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A Guide to Educational Programs and Partnerships in Environment and Sustainable Development at the Earth Institute

Office of Academic and Research Programs


Contents 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 9 9 9 10 10 11 11 11 11 12 13 13 13 13

Overview Integrated Project Week (IPW) Middle School Partnership (MSP) The Technology, Research, Ecology and Exchange for Students (TREES) Learning through Ecology and Environmental Field Studies (LEEFS) School-based Ecology and Environmental Discoveries (SEEDS) Earth 2 Class (E2C) Lamont-Doherty High School Research Program Planning Land Use with Students (PLUS) Secondary School Field Research Project (SSFRP) Columbia Green Roof Consortium – Green Roof Monitoring Project Earth Intern Program Lamont-Doherty Summer Intern Program Aquanauts Professional Development Program in Environmental Sustainability Ice-Pod Polar & Climate Curriculum and Educational Activities NSF RCN-SEES Multidisciplinary Approaches to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) The Schools2Schools (S2S) Connectivity Project Core Library Open House Public Lectures World Science Festival A Day in the Life of the Hudson Big Green Theater Eco-Expert Student Mentorship A Climate Cabaret (PositiveFeedback)


Overview The Education Committee aims to support partnerships between the Earth Institute and local schools and teachers as a form of public outreach and education. Together with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and various Earth Institute research centers, the Office of Academic and Research Programs will provide centralized support for this initiative. This compendium is a compilation of existing partnerships in several areas, including: student programs, professional development, outreach events, citizen science, and other educational initiatives.


Student Programs Office of Academic and Research Programs (Middle/High Schools) Integrated Project Week (IPW) Groups of students are assigned to an IPW course during a designated week of the school year to explore a topic or theme in depth, in a project-based format. A teachers’ curriculum for IPW week could be a combination of classroom work, field trips, guest speakers, and workshops that culminate in a showcase event. Target audience: Grades 6-8 Teachers Link to program: http://eices.columbia.edu/education-training/k-12-education/integrated-projectweek-ipw/ Primary contact: Nancy Degnan Middle School Partnership (MSP) Works with NYC Title I middle schools, training teachers to develop hands-on, inquiry-based, ecologydriven curriculum units with an accompanying teacher resource plan and assessment rubric to promote student-centered teaching and learning. Target audience: Grades 6-8 Teachers Link to program: http://eices.columbia.edu/education-training/k-12-education/middle-schoolpartnership-msp/ Primary contact: Nancy Degnan The Technology, Research, Ecology and Exchange for Students (TREES) A program that helps teachers design, implement and evaluate STEM ICT teaching strategies for the study of ecology, biodiversity and environmental sustainability in urban ecosystems. Target audience: Grades 6-8 Teachers Link to program: http://eices.columbia.edu/education-training/k-12-education/technology-researchecology-and-exchange-for-students-trees/ Division: NA Primary contact: Nancy Degnan Operational costs: NA Funding Source: NSF 3-year $1,200,000 grant- Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers Division Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (Middle/High Schools) Learning through Ecology and Environmental Field Studies (LEEFS) The grant is focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math – the STEM disciplines – and effectively links advanced graduate students and their research to middle and high school teachers and their students in Title I/III schools throughout New York City. Target audience: Grades 6-12; Columbia DEES; E3B SEAS Graduate Students; Link to program: http://eices.columbia.edu/education-training/k-12-education/learning-throughecology-and-environmental-field-studies-leefs/ Division: Geochemistry Principal Investigator: Robert Newton Operational costs: 30% of the total grant is for administration


Funding Source: NSF 5-year $3,100,000 grant- Division of Education and Human Resources. Some matching funds from the GSAS Dean’s office. Funding ends May 2013. Measures of impact: NA Evaluations: Evaluation via an external evaluator, Deborah Ward; annual reports logged at NSF. School-based Ecology and Environmental Discoveries (SEEDS) Designed to extend the SSFRP programming to research-based, project-based learning in projects closer to three of the schools we work with. The money is mainly earmarked for teacher and student stipends and research supplies. There is a small amount (3 weeks per year) of salary for PI in the grant. Target audience: Grades 9-12 teachers and students Link to program: http://eices.columbia.edu/education-training/k-12-education/school-based-ecologyand-environmental-discoveries-seeds/ Division: Geochemistry Principal Investigator: Robert Newton Operational costs: NA Funding Source: NSF 4-year $400,000 grant, funding ends June 2014 Measures of impact: NA Evaluations: Evaluation via an external evaluator, Deborah Ward; annual reports logged at NSF. Earth 2 Class (E2C) E2C consists of “Saturday Workshops” and summer Science/math/technology workshops. K-14 teacherparticipants combine presentations by research scientists about "cutting-edge" investigations with acquisition of new background information and classroom-ready applications. Earth Science curriculum units, web-based student investigations, links to useful internet pages and national and state standards, and other features provide a variety of resources for teachers and their students. Target audience: Grades K-12 teachers, students, and general public Link to program: http://www.earth2class.org/ Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Mike Passow Operational costs: NA Funding Source: NSF Geoscience Education Grant Measures of impact: NA Evaluations: NA Lamont Doherty High School Research Program Collaboration with different schools in the City of New York to include the Advanced Science Research program at the Manhattan Center for Science and Mathematics High School, Tenafly High School and Ossinig High School. Students work on three-year, college-level research project. Students choose their own research subject, find a scientist-mentor and commit to two summers in the lab. Target audience: High school students Division: Office of Education and Outreach Primary contact: Minosca Alcantara; research mentors: Nicole Davi, Terry Plank, Brendan Buckley, Nina Keul Operational costs: Salary support of coordinator Funding Source: Pro bono by resaerchers, 6-8 weeks of time investment per year Measures of impact: No systematic measures in place Evaluations: No evaluation structure in place yet


Planning Land Use with Students (PLUS) The P.L.U.S. program is designed to show students how local planning issues can be of concern to them. Students work in teams with students from other schools in their community to address concepts of sustainable planning examining important environmental, social and economic land planning questions. Target audience: Grades 6-12 Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Margie Turrin Operational costs: 1 month salary support for education coordinator. Funding Source: Last year of funding Measures of impact: Tracking returning schools, returning professionals, and response from the County. Evaluations: Evaluation of students, teachers, facilitators, and professional mentors who join us for the event. Secondary School Field Research Project (SSFRP) The SSFRP brings together teachers and students from neighborhood (non-exam-entry) schools with top-level scientists from Columbia’s earth, environmental and ecological departments. Mission/objectives (if available) Target audience: Grade 9-12 Link to program: http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/ssfrp/about-ssfrp Primary contact: Robert Newton Operational costs: Some costs covered, especially the Program Director’s salary, by the grades K-12 LEEFS, TREES and SEEDS grants. $180,000 per year to include salaries, supplies, and transportation. Admin costs have been highly variable over the past 6 years. Our estimate of the administrative requirements is approximately 2 person-months per year. Funding Source: Various private grants from Toyota; Society for Science and the Public; Columbia Community Fund; Options and Futures; Young Women’s Leadership Network; Urban Assembly; Harlem Children’s Society; and Lamont Climate Center. Measures of impact: No systematic measures in place. 2010 Lamont Development follow-up showed that all graduates go to 4-year colleges. 2012 Young Women’s Leadership School review of East Harlem graduates showed very high success at entry to top-tier colleges and success procuring college scholarships. Evaluations: NA School of Engineering and Applied Science/Earth Institute (High School) Columbia Green Roof Consortium - Green Roof Monitoring Project Program works with high school teachers and students to monitor the performance of vegetated rooftops and teach students about the benefits of green infrastructure for urban environments. Schools worked with include Bronx Design and Construction Academy, Ethical Culture Fieldston Upper School, and Regis High School. Mission/objectives: To optimize technologies’ functionality and potential benefits to human health and the economy. Target audience: Grade 9-12 Division: School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Primary contact: Patricia Culligan Operational costs: Run by faculty, research scientists and students Funding Source: NSF $500,000; NSF, EPA, Tectatech, and ConEd


Measures of impact: Consortium is not funded to do education in K-12, but has been proactive in engaging High School students in science and monitoring projects the consortium is engaged in. The project has had several Intel Science Projects that were supervised by the Consortia PIs Evaluations: Schools conduct their own evaluations of their science curricula Lamont Undergraduate/Graduate Student Initiatives Earth Intern Program The Earth Intern Program offers the chance to experience scientific research as an undergraduate student. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. Mission/objectives (if available) Target audience: Columbia College, Engineering, General Studies, and Barnard students who have completed their junior or sophomore year with majors (or anticipated majors) in earth science, environmental science, chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, engineering or political science. Graduating seniors are not eligible. Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Dr. Dallas Abbott Operational costs: 6 months' salary support for education coordinator Funding Source: Earth Institute, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Barnard College, Columbia College, the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University, and Columbia Engineering. Measures of impact: Formative evaluations in place Evaluations: Formal evaluations in place Lamont-Doherty Summer Intern Program The Lamont-Doherty Summer Intern Program offers the chance to experience scientific research as an undergraduate. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. Target audience: The program is open to US citizens or permanent residents who have completed their junior or sophomore year in college with majors in earth science, environmental science, chemistry, biology, and physics. Link to program (if anything is relevant) Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Dr. Dallas Abbott Operational costs: 6 months' salary support for education coordinator. Funding Source: Sponsored by the National Science Foundation Ocean Sciences REU Sites Program. Measures of impact: NA Evaluations: Formative evaluations in place. Columbia Water Center Undergraduate/Graduate student initiatives Aquanauts The Aquanauts is a student club formed to create awareness and address the issues of water scarcity and the lack of availability of safe clean drinking water. The club engages students and faculty from various disciplines at Columbia’s undergraduate and graduate schools to tackle some of the most pressing global water challenges, through research both on and off the field.The Aquanauts develops projects to analyze supply chains, assess regions and examine particular sets of water issues, working on both policy and technical analyses that are region and location focused with a long term perspective. Designated regions will receive sustained interactions and focused research, client advising “Water Guru,� and media coverage of issues and solutions. The group seeks partnerships on such projects with governments and corporations who wish to integrate water initiatives into their development and CSR


activities. The group seeks to become a “Center of Excellence” on all matters related to water by defining general solutions that could be easily replicated in similar regions. In addition, the Aquanauts will aim to partner with organizations in developing countries and places with limited access to clean water, in order to facilitate the implementation of these solutions. Link to program: http://water.columbia.edu/aquanauts/ Target audience: Columbia University students. Primary contact: Melissa von Mayrhauser Research projects EPA Campus RainWorks Challenge: The Aquanauts Fall 2012 student group participated in the U.S. EPA’s Office of Water Campus RainWorks Challenge for undergraduate and graduate students. Our team created an innovative green infrastructure design for the Engineering Terrace on Columbia’s Morningside campus to manage stormwater. National Water Rates Study: Columbia Water Center has a number of interns working to put together a comprehensive database on water rates in the US and demographic and physiographic factors that may relate to them under the guidance of Professor Upmanu Lall. The idea is to have a publicly available and updated archive that supports analyses of what is driving rates and how it may relate to past (e.g., a protracted drought, or groundwater depletion or regulatory action or demand growth) or future scarcity (or treatment needs or ecological services) in the region. Publications include: Floods in Brazil, National Risk Management – Flood Modeling in France, and Solar Powered Reverse Osmosis


Professional Development Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability Professional Development Program in Environmental Sustainability Provides graduate students in education and K-12 teachers the opportunity to create integrated units of curricula for their classrooms. Student research projects may address topics such as the value of biodiversity in both the natural and built urban landscape, the policy and practice of watershed management, or issues of eco-tourism and its impact on tropical ecosystems. Target audience: Grades K-12 Teachers and graduate students in Education Link to program: http://eices.columbia.edu/education-training/professional-development-program/ Division: NA Primary contact: Desmond Beirne Operational costs: Funding Source: Program and application fees, tuition for each 10-hour course is $720 Measures of impact: Evaluations: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Ice-Pod Ice-Pod develops an integrated ice imaging system that can measure in detail both the ice surface and the ice bed. The baseline of critical data collected through this project will be shared through a community research facility, providing data to scientists and educators globally. Mission: To develop an integrated ice imaging system that can measure in detail both the ice surface and the ice bed in Antarctica and Greenland Target audience: Grades 6-12; undergraduate students; educators, scientists Link to program: http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/icepod/ Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Margie Turrin Operational costs: 4 months of salary support for education coordinator Funding Source: NSF Major Research Instrumentation grant. Funding ends 2015 Measures of impact: Working with teacher advisory group Evaluations: No formal evaluation Polar & Climate Curriculum & Education Activities Curriculum development developed through a series of ongoing research and outreach initiatives Target audience: Grades 3-12; educators Link to program: http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/edu/polareducation/Outreach.html Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Margie Turrin Operational costs: 3 months of salary support for education coordinator Funding Source: NSF Antarctic Research Grants. Funding ends 2015 Measures of impact: CRED is involved in developing some of the impact metrics - this is all part of the overall project Evaluations: An extensive evaluation piece is part of overall project (which runs through EI). There is an external evaluator GRG – they just completed the evaluation of phase one of this program.


Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy NSF RCN-SEES on multidisciplinary approaches to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) The RCN-SEES will develop and run a bi-annual webinar series to provide high light introductions to the basic concepts and recent challenges/advances of CCUS across its multiple disciplines of science, engineering, technology, law and policy, economics, and social sciences. These webinars will be geared towards K-12 teachers but will be open to the public as well. Support for the project is through the NSFRCN award. The RCN-SEES team will also develop an experiment module for hands-on demonstration for K-12 students based on the proposed research. IT will be designed to teach students about various scientific and engineering fundamentals of CCUS technologies. Primary Contact: Alissa Park Funding Source: National Science Foundation, Research Coordination Network-Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability Millennium Cities Initiatives and Teachers College The Schools2Schools (S2S) Connectivity Project The School2School Connectivity Project (S2S) assists science, math, technology (ICT) middle school teachers at 15 junior high schools in Kumasi and Ghana in utilizing computers, the Internet and other technologies to enhance their lesson planning and delivery. The Project also promotes cross-cultural educational exchanges between the Kumasi students and teachers and selected peer students and teachers in New York City classrooms. Target audience: Grades 6-8, 17 schools currently involved Primary contact: Susan Blaustein


Outreach Events Core Library Development of Educational & Outreach activities for school; hands on demonstration and exhibit display Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Margie Turrin Operational costs: 2 months of salary support for education coordinator Funding Source: NSF Funding until 2017 Measures of impact: Not available yet, grant was just funded. Evaluations: Administrative (percentage of time that is spent on project) Open House A day of free lectures, demonstrations and workshops for adults and children. Target audience: K-12 teachers, students, geoscientists and the general public. Division: Office of Development Primary contact: Stacey Vasallo Operational costs: Event costs $70-$75,000, or 4-5 months of cumulative salary support for coordinators (2 ½ months for Stacey Vasallo, 2-3 months for Erika and Roney) Funding Source: Project Directorate, Open House collection in 2012 was $18,850; in 2011 it was $16,100. Measures of impact: 2012 evaluation of event Evaluations: 2012 evaluation of event Public Lectures Four different Lamont researchers provide presentations on their current research. Target audience: K-12 teachers, students, geoscientists and the general public. Division: Office of Development Primary contact: Stacey Vasallo Operational costs: 3-4 weeks of salary support for coordinator Funding Source: Project Directorate, attendees pay $5 at the door, in 2012 $2,300 was collected Measures of impact: None Evaluations: None World Science Festival Discover incredible marine life through an ancient fishing technique, join a leading botanist for a parkwide botanical safari, and learn the engineering secrets of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge and more. Target audience: K-12 teachers, students, geoscientists and the general public. Division: Office of Development Primary contact: Stacey Vasallo Operational costs: 2-3 weeks' salary support for coordinator Funding Source: Office of Development general unrestricted account Measures of impact: No systematic measures in place Evaluations: No evaluative structure


Citizen Science A day in the life of the Hudson School groups go down to the Hudson River estuary to collect scientific information and share it to create a picture of “A Day in the Life of the Hudson River.” Using hands-on field techniques teachers and students describe their sites, monitor the physical system, seine for fish, collect water and invertebrate samples, and examine water chemistry parameters. Groups then use this data to understand how their piece of the river fits into the large, and complex, Hudson estuary ecosystem. Target audience: Teachers and high school and middle school students Link to program (if anything is relevant): Division: Marine Geology and Geophysics Primary contact: Margie Turrin Operational costs: 2 months of salary support for education coordinator Funding Source: DEC Funding $20k - $30K per year Measures of impact: Event workshops participants; student participants the day of the event and returning participants’ numbers are tracked. Evaluations: Annual evaluation through December


Other Educational Initiatives Center for Research on Environmental Decisions Big Green Theater A partnership between the Bushwick Starr Theater and the Superhero Clubhouse theater company. Big Green Theater is an eco-playwriting program for Brooklyn 5th graders that begins in the classroom and culminates with a professional “green” production of the student-written plays at the Bushwick Starr in April. Target audience: Elementary schools, 1 school is currently involved with a Grade 5 class Eco-experts CRED supplies “eco-experts” to provide lectures to the class.” CRED PhD candidate Katherine Thompson mentored students via once-a-week after school session at 105th Prep. Citizen Schools partners with middle schools to expand the learning day for children in low-income communities across the country. It promotes student achievement, transforming schools and re-imagining education in America. The New York effort is a partnership with the New York Academy of Science. Target audience: Middle schools, 1 school currently involved with grades 6-8 and some teachers Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy Student Mentorship Klaus Lackner, director of Lenfest, mentors students from time to time based on his availability. One recent student has made the semi-finalist at the Intel Science Talent Search. Through these mentorship opportunities, faculty members have the opportunity to assist in the development of young scientists by providing their guidance and encouragement. Target audience: High school students Performances of Field Trip: A Climate Cabaret (PositiveFeedback) This original piece, a PositiveFeedback commission, weaves together stories of seven extraordinary women of science (from LDEO) and their groundbreaking work; it is currently available for touring through other outreach networks. PositiveFeedback is an inter-institutional consortium whose mission is to explore the possibilities that lie at the intersection of art and science. By supporting collaborations between artists and scientists focused on climate change, PositiveFeedback hopes to amplify the communication ability of both disciplines and allow them to reach broader audiences. Target audience: Educators, scientists, and artists, involved with the Lamont Open House Funding Source: Center for Research on Environmental Decisions and the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy Primary contact: Lisa Phillips

Education Compendium  

Education Compendium

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