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“ A FAIRY TALE OF LIGHTNING SPEED, DRIVEN BY THE ELECTRONIC BEAT OF A HYPNOTIC SCORE BY THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS. Like nothing you’ve ever seen. Knocks you off balance and forces you to rearrange the puzzle pieces in your head. A knockout.”

– PETER TRAVERS, ROLLING STONE

“THRILLING.

THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS soundtrack adds

just the right contemporary electronic charge for this new kind of action movie.” – CARYN JAMES, INDIEWIRE

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES, INCLUDING:

BEST SOUND EDITING CHRIS SCARABOSIO (SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR) BEST SOUND MIXING CHRIS SCARABOSIO AND CRAIG BERKEY BEST ORIGINAL SCORE THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS

For up-to-the-minute screening information and more on this extraordinary film, go to: www.FocusAwards2011.com


FEATURES Kudos to Emmy Winners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CAS Career Achievement Award Recipient. . . . . . . . . . . 14 Scott Millan, CAS to be honored

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CAS Filmmaker Award Recipient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Rob Marshall to be honored

AES Lip Sync Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Virtual Mixing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Working with the A8 Realiser

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App Review: The V-Control Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Got Sleep Debt? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 The Rise of the Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 EUCON Ethernet Protocol & Pro Tools

Downgrading Your Mac OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

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DEPARTMENTS President’s Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Expanding the reach of the CAS

From the Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Technically Speaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Listening to the Arri Alexa

Been There Done That . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 CAS members check in

The Lighter Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

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CAS QUARTERLY

FALL 2011

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THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER

As we find ourselves once again in the midst of Awards season, I’d like to welcome everyone to our fall edition. Inside these pages, you will find articles of interest to the sound community written by our members, as well as contributions from our corporate sponsors, which we hope you will find interesting as you work and learn in the craft of sound mixing. Your CAS Board has set in motion several ideas and concepts, which will expand the reach of the CAS, as well as to further our mission—to advance the art and craft of sound mixing. Recently, we launched our new website—CinemaAudioSociety.org— which will be our platform for all of our events and news. The site will be a two-way street, as we grow it into an interactive site. Check it out, and please send feedback and ideas! Currently, we are posting all the latest CAS Awards news, applications, and online voting information for this year’s Awards. Please note also, that we have revised three of our categories to now include scoring mixers as nominees. This goal was realized this year for the very first time, and next year will likely expand to include other mixing disciplines, as well as new Award categories. I am very excited to see these, and many other changes happening as the CAS grows. We have also revised our membership application process. Please note, that as an active member, you can sponsor an applicant for admission to the CAS. New this year however—membership sponsors are now asked to write a letter of sponsorship for any applicant they sponsor. This letter will verify a working relationship with the applicant, and their credits and qualifications for CAS membership. Please keep this in mind if you are asked to sponsor an applicant. Everything you need to know is on the website under the membership tab. Also on the website, you will find our Awards Timeline which dictates our Awards season, leading up to the Awards Dinner, held at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles on February 18, 2012. This past month, we held an extremely successful seminar called “The Parade of Production Sound Carts.” Several production mixers brought their carts and gear, and were able to give a description of their equipment and workflow to the large audience in attendance. Students and professionals alike enjoyed the event in a packed house. The event streamed live on the website, and it is posted there for you to review. Speaking of seminars, keep an eye out in the spring for our next public event, which will be based on music in production and post-production mixing. We will have a distinguished panel of mixers, music executives, composers, and music editors on hand to discuss anything and everything involved with the prep and execution of music mixes for film and television. Another goal of ours is to reach out to our national and international sound community, and hopefully bring this seminar to the East Coast, and possibly overseas. We are constantly looking for ways to include our ‘out of town’ members and use the available technology to close the gap of distance and involve more of our membership in our events. I see no reason to delay! In closing, I’d like to say “Thank You” to your CAS Board of Directors for all their hard work. Nothing can happen without full participation from many people, and we have a great group working together to move us forward. If you would like to get more involved, just let us know, you will be welcomed.

David E. Fluhr, CAS President of the Cinema Audio Society 4

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CINEMA AUDIO SOCIETY MISSION STATEMENT

To educate and inform the general public and the motion picture and television industry that effective sound is achieved by a creative, artistic and technical blending of diverse sound elements. To provide the motion picture and television industry with a progressive society of master craftsmen specialized in the art of creative cinematic sound recording. To advance the specialized field of cinematic sound recording by exchange of ideas, methods, and information. To advance the art of auditory appreciation, and to philanthropically support those causes dedicated to the sense of hearing. To institute and maintain high standards of conduct and craftsmanship among our members. To aid the motion picture and television industry in the selection and training of qualified personnel in the unique field of cinematic sound recording. To achieve for our members deserved recognition as major contributors to the field of motion picture and television entertainment.

CAS FALL 2011 NEW MEMBERS Active Ethan Andrus, CAS Laura King, CAS

Associate Tim Hoogenakker Mark F. Page

Student Paul Miller David Turner

Correction In the CAS Quarterly summer 2001 edition, “Solar on Set” article on page 21, the names should read from left to right: Paul Leo Romo, Paul Vik Marshall, CAS, Patrick Gleason and Dave Stockton.


7 BIFA AWARD NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE BEST TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT BEST ORIGINAL SCORE ALBERTO IGLESIAS BEST SOUND EDITING STEPHEN GRIFFITHS ANDY SHELLEY (SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR)

JOHN CASALI (PRODUCTION SOUND MIXER)

(SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR)

BEST SOUND MIXING HOWARD BARGROFF DOUG COOPER (RE-RECORDING MIXER)

(RE-RECORDING MIXER)

A BEAUTIFULLY CONSTRUCTED THRILLER. FORMED WITH THE UTMOST CARE. The lovely, understated score (by Alberto Iglesias), with its whispering strings and muted trumpets, perfectly suits the movie’s palette of soft mauves and grays.

—STEPHANIE ZACHAREK, MOVIELINE

TINKER TAIL0R S0LDIER SPY For up-to-the-minute screening information and more on

this extraordinary film, go to: www.FocusAwards2011.com


FROM THE EDITORS...

Welcome to fall everyone! This issue of the CAS Quarterly is a busy one. First, we bring you this year’s Career Achievement Award recipient, Scott Millan, CAS! Then, Karol Urban, CAS gives us some insight into the EUCON Ethernet Protocol and Pro Tools interfacing, while David Bondelevitch, CAS discusses another kind of interface; the V-Control iPad app. Peter Damski, CAS reports on his interactions with the Smyth Research A8 Realiser, while Matt Foglia, CAS reports on the “fun” of downgrading your OS. Will Hansen, CAS questions how we’re able to work such long days with such little sleep. G. John Garrett, CAS tells us about a lip sync seminar he caught at this year’s AES Convention and, with the help of Jay Rose, CAS, discusses the audio specs of the Arri Alexa camera in his “Technically Speaking” column. As always, you can check in on the happenings of your fellow members in the “Been There Done That” and “The Lighter Side” sections. The CAS Quarterly is produced as a service to our members on a voluntary basis. A special “thank you” goes out to those taking the time to contribute articles. We greatly appreciate, and want, your feedback and suggestions—so send them in! Email us at casquarterly@cinemaaudiosociety.org. Remember, our sponsors are professionals like you who understand the business and needs of our industry. We encourage your commitment to them.

OFFICERS

President: David E. Fluhr Vice President: John Coffey Treasurer: Peter Damski Secretary: David J. Bondelevitch BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Deb Adair Bob Bronow Ed Greene Tom Holman Paul Vik Marshall Scott Millan

Frank Morrone Lee Orloff Lisa Pinero Greg P. Russell Jeff Wexler

ALTERNATES

Bob Beemer Phil Palmer Joe Foglia R.D. Floyd OFFICE MANAGER

Patti Fluhr EDITORS

Peter Damski, CAS

Matt Foglia, CAS

2011 Entry Submission Form available online on the CAS website (eblast notification) Mon., Oct. 17 Entry Submissions due by 5 p.m., Fri., Nov. 18 Nomination Ballot Voting begins online Wed., Dec. 14 2012 Nomination Ballot Voting ends online 5 p.m., Fri., Jan. 6 Final Five Nominees announced Thu., Jan. 19 Final Voting begins online Wed., Jan. 25 Final Voting ends online 5 p.m., Fri., Feb. 10 48th Annual CAS Awards Sat., Feb. 18, in the Crystal Ballroom of the Millennium Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles

FALL 2011

CAS QUARTERLY

48TH ANNUAL AWARDS TIMELINE

48TH ANNUAL AWARDS TIMELINE

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Peter Damski Matt Foglia PUBLISHER

IngleDodd Publishing 11661 San Vicente Blvd., Ste. 709 Los Angeles, CA 90049 QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS:

Cinema Audio Society 827 Hollywood Way #632 Burbank, CA 91505 Phone: 818.752.8624 Fax: 818.752.8624 Email casquarterly@cinemaaudiosociety.org Website www.cinemaaudiosociety.org ADVERTISING:

Dan Dodd 310.207.4410 x 236 Email: Advertising@IngleDodd.com ©2011 by the Cinema Audio Society. All rights reserved. CAS®, Cinema Audio Society®, and Dedicated to the advancement of Sound® are all trademarks of the Cinema Audio Society and may not be used without permission.


F O R FY OO RU YR

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THE #1 A N IM ATED M OVIE OF THE YEAR T H E # 1 “It A maintains N I M A Tand ED MO I E made O Fthe T fiHrstEmovie YEA builds on V what so R special: Fun characters, dialogue that’s smart, sharp animation and gorgeous design. The animation is stunning.” -Sean P. Means, THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE

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CI OD NE SR IA DT EI RO N A T I O N

BES T SO UND E DIT ING Ethan Van Der Ryn • Erik Aadahl

B ES T SO UND MIXING Andy Nelson • Jim Bolt


S E P A R A T E D B Y WA R . T E S T E D BY BAT T L E . B O U N D B Y F R I E N D S H I P.


It looks beautiful, but how does it sound? b y G . J ohn Gar r et t , CAS and J ay Rose, CAS

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This quarter I’ve teamed up with noted post mixer and writer Jay Rose, CAS to take a listen to the Arri Alexa. With various iterations of the RED in the field sporting anything from no audio to disappointing audio circuitry, it seemed natural to do a little bench test of the Alexa—since it comes with audio inputs as standard equipment. I’ve always been an advocate of double system recording with digital cinema cameras. On the last picture I mixed, we used two Alexas and the camera department was perhaps my biggest fan of double system. Once you get monitors, follow-focus and any other camera gizmos tacked to the camera, a pair of audio cables is the last thing the ACs want to worry about. Still, there will be situations where production wants single system or, at least, reference audio with the picture. When that time comes, the Alexa will deliver great recordings. Jay and I got to spend a little quality time with one of the Alexas at Rule Boston Camera, who generously kept us informed when one of their cameras might not actually be out on a job.

The Alexa has a 5-pin XLR connector for line level audio input, and RBC supplied us with a breakout cable that terminated in 3-pin XLRs. The audio inputs of the Alexa are set up for +4 dBu = -20 dBFS and there are manual controls for Ch1/Ch2 as well as a fixed Unity input setting. First we looked at the monitor chain and the headphone output. We were very surprised to see that the performance of the headphone return is better than many small video cameras’ audio recording capabilities. In addition, the crosstalk levels were in the -30 dB to -40 dB range. ANALOG IN TO HEADPHONE OUT Nominal +4 dBu from mixer, camera set to -20 dBFS record S/N re -20 dBFS: 64 dB (84 dB dynamic range) THD+N @ +4 dBu: 0.08% THD+N @ +14 dBu (nominal peak): 0.18% THD+N @ +24 dBu (analog overload): .8%; No crackle. Freq Resp: +/- 0.4 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz

-0.5 dBFS -20 dBFS

-20 dBFS

-96 dBFS

THD .005%

Alexa SN: Input controls at nominal +4 dBu = -20 dBFS Input terminated with 600Ω

Alexa “Worst Case”THD+N: Source 1 kHz @ -.5 dBFS

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BEST SOUND MIXING Production Sound Mixer:

LEE ORLOFF Re-Recording Mixers:

PAUL MASSEY, CHRISTOPHER BOYES

BEST SOUND EDITING Supervising Sound Editors:

GEORGE WATTERS II, SHANNON MILLS

www.WaltDisneyStudiosAwards.com ©2011 DISNEY

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–0.25 dB @ 33 Hz



CELEBRATING CELEBRAT A ING 15 YEARS

          

  













The Alexa makes 32-bit floating point/48 kHz.WAV files which were embedded in the QuickTime output files we got. We used the Terrasonde generator/analyzer for data generation and acquisition, and Rightmark for some of the analysis. The .WAV files were equally surprising. At nominal +4 dBu/-20 dBFS we barely saw 0.001% THD+N (fig. 1). With a -0.5 dBFS input, the distortion shoots all the way up to 0.005% (fig. 2). Even at +26 dBu, the Alexa behaved very well as you can see in fig. 3. The harmonically related spikes to the right of 1 kHz are aliasing products, and around -30 dB from the input signal. ANALOG IN TO FILE OUT 48 kHz, 24 bits S/N re -20 dBFS: 70 dB (90 dB dynamic range) THD+N @ +4 dBu: < 0.001% THD+N @ +14 dBu: 0.005% THD+N at overload: well ... what would you expect

The long...

...and short of it.

Now, as to frequency response, the data were so flat as to make a pretty boring curve, but here it is. Headphones and files both go 20â&#x20AC;&#x201D;20 kHz pretty much ruler-flat the whole way. With the sound files from 50â&#x20AC;&#x201D;15 kHz thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less than 0.01dB variance, and it climbs to +0.03 dB at 18 kHz and +0.05 dB at 19 kHz. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure if there is any other video recorder that can claim performance like this. So in short, if you can live with two recorded tracks and 16-bit field audioâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and you and production trust the DIT or DP not to mess up the audio somewhereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you can make very nice master recordings on the Alexa. â&#x20AC;˘

-? dBFS

Serious Punishment: +26 dBu 1 kHz input. Alexa meter gave up.

www.ktekbooms.com Tel. 760.727.0593

info@ktekbooms.com MADE IN THE USA

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The CAS congratulates the following mixers for receiving a Primetime Emmy Award at this year’s gala held September 10, 2011 OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES (ONE-HOUR) House – “Bombshells” FOX

Von Varga, Production Sound Mixer Juan Cisneros, Production Sound Mixer Joseph DeAngelis, Re-recording Mixer Brad North, Re-recording Mixer OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES (HALF-HOUR) AND ANIMATION Family Guy – “Road to the North Pole” FOX

Patrick Clark, Production Sound Mixer James F. Fitzpatrick CAS, Re-recording Mixer

OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A MINISERIES OR A MOVIE The Kennedys – “Lancer and Lace” ReelzChannel

Henry Embry CAS, Production Sound Mixer Frank Morrone CAS, Re-recording Mixer Stephen Traub, Re-recording Mixer Larold Rebhun, Music Score Mixer OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A VARIETY, MUSIC SERIES OR A SPECIAL American Idol – “Finale” FOX

Edward J. Greene CAS, Production Mixer Randy Faustino, Music Mixer Patrick Baltzell CAS, PA Mixer Michael Parker, Monitor Mixer OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR NONFICTION PROGRAMMING (SINGLE OR MULTI-CAMERA) Deadliest Catch – “Redemption Day” Discovery Channel

Bob Bronow CAS, Re-recording Mixer 12

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“‘J. EDGAR’ IS MASTERFUL. FEW FILMS SPAN SEVEN DECADES THIS COMFORTABLY.” ROGER EBERT,

BE S T S O U N D M I X I NG SOUND MIXER

JOSE ANTONIO GARCIA R E - R E C OR DI NG M I X E RS

JOHN REITZ GREGG RUDLOFF

BE S T S O U N D E DI T I NG AL AN ROBERT MURRAY BUB ASMAN

W W W .WA R N E RB RO S 2 0 1 1 .C O M


CAS to Honor

Scott Millan, CAS with Career Achievement Award

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Cinema Audio Society President David E. Fluhr announced that the organization will honor rePhoto: Daniel Saxlid recording mixer Scott Millan, CAS with the Cinema Audio Society’s highest accolade, the CAS Career Achievement Award, to be presented at the 48th CAS Awards on February 18, 2012, at the Crystal Ballroom of the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles. “The Cinema Audio Society has a long tradition of honoring talent, excellence and integrity, and contributions to the craft of Sound Mixing,” said Fluhr. “I am privileged to have known Scott for many years; to have watched him excel in every area of his expertise, and now to present him with our highest honor. As he takes on a new and exciting chapter in his career, we can all enjoy a look at his accomplishments so far, and watch as he continues to build on an amazing body of work.” Millan has previously received the CAS Award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing for a Feature Film on three occasions for the films Apollo 13, Gladiator and Road to Perdition. Millan is also a four-time Oscar® winner. In a career that spans 37 years, Millan started at channel 13 in Los Angeles then moved to the CBS network. After a stint at Larson Sound, Millan moved to Todd-AO Studios as a re-recording music mixer and in 1993, with the support of Shawn Murphy, Buzz Knudsen and composer John Williams, he worked with Steven Spielberg on Schindler’s List. He became a lead dialogue/music mixer at their westside facilities, where he worked on critically acclaimed films like Braveheart and American Beauty. It was in 2000 when Millan moved to Sony Pictures and worked on such films as The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Supremacy, and Vertical Limit.

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In 2004, Millan returned to Todd-AO Studios as SVP Operations in addition to his role as re-recording mixer. While there, he mixed many films including World Trade Center, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, Jarhead, Revolutionary Road, and Salt. In the fall of 2011, Millan took a new position at the Technicolor/Paramount sound facilities on the Paramount lot, continuing his work as re-recording mixer and serving as Sound Director for Feature Films. In addition to his nine CAS nominations and three wins, Millan has also been nominated eight times for the Oscar with four wins (Apollo 13, Gladiator, Ray and, most recently, The Bourne Ultimatum), and he had been recognized by BAFTA with seven nominations and three wins. As the 30th recipient of the Cinema Audio Society’s highest honor, Mr. Millan joins an illustrious group of past honorees that include Ray Dolby, CAS; Robert Altman, Jack Solomon, CAS; John Bonner, Bill Varney, CAS; Don Rogers, CAS; Walter Murch, CAS; Jim Webb, CAS; Richard Portman, CAS; Tomlinson Holman, CAS; Mike Minkler, CAS; Ed Greene, CAS; Dennis Sands, CAS; Dennis L. Maitland, Sr., CAS, Randy Thom, CAS and Jeffrey S. Wexler, CAS. KTLA entertainment reporter Sam Rubin will be returning as master of ceremonies at the 48th CAS Awards dinner which will also honor Outstanding Achievements in Sound Mixing in five categories: Motion Pictures; Television Movies and Mini-Series; Television Series; TelevisionNon-Fiction, Variety or Music Series or Specials and DVD Original Programming. The Cinema Audio Society, a philanthropic, non-profit organization, was formed in 1964 for the purpose of sharing information with sound professionals in the motion picture and television industry. •


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“ THE FILM SURGES WITH TREMENDOUS URGENCY,

SUPERB SPECTACLE AND POWERFUL, EVEN

OVERWHELMING EMOTION.” JUSTIN CHANG,

BEST SOUND MIXING

PRODUCTION SOUND MIXER

STUART WILSON

RE - RECORDING MIXERS

STUART HILLIKER MIKE DOWSON ADAM SCRIVENER

BEST SOUND EDITING

JAMES MATHER

W W W . WA R N E R B R O S 2 0 1 1 . C O M

Harry Potter Publishing Rights © J.K.R.


“THE SEQUEL IS A TIRE-BURNING BURST OF ACTION AND FUN WITH A BEATING HEART UNDER ITS HOOD… THAT MAKES ‘CARS 2’ A WINNER.” PETER PETER TRAVERS TRAVERS || ROLLING ROLLING STONE STONE

www.WaltDisneyStudiosAwards.com © 2011 DISNEY/PIXAR

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE DIRECTED BY JOHN LASSETER

03ABA=C<2;7F7<5’03ABA=C<2327B7<5


CAS to Fete

Rob Marshall with the CAS Filmmaker Award

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Academy Award®-winning director Rob Marshall will receive the Cinema Audio Society Filmmaker Award at the 48th CAS Awards on February 18, 2012, at the Crystal Ballroom of the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles. In making this announcement, CAS President David E. Fluhr said, “We are delighted to be honoring Rob Marshall. Rob’s career spans film, Broadway, television, musicals, drama and tentpole blockbuster fantasy adventure. Following in a tradition of synergy between our two honorees, Marshall as the Filmmaker Honoree and Scott Millan, CAS as the Career Achievement Honoree, worked together on Marshall’s film Nine. The CAS has recognized Marshall’s work three times by nominating his Memoirs of a Geisha, Chicago and Annie. He is indeed a perfect choice for the CAS Filmmaker Honoree.” Marshall’s films have been honored with a total of 23 Academy Award nominations—winning nine, including Best Picture. His most recent film, Pirates of the Caribbean: on Stranger Tides, starring Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz, has grossed more than 1 billion dollars at the worldwide box office becoming the “Eighth Highest Grossing Picture in History.” He is currently developing The Thin Man, starring Johnny Depp. Marshall’s Nine was nominated for four Oscars, five Golden Globes and 10 Critics Choice Awards. His previous directorial efforts include the Academy Award-winning films Chicago and Memoirs. For his work on Chicago, winner of six Oscars including Best Picture, Marshall received the Directors Guild Award, an Oscar nomination, a Golden Globe Award nomination, a BAFTA nomination, the National Board of Review Award and the New York Film Critics Online Award, both for best directorial debut, as well as the American Choreography Award. His Memoirs of a Geisha was the winner of three Oscars, three BAFTA Awards and a Golden Globe.

Marshall executive-produced, directed and choreographed the NBC television event Tony Bennett: An American Classic. He won his second Directors Guild Award for this production as well as three Emmys himself for Direction, Choreography and Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special. He directed and choreographed Disney/ABC’s critically acclaimed movie musical Annie, which received 12 Emmy nominations, a CAS nomination and won the prestigious Peabody Award. Former CAS President Edward L. Moskowitz commented, “It was great to work with Rob Marshall on Annie. Rob’s depth of experience in live entertainment enhanced his inspirational leadership on the set and I am proud that the Cinema Audio Society has decided to honor him with our Filmmaker Award.” A six-time Tony Award nominee and George Abbott Award winner, Marshall’s stage work includes co-directing and choreographing the worldwide award-winning Broadway production of Cabaret and directing and choreographing the Broadway revival of Little Me, starring Martin Short. He made his Broadway choreographic debut with Kiss of the Spider Woman, directed by Harold Prince, which also played London’s West End and Vienna. He followed that with productions of She Loves Me on Broadway and London; Damn Yankees on Broadway, National Tour and London; Blake Edwards’ Victor/ Victoria on Broadway; A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum on Broadway; Company on Broadway; The Petrified Forest at the New York Public Theatre, and Promises, Promises for City Center Encores! Additional choreography credits include the Disney/ABC movie musical Cinderella (Emmy nomination), the CBS movie musical Mrs. Santa Claus (Emmy nomination), and the Kennedy Center Honors (Kander & Ebb and Chita Rivera tributes). Marshall, who holds a BFA from Carnegie-Mellon University, will be the seventh recipient of the CAS Filmmaker Award. Past honorees have included Quentin Tarantino, Gil Cates, Bill Condon, Paul Mazursky, Henry Selick and Taylor Hackford. KTLA entertainment reporter Sam Rubin will be returning as master of ceremonies at the 48th CAS Awards dinner which will also honor Outstanding Achievements in Sound Mixing in five categories: Motion Pictures; Television Movies and MiniSeries; Television Series; Television-Non-Fiction, Variety or Music Series or Specials and DVD Original Programming. • CAS QUARTERLY

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AES Lip Sync

by G. John Garrett, CAS I had the opportunity to attend most of a seminar on lip sync at the AES show in New York this year, and I think it’s safe to say things are as confusing as I thought they were! Back in the good old days, analog TV lip sync was pretty easy to maintain. Once you had it, the sound became part of the composite broadcast signal, generally by way of being physically married to the playback and record media, and the transmission path was able to handle both simultaneously with no problems. Now that we have high-definition digital television systems, along with digital satellites and cable systems, it seems like lip sync has become optional. One would think that advancements in technology would, at least, not break current systems that work. The problem is that yes, the audio is locked in playback and record media, but the transmission and display layers have not been able to keep up. Video data compression is here to stay, it seems, and encoding and decoding video into and from the various codecs takes processing power, and buffers, and, well ... time. So once the sync looks good leaving the network uplink center, it’s something of a small miracle that anything is in sync at all once it gets downlinked, re-encoded at the cable head end and decoded at your cable box. Sync, or the lack thereof, is a pretty serious problem and 18

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some of the solutions being discussed aren’t simple. One system that is being talked about is fingerprinting video and audio frames, and having correction applied at the local TV station, cable head end and individual receivers. The system is designed to encode low-bitrate information derived from unique aspects of the program material into the A/V stream, generating an A/V delay value, where it is then corrected for at the receiving location(s). It’s a not-very-simple solution to a dynamic problem, but gaining support. Part of the problem is that receivers and decoders often have poor A/V synchronization due to bad receiver designs and naïve design choices, even with perfect content streams! Some of the shortfalls include not being able to recover the 27 MHz Broadcast Program Clock signal sent from the originating location, and not using correct buffer sizes in the receiver designs. So, between various delays introduced by different audio and video signal processing, poor receiver designs and changing technology in general, I wouldn’t expect to see a real change in the living room for at least three more years. But don’t think you’re the only one that notices; industry gurus are trying to educate manufacturers, and are building and testing supplemental sync systems. •


“‘MONEYBALL’ RENEWS YOUR BELIEF IN THE POWER OF MOVIES.” THE WALL STREET JOURNAL JOE MORGENSTERN

“ONE OF THE BEST AND MOST VISCERALLY EXCITING FILMS OF THE YEAR.” ROLLING STONE PETER TRAVERS BEST PICTURE BEST SOUND EDITING RON BOCHAR BEST SOUND MIXING DEB ADAIR, C.A.S., RON BOCHAR, C.A.S., DAVE GIAMMARCO, ED NOVICK

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Virtual Mixing with the A8 Realiser;

Or, How did I get the Cary Grant Theater into my living room. by Peter Damski, CAS

One of the many challenges facing post sound mixers and editors today is gaining access to a mixing space which has adequate cubic footage to replicate the size of a commercial movie theater. Sure, there are many of you who are staff at a large studio, with multiple large mixing stages, but for the majority of us, the best we can hope for is a decent 5.1/7.1 system in a smaller mixing space. Pre-dubs are often mixed in a smaller space as well. It becomes difficult to predict how the sound will translate to a large stage/theater space when mixing in a small room. This article will introduce many of you to a relatively new product, which provides a solution to this size issue, the Smyth Virtual Surround System (SVS) using the A8 Realiser hardware interface. In a nutshell, this technology allows the user to virtually sample any Stereo/5.1/7.1 mix space, which can then be reproduced through a pair of Stax SR-202 headphones, eliminating the need for a large physical mixing space. I became familiar with this technology when my co-editor, Matt Foglia, CAS, told me about a visit from one of Smyth’s representatives, Lorr Kramer, to his department at Middle Tennessee State University about a year ago. Educational facilities tend to be spatially challenged as well. Foglia mentioned that this technology was “mind numbingly accurate,” so this planted a seed for me to pursue at a later time. Early in September of this year, I decided to send an email to info@ smyth-research.com to find out more and to propose an invitation for them to visit the SCAD Sound Design facilities. I received a response from Lorr Kramer within 24 hours, letting me know that he was going to be in Atlanta in a week and would be happy to come down to Savannah to demonstrate Smyth’s A8 Realiser Virtual Surround System.

Mr. Kramer arrived at about 2 p.m. and in about a half hour, he had installed the interface and was ready to demo the device for our faculty and students who were interested. The A8 Realiser is easily installed between the outputs of the mixer and the inputs to the amplifiers. The demonstration begins by sampling the HRTF (Head Related Transfer Function) of the individual user in the space to be sampled. A pair of small microphones are placed in the user’s ears and a tracking unit is attached to a simple headband and placed on the user’s head. An additional function of the Realiser is head-tracking capability. When the user turns their head up to 30 degrees left or right, the sound source remains stationary. The unit comes supplied with an infrared accelerometer, which attaches to the headband of the phones, and a receiver, which is placed directly in front of the user and aligned with the center speaker. Spoken instructions come from the software interface, directing the user to look in a particular direction, while a series of frequency sweeps are generated from various sources (ex. Left Front, Right Rear, etc.). The device records these sweeps while the head is placed in three positions; first center, then left 30 degrees, then right 30 degrees. Once the room has been sampled (this records the actual sound characteristic of the space as the user hears them, including the speakers and electronics), the simple headband is replaced with the Stax SR-202’s and the head-tracking unit is attached to the Stax headband. Again, the software issues spoken instructions and the sweeps are recorded. The microphones are then removed while the Realiser processes the recordings. Each user’s profile can be stored both locally and on removable SDHD cards with the file stored under the user’s name. The device will store up to 64 profiles locally. An additional head-tracking unit can be CAS QUARTERLY

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purchased separately, allowing two mixers to work together in the same virtual space at the same console. There are additional outputs on the device to run an LFE channel and it can also control a “Shaker” device for gaming chairs. The Realiser can be configured to switch between the “cans” and the speakers when the tracking unit loses communication with the receiver. This is very useful for doing A/B comparisons between the actual space and the virtual space. After Kramer ensured that the file was processed properly, the subject placed the headphones on and the device generated a short musical sample, which could be directed to any speaker in the room. This was the moment of truth. The looks on the faces of the subjects were worth more than any words can describe. Of the 30-plus people that tried this out, most were shocked to comprehend that the sound was not coming from the speakers, but from the headphones. When the subjects removed the headphones (with the A/B function disabled), there was no sound in the room. Level matching was accomplished by setting the gain to match the speakers by enabling the A/B function. I was the final subject to experience the demonstration and I was amazed at the accuracy of the monitor placement in the virtual mixing space. Not only was the left/center/right/left surround/ right surround placement accurate, but the vertical placement was accurate as well (periphony). It was as if you were listening to the speakers in the room while wearing the headphones. I did not have the opportunity to listen to any surround mixes during the demonstration, but I spoke with Foglia who said, “I was absolutely floored with the directionality of the surround field. Sounds were at the same location and level with and without the headphones on. Additionally, I was, perhaps, even more impressed with the lack of audible phase issues that tend to be

present in surround via two-speaker devices. This technology really makes you question your eyes and ears—and has you wondering which one is lying to you!” I will need to arrange another opportunity to evaluate the device in some real-world testing. I imagine that it can be a bit jarring the first time your ears tell you that you are in a large space when your eyes tell you that you are in a small space. I am going to request five units for use at SCAD in my 2012 budget. This technology opens up the possibility for recording profiles in some of the best stages in the world and bringing those fantastic spaces back to your small mix room, allowing the user to virtually mix in any of those profiled spaces. This would be perfect for mixing teams who work remotely, or who live in different countries. They can both sample the mix stage where they do their final mixes and both virtually mix in that space in each of their respective studios. Kramer revealed that Skywalker Ranch has purchased several units, and another un-named post facility was able to forestall an expensive real estate/construction project, needing fewer “large” rooms for pre-dubs and editing, by purchasing several units. The A8 Realiser is the brainchild of Stephen Smyth, Ph.D. (pronounced Smith). Smyth also created the algorithm that was employed in the Digital Theater System (DTS), beginning with the release of Jurassic Park in 1993. Smyth has also created an algorithm that helps reduce the bandwidth required for wireless microphone transmission, known as APT-x. This codec has serious implications for the spectrum-challenged environment we work in today. •

For more information on the A8 Realiser and Smyth Research, go to: http://smyth-research.com/index.html CAS QUARTERLY

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Review:

V-Control Pro

by David J. Bondelevitch, MPSE, CAS

V-Control is an application for the iPad that is designed to allow control of Pro Tools from the iPadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multi-touch surface, making it similar to a controller surface. I spoke with Paul Neyrinck, who wrote the application, about its genesis (Neyrinck may also be known to Pro Tools users as having designed the Dolby encoder tool used by many of us).

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Paul studied electrical engineering at UCSB when digital audio was in its infancy in the late ’80s. Upon graduating, he entered the world of telephony, writing code for early cellular technologies that used digital audio. In 1994, he took a position at Digidesign, writing audio code for Pro Tools. Previously, he had played guitar in college bands, which gave him a musical ear for use with Pro Tools. However, he decided to leave Digidesign in 2001 to pursue work as a filmmaker, including work as a sound mixer on his own films. “This experience really tuned me in to sound for picture,” Neyrinck said, but he added that he did not see himself as a mixer for a career. When the iPhone came out, and the larger iPad, several applications were written to allow users the ability to control music applications using the Wi-Fi built in to both pieces of hardware. It seemed obvious to Neyrinck that an iPad app needed to be written for Pro Tools, as it could be more powerful and could be applied to music, post, mixing and recording. “This is obviously not going to replace a real console or real faders. The touch is different.”

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As for user demographics, students will especially like the ability to control their software from the iPad, as they can carry their iPad into a home studio and punch in to record while playing the drums or attempting to do some home Foley, for instance. But professionals may also want to look into it as an option to mix within a pinch. If you are at home on a computer where you have only a mouse, and you already have an iPad, adding this app suddenly gives you an eight-fader controller surface. If you need to do a quick temp mix or pre-dub, and you want to do it from home, this app can help. I routinely find myself getting asked to do a quick mix on an Avid output for a screening, and frequently have very little turnaround time to do any editorial work. So, Paul Neyrinck I will take the 4-8 OMF tracks given to me and quickly automate some volume changes, and maybe add some EQ and compression. In many ways, V-Control on the iPad is a perfect choice for this, as it allows 11 touch points at once (10 fingers plus your, um, nose?), easily allowing control of eight faders at once. This


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does result in the faders being fairly close together though, so it is more likely you will only want to handle a few at a time. Installation is an absolute breeze, you will be up and running in just a few minutes. Download the app from the App Store (where it has nothing but five-star reviews), download the program from their website, change a few settings in Pro Tools, and you will be ready to start mixing with your iPad. It is quite nice, as the V-Control app is laid out very similar to the mix window in Pro Tools. This means that you can leave the edit window open on your computer, the video window open on the second monitor, and the iPad, essentially, becomes a third monitor with the mix window on it. Of course, there are limitations. They are not real faders. The tactile feedback one receives from a real fader is very different. In addition, if you are mixing to picture, you are not looking at your fingers, and it is easy for your fingers to slide off the faders without realizing it, partly because they are so close together. The software is very intuitive, but there is one missing function that bothers me. I like to routinely change the automation mode on all channels at once. On a controller surface (or in the Mix Window), this is easily accomplished by holding down the option key. In V-Control, there is no way to do this, because Apple’s guidelines do not allow two pop-over menus to be open at the same time. Neyrinck is working on a way to fix this. Latency does not appear to be much of an issue. You are encouraged to have your computer directly connected to your Wi-Fi hub via Ethernet. That leaves the only true Wi-Fi going to your iPad. In this setup, the latency is about 10 milliseconds.

For moving a fader, this is rarely a problem. But for switch clicks (like mutes) it may not be fast enough. On the other hand, you are still using a computer, so you can always go back to the mouse for switch clicks. In my experience using the controller, there were no issues at all with the latency. The battery on the iPad does drain quickly, though, due to the screen’s backlight being on all the time with the constant touch and the Wi-Fi constantly communicating. This means that you will need to leave it plugged in. This is a little awkward, trying to mix with the cable hanging off of it. It also makes one wonder why it uses Wi-Fi, and not a direct connection to the USB port on the computer, but alas Apple does not support USB communication for the iPad. The latest version of V-Control (1.2) adds support for several other software programs as well, including Logic, Cubase, and Nuendo, which will also attract more student users. Logic implementation is very good as it uses control surface protocol rather than HUI implementation. All knobs get full resolution, and it displays accurate dB readings in real time. (The version for Pro Tools may get these features at some point.) This version also introduced a pricing change geared toward attracting more users. There used to be a light version that was 99 cents, but professionals will want the full-blown V-Control Pro, which remains at $49.99. The light version has been replaced by an even more stripped-down version that is free. “It’s a no-brainer to try it for free,” Neyrinck states. “We’ve got a lot of ideas about improving it. Touch screen surfaces are getting lower in cost, so they are here to stay. It gives us lots of possible uses in creative ways.” •

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GOT SLEEP DEBT?

by Will Hansen, CAS Lead actor Beck Bennett (left) and Will Hansen, CAS catching up on some sleep during a lighting change on the set of Blue Movies (2008)

Recently, I worked on a film where we worked 27 days straight and I finished with 459 hours in the can, so to speak. So when I thought about what to write, I was compelled to put my take on this subject out there as I feel it’s an important topic that most can relate to. This is a touchy subject I feel to say the least. I find it extremely difficult to say “No” when it comes to overtime. When I first got into the film and television industry, I thought people were insane: “Why on earth would anyone want to work for 12 hours? Every day?” I thought to myself. But, slowly, the overwhelming technical challenges I knew nothing about subsided, and I fell in love with watching a story be told right in front of my eyes. For a while I never read a script; making each day a surprise. I learned how to be ready for anything at anytime. Of course, I always found out beforehand if there was to be anything special I needed to prepare for—like shooting in the rain or other conditions. But other than a few pointed questions, it was game on for me. And I still pretty much operate like that. It keeps it fresh for me and keeps me on my toes. I love when a plot twist comes up that I didn’t see coming and then having a good chat about it with the actors and director. I feel like a kid on set most of the time. A really good friend of mine once said, “Can it get any better than this, Will? Here we are, a bunch of grown adults getting paid to make-believe!” And that has always stuck with me. I feel very fortunate to be doing what I love to do. And that is why I find it so difficult to say “enough is enough” when it comes to overtime. I’ve, personally, almost driven my car into the back end of another vehicle at 80 mph on the 5 freeway on my way home

from a 19-hour day. I’ve seen a bolt of lightning shoot out of a 10k in the rain at the 20-hour. On this last job, a poor PA worked herself into the hospital on the 26th straight day of production. I’ve also read stories in our trade magazines of people dying on set or while traveling home. Such a tragedy! I’m sure we all have stories like these. I think the work itself also suffers tremendously. I’ve been reading some sleep deprivation studies lately and most of the ones I came in contact with were studies for a few weeks where people would come in and only be allowed a certain amount of sleep each night. They would then be given a P.V.T. (Psychometer Vigilance Task) to perform throughout the day. This is a task (test) to see how long a person can sustain attention. It’s a tedious test but easily passable for those with an ample amount of sleep, generally eight hours a night. This sustained attention is vital for tasks such as driving. The people with eight hours of sleep a night showed no real difference in attention lapses. Those with six hours and less started to show signs of attention lapses on the second day. By the end of the two-week study, lapses were five times of what they were on the first day. And that’s just after two weeks—not even the length of a feature film production. The average American gets 6.9 hours of sleep a night. I wonder what it is for the average person in our industry? It’s a tough subject that I battle with on, what seems to be, a daily basis. But the thing is, I keep coming back for more. And there has got to be something to that. At the end of the day, I get to help give a voice to story. And we all know dialogue is what drives a piece! (LOL) And I love that! It matters to me! Hopefully, someday, I’ll be able to find a happy balance between my love and my sleep. • CAS QUARTERLY

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EUCON Ethernet Protocol and Pro Tools The Rise of the (Fully Integrated) Machines by Karol Urban, CAS

It’s been a long war. But after 14 years, the tides are beginning to turn. We’ve seen this day on the horizon and have waited impatiently. Whether you waited in fear or great anticipation depending on your market, your experience, your brand loyalty, or even your ears, today, we are closer than ever to a Fully Integrated PC-based DAW Console.

Prologue Starting my career in the late ’90s, I found myself seated at DAW systems from SSL (ScreenSound & Scenaria) and AMS Neve (Logic 3 & AudioFile), where proprietary technology meant that full integration was a given. With the rise of the PC-based software DAWs (Pro Tools, Nuendo, Logic), price points were lowered, upgrades became more frequent, and technical support became more accessible. But in the trade, we lost the feel and power of a traditional console. This luxury became relegated to the higher echelons of audio manufacturers. Even as Pro Tools has become an “industry standard,” re-recording mixers at some of the finest studios still rely on consoles like Neve’s DFC or Harrison’s MPC, which offer them the sonic control that they’ve come to rely on at the cost of distancing them from much of the functionality of their PC-based DAWs. This is a problem that Digidesign (now AVID) was keenly aware of back in 1997. That was the year they partnered with Mackie to unveil the HUI and HUI protocol. To me, the HUI was phenomenally groundbreaking. Perhaps it was because before that I was using a non-motorized, 4 fader, JL Cooper box that was only capable of sending 32

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volume automation to my Pro Tools system. The MIDIbased HUI protocol was eventually released to third-party developers and the onus was put on the user to decide which manufacturer integrated best into their workflow and their DAW of choice. Parlaying the experience of developing the HUI protocol (and undoubtedly recognizing the market share that thirdparty developers were snatching up), Digidesign went into the control surface business. Each offering from Digidesign built upon the success of its predecessor. Over the years, I graduated from that first HUI to a Command 8 and then on to a Pro Control. With each setup, I would find that the control surface and DAW were becoming better integrated as partners.

Judgment Day It was at the 2008 NAB Conference that Euphonix announced that my then-employer, Discovery Communications, had purchased four System 5-MCs for the Discovery Production Center. It would be a lie to say I was excited about this change in the beginning. I had become enamored with my Pro Control. It was familiar, easy to use; I loved my Edit Pack’s record-enable buttons and surround panners. Most of all, troubleshooting was a breeze. The System 5-MC seemed needlessly expensive. It didn’t have physical space for my two large LCDs: one each for displaying my mix and edit windows. It forced me to use the integrated trackball (I have little hands), and get rid of my beloved Martinsound Multimax EX in favor of its pro-


prietary Studio Monitor Pro (a system that still is Windowsonly and requires a separate machine). I was hesitant, but I felt grateful that I, at least, got to keep using the DK meters. But the more I used it, the more I was converted. The custom user presets and ability to add macros, a series of up to five commands to one of their programmable soft keys, were very useful and time-saving. I got hooked on the customization. No matter which of the four suites I worked in, my personal control surface layout and macros followed on a USB thumb drive. Besides, the fader construction and TFT displays were really nice. Okay, Euphonix had some serious potential! But at the time I was running Pro Tools 6.9 and, customization and macros aside, the control surface still used a HUI protocol. I still migrated to the keyboard and mouse for many of my commands. But, honestly, I didn’t really notice this as an issue until we began to use the system to control multiple workstations. It wasn’t until four Logic Pro machines were installed to assist in sound design that the old familiarity of tight integration between board and DAW came flooding back. WOW! You could do seemingly anything in Logic from that board. I longed for that integration with Pro Tools. But for plug-in control and any menu command without a QWERTY shortcut or HUI command, I was still clicking away. Meanwhile, across town my husband was relishing his new

D-Command. He showed me Custom Fader Groups and Plugin Mapping. He even had a nifty VCA spill function. That’s what I was talking about! It was clear that AVID was taking intentional steps closer and closer to a fully integrated control surface.

Salvation It was in a 2010 NAB press release that AVID announced its acquisition of Euphonix. While still planning to sell its existing ICON solution, “allowing customers to leverage already existing investments in the industry leading hardware.” AVID stated that “seamless interoperability across [a] broad spectrum of third-party solutions for every customer” was the goal. Indeed, seven months later at AES, AVID released Pro Tools 9 and EUCON Phase I, a super fast EUCON Ethernet protocol to replace the existing HUI protocol, increasing integration immediately. Brian Gerstner, post mixer at SSI in Hollywood says: “The thing I like most about the S5 Fusion [since we upgraded to Pro Tools 9] is the implementation of EUCON because I use it non-stop. I’m a fader jockey; I don’t like to mix with the mouse… Using the HUI, we didn’t have the opportunity to just grab and go, it was so clunky, it wasn’t a user flow that I liked.” CAS QUARTERLY

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Now, a year later, as the 131st AES Convention has concluded, there appears to be a whole new world of options. AVID has not only unveiled Pro Tools 10, but also marked the beginning of EUCON Phase II. What does this new Phase offer us? Tom Graham, marketing manager of Post Audio & Pro Mixing at AVID explains, “Our customers have told us the difference is night and day…. Modern workflows and time schedules demand a high level of integrated Pro Tools mixing and control. Basically, the Avid Pro Mixing family offers advantages, workflows and price points to fit every possible professional mix situation.” AVID has released new Application Sets for The Artist Control, Artist Transport and Artist Color, which are very easily customizable via programmable soft keys by the individual user. In addition, users of the Artist series or System 5 now have access to all aspects of Pro Tools via EUCON commands. User-defined buttons and macros can be created easily into the touch screens or customizable switches from up to 500 commands and functions, not just functions that have corresponding QWERTY keyboard commands. It even offers new commands just now available in Pro Tools 10, like “Export Selected tracks as a New Session.” My old co-worker, Dallas Taylor, CAS sound designer and mixer at Defacto Sound, explains why he has decided to stay with Euphonix when building his own studios: “I used the Euphonix System 5 for years at NBC in Burbank, and the System 5 MC while I was at Discovery. When I opened my own shop, there was no doubt that I would go with the Euphonix

Artist Series. There are no controllers on the market that give as much bang for the buck as these. While I use this primarily with Pro Tools, it’s exponentially more powerful than any other HUI or Pro Tools specific controller because it plays nice with any application on your computer. Also, the ability to add macros & modify your track assignments is a major timesaver.” AVID also announced that the family of EUCON control surfaces in conjunction with Pro Tools 10 now has preview and punch automation available for mapping on the EUCON surface. Additionally, we can now control video satellites from a EUCON surface and see EQ curves from plug-ins on the System 5 TFTs. While AVID’s Graham did tell us that they have now only completed the Phase II of their III Phases of EUCON development strategy, he could not comment on future specific feature development. One can only wonder what might be coming next. In the past, many other control surface developers, including Euphonix, were using the HUI protocol in their product development and were restricted by its limited resolution and bandwidth. Now, the potential is that we will see a new emerging generation of third-party venders using the new EUCON protocol. I personally can’t wait to get my paws on many of the new systems and incarnations utilizing this new level of integrated technology. We may finally feel again the native deep integration and physical construction available on many complete proprietary systems, while still retaining the almost universal compatibility, and flexibility, of working with Pro Tools or other PC-based DAWs. •


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“A Not-So-Fun Way to Spend a Saturday” or “How to Downgrade Your OS” by Matt Foglia, CAS

Recently, I got all “Gung Ho” and decided to upgrade my computer (and OS) along with my Pro Tools software. I had been running PT 8 with OS 10.5 on an iMac for a number of years and figured I’d follow in the footsteps of my university and go to 10.6.8 and PT 9 (an upgrade that had been performed between summer and fall semesters). Going against the better judgment I’ve learned through a decade and a half of watching things go awry, I figured I’d knock everything out over the course of a free weekend.

Apple geek sites and found that Apple wouldn’t allow you to downgrade your OS so easily—that you’d need to erase your startup drive. So, I archived the internal drive with disk images and a bootable backup, in case I ever needed to get back to Lion (even though it didn’t have any of my info on it yet). I connected the new Mac via Target Mode (Note: Target Mode is a way to have a computer act as a hard drive. In this case, I connected the iMac to my MacBook via a firewire cable, and then turned on the iMac while holding down the T key on the iMac keyboard. This had it show up as an external drive). I opened Disk Utility, selected the iMac and initialized the partition as the default Mac OS Extended (Journaled). I then inserted my Snow Leopard install disk into my MacBook and tried to install it onto the newly formatted iMac. While doing so, it gave me the same nuclear warning sounds. Ugh!

My iMac arrived, which was a refurbished model newly released five months prior (I have always purchased refurbished models directly from the Apple Store). Since it was refurbished, it had OS 10.7 Lion installed. Hearing many stories about Lion and its instability with Pro Tools 9 from my students and industry colleagues, I figured I’d go back to 10.6.8 for now. Sticking in my Snow Leopard install disk and trying to reboot off of the disk caused the Mac to make sounds I’d never heard a Mac make. Back in the day, you’d get the “Sad Mac” face—letting you know that something wasn’t right. This time, the Mac chimed with these nuclear warning sounding beeps that seemed to be at full level. The computer wouldn’t stop beeping! I had to force power down the computer. Remembering that few things come easy, I did some further research on CAS QUARTERLY

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After racking my brain for a couple of hours—it came to me that my install disk was version 10.6.3—the only retail version of Snow Leopard that I’ve seen. However, my computer was originally released with 10.6.6 when new. Knowing that Apple will often implement hardware changes that coincide with software updates, I figured this might be playing a part. I did some further research and realized, in addition to this version difference, I had inadvertently, formatted my iMac incorrectly —selecting the partition on the drive instead of the drive itself (oops!). Time to try this again. With the formerly Lion computer in Target Mode, I launched Disk Utility and selected the drive I wanted to install 10.6 on (not the partition, but the actual drive). Then, under FORMAT, I chose the default Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Then, I went to PARTITION and, under VOLUME SCHEME, made a selection (such as 1 Partition). Here’s the important part when formatting a drive so that it can act as a startup volume: Under OPTIONS, make sure that “GUID Partition Table” is selected and not “Apple Partition Map.” This is what I had glanced over before. I pressed OK and then APPLY. The computer was now reinitialized. Now that the drive was ready for the OS install, I inserted the Snow Leopard Install DVD into my MacBook and installed the 10.6.3 software onto the iMac. Once the install was complete, I checked under the Start Up Disk options in the Preferences pane, and saw the iMac with 10.6.3 as the OS listed as a viable startup volume. Excellent. Next, I restarted the iMac—but it made the same bad, nuclear raid beeping sound again! This was because, as mentioned before, the OS build of 10.6.3 preceded 38

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the build that was released with the computer. So, with the 10.6.8 update downloaded, and the iMac still in Target Mode, I installed the downloaded 10.6.8. Once that installation was complete, under the Start Up Disk menu (under Preferences), the iMac showing 10.6.8 as the OS was an available startup disk. I restarted the iMac in normal mode and the nuclear warning beeps were gone! Feeling that it would be clear sailing from there, I installed Pro Tools 9—and it launched fine! Everything worked dreamingly; I could import an AAF, see time code, all the goodies. Except, I realized quite quickly, while I was able to get all of the plug-ins that came with DV Toolkit (a utility I was using with PT 8) to work, a main automation function that was part of the kit was not available—being able to write snapshot information (applying EQ/Compression presets to regions). Since EQ automation is a vital part of my workflow, I’ll have to wait for the DV Toolkit/Complete Production Toolkit cross-grade option to become available again (I was told to “Check back in later.”). So, for now, I’m back in PT 8 for anything where multiple-parameter plug-in automation is required. Of course, one week after I performed this upgrade, AVID announced Pro Tools 10 (fortunately, I’ll get a complimentary upgrade since I purchased PT 9 in October). Kind of makes you feel like you’re in that commercial where the guy just bought a 3D TV and he sees his neighbor getting a new “4D” TV delivered. Ah, technology… •


John J. Murphy CAS was captured at work in the main photo spread of an article about Project Runway (pg 42/43 Aug. 26 issue). Murphy is adjusting a wireless transmitter on Heidi Klum.

Tamás Csaba CAS has finished mixing ITV’s Titanic, a four-episode TV series for the centennial. Now he is working with his crew, Pal Szuros and Gabor Mate on the second season of The Borgias for Showtime.

Ron Bochar CAS and Michael Barry CAS completed mixing at Digital Cinema in NYC on the Focus Feature Being Flynn, directed by Paul Weiss. I’m back on Grey’s Anatomy Season 8, with Derrick Cloud and Anna Wilborn. It’s great having Anna here, since I boomed for her dad, Charlie Wilborn CAS. During the hiatus, I did an independent film, Ex-Free, with Sean Byrnes, Chloe Patenaude, and Lisa Gillespie. I don’t know if I thanked Eric Pierce CAS for his hard work on playback for the “Musical Event” episode of Grey’s last season, but he managed the complicated (11 earwigs) cues with aplomb. And I must also thank the many day players that

show up, unload, work, and pack up: Steve Hawk CAS, James Clark CAS, Michael Krikorian CAS, Joe Foglia CAS, and their crews. It gets crazy but they all handle it well. Seventh year here, wow! –Beau Baker CAS

Steve Morantz CAS has been MIA from this page for a while. I was fortunate to mix three pilots; Up All Night, Suburgatory and Free Agents. I am currently mixing Season 4 of Parks and Recreation. On the pilots I had Ron Wright, Craig Dollinger, Ace Williams, and Aaron Wallace booming for me. After 10 years, I have a new boom operator with me on Parks, Dirk Stout. As always, Mitch Cohn as sound utility.

Eric Batut CAS is mixing Fringe Season 4. Boom operator is Danny Duperreault, sound assistant/second boom is Millar Montgomery.

Philip Perkins CAS recently finished mixes for the new TV series for kids Stepping on Up, Julie Wyman’s PBS doc Strong!, worked on the new season of the PBS series Making Stuff and The World of Mark Stock, on the Lines Ballet doc 3 Ballets for German TV and has

just begun mixing Steve Olsson’s Vietnam vets doc A Waterbuffalo Named Bob for PBS; as well as location music recording for two other new films. His own new CD, The Department of Strange Weather, has just been released on the Fun Music label.

Michael Keller CAS and Mike Prestwood Smith CAS finished mixing John Singleton’s Abduction at Todd-AO, and are currently working on Chris Groaks’ The Darkest Hour. Gary Bourgeois CAS finished The Raven at 424inc. (with John Ross CAS) and is currently mixing As Good as I Am at ToddAO. Also mixed an interesting docu for the DGA titled Lunch with Tom Marks CAS at his Black Rock Studio. Gary is also mixing an album for Nashville artist Dan Hagen.

Curtis Choy CAS reports that he has been submitting You! Young People! (see www. childrenoftheatomicbomb) for rejection at various film festivals, and worked on Dave Boyle’s indie music movie featuring Goh Nakamura, proving he can still boom, mix, run and crack wise at the same time.

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Mark Rozett CAS just completed the dialogue/music rerecording on Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie with Kelly Vandever handling the effects at Monkeyland Audio. Preceding that was Jabberwocky at Jet Stream Sound for the Sy Fy Channel, then the Twentieth Century Fox International upcoming pic La cara occulta with Wade Chamberlain at Chace/Deluxe Productions. Then back to Monkeyland for Like There’s No Tomorrow—the latest Warren Miller ski film. He’s currently at work on the Western Yellow Rock and thanking his lucky stars for staying busy. At Larson Studios in Hollywood, Sherry Klein CAS and Lisle Engle are mixing Season 5 of Burn Notice. In Burbank at Smart Post Stages, Sherry and Brian Harman CAS are mixing the fourth season on Sons of Anarchy. Sherry and Brian just completed the FX pilot

Outlaw Country at West Digital Post.

Gary D. Rogers CAS and Dan Hiland CAS are currently mixing the second season of The Walking Dead for the AMC network,

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along with the new series Hart of Dixie for the CW network at Warner Bros. on Dub Stage 1. 2011 picked up where 2010 left off, very busy. And in light of the dismal economy, I, Jeffree Bloomer CAS, and my crew feel very fortunate to have so much work. We hit the ground running to Charlotte, NC, in January with the intriguing pilot for Showtime’s Homeland. We then traveled to Wilmington, NC, to shoot an ABC Family movie called Teen Spirit. Anthony Cargioli continues to be my boom op and right-hand man, while Mason Donahoe brought his talents to these shows for utility & 2nd boom. Then Tony and I traveled to Pittsburgh where we were able to convince the wonderful Chris Strollo to join us on the feature The Perks of Being a Wallflower. That took us to midsummer and I decided to take a few weeks to play hooky. I did get a few days of fishing in, but the phone kept ringing. So I day-played a couple days every week on various projects but my guys and gals were all working, it seemed like I was the only one

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wanting some time off. As frustrating as it is, I told the local BA Jason Rosen, this is a great problem to have. Well, fall has arrived and I assembled my crew back to shoot Arthur Newman, Golf Pro. This feature stars Colin Firth and Emily Blunt and has much promise and will complete 2011. My best wishes to all my fellow sound friends.

Scott Harber CAS is knee deep in the L.A. noir film Gangster Squad with Ruben Fleischer at the helm. Josh Brolin, Ryan Gosling, Giovanni Ribisi and Emma Stone get to dress up nice, say snappy ’40s things and shoot stuff up as we work through our many nights at L.A. touchstone locations. Brendan Beebe is booming and Tula Snoek is juggling like crazy. Rich Cogswell and Wayne Tidwell plug cables in to other gear near us and are pretending to be our friends. Such a gift to have this one in L.A.

John Pritchett CAS and crew, always on boom, Dave Roberts, and utility Shawn Harper and Kay Colvin, had no movies released in 2010 but FIVE have been released


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in 2011, starting with The Green Hornet and followed by Jake Kasdan’s Bad Teacher with Cameron Diaz and Justin Timberlake, then at long last, Terence Malick’s Tree of Life (three years in the edit), and later came Larry Crowne, helmed by and starring Tom Hanks with Julia Roberts. John with Dave and Kay finished The Amazing Spiderman, a total reboot of the franchise, with relative newcomer Andrew Garfield and the wonderfully experienced Martin Sheen and Sally Field. Douglas Axtell and crew had the most fun doing the elaborate 2nd unit job. It’s due out summer of 2012. John’s next project was a little closer to home, finally going for total knee replacements, recovering just in time for Rick Linklater’s College Republicans late 2011 show.

Darryl L. Frank CAS writes: After finishing Season 4 of AMC’s Breaking Bad, I went into documentary mode… Working on three different projects for the Smithsonian Museum, and a one-hour project for Discovery Channel. I am currently mixing the Arnold Schwarzenegger comeback film entitled Last Stand, with Peter Stormare from Fargo fame, and Rodrigo Santoro. Lots

of action in this one, should be a fun show. “ See ya in the wide shots.”

Gavin Fernandes CAS will spend the fall working on Fortunate Son, Wonders of the Modern World, and China Heavyweight…. All projects at Technicolor Montreal.

George Flores CAS, sound editor, designer, re-recording mixer and owner of Quatro Sound Productions Inc. in Toronto, Canada, recently completed comprehensive sound post production, in Surround 5.1, for several Canadian “indie” feature films including The Collapsed, Monster Brawl, Never Lost, and Medium Raw, which are being released by Anchor Bay Canada, Dark Rising 2, which is released by Vivendi, and the Nigerian feature ZR7, which is independently distributed in Nigeria and other parts of Africa. Flores also did the sound post for the first 13 episodes of the television series The Savage Tales of Summer Vale, and the feature films Mystic and Night Vision, currently airing on Super Channel. To culminate a stellar production cycle, Flores, along with Arthur Zaragoza, completed sound post for the Vietnamese feature film Pearls of the Far East, due to

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premiere later this year at the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival. On the non-theatrical side of sound post, Flores provided sound post for several corporate and PSA projects produced by the Ottawabased production company inMotion, including the Bank of Canada, the Canadian Wildlife Federation, and the CAA. In terms of what lies ahead, Flores is considering expanding Quatro Sound to include a larger mix room that will host dual Pro Tools HD3 systems, while maintaining the contemporary business model of a “personalized sound post boutique” that has made him one of the busiest and most sought out, cutting-edge sound post-production artists in Canada.

Fred Ginsburg CAS and Woody Woodhall CAS recently taught a full day workshop at the ShowBiz Store & Cafe in Los Angeles, covering aspects of production and post-production sound. Fred has a new website that serves as an online course book for several major universities, www. FilmTVsound.com. Fellow CAS members can email Fred@FilmTVsound.com for a complimentary subscription to the site. Fred also recently completed writing

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a user-friendly instruction manual for the Tascam HS-P82 multi-track field recorder and companion fader controller. K-Tek has announced that Fred Ginsburg will be in charge of demo loans and rentals of their new E-Z Boom rig. From Richard Branca CAS at Sony Pictures Post Production Facilities: Paul Massey CAS and David Giammarco completed In Time in the Cary Grant Theater. Paul Massey CAS is currently temp dubbing 47 Ronin in the Cary Grant. In the Burt Lancaster Theatre, Tateum Kohut CAS and Greg Orloff CAS are currently predubbing Here Comes the Boom. Deb Adair CAS and Steve Ticknor CAS just concluded Ghost Rider 2 in the Anthony Quinn Theatre. On Dub Stage 6, Rusty Smith and Bill Freesh CAS have been mixing Pan Am and 90210. Todd Beckett and Terry O’Bright CAS continue to work on Charlie’s Angels, Bones and Modern Love on Dub Stage 7. On Dub Stage 11, Mark Linden CAS and Tara Paul CAS are dubbing The Simpsons. Fred Tator CAS and Bill Jackson continue to mix House of Lies on Dub Stage 12.

Richard Lightstone CAS has joined the Disney production of When We Meet Again, directed by Paul Hoen and produced by Amy Gibbons in very busy Atlanta, Georgia. Richard is enjoying the southern hospitality with his local crew of boom operator Drew Pondor, utility Hank Martin and ProTools playback operator Alex Lowe.

Thomas Curley CAS recently returned from a three-month shoot deep in the wilds of Alaska for 13 episodes of Goldfather, to be seen on NatGeo in December. Mixed one of three stages for the fall promo week for Disney Channel with Keith Birchfiel operating the J.L. Fisher boom. NOVA: Fabric of the Cosmos was scheduled to air November 2 on PBS. P90X2 will be shipping for the 2011 holiday season.

David K. Grant CAS is back in the saddle production recording after extended honeymoon, coming off of splinter unit TV series Flash Point, ah yes, Arri Alexa’s. Fun daily on “Breakaway” Russel Peters Comedy. Couple of exciting days on Alpha’s, also Arri Alexa’s.

Till the end of October recording the 20-episode TV series What’s Up Warthogs with 35+ pages a day, 788 metadata WiFi, smv small lectros. So good to see the industry busy, all the best fishing for dBs.

Robert Sharman CAS has finished up nine episodes of Jane by Design, another new show for ProdCo/ABC Family, with Richard Bullock and Aaron Grice handling the boom and 2nd boom duties. Buck Robinson CAS joined them for 2nd units as well as mixing the last episode, while Robert and Aaron went back to shoot the remaining 22 episodes of a 32-episode first season of ABC Family’s popular new series, Switched at Birth. Michael Kaleta is back on the team as 2nd boom. Since wrapping production on the sci-fi thriller Mentryville, Glenn Berkovitz CAS has been day-playing and bouncing around. A little American Horror Story, a touch of Ringer, a dash of Aspen—Glenn, along with boom ops Kurt Peterson, Sean Byrnes and Daniel Quintana, feels like he’s seen it all, one day at a time. Ah, Hollywood . . . we’ll take it as it comes. . .

Reality Check.

The Venue receiver is a busy little box with a DSP, microprocessor and switching power supplies, plus high speed data and signal traces all over the place. It’s designed with a 6-layer circuit board and lots of shielding to keep offending RFI from getting in and internal radiation from getting out. To be certain, however, a trip to the TEM cell is a routine step in the design process. This onsite RF chamber is just one of the tools the fanatical bunch of engineers need to complete a thorough design. When the receiver ends up sitting on your cart next to digital recorders, mixers, IFB transmitters and who knows what else, it’s nice to know that it’s actually going to work, and get along well with everything else in your rig.

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“‘ANONYMOUS’ IS A SPLENDID EXPERIENCE: THE DIALOGUE, THE ACTING, THE DEPICTION OF LONDON, THE LUST, JEALOUSY AND INTRIGUE.” - ROGER EBERT, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES


I have just finished sound designing and mixing an India film named Ra.One. It’s one of the biggest Indian films ever made. –Resul Pookutty CAS

Kenn Fuller CAS is happily working in Hollywood on New Girl for Fox. After a summer of fun in the sun and some interesting travel, Bob Israel CAS reports that business is once again booming, with projects for Warner Bros. EA Sports, Lexus, Shiseido and others recently completed. Here’s hoping we all stay busy and healthy!

Steve Weiss CAS is mixing season two of Body of Proof for ABC, shooting at the Disney lot. Chris Tiffany swings boom and Dennis Carlin handles the utility chores.

Paul James Zahnley CAS recently mixed numerous TV docs among them: Smokin’ Fish for PBS, Gang War USA for the National Geographic Channel, and three episodes of Aerial America for The Smithsonian Channel. Paul is currently mixing Jason Wolos’ Trattoria.

From Dave Schaaf CAS: No long films recently, but I have been working on projects for Ford Trucks, Apple iPad, Victory

Motorcycles, NFL Films, and Coca-Cola.

Lisa Pinero CAS writes: I feel fortunate to have been very busy in the past year. Last fall/winter, David Raymond, Alexandra Gallo and I had the pleasure of working here in Los Angeles on Oren Moverman’s film Rampart, starring Woody Harrelson and an exceptional supporting cast including Sigourney Weaver, Robin Wright, Ned Beatty, Steve Buscemi and Ben Foster. In the spring, I headed to Georgia with Anthony Ortiz on boom to work on John Hillcoat’s The Wettest County in the World, starring Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Guy Pearce and more in a true story of a bootlegging family in prohibition era Appalachia. Back home in Los Angeles this summer in time for the opportunity to mix David Ayer’s latest feature, End of Watch, starring Jake Gyllenhaal & Michael Peña with Scott Solan on boom and Zach Wrobel handling utility. From Universal Studios Sound: Elmo Ponsdomenech and Bob Edmondson CAS are mixing Against the Wall on Dub 1.

Nello Torri CAS and Alan Decker CAS are mixing Homeland, Grimm, Psych, and Covert Affairs in Studio B. John W. Cook III CAS and Peter Nusbaum CAS in Studio A mixing The Office, Parks and Recreation, Happy Endings, and Up All Night. Pete Reale and Todd Morrissey mixing in Studio G the USA series Suits, NBC’s Desperate Housewives and Law & Order: SVU. Joe DeAngelis and supervising sound editor Brad North are mixing the final season of House. Kevin O’Connell and Beau Borders are on Dub 6 mixing The Muppets for Disney. Chris Jenkins and Frank Montano are mixing The Movement for executive producer Kurt Miller, followed up by Safe House for Universal.

Dallas Taylor CAS is celebrating his twoyear anniversary of opening Defacto Sound. Over the past few months, Defacto has added two new employees and is continuing to grow! Some of the highlights include mixing shows and promos for Discovery, TLC, PBS, Science, NatGeo, & Velocity—advertising for Ford & NAB—and many other feature documentaries, games & trailers!

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™ and © 2011, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

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Karol Urban CAS reports: After mixing another season of Twisted for Investigation Discovery and a Web campaign and theatrical trailer for Degree Adrenaline called The Adrenaline Lab, she left Discovery Channel after eight years to join many of her friends in the sound community in Los Angeles. She is offering her services as a freelancer and has accepted a contract with Gray Martin Studios in Santa Monica. Thus far, she has worked on various promotional campaigns for Discovery, EA, and FX and is providing pre-dub mixing and dialogue editing for Made for MTV and CMT, Undercover Boss for CBS, and The League for FX as well as mixing a number of independent films. From Steve Nelson CAS in Oahu, Hawaii: This last quarter has been occupied by The River. My first time working here and it’s been a pleasure to make some scary stories for your enjoyment sometime next spring on ABC. Also scary is that we shot these with as many as 13 cameras, including Go-Pros, 5D’s & 7D’s, Sony EX-3’s, other consumer cameras, and even a couple of Alexa’s, on land, in the jungle, in the mud, in a “boat” on a “river,” zodiacs, skiffs, on stage, and with a mess o’ radio mics. Sometimes the most exiting part of the day was getting slates for all those cameras! It is a unique show, with a unique look and it’s gonna sound great, thanks to excellent support from Tom Hartig and local Jon Mumper. Also a shout out to Robert Kennedy at Coffey Sound for helping me set up my studio-in-a-bag and answering my frantic calls from wherever I could get cell service. Not to mention there are many worse incentive states to work in. By the way, all of us who work for ABC/FTP Productions should get together for a talk about our treatment there regarding rentals. Looking forward to spending some time at home; maybe Season 2 I’ll learn how to surf. Ha!

Paul Vik Marshall CAS has been busy working on seminars. In early July, Marshall was in Bangkok, Thailand, where he put on an informal sound seminar for the Thai sound community at the Anantara Bankok Sathorn Hotel. Marshall’s second seminar, CAS’s Parade of Sound Carts, on October 15 on the Local 80 stage in Burbank, was a resounding success. Marshall could not have put it together without the help of R.D. Floyd CAS, David Fluhr CAS, CAS’s publicist, Dorothea Sargent, Frank Marrone CAS, CAS’s webmaster, Steven Wolstrup, Daron Arnold of Coffey Sound and volunteers, Paul Romo, James Pape, Hansel Gonzalez. It was rewarding to get CAS QUARTERLY

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very positive feedback from student, mixer and general filmmaker attendees. Great job guys!!! Marshall continues to work on commercials with his boom operator, Paul Leo Romo. Marshall and Vince Schelly just finished a Betty White special for NBC.

Carl Rudisill CAS is ending his year with a bang. In August, Carl took over as sound mixer for the feature Hunger Games when Mark Weingarten CAS developed pneumonia in the middle of shooting. He, Chris Main and Albert Hedgepeth teamed up in Charlotte, capturing sound for the remaining seven weeks of shooting. His readiness to jump on board and hard work was really appreciated by the Hunger Games Crew. Upon wrapping Hunger Games, Carl headed to Virginia for the feature To Have and to Hold, a 16th-century piece with Spaniards, Indians and pirates, which finishes in the Cayman Islands. After last fall’s car accident, which left Carl in critical condition, he has fully recovered and has managed to work a total of five feature films this year. Carl’s studio, North Star Post & Sound at EUE Screen Gems, has met the recording needs of actors Colin Firth and John Corbett, as well as the talented cast of One Tree Hill, recording ADR for their final season. As One Tree Hill’s ADR comes to an end in November, North Star will begin its ADR service to Army Wives in South Carolina. And in December, local band Sunlight Alumni will start recording their first full-length album at the studio. Cheers to the end of a very successful year for Carl. It’s been a varied run recently for Michael Filosa CAS in Atlanta. After spending nearly two months in prison (Hard Times for National Geo), I enjoyed a multi-week road trip of commercial spots for the TLC Network, General Electric, and Invesco—and then moving on to six weeks with the independent feature Papa, with locals Allen Williams on boom and Cristen “Cat” Clark as utility. As the television season got started back up, Jon Ailetcher CAS was back for Season 3 of ABC’s Cougar Town. Back for another season with me is Mark Jennings on boom and Laura Rush handling utility duties.

Michael Barry CAS and Eric Hirsh finished mixing Young Adult for director Jason Reitman at Sound One in New York. Lee Dichter CAS, Michael Barry CAS and Paul Hsu finished mixing Premium Rush for director David Koepp and Sony Pictures at Sound One in New York.

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Kenn Fulle

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r, CAS’s “Best Look on New Girl fr ing Crew” om Ron Hairston Jr left to right: Tom Payne, . and Valeria G hiran on boom s.

The Technicolor Montreal team picked up the Canadian Gemini Award and the editorial Emmy for Pillars of the Earth. Above: Louis Gignac, Gavin Fernandes, CAS, Marcel Pothier, Christian Rivest. all and ylee Marsh Front dgers, CAS. ese Aletha Roand Linda Chong. Thfu n o e le h T tt li t: a se to have a d e s. d e il ci e d sm moms t those er. Look a m m su is th

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ck, CAS & pson, Pud Cusa ting as From left: Ross Sim ac ile awesome wh Chris Welcker being Willis publicity photo shoot uce stand-ins for a Br Joe 2: Retaliation. I. G. of t se e th on blood Photo: Jamie True

Here’s a p ic 695ers wo of us rk o n G a n g st ing e Union Stati r S q u a d a t o R ic h m o n d n. Left to right: C o g sw e ll , Scott Harb Brendan B er, CAS, ee Tula Snoek be, , Wayne Tid well.

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cordin rant, CAS re t’s Up ha David K. G W es e TV seri

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2011 – Fall CAS Quarterly  

Career Achievement Award, Arri Alexa Audio Test, V-Control App Review

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