940.3130

Saint Photios National Shrine (Greek Orthodox) Monday - Saturday, Sunday Service Friday 11am 41 St George St | St Augustine | 829.8205 San Sebastian Catholic Church Saturday Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Masses 8am,10am, 12 noon Spanish Daily Mass 8am Tues - Friday 1112 SR 16 | 824.6625 Seventh - Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:30am, Worship 11am 555 State Road 16 | St Augustine | 824.5855 Shiloh Baptist Church Call for Services 271 West King St | Downtown | 824.3913

1475 Old Dixie Highway • St. Augustine Tabernacle Baptist Church Call for Services (904) 824-1672 280 Duval St | aigFuner DowntownalHome.com | 829.2041 www.Cr

Temple Bet Yam (Jewish Reform) Services First and Third Friday 7:30pm 2055 Wildwood Rd | St Augustine | 819.1875 The Village Church (Interdenominational) Bible School 9:00am Services 9am & 11am, Children’s 11am Adult Bible Study 10am, Youth 5pm 4225 Pacetti Rd | World Golf Village | 940.6768

Miracle Center Ministries (Non-Denominational) Sunday 10:30am 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 824.9673

Saint Augustine Shores United Methodist Church Sunday School 10am, Traditional 9am Contemporary 11am 724 Shores Blvd | St Augustine Shores | 797.4416

Moultrie Baptist Church Sunday School 9:45am Service 11am, 6pm, Wed 6:30pm 3699 US 1 S | Moultrie Creek | 797.9005

Saint Cyprian’s Episcopal Church Sunday Holy Eucharist 10am Third Sunday 5:30pm 37 Lovett Street | 829.8828

New Life Baptist Church Call for Service Times 346 Varella Avenue • Near SR 16 | 823.9537

Saint Francis In-the-Field Episcopal Church 9am, Sunday 10am 895 Palm Valley Rd | Ponte Vedra | 543.0112

Turning Point at Calvary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:40am Worship 9:40am, 11am, 6pm 3500 SR 16 • 829.9795

New Saint James Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am 135 Rodriquez Street | 824.6500

Saint Luke AME Church African Methodist Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 11am 694 W Pearl St | Downtown | 824.6120

Unitarian-Universalists Fellowship of St. Augustine Sunday 10:30am 2487 A1A South | St Augustine | 471.2047

Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church Saturday Vigil 4:00pm Sunday masses 8am, 10am, 12 noon Daily mass Tue 8:15am, Thurs 8:15am 5950 SR 16 | 824.8688

Saint Mary’s Baptist Church Call for Services 69 Washington St | Downtown | 824.1314

Wards Creek Baptist Church Sunday Services 7am, 10:45am 7pm Home Bible Studies Wednesday Youth 6pm - Service 7pm 7730 County Rd 13 N | Wards Creek | 522.0128

Pentecostal Fellowship Center Church Sunday Schoool 10:00am Worship 11am, 6pm | Youth Thursday 5:30pm 1065 Kings Estate Rd | Kings Estates | 797.6040

Saint Paul AME Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship Services 10:45am Bible Study Wednesday 6pm 85 ML King Avenue | 829.3918

Trinity Episcopal Parish Holy Eurcharist 7:30, 9am Family Service & 11:15am Wednesday 10am Holy Eurcharist and Healing Service followed by Bible Study 215 St. George St | Historic District | 824.2876

Zion Baptist Church Call for Services 94 Evergreen Ave | St Augustine | 826.1424

Pilgrim Church (United Church of Christ) Service Sunday 10am 5880 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.5187 Radiant Family Church Sunday Worship 10:45am, Wednesday 6:30pm 1515 CR 210 | 808.7390 Saint Anastasia Catholic Church Saturday 4pm, Sunday 8am & 10:30am Daily Mass 9am Monday-Friday 5205 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.5364

“Our Family Serving Your Family Since 1915” 4th Generation 1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com volume 7 old city life Issue 7 75


business

Veranda Rose

Cure for the common gift

by OCL Staff

O

EMMA Concert Association & Flagler College present

Upcoming Performances • 2013 - 2014 Season

Nov. 9, 2013 ! 7:30 p.m.! ! ! Dec. 17 & 18! 7:30 p.m.!

New Directions Veterans Choir Award-winning Men & Women Singers

$30

Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra Holiday Pops - a St.Augustine Tradition

$35

Jan. 4, 2014 ! 7:30 p.m.!

PHILADANCO Dance Company A highly professional, modern Troupe

$35

Jan. 19, 2014! 2:00 p.m.! ! !

Ran Dank & Soyeon Kate Lee Prize-winning Artists on four-hand Piano

$30

ne of our favorite things about St. Augustine is the Holidays. One can complete their entire shopping list right here in town without driving all the way to Jacksonville. St. Augustine is the literal “Cure for the Common Gift.” Our town is home to so many unique shops, like Veranda Rose. Cecelia Aldrich and Christy Rose Cobbs opened Veranda Rose in March of 2013 and have made quite a name for themselves in a short period of time. They describe their shop as “Creative Collective” and in addition to artworks by Wendy Tatter, Shelly Anne Cottage, Natalie Buckley, and Adriana Cabezas Lulkoski, Veranda Rose offers a large selection of metal crafts, wood sculptors and plants. If it’s a gift you’re looking for, chances are you’ll find it at Veranda Rose. Of course December will bring many more Holiday

Purchase tickets online: www.emmaconcerts.com Like EMMA Concerts - follow us on Facebook Children & Students with ID $5 - all Performances

themed creations like wreaths and ornaments, but the big news is the classes and workshops that are being organized now focusing on wreath-making, gardening, air plants and vintage furniture painting. Look for classes to begin in the New Year. Green With Envy Gardening partners with Veranda Rose providing a large selection of Pottery, Plants, and designer Container Gardens. All in all, Veranda Rose and its owners are a delight. They invite you by to say hello at 2820 Lewis Speedway, on the corner of State Road 16. See why Veranda Rose and their “Favorite Things” will be one of your favorite Holiday stops.

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Photos by: Melissa Roby

seen

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Photos left to right - April & Marcus Morton • John & Kim Koloss • Norma Gillis, Levia Jacob, Bill O’kane, Elise O’kane • David Swindle, Brad Burchfield, Melissa Swindle • Carol Whestley, John & Karen Lea • Paul Daum and Trish Mcbride • Emil & Janice Hernandez • Neytha Lewis, Barbie Garrett • Barbara Johnson, Bill Johnson, JB and becky Cross, Jim Byron Jennifer Byron • Jennifer O’Connor, Tommie Lee Lehman, Amanda Cretens • Camille Falconer, Betty Clark, Karen Cordaro • Fran Hampel and Deborah Blackman • Beverly Thibodeau, Kristin Thompson, Maryellen Williamson • Pete Kuc, Chad Turner, Sarah Bell, Corey Mcbride, Myles Newell volume 7

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he Flavors of Florida’s Historic Coast Top Chef Cook-off was held on October 10th at the beautiful Renaissance World Golf Village Resort. An iron-chef style cookoff was the entertainment for the evening, with the title Top Chef going to Brett Smith(Sawgrass Marriott Resort). Proceeds from this event supported the Home Again St. Johns, the primary organization responsible for meeting the needs of the area’s homeless.

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Hot Shot Bakery and Cafe

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community

The Saint Augustine Amphitheatre music among the trees

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n a warm May evening in Saint Augustine, the air is filled with the scent of jasmine and the sound of brass instruments playing the music of Havana. Women and men of all ages are swinging each other around the dance floor, skirts swaying with their movement and the sound of shoes clacking in rhythm with the beat. Laughter mixes with the music as the audience and the dancers roam and mingle amongst the vendors selling black beans, plantains and roasted pork. The night lights up with gold, blue and pink hues from the lights of the stage. A feast for the senses, the Saint Augustine Sol Cuban Jazz filled the late-spring air, It was a reminder of how even a spectacular evening such as this is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how much draw our Amphitheatre has for musical, and live events. Though our “backyard” venue may seem small compared to larger city venues, make no mistake that it has many offerings to set it apart from more conventional concert and event spaces: a staff that treats each event with the same level of commitment and purpose as the last, as well as a community that shows its love every chance it gets. Driving down Anastasia Boulevard, there is a stretch of road that is lined with trees and a small sandy patch that separates the road from Anastasia State Park. It is in the middle of that patch of trees that the marquee for the Amphitheatre, a single beacon among the otherwise untouched foliage, sits as a signal to the community that something special is just a turn and a short drive away. Acts such as Stevie Nicks, Hank Williams, Jr., Steve Miller Band, O.A.R. and Steely Dan are enjoyed regularly in a setting that is not just acoustically perfect, but beautiful as well. It’s not very often that nature and music meet in such a lovely way. General Manager Ryan Murphy, agrees. “The location of the Amphitheatre cannot be beat...and the facility itself is gorgeous. But beyond this, we have some of the most amazing audiences. We also have a really great staff that is welcoming and considerate of the artists and crews that come here. It all seems to feed into each other and create a vibe that is infectious and memorable.” This year, the staff helped the City of Saint Augustine put on what was perhaps one of largest musical events hosted here; the Gentlemen Of The Road tour, headlined by the world-renowned band Mumford & Sons. Though GOTR was held at Francis Field and not at the Amphitheatre, the staff was an integral part in making sure the show went off without a hitch. Reaching out to Murphy and his crew only goes to show the level of confidence the city has in the the staff ’s expertise and knowledge in planning events of this magnitude. But music is not the only thing on the menu. The Amphitheatre also plays host to Expos, Farmer’s Markets, workshops, movie nights and festivals. One of the holiday favorites held at the venue, Winter Wonderland will be replaced this year by Community First’s “A December to Remember”. The ongoing event features an elf village, holiday train rides, a nightly snow fall and visits from the Jolly Old Elf himself, Santa Claus, as well as a free live theatre, dance shows, concerts and a drive-in movie theatre. I asked Murphy if he agreed that the Amphitheatre should remain a government funded and run agency reassuring. “I do indeed, if the community chooses to support it.  We have gotten extremely proactive in the last couple years to make sure we are working smarter with what we have here. I appreciate the fact that the facility is government managed as it keeps everything transparent and we are held accountable for all the decisions we make.  We are also a quite involved staff and… if you privatized the Amphitheatre, you would have less involvement in volume 7

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by Shana L. London

the community and with community needs.” This involvement in the community extends to charity and civic events as well. The dedicated non-profit group Friends of the Saint Augustine Amphitheatre is essential in helping local community and charity groups hold their events at the venue. Murphy also notes that they make an effort to provide a wide-variety of fund-raising events for charity and community organizations. The staff of the Amphitheatre enjoyed bringing back the “Nite Owl Cinema” this year, which allows individuals and families to enjoy the space of the venue and a night out without having to lay out the cost of concert tickets throughout the year. Murphy also mentions that one of the venue’s favorite events to put on is the Murray Middle School production of “Seussical the Musical” that is performed by the school’s students for elementary children. It is clear that the the staff are dedicated to not only providing the best entertainment they can to Saint Augustine, but also to making sure that they are allowing the residents and visitors of our city to be as much a part of the experience of the Amphitheatre as possible. When speaking to anyone at the venue, it is loud and clear that the community is at the heart of everything they do, and that it’s a community they feel lucky to be a part of. OCL 79


travel

Enjoy the Holidays on the High Seas!

E

xperience all the joys of the holidays without any of the stress of the season. Savor sumptuous holiday meals, beautiful decorations and fun filled days with your family, with no responsibilities of cleaning, cooking, decorating or hosting out-of town guests. Relax and enjoy a holiday family reunion knowing there are activities designed for every age and interest. It’s all possible on a holiday cruise! Perhaps your family situation has changed significantly since last year and you want to celebrate in a new way. Try a cruise without all the fuss and meet interesting new people. When my wife’s father passed away, she and her mother took a Christmas cruise, and found that this was a perfect holiday in a new way. What can you expect on a holiday cruise? For one thing, cruise lines serve special meals. For instance, expect latkes during Hanukkah. On Christmas, you’ll find roast turkey, along with such traditional trimmings as stuffing and cranberry sauce. Nearly all cruise lines decorate to some degree, starting with pumpkins and cornucopias, followed by wreaths and decorated trees. Holiday decorations generally go up around

Thanksgiving and stay until the New Year, but the timing does vary from ship to ship. Many ships will offer special religious services for holidays. On New Year’s Eve, a ship-wide countdown to midnight is to be expected, as is a Champagne toast. Luxury cruise line, Crystal, does a full balloon drop in the atrium to ring in the New Year. volume 7

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For the most part, the cruise lines stick to traditional festivities, but there can be some surprises. We have enjoyed the wonderful gingerbread house display created by the Chefs on Royal Caribbean. Princess Cruises employs snow-making machines to offer daily snowfalls in the atrium throughout the month of December. On Disney Cruise Line’s private island, Castaway Cay, the tram will be magically transformed into a sleigh. Most cruise lines have made special provisions for children onboard during the holiday season. Always expect a visit from Santa on Christmas. Holiday cruising has become a traditional way to bond families who reside in different regions of the country. Family members may come from California, Texas, Missouri, Ohio or Maine, and all meet together for a family cruise to celebrate the holidays. Your cruise agent can help you plan for a cruise that meets all the family’s preferences. One family group I know books a suite for the grandparents which enables the rest of the family to have a gathering place. In the same area, other family members choose adjoining balcony or inside cabins depending upon their budget. They decorate their doors and rooms for the season.

And of course they bring a small artificial tree for the suite! It does take a cruise agent to book all the rooms together but remember that there is no cost to the customer for using a cruise agent. The ultimate holiday shopping cruise may be a European river cruise. It is also a great time to experience many Christmas traditions in other countries. Most river cruises stop everyday at a

by Tom Bartimus

different interesting port. You can visit historic towns from Paris to the heart of Normandy, from Amsterdam to Budapest or many other exciting destinations. Although river cruises may seem a bit pricey, their fares include many extras that you would pay extra for on the larger cruise lines, such as shore excursions and wine with dinner. In the past, holiday cruises have been sold a year in advance making it very difficult to book late. However, with the economy, there aren’t as many people booking a year in advance, so there are plenty of good cruise values still available for this year, that is if you book now! Don’t wait until the week before a holiday to book, at that point either the price is at its highest or there just aren’t staterooms available. No matter what destination or ship you choose, you can truly celebrate the holiday season on the high seas. And it’s a great time to spend quality time with family, so instead of doing all the preparations and cooking at home, take the family on a cruise for the holidays and start a new tradition. The Old City Life Cruise on Royal Caribbean’s Oasis of the Seas, is a great place to start your tradition! We’ll be sailing Dec. 14-21 from Ft. Lauderdale to the Eastern Caribbean. Don’t miss cruising on this special ship with the Old City Life group. Contact me today for more information: (904) 372-1703 or TBartimus@CruisesInc.com. OCL

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Helping Younger Generation Brings Challenges

finance

by Alan Bratic, CFP

A

s the American population ages into retirement, younger generations may be the ones responsible for picking up the pieces. There’s only one problem: the younger generation is in no position to do so. A recent study by the Urban Institute, published on March 15, 2013, found Americans from young adulthood up to about age 40 have accrued less wealth than their parents at the same age even as the average wealth has doubled over the last quarter-century. So, what is to blame? The truth is, it’s not a single issue. A broad range of economic factors has conspired to suppress wealth-building for younger American workers. According to the study, they face a number of issues such as stagnant pay, declining median incomes, a housing collapse, and soaring student debt. The cost of college tuition today is just one of those economic factors. “Rising tuition threatens to discourage all, but the well-off, from going to and finishing college, restraining future economic growth, and widening the gap between winners and losers in the U.S. economy,” wrote David Wessel, economics editor and columnist for The Wall Street Journal. “The College Board says over the past 20 years, the inflation-adjusted average published cost of tuition and fees at a four-year state university have more than doubled. Factor in scholarships and tax breaks and it’s still up more than 50 percent. “Over the same period, the income of the typical family in the middle class has risen only seven percent. That’s one reason student borrowing is up so much,” he noted in the same recent article. In addition to these challenges, public policy now burdens the young with ever-increasing interest payments on the federal debt. The study says the cost of preserving retirement and health benefits for older Americans and baby boomers should not be passed on to younger generations that have already been losing out on their share of private wealth. If current

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trends are not reversed, today’s younger Americans may be more dependent when they retire on safety net programs that are less capable of providing basic support, according to the study. “In this country, the expectation is that every generation does better than the previous generation,” said Caroline Ratcliff, an author of the study. “This is no longer the case. This generation might have less.” Over the years, we have seen increasing numbers of parents and grandparents spending more than they anticipated for their children and grandchildren. And, with increased longevity, this may affect their own retirement plans in the years ahead. Thus, it is crucial not to only have a well designed accumulation plan, but to create a long-lasting distribution/ income plan as well. For some reason, most folks will concentrate on growing and accumulating their wealth and sometimes fail to adjust their plans once the income needs arise. Take the first step to ensure your retirement by doing a financial plan. It’s crucial to helping you decide the amount you can contribute, if any, and how it might affect your own retirement. No matter what issues either generation face, having a plan helps ensure you’ve done everything you can to prepare yourself for the challenges of the future. And, that is a responsibility both generations must realize. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. No strategy can assure success of protect against loss. The above material was prepared in association with Peak Advisor Alliance. Securities and advisory services offered through Cetera Advisors LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity.

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he Lightner Museum was the host of the 2013 Halla Galla, presented by the Junior Service League. The theme of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Steampunkâ&#x20AC;?, a unique trend sweeping the country. Proceeds from this annual event go to support Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bridge of Saint Augustine.

Photos by: Justin Itnyre

Photos Left to Right: Todd & Heather Neville â&#x20AC;˘ Amanda and Ryan Alton â&#x20AC;˘ Andy Norman (2012 Society King), Robert Mathis (2013 Society King) â&#x20AC;˘ Brad and Rachel Hughes â&#x20AC;˘ Jessica Cooksey, Erika Metzger, Christine Chapman, Jenny Burnett, Sheila Sagear â&#x20AC;˘ TJ Sartiano, Jennifer Tesori â&#x20AC;˘ Angela Ward, Jacque Watson â&#x20AC;˘ Lauren Goedelman, Jane Mathis

Lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Not Perfect.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to help. Personal Injury s Auto Accidents s Wrongful Death Criminal Law s Family Law s Medical Malpractice Nursing Home Neglect/Abuse

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Hunter Conrad â&#x20AC;˘ Julie K. Kurtz â&#x20AC;˘ Patrick T. Canan â&#x20AC;˘ Andrew Morgan volume 7

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Old City Life Magazine Dec. 2013  

The City & Lifestyle Magazine of Saint Augustine, Florida.

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