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1920s Can you swing dance? Do the Charleston? Are you a flapper? How about pole sitting, can you do that? Do you own a dropped waist dress? How about a pair of nylon stockings? Are you not allowed to vote because you have a vagina? If you answered “no” to any of these questions, you should be happy you don’t live in the 1920s.


1920s

Typography of the Decade

Respective Eternal Call Feathergraphy HAND SHOP TYPOGRAPHY C30 Romantiques Birmingham Quentin Caps BELGRAD Ornamental Versals Spirulina


1920s

Designer of the Decade: Friedrich Herman Ernst Schneidler After leading the graphic design department at the Württemberg Commercial Art School, he started his own school, known as the “Stuttgart School.” His students included Imre Reiner, Geort Trump, Walter Brudi, Rudo Spemann, HAP Grieshaber, and Albert Kapr. In 1925, he began work on his design and composition book “Wassermann.” The book remains unfinished. His creed is “Anfangen, anfangen, immer wieder mit Ernst anfangen” (Begin, begin, always begin again in earnest).


1920s I don’t know whether war is an interlude

during peace, or peace is an interlude during war

George Clemenceau


1930s The poor ol’ 1930s. While Europe is dealing with Adolf Hitler and his shenanigans, America is dealing with the Dust Bowl. The Spanish civil war began. Japan invade China. Amelia Earhart vanished. Poor Bonnie and Clyde were killed by police. The Great Terror began in the Soviet Union. Alcoholics Anonymous was founded. The Hindenberg Disaster happened. Franklin D. Roosevelt almost got himself killed. Lindbergh’s baby was kidnapped. Al Capone was thrown in jail. And the poor Scottsboro Boys were accused of rape. However, there was still hope! The cheeseburger was invented. The Christ monument was built on the Rio de Janeiro hilltop. Air conditioning was invented as well as Zippo lighters. The Golden Gate Bridge was opened. And the Hoover Dam was finished.


1930s

Typography of the Decade Little Lord Fontleroy Airstream Carrington Velocette Hamburger Heaven Hardman Louisianne Betty Noir Little Ricky Crystal Deco


1930s

Typographer of the Decade Arthur Eric Rowton Gill British sculptor, typeface designer, stonecutter and printmaker, Gill is associated with the Arts and Crafts Movement (1860-1910). He is probably known best by his Joanna typeface that he used in his book An Essay on Typography in 1930. During this time, he also created the typefaces Perpetua Greek, Golden Cockerel Press Type, Solus, Aries, Floriated Capitals, Bunyan, and Jubilee (also known as Cunard).


1930s s s e n d e k c i w y It wasn’t onl g n i m e h c s d n a , it was confusion and

y p p a h n u e l p o e p e d a m t tha o t e r u il a f e h t s a w it , l a e v misunderstanding; abo l a e r s a e r a e l p o e p r e h t o t grasp the simple truth tha se e h t r e t n e u o y d l u o c y r o st as you. And only in a . e u l a v l a u q e \ n a d a h y e h t w o different minds and show h . e v a h d e e n y r o st a l a r o m y That was the onl - Ia

n a w E n Mc


1940s Say goodbye to Anne Frank, because she’ll be hiding for a while. Leon Trotsky, Gandhi, and Franklin D. Roosevelt are gone too. Britan is going to battle. Hitler killed himself. D-Day. “From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent.” But remember to save your money to buy yourself a bikini, a polaroid camera, and some ball point pens!


1940s

Typography of the Decade Antsy Pants Bittersweet Becker Black Postface Snappy Service Little Device Coupe Uncle Bob Retro Town Rebel Caps Boogie Nights


1940s

Typographer of the Decade Rudo Spemann Known as one of the best scribes of the twentieth century, Spemann rarely used color, and most of his typography was concentrated in cursive, Gothic, and Roman styles. He used a pen or brush to create thick strokes in his typography, which enhanced them visually. His typography is very wellbalanced by his controlled and active use of space. He created the calligraphic font Gavotte in 1940-1942 at Klingspor.


1940s r e b m e m s re a s I 0 e 4 9 w 1 n e e h n th w i e d e m i a t e unit wn o r n e k t w a y h a t w a to i o n . y l t n a o d r e g e n n o e l n g be o m e m . o W c r a a w to e -- the s u a c

Gene Tierney


1950s The good ol’ 50s. Now you can read the “Peanuts” cartoons. You can now get that organ transplant you’ve been waiting on. Colored TVs? Yes, it really does exsist! The hydrogen bomb is well on it’s way. World War II has finally come to an end. Bye bye Stalin. Bye bye Polio. Tired of tying your shoes? It’s ok, we have velcro now. No more getting up to change the TV channels! For some reason, “Playboy” magazines seem to be popular. Now excuse me while I eat McDonald’s and read some “Cat In The Hat.” It’s time for a much needed vacation to Disneyland.


1950s

Typography of the Decade Remachine Script Hemmet

Recorda Script

Big Surprise Lauren Script Arabella Better Heather

Shardee

Sachiko Helvetica


1950s

Typographer of the Decade Eduard Hoffmann Director of the Haas’sche Schriftgiesserei (Haas Type Foundry) in Mßnchenstein, Switzerland, in the 1950s, Eduard commissioned his former employee, Max Miedinger, to update the sans-serif typeface. This new typeface competed with the popular sans-serif is Akzidenz Grotesk. Eduard called it Neue Haas Grotesk, and later renamed it Helvetica when the font began to be marketed internationally.


1950s


1960s Make sure to check behind the shower curtain, “Psycho” has been released. Ladies, no more worries about planning parenthood, there’s a pill for that now. And show off some sexy legs in your new mini skirt. “I have a dream!” Everyone get out your paint, the Berlin Wall has been built. Kennedy’s “Man On The Moon” speech seems to be a hit. Andy Warhol has some pretty nifty stuff going on. “The name’s Bond. James Bond.” There is finally a place for all those crazy people you know, it’s called Walmart. Rest in peace Marily Monroe, Malcome X, Martin Luther King Jr, and JFK. Neil Armstrong walks on the moon. And “We all live in a yellow submarine” because “I can’t get no satisfaction” so I’ll see you at Woodstock.


1960s

Typography of the Decade Champagne & Limousines Boris Black Bloxx Veron Nouvell Vague Pistilli Roman Mermaid Euphorigenic Edwardian Script Voor Bambi


1960s

Typographer of the Decade Colin Brignall After leaving school, Colin began work as a photographic apprentice in London’s Fleet Street. He joined the type design studio of Letraset Limited in 1963 as a photographic technician. This is where he learned the design and art skills which underpined his career. He assisted Fred Lambert and produced the first original typefaces for the Instant Lettering range. Brignall also worked on the successful Compacta series of condensed display faces. Colin is also known for his type families Romic, Corinthian, and Edwardian.


1960s


1970s Happiness really is a warm gun. Just ask the Beatles, oh wait, they don’t exist anymore. Watch your back at Kent State, they’re shooting up the place. Watergate, Walkman, M*A*S*H. Abortion is legal. Time to nix Nixon. Hello Microsoft, goodbye Elvis. “In a galaxy far, far away,” a test tube baby was born. Oh! Do you have your floppy? Computer floppy disk you perv!


1970s

Typography of the Decade K22 Didoni Alba Bell Bottom Laser Coaster Advert Space Beach Mama Go Soul Shagadelic 60s Pop


1970s

Typographer of the Decade International Typeface Corp (ITC) Founded in New York, in 1970 by Aaron Burns, Herb Lubalin, and Edward Rondthaler, this type manufacturer was one of the world’s first type foundries to have no history in the production of metal type. The company was founded to design, license and market typefaces for filmsetting and computer set types internationally. The company issued both new designs and revivals of older or classic faces, invariably re-cut to be suitable for digital typesetting use and produced in families of different weights. ITC’s revival designs frequently followed a formulary of increased x-height, multiple weights from light to ultra bold, multiple widths and unusual ligature combinations, sometimes with alternate characters.


1970s


1980s Ah! The 80s. The years of horror movies with bad graphics, and good rock n’ roll. How can you not like the 80s? You have Pac Man, the Rubik’s Cube, personal computers, Reagan, E.T., Thriller, Cabbage Patch Kids, PG-13 movies, DNA based convictions in crimes, the fall of the Berlin Wall, AIDS, and President George Bush announces his dislike for broccoli. What....what?


1980s

Typography of the Decade Feast of Flesh Frankentype Double Feature Friday 13th

Gypsy Curse Misfits

Mars Attacks! Burning Wrath True Crimes


1980s

Typographer of the Decade Matthew Carter With his colleague, Mike Parker, Matthew created “Bitstream Inc,” in Marlborough, Massachusetts. The company had a high level of involvement in the operating system for personal computers, BeOS, with older BeOS releases using a Bitstream renderer. After leaving “Bitstream Inc,” Matthew formed the “Carter & Cone” type foundry with Cherie Cone. Matthew now designs for Apple and Microsoft computers. Georgia and Verdana are two fonts created primarily for viewing on computer monitors. Carter has designed type for publications such as Time, The Washington Post, The New York Times, the Boston Globe, Wired, and Newsweek.


1980s


1990s The Rodney King Verdict sparks riots. The Soviet Union collapses, and the Cold War ends. The Unabomber is arrested. Princess Diana dies. Scientists clone a sheep and create Viagra. I hope those two aren’t connected... Talk of the Y2K bug can be heard. The movie “Titanic” is a success. And I was born, so what else matters?


1990s

Typography of the Decade Tode Ja Oigus Comic Sans Midroba Bebas Revolution Europe Underground Couture

SF Movie Poster Aubrey Arual


1990s

Typographer of the Decade Vincent Connare American font designer and former Microsoft employee, Vincent is most known for his typefaces Comic Sans, and Trebuchet MS. Besides text typefaces he finalized and hinted the font Marlett which has been used for scalable User Interface icons in Microsoft Windows since 1995 and created portions of the font Webdings that was first shipped with Internet Explorer.


1990s


2000s Wikipedia was created, but don’t use it! It’s a lie! Yay iPods and cyborgs. Boo Shuttle Columbia disaster. Myspace, the original social network. Facebook, the better social network. YouTube, broadcast your life. Twitter, because we need another social network. Hurricane Katrina. Goodbye New Orleans. Remember when Pluto was a planet? Good riddens Saddam Hussein. Welcome iPhones and Kindles. Stalking just got easier with Google Street View. America is left in shock from the terrorist attack on the Twin Towers. Ladies and gentlemen of the United States, may I present to you, Barack Obama.


2000s

Typography of the Decade Komika Azis Comic Book I Hate Comic Sans All Things Pink Always Forever Jack Story Chocolate Covered Raindrops Instruction Verily Serif Mono Pupcat


2000s

Typographer of the Decade Tobias Frere-Jones Working at the type foundary “Hoefler & Frere-Jones,� in lower Manhattan, New York, he has collaborated with Jonathan Hoefler on projects including, The Wall Street Journal, Martha Stewart Living, Nike, Pentagram, GQ, Esquire magazine, The New Times, Business 2.0, and The New York Times Magazine. He has designed over seven hundred typefaces for retail publication, custom clients, and experimental purposes, including Gotham, Lever Sans, Vitesse, Surveyor, and Retina.


2000s


2010s

Hasta la vista Osama Bin Laden! Feel like you’re running out of elbow room? That’s because the world has reached a population exceeding 7 billion. And the world has officially ended...three times.


2010s

Typography of the Decade Woah! Angry Birds Alice In Wonderland Sucker Font Tattoo Ink Sanchez Mustache BS B DF 50 CF Punk Attitude Handwriting Draft Impact Label


2010s

Typographer of the Decade Terrance Weinzierl Terrance is a Type Designer for Monotype. He is actively involved in custom font design, retail fonts and both productizing and testing fonts. Terrance, along with the font development team at Monotype, has worked on fonts for Microsoft, Google, and Barnes and Noble, as well as design firms, ad agencies and publishers. Terrance’s typefaces include Romany, Stenblak, and Quartz MS typefaces as well as the Comic Sans Pro expansion and notable contributions to the Georgia Pro family.


2010s


Cassandra Goodall goodallc@ohiodominican.edu 614-593-1684 http://cassandragoodall.wordpress.com/typography/

Font Decades (Work In Progress)  

checking in on my progress!

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