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It’s always interesting to me to hear the different perspectives and challenges regarding the same situation, so I asked Re-recording Mixer Dean Okrand his recollections of that scene. Dean Okrand: If my memory serves, they had some pre-recorded music, and it was a cappella. We had to make sure that the pre-recorded stuff and the live stuff blended together and sunk up properly, and there were places that it didn’t. And that’s where editor Lisa Varetakis had to make sure she didn’t have any odd overlaps or places where tonality clashed. She had to pull the right takes to do that and make sure to move the sync around properly. And then I had to make sure everything was blended properly. It worked out great. The boys sounded good as they were approaching, and I couldn’t tell where I was listening to the live record verses the pre-record. Okrand: Good, because you’re not supposed to know!

I had a conversation with Stephen Tibbo about a subject that is very important to me: the composition of the production sound crew. So, production crew ... There are three guys working with you now? Tibbo: It’s been Dan Lipe, Preston Conner and Srdjan “Serge” Popovic. Those are the three guys that did that episode [“Disneyland”]. But I have been fortunate enough to have a great crew that’s able to adapt to change. I think it’s great that our crew size can grow like that now. It has always shrunk in the past. Tibbo: The producers on our show care about quality. They will give me an extra boom operator or sound utility if we need the additional help, because we move fast and shoot most scenes in

At Disneyland—Opposite page, from left: Stephen Tibbo with headset; a roller coaster ride. This page, from left: The cast with Mickey & Minnie; the Dumbo ride.

one setup. I don’t always have three boom operators, but on this episode I did. With Modern Family, did you know what you were getting into or did you have to figure out from the first episode how you were going to do this show? Tibbo: Jeff Morton sent me preliminary outlines of the first six scripts. I started seeing scenes where the whole family was together and it was like 10 or 11 people. I was like: Hmm. How am I going to do it if they want to do this new style of shooting? Kind of a multi-cam/single-cam hybrid ... And I thought, I don’t have a board big enough because, at that point, I was using a PSC M8. So, then I decided that I had to go to the Yamaha 01V and be able to have at least 16 tracks on a regular basis. And the other added advantage of using the Yamaha is, if we got into HUGE scenes, I could cascade two consoles together. Of course, I don’t want to wire and mix 24 tracks. I still try to boom everything. What they wanted was for us to have the most flexibility. Dean and Brian will say the same thing: They want the options. We have a really great crew that’s used to working together. Jim Bagdonas [director of photography] is amazing at lighting CAS QUARTERLY

SPRING 2013

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2013 CAS Spring Quarterly  

CAS Awards, Meet the Winners, Dolby Atmos on the Stage

2013 CAS Spring Quarterly  

CAS Awards, Meet the Winners, Dolby Atmos on the Stage

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