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Dream Ride: Bikepacking the Colorado Trail. on pg. 3 March 2014 / Vol. 44 No. 3

cascade.org

STP sold out in record time By Anne-Marije Rook, Communications Director

The Group Health Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic sold out in record time this year–in less than two weeks since general registration opened–making a loud and clear statement: bicycling is more popular now than ever before. We are excited to have you all riding with us.

STP registrations with low-numbered bibs for charitable auction on Ebay throughout the month. Any amount you pay beyond the standard online registration fee is a tax-deductible donation to the Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation, so you can feel good about spending a few extra bucks.

Or, take a completely different route... Ride to Bellingham Saturday, June 28

Missed out on registration? Don’t despair! We have some options: Trade your time for a bib

First, you can start volunteering to earn a spot. Volunteers who clock 24 hours with us can earn registrations for STP (and our other events, too). Helping with Cascade events or in the office is a great way to get involved in your community and keep Cascade running smoothly. Email Serena Lehman (serenal@ cascadebicycleclub.org) for information about our volunteer opportunities. Bid in our auction

PRSRT STD US Postage Paid Seattle, WA PERMIT No. 2172

We will sell a limited supply of

The 4th Annual Major Taylor Project Spinathon is an excellent way to show your support for the Major Taylor Project and to challenge yourself with an awesome workout. Sign up, ride and donate for one, two or all three hours! All of your efforts and donations will expand the Major Taylor Project in South and Southeast Seattle.

Last year’s Spinathon was a huge success, raising $30,000. Let’s keep the success rolling to reach this year’s goal of $50,000! 100% of the evening’s proceeds will go towards reaching more students at our existing Major Taylor Project sites and to support the newly created Major Taylor Project Youth Leadership Retreat.

Don’t stop there—ride all the way to Vancouver Aug. 16 – 17

In August, we’re heading to Vancouver for the RSVP. If you’re not familiar with this ride, it’s a two-day event from Seattle to Vancouver, British Columbia, with a stopover in Bellingham. The Friday/Saturday event is closed, but we still have spots open for Saturday/Sunday. Come Ride from Seattle to Vancouver and Party with us! In August, see the state like you’ve never seen it before during the 16th Annual Ride Around Washington.

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115 www.cascade.org

By Ed Ewing, Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Ride in June and ride for a reason! The Red-Bell 100, benefitting World Bicycle Relief and Cascade Bicycle Club, is a fully-supported century on low-traffic roads and trails through some of the most beautiful rural countryside our state has to offer. The best part, though, is that you’ll be pedaling in support of two great organizations: Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation and World Bicycle Relief.

The heck with it all, go touring Aug. 3 - 9

TIME DATED MATERIAL

Major Taylor Spinathon: Spin for a Better Future

The first route of the four-year RAW Cycle, the “Olympic Peninsula & Coast” ride, was designed with newbies in mind. The route has shorter (65-70 mile average) and less hilly daily rides than in years past. This route features numerous iconic Pacific Northwest locations throughout the tour, and is a favorite because of its diverse terrain, excellent roads and gorgeous scenery. Your bags are transported from campsite to campsite, so you can ride light. Meals, showers and road support are part of the deal. This tour has only limited registrations, so get on it before it’s sold out. View all our rides and events at www.Cascade.org. See you on the road!

Fundraising details:

Donations to reserve your bike are $40/hr. Online registration opens Tuesday, Feb. 4. When you sign up for the evening’s events, you will automatically enter a drawing for some amazing gifts and prizes.

You can also show your support in the following ways:

Personal Pledge Challenge: ​Collect donations from your supporters and increase you chance to win great prizes. And if you raise $1,000, you’ll receive a Major Taylor Project jersey! Sponsor a Major Taylor Student ‘Spinner’: Support a student on the bike for one, two or all three hours.

Bike to Work Month Team Challenge: Are you part of your organization’s Bike to Work Month team? Pledge your support and have your organization match your efforts. The Major Taylor Spinathon is the perfect “tune up’’ for Bike to Work Month. Register your team and show your support!

Direct Donation: Unable to make the Spinathon? Make your direct donation online and show your support. Mail-in Donations: (Please write “MTP” in the memo line on your check) Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115 The 4th Annual Major Taylor Spinathon will be held Thursday, March 20, from 5 till 8 p.m. at Live Love Flow, 1223 E Cherry St, and the Magnuson Athletic Club, 7751 63rd Ave NE. Reserve your bike online at www.cascade.org/spinathon For more information, contact Liz Johnson, Major Taylor Project Coordinator at LizJ@cascadebicycleclub.org, (360) 319-6557.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Partners for progress........................................................................ p.2 Mechanics Corner.............................................................................. p.5 Free group rides................................................................................. p.9 Biking the annapurna circuit........................................................ p.10


March 2014

The RAW Cycle: A series of four great routes over the next four years

Partners for progress By Elizabeth Kiker, Executive Director

It’s a drumbeat. It’s said among staff, who admire the work being done around the region. It’s said among volunteers, who know that our success depends on working well with others. It’s said among board members, who want Cascade to lift up other people and organizations doing work with cyclists. It’s said among members, who often belong to many groups and value them all. Partnership. Partnership. Partnership. We are working better with Washington Bikes, ensuring a coherent voice in Olympia speaking up for bicycling. We are working better with Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, a group that has electrified the conversation around liveable streets and engaged a whole new generation of advocates. We are working better with Redmond Cycling Club and other clubs in the region to encourage and partner around excellent riding opportunities. We are working better with Bike Works, a group whose work com-

By Chris Partridge, Communications Specialist

plements and enriches ours. We’re cheering on Puget Sound Bike Share. We’re partnering with Feet First. We’re meeting with Transportation Choices Coalition. The list goes on and on. All of these groups (and many more) are working to build a better Puget Sound region, and we all recognize that our successes are intimately tied with the successes of other groups. It’s a drumbeat, and we’re marching to it. Partners for progress!

Brakeless Youth

Matthew Metcalf, AmeriCorps Volunteer

Left-hip heavy as I pedal along strong and inhale to bring my cadence to a steady smooth rhythm of calculated body mechanics

Couldn't make it to Sochi? Take on your own Olympic challenge this August by joining us on the Ride Around Washington! Starting in 2014, RAW will commence an epic, four-year cycle of routes which will circumnavigate the state. Join us for one or all four legs of the cycle. This is your vacation so let us handle the details! We’ll provide meals, haul your gear and organize on-road support, in-camp activities, route guidance and more. There will be no “roughing it”. Instead, enjoy quality food, massages, laundry and other premium amenities along the way. The first year of the RAW Cycle was designed with new riders in mind and features shorter (65-70 mile average) and less-hilly daily rides.

Route highlights: • Deception Pass • Secluded Pacific beaches • Optional self-guided ride up Hurricane Ridge • Olympic National Forest • Mouth-watering oysters in Raymond

RAW by the numbers: • 7 days • 250 riders • 393 miles • 14,900 feet of climbing For details and route info, visit cascade.org/raw

The RAW Cycle Year One

Olympic Peninsula and Coast Year Two

Trace the Columbia River to Walla Walla Year Three

Northeast Washington and Palouse Year Four

Crown Jewel Highway 20 to Bellingham

I push forth with all traffic classic two wheels are faster than four round here for certain this certain bliss exists that we may never forget we are kids until the day we desist

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Need to renew your membership? Renew now at cascade.org/renew www.cascade.org


Vol. 44, No. 3

Dream Ride: Bikepacking the Colorado Trail By Jeff Aken, Principal Planner

Jeff Aken on his dream ride: 500 miles of single track on the Colorado Trail.

The Colorado Trail stretches for nearly 500 miles from Denver to Durango, crisscrossing the Continental Divide. Elevation ranges from a low of 5,000 feet to a breathless high point of more than 13,200 feet in southwestern Colorado. The ride (and hike-a-bike) consists of 300+ miles of singletrack and around 200 miles of double track and gravel roads that skirt wilderness areas where bikes are not allowed. Having grown up in Colorado,

I have a soft spot for my home state, and after much dreaming and scheming over beers with a good friend, my dream trip took shape last August: bikepacking the Colorado Trail. We flew into Durango and had two weeks to work our way north and east across Colorado. An old adage of lightweight backpacking and bikepacking is, “pack light and freeze at night.” To avoid the freezing part while still going light, we spent many hours debating gear

choices. It’s a fine line to bring enough gear to deal with regular afternoon thundershowers, the chance of sub-freezing nights and hot days at lower elevations while not overpacking. So we chose to share a stove, skip a tent in favor of bivy sacks and leave those extra clothes behind—(which meant spending two weeks in one pair of bike shorts and one jersey). It can be done. Despite a few setbacks (what big trip doesn’t have setbacks?) that diverted me off the trail for a day or two, the Colorado Trail was everything I dreamed of—long days of gorgeous, high-alpine singletrack, pedaling until the sun goes down, a memorable night camping near 13,000 feet where the temperature dipped into the twenties (and we came close freezing at night), hours upon hours of stumbling and pushing heavy bikes over scree, steep climbs and endless rocks that we didn’t have the oxygen or energy to surmount. And endless stories of food: Do we have enough? Is the brewpub going to be open when we get there tomorrow? What are we going to buy for dinner at the gas station? Do I order one breakfast or two? Do we have enough candy to get through the next two days? When will we hit a town with a grocery store? With two weeks to ride the trail, we had plenty of time to hang out in mountain towns, sit around the

campfire and never, ever start riding until the sun was up. All too soon it was late on our last night. We topped out on the last climb (of what amounted to 75,000 feet of climbing over the 500 miles) and with only one energy bar left, we could see the lights of Denver in the distance. The next morning, I pulled on my filthy shorts and jersey for the last time and we rolled the final miles reminiscing about our favorite sections (mine: the San Juans above Stony Pass). Then the chatter quickly turned from all the amazing memories of this trip toward the next big bikepacking trip. Bikepacking is backpacking on a bike. Modern bikepacking is defined by going light, using soft bags instead of panniers and racks, and most often involves singletrack trails where a lighter, more maneuverable bike is necessary. If you are interested in learning more about bikepacking, go to bikepacking.net. For information about the Colorado Trail, go to ColoradoTrail.org. Closer to home, the John Wayne Trail offers an easy, convenient place to try bikepacking for the first time. For other trails in Washington state that might make a fun overnighter, go to Evergreen MTB Alliance at evergreenmtb.org.

Congrats new League Cycling Instructors! By Shannon Koller, Director Of Education

Shout out to Khatsini Simani and Miranda Kubasti who participated in a 20-hour League of American Bicyclist seminar last month and earned their League Cycling Instructor certifications. Josh Miller was an assistant coach for the seminar and is now one step closer to being a League coach. This means that the entire Education Department has LCI certification! Half of the 12 students that participated in the seminar last month will be incorporated into our inCreating a Better Community Through Bicycling

structional staff. In making this investment in our instructors, we are greatly increasing the gender, age, ethnic and geographic diversity of our instructional staff. Please join me in congratulating Khatsini, Miranda and Josh on their accomplishments! I also want to give huge thanks to Robin Randels who put a tremendous amount of work into bringing this seminar to Seattle!

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March 2014

Become a ride leader

By John Weller, Cascade Ride Leader and Rides Committee member

THE COURIER CREW Anne-Marije Rook, Editor Diane English and Chris Partridge, Editorial Assistants March contributors: Jeff Aken, Jwalant Gurung, Elizabeth Kiker, Shannon Koller, Matt Metcalf, Lisa Miller, Josh Miller, Chris Partridge, Joe Platzner, Anne-Marije Rook, Jeff Seifert, Peter Verbrugge, John Weller, Tarrell Wright Layout by: Tom Eibling

We welcome your contributions! Got an inspiring story or a great photo? We welcome submissions. The editorial calendar is planned one month in advance. If you wish to contribute an article to a future issue, contact the editor as early as possible. Articles and photographic submissions are due by the 10th of the month prior to publication. Articles submitted after that will be considered on a space-available basis. All submissions are subject to editing for content and space. Queries can be emailed to: amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org.

Advertising: We welcome ads and inserts. To check availability and inquire about prices, please contact Anne-Marije Rook at amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org. Let’s be social! Follow Cascade on Facebook and Twitter. @cascadebicycle facebook.com/cascadebicycleclub

CASCADE CONTACTS

Are you an experienced rider looking for more people to ride with? Become a Cascade ride leader!

Cascade is always looking for new ride leaders. Our 280+ ride leaders are the heart of the Cascade free group rides and free ride series programs. They posted more than 2,000 rides in 2013, and we hope for even more this year. Being a ride leader means you get to choose the route and pace as well as the day and time, and you get to frame the ride to attract the kind of rider community you want to serve. The entry requirements are simple. You must be a current Cascade member and you must have participated in at least five Cascade free group rides or CTS rides. If you meet those criteria, you have already taken the first step. Next, you must attend one of our monthly ride leader certification classes.

And finally, you must complete two Cascade free rides with a ride leader mentor. Once you’re a ride leader you can publish rides on the Cascade calendar. If you want help with the early steps, we have experienced ride leader coaches to help you choose routes and get them onto the web. And along with the pleasure of leading riders to the places you love to cycle, you will earn ride leader garments and free entry to Cascade events like Bike Expo, Chilly Hilly, Flying Wheels, STP, RSVP and all the other big rides on the calendar. Interested? Visist www.cascade.org/ become-ride-leader for more information, or email rlcert@cascadebicycleclub.org.

Home Page: www.cascade.org Office phone: 206-522-3222 or 206-522-BIKE Fax: 206-522-2407 Email: info@cascadebicycleclub.org BOARD OF DIRECTORS Note: All email addresses are @cascadebicycleclub.org President Charles Ruthford • charles.ruthford@ Vice President Daniel Weise • daniel.weise@ Treasurer Don Volta • don.volta@ Secretary George Durham • george.durham@ Executive Committee Member-at-large Catherine Hennings • catherine. hennings@ Directors Maggie Sue Anderson • maggiesue. anderson@ Dr. Rayburn Lewis • rayburn.lewis@ Mo McBroom • mo.mcbroom@ Joe Platzner • joe.platzner@

DATES FOR 2014 CLASSES ARE: March 4 at the Cascade offices, Magnuson Park Seattle

Cascade Bicycle Club 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Elizabeth Kiker • (206) 523-9495 or Elizabeth.kiker@ SENIOR STAFF Ed Ewing, Director of Diversity & Inclusion (206) 778-4671 • ed.ewing@ Thomas Goldstein, Advocacy Director (206) 799-7775 • thomasg@ David Lee, Events & Rides Director (415) 203-4578 • david.lee@ Shannon Koller, Director of Education (206) 696-4425 • shannonk@ Serena Lehman, Director of Membership & Outreach (206) 291-4032 • serenal@ Kathy Mania, Finance Director (206) 498-2607 • kathy.mania@

Merlin Rainwater • merlin.rainwater@

Anna-Marije Rook, Communications Director

Ron Sher • ron.sher@

(208) 870-9406 • amrook@

Jessica Szelag • Jessica.szelag@

Tarrell Wright, Development Director

Ed Yoshida • ed.yoshida@

(206) 240-2235 • tarrell.wright@

April 10 at the Cascade offices, Magnuson Park Seattle May 17 at a King County Library, location to be announced

In Focus

June 5 at the Cascade offices, Magnuson Park Seattle

Stacks upon stacks of membership cards went out the door this past month! Thank you to the thousands of people who (re)joined Cascade in the first months of 2014. Together we’re creating a better Puget Sound region through bicycling!

July 10 at the Cascade offices, Magnuson Park Seattle Aug. 23 at a King County Library, location to be announced Sept. 9 at the Cascade offices, Magnuson Park Seattle Oct. 7 at the Cascade offices, Magnuson Park Seattle Nov. 22 at a King County Library, location to be announced Dec. 9 at the Cascade offices, Magnuson Park Seattle 4

Got a picture to share? Send it to amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org www.cascade.org


Vol. 44, No. 3

”The Bike”

By Jack Seifert, Cascade Donor

Two years ago I was riding Chilly Hilly, thinking about other rides I could do in the summer. “What’s with all these fundraiser rides? I have to pay for the ride and raise money? Shouldn’t cycling be free?” Then I met ‘The Bike.’ She was beautiful, not in a sexy sort of way, more strong and capable and an easy joy to ride. Then I learned what she was for. This was not a bike you could buy in America. This was an Africa bike, made for the rigors of rural roads, transporting schoolgirls to school and milk to market. This is something I can fundraise for with a passion.

“Then I met ‘The Bike.’ She was beautiful, not in a sexy sort of way, more strong and capable and an easy joy to ride” – Jack Seifort Okay, you can’t buy a Buffalo bike in the US. ‘The Bike’ is made

by World Bicycle Relief specifically for Africa, and they train assemblers and mechanics and supply spare parts so this can be a long term relationship. But there are a few bikes in this country for demonstration purposes, and I got my hands on one for last year’s Red-Bell 100. Like I said, this bike is designed for Africa, not Pacific Northwest centuries. It weighs close to 50 pounds and can carry 300 to 400 pounds of whatever. There’s one gear and a coaster brake. I truly wasn’t sure if my knees could handle it. But I figured if little schoolgirls in Zambia can ride day in and day out and farmers can carry who knows how many gallons of milk on one of these babies, I can ride one for one day. I had the time of my life. I decided I had two gears, sitting and standing, although I kept trying to shift gears with the bell. Since there’s a big rack capable of carrying heavy loads, I needed to carry something, so I strapped on a cooler full of lemonade and enjoyed sharing my bounty. I did walk up one hill to save my knee, but no one was watching so it was okay. But mostly I felt a great joy, power and potential of cycling, and specifically of the difference these bicycles make to the children and farmers and everyone else in Africa that has access to one. I’ve been in cycling most of my life. I’ve been a courier and a mechanic and I’ve been touring across the US and New Zealand, and I’ve commuted by bicycle in the past.

“The Bike”: World Bicycle Relief’s Buffalo Bike mobilizes people, opening doors to education, healthcare and economic opportunities. Photo courtesy of World Bicycle Relief

But for the last decade I’ve worked at home and worked on my home and my bikes have mostly collected dust, until I met ‘The Bike.’ Now I’m excited again. I’ve got no place to commut,e but I’m doing day rides and trips to the store and planning centuries and tours for this summer. Learning how Red-Bell 100 also supports Cascade’s youth cycling programs has me thrilled too. I’ve donated a dusty bike, and I’ve volunteered to fix bikes and help in other ways as well. Cycling is just plain good, which makes fundraising easy when you believe that. If you believe cycling is good and you explain World Bicycle Relief or Major Taylor Project people will donate money to your cause. Now, it’s more fun if you put some fun in it, so I did things that I like to

do, like make a bunch of BBQ and ‘sell’ plates, and host a Texas Holdem poker tournament. By thinking creatively of value-added things you can do, you can create incentives for more donations. But I’m convinced the most important thing is believing in your cause and then getting the word out. Jack Seifert is a massage therapist and personal trainer and was a top fundraiser for the first two Red-Bell 100s. If you’re riding the Red Bell 100 this year and would like to learn more about how to be a successful fundraiser, Jack is happy to coach you through ideas. You can email him at: jackseifert@hotmail.com or contact Tarrell Wright, Development Director at (206) 240-2235 or tarrellw@ cascadebicycleclub.org

Mechanics Corner: Broken saddles and saddle maintenance By Anne-Marije Rook, Communications Director

I broke my saddle. After a few thousand miles and two seasons of cyclocross abuse, my saddle said “no more!” It started by squeaking and then, one morning, it dented in the middle of the saddle, causing it to become uneven, putting painful pressure on my right sitbone. Time for a new one! This made me wonder, when should one replace a saddle? Are there tell-tale signs that it may be worn- out? Kristi Berg, cycling coach and owner of Cycle U North, informed me that the basic signs of wear and tear to look for are: Rips In The Leather These are usually caused from crashing the bike or leaning the bike up against the saddle. General Wear In The Area That Your Sit Bones Connect With The Saddle “If you see divots or significant indentations, you would want to replace the saddle as the foam or gel inside has broken down,” said Berg.

Squeaking “If the saddle starts to squeak, I have found that that sometimes it is a sign that the rails are starting to come loose,” said Berg. “This would be a good time to replace the saddle.” In general though, there is no real guideline on how many miles one can spent in a saddle before it needs to be replaced, said Berg. But there are a couple things that are important to preserving the life of your saddle. Quality of Materials The quality of the saddle material matters. Berg suggests a higher end saddle made from leather or high quality synthetic material. Saddle Placement Even more important is the placement of your saddle on the seat post clamp. “The most important factor for preserving your saddle is where you place your saddle on the rails in the

Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling

seat post clamp,” said Berg. Berg explained that if your saddle is moved all the way back, so that your rails are clamped towards the front of the saddle, you tend to put a lot of weight on the back of the saddle. This in turn puts a lot of stress on where the rails are connected at the front of the saddle, and can cause the saddle rails to pop out of the saddle, therefore breaking the saddle. The same is true for the opposite set-up. If your saddle is moved all the way forward, so the seat post is clamped on the back of the rails, your weight is more on the front of the saddle and the rails can pop out from the back of the saddle.

rails so that your weight is placed more evenly on the saddle,” said Berg. “And if you have a set back seat post already and your saddle is moved all the way forward, then you want to get a zero set back seat post (post where the clamp is directly on top of the seat post). That will allow you to also put the clamp on the rails more in the center so your weight is more evenly placed on the saddle.” There you have it. Got a squeaking, scuffed up saddle? It may be time for a new one!

The Fix “The way to fix these problems is to purchase either a set back seat post (where the seat post clamp is set behind the seat post). This will fix saddles that are moved all the way back by moving the clamp further back allowing you to set your saddle more in the middle of the

If you have any questions about bike maintenance, email me at amrook@ cascadebicycleclub.org and I’ll find an expert to answer your questions! 5


March 2014

That’s Rando: An insight into randonneuring By Joe Platzner, Randonneur and Cascade board member

Commuter Corner: Why I ditched the earbuds By Chris Partridge, Communications Specialist

Have you ever noticed a group of cyclists who seem to ride rain or shine, day and night throughout the year? The ones who top the mileage rankings on Strava and who disappear for days on end on a “little bike ride”? Those are the randonneurs. And Seattle is the home of one of the most active rando clubs in the country, the Seattle International Randonneurs. We thought we would use this section of the Courier to shed a little light on randonneuring. Randonneurs USA describes randonneuring as “long-distance unsupported endurance cycling. This style of riding is non-competitive in nature, and self-sufficiency is paramount. When riders participate in randonneuring events, they are part of a long tradition that goes back to the beginning of the sport of cycling in France and Italy. Friendly camaraderie, not competition, is the hallmark of randonneuring.” Randonneuring is not racing, but there are time limits. Randonneuring events typically start at 100 kilometers. A Super Randonneur is someone who has completed a series of a

200-, 300-, 400- and 600 kilometer rides. The most famous ride for randonneurs is Paris Brest Paris, a 1200 kilometer event with a 90-hour time limit. This ride takes place every four years and will occur next in 2014. Thousands of cyclists from all over the globe participate in a tradition that goes back to the 1890s. Randonneurs are a tremendously disparate group. Seattle is home to some of the fastest and highest mileage riders in the world. We also have our share of people who just enjoy the camaraderie of the group, and we have our share of riders who struggle to make the time cutoffs. Randonneuring has been known as “cycling with paperwork.” There are seemingly obscure rules and requirements to certify that each rider completed the course within a time limit. It’s also been known as “riding for trinkets,” as there are tons of awards one can earn for accumulating various rides. For more information about randonneuring, look up: • Audax Club Parisien • Randonneurs USA • Seattle International Randonneurs • Paris Brest Paris If you think you would enjoy this sort of challenge, consider checking out the Seattle International Randonneurs. A good place to start would be a 100k daytime populaire. And be sure to check the next Courier for more “That’s Rando” insights!

I started my last Commuter Corner with a confession, but as it turns out I have a lot of biking vices, so here’s another: until recently, I rode listening to headphones. I know, I know. It’s got to be said that listening to music—actually, I’m a podcast addict—on a ride is unsafe and, consequently, against the law in many places and Cascade ride policy. But I want to talk about a different reason that ultimately got me to give up the earbuds. It all started because I forgot my headphones at work one day. I rode home and back the next morning without them, and after some initial pop culture withdrawal, I started seeing the upsides to a distractionfree commute. Our jobs, families and other commitments often have very immediate needs, and when that’s the case,

it can be hard to find time to be creative, re-examine our habits or think deeply. Riding without music has given me that time to think bigpicture and brainstorm when everything else gets hectic. Many of the ideas that get me excited about my job are born on the Burke-Gilman. An active morning commute is also a great transition between work life and home life. It helps me shift gears psychologically and helps me move in and out of work mode. That’s not only good for starting the workday with momentum, but it also keeps me from boring my friends and family with work talk after hours. One thing I noticed while riding distraction-free was that I was simultaneously more in my head and more in the moment. It’s almost meditative in that sense. I’m more aware of the neighborhood, other riders, my own body and those little idea seeds that move in and out of my head. Riding in a bike train or with friends is a great way to connect with others, motivate yourself and have a good time. But riding solo without noise is a nice way to reconnect with yourself. If you’re feeling overworked, overwhelmed or just want some time to brainstorm, consider bike commuting. It’s a healthy and productive way to make your commute time count.

CTS builds better bicyclist and forges friendships By Cathy Henley, CBC Ride Leader

I love exploring new areas by bike. After a decade roaming the rural roads of Bellingham, I moved to Seattle in February 2011, and was ready for new adventures. But Seattle traffic—it was intimidating! Two days after moving into my urban apartment, I won an entry into STP at the Major Taylor Spinathon fundraiser. Yikes. I needed to get comfortable with riding in the area ... and fast. To help me learn the local ropes, I enrolled in the Cascade Training Series (CTS). I knew it would fully prepare me for STP and familiarize me with the Greater Seattle Area. What I had not anticipated was the fast friendships I would forge over the course of the series. Riding with 6

the same pack of cyclists through the spring and summer helped me stay accountable to my training plan and meet others of similar pace. I quickly discovered that these weekly “training” rides were as much fun as STP itself. They became the high point of my week. I had such a good time in 2011, I repeated the series in 2012, and then again in 2013 as an associate ride leader. Along the way, I have become a much stronger rider and met some of the best people on the planet. It has become a family of sorts, a family that keeps growing with every ride.

www.cascade.org


Vol. 44, No. 3

Cascade Presentation Series

What is vacation?

Brain, body, emotions and focus. To be a good rider you must harness all of your potential and see what you can accomplish. You must be smart and successfully read and assess the terrain to get the most out of every ride. You need the fundamental skills of cornering, braking, standing and riding around others, traffic and weather. Cycling may be so simple a child can do it, but to master it you need the full package. Join Ph.D. on wheels Craig Undem for the Craig Undem keys to unlock your best ride. Craig Undem was the first professional Pacific Northwest Tuesday, March 11 bike coach to translate racing skills into simple step-by-step 7 p.m. (free!) instruction that will improve any rider’s performance. He 222 Yale s Ave. N is the owner and head coach of Cycle University, currently celebrating 10 years of teaching cycling skill, coaching and selling great gear in Seattle, with thousands of grateful graduates riding and racing all over the world.

What’s a vacation? Is it a time to relax? A time to sleep in? Is it a time to catch up? I think we all answer that question differently depending on our needs. Last year I answered that question myself with a trip to Chile to ride a bike on a tour. I have never answered my vacation question with biking. I have an insatiable desire for adventure and travel. I’ve always been a light traveler, and I try to tread lightly on the planet (one time I carried five pounds of dead batteries in my backpack around China for a week so I could recycle them at home). But I’d never been on a bike tour or vacationed by bike. After the tour in Chile, I can guarantee that it was not my last! So back to my question; what is a vacation? For me, a vacation is active, full of scenery, with daily adventures. It’s also stress-free, a break in routine and a time to recharge. The confluence of vacation qualities and bike tour qualities is a natural one. Let me describe to you, as I have to many, many friends, what my trip was like. Every day I wake up in a warm bed, I wobble to a breakfast buffet and fuel up on ham, cheese, bread and fruit. Then I change into a wool jersey, my favorite bibs and knee high striped socks. I stick sunglasses, sunscreen and a camera in my jersey pocket. At this moment I

The 5 keys to faster riding every good rider must master Seattle REI

Coming up in the presentation series:

Women’s Cycling Presentation special! “Cycling Tips for Women, by Women.” Tuesday, April 8, 7 p.m @ Seattle REI.

Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling

By Ellison Fidler, Operations Manager

Ellison’s idea of vacation: bike touring Chile

know that today I will ride my bike, and if I feel like it, I will push myself, if I don’t I’ll chat with friends. I’ll look at the beautiful scenery and in the middle of the day the amazing guides (Cristian, Ernesto, Alejandro and the brothers) will have lunch ready and waiting. Then I’ll hop back on my bike, ride some more and be treated to a hot shower, clean clothes and a delicious meal in a new town with 12 of my new favorite people. I had nothing to worry about, I was never hungry, and it only rained half of one day! I couldn’t ask for a simpler, more enjoyable vacation. So next time you ask yourself, “what’s a vacation?” and you answer with anything like “a time to relax while still being active. A place to learn bits of a foreign language from knowledgeable local guides. A time to enjoy the simple pleasure of riding a bike and enjoying life.” Then it’s time for you to sign up for a bike tour!

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March 2014

Seattle Bike-n-Brews

2014 Classes and Camps

By Peter Verbrugge, Events Producer

By Josh Miller, Classes and Camps Coordinator

In 2014, we will continue to offer our core riding and maintenance classes at Magnuson Park on a regular basis. These classes include: Learn to Ride; Urban Cycling Techniques; Back to Basics of Bicycling; Fix-a-Flat; Chains & Derailleurs; Brakes, Wheels and Tires; and Maintenance for Everyday Riders. If you are interested in improving your riding or maintenance skills, we can help you on your way. In addition, we offer off-site commute classes to organizations, businesses, governments and educational institutions in the Greater Seattle Area. We focus these efforts around Bike Month, although offsite commuter classes are available year-round by appointment. The topics of these classes include: Introduction to Bike Commuting,

Lights and Reflectors, Maintenance for Everyday Riders and Fix-a-Flat. This year we are planning to offer commute classes in Bellevue, Edmonds and north and south Seattle. Cascade also runs youth summer camps for three different age groups. These camps are all based at Cascade’s Magnuson Park location and take advantage of the park’s amenities as well as close proximity to the Burke-Gilman Trail and nearby destinations such as Matthews Beach Park. We’re excited to have you join us for any of our riding, maintenance and commuter classes or youth camps. We love the transformational power of riding bikes and want to share that with you and your family.

UPCOMING CLASSES

CAMPS

Urban Cycling Techniques Two-part classes Thursday 6-9 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. March 20 and 22 April 17 and 19

Wheelie Fun Camps 6-9-year-olds 10 a.m. -2 p.m.

Back to Basics of Bicycling 9 a.m.-3 p.m. April 27 Chains & Derailleurs Wednesdays, 6:30 - 9 p.m. March 12 April 9 Maintenance for Everyday Riders 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. March 18 April 15 Brakes, Wheels, and Tires 6 - 9:30 p.m. March 26 (rim brakes) April 30 (rim brakes) Fix a Flat Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. March 3 April 7

June 30 - July 3 July 21 - 25 August 11 - 25 Gearheads Camps 9-12-year-olds 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 6/23 - 6/27 7/14 - 7/18 8/4 - 8/8 8/25 - 8/29 Urban Riders Camps 11-15-year-olds 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. July 7 - 11 August 4 -8 August 18 - 22

Visit www.cascade.org/learn to register

Put in the hours and you’ll earn a FREE ENTRY to RSVP, STP or a ride of your choice!

Become a Cascade Bicycle Club volunteer today! cascade.org/volunteer

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SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 REGISTER TODAY: www.cascade.org The Seattle Bike-n-­Brews is an urban ride produced by the Cascade Bicycle Club for recreational cyclists who appreciate city riding and quality Pacific Northwest craft beers. Last year’s event drew a truly eclectic mix of riders young and old, lycra and jeans, fixies and carbon road bikes. Several riders even wore Cinco de Mayo costumes! The ride begins and ends at Schooner Exact Brewery in Seattle’s SODO District. Riders are taken on a flat, 30­-mile course to Kent and back, utilizing the First Ave South Bridge, Duwamish, Green River and Interurban bike trails, and lightly traveled roads in between. The mid­point stop for will be at Airways Brewery in Kent. Riders can use a beer ticket here for favorites like Skyhag IPA and fuel up on soft drinks and snacks. On the return, riders will have a chance to swing north on Airport Way through Georgetown before docking in SODO at the finish line party. With only 150 feet of total elevation gain and a leisurely start time of 9 till 11 a.m., the Seattle Bike­-n­-Brews is a fun social ride ideal for

riders of all types. In addition to the 30­-mile loop, there is a 15­-mile route option for participants who seek a shorter cruise and a 40­-mile route for the early risers. The start/finish line and turnaround stop will feature an outdoor festival style setting with mechanical support, cool tunes, food options, D.I.Y photo booth, bike parking galore and the opportunity to sample some of the area’s finest microbrews. With their paid registration, riders receive a trucker hat and beverage tickets good for beer at both breweries. Sample size portions and soft drinks for non­drinking riders will be available at each venue. Designated drivers, family and friends are most welcome at the finish line party. We expect participants to drink responsibly at this event, just like they would at any other gathering offering alcoholic beverages. Registration is open and space is filling up! The event capacity is limited to 750 riders, so registering early is advised. Register at www.cascade.org

www.cascade.org


Vol. 44, No. 3

FREE GROUP RIDES LEISURELY PACE (10-12mph) Friday, March 7 FRIDAY RIDERS: Yesler Swamp and beyond 10:00 a.m., 20 mi from Gas Works Park, Seattle • Ride Leader: Norm Tjaden Saturday, March 8 Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) Seattle #5 11:00 a.m., 22 mi from Gas Works Park, Seattle • Ride Leaders: Heidi Schillinger, Andy Williams, Mike Kelly Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) Eastside #5 11:30 a.m., 26 mi from Marymoor Park East free parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leader: Deborah Munkberg Sunday, March 9 South End Getting Ready to Ride Series (GR2R) #5 1:30 p.m., 28 mi from Interurban Trailhead parking lot, Auburn • Ride Leaders: Ida Chiu, Susan Krezelak Friday, March 14 FRIDAY RIDERS: Go North from Ballinger Playfield 10:00 a.m., 28 mi from Ballinger Playfield, Mountlake Terrace • Ride Leader: Jan Johnson Saturday, March 15 Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #6 Seattle 11:00 a.m., 20-25 mi from Jack Block Park, Seattle • Ride Leaders: Machiko Threlkeld, Heidi Schillinger, Marge Evans Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #6 Eastside 11:30 a.m., 26 mi from Juanita Beach Park, Kirkland • Ride Leader: Windsor Lewis Sunday, March 16 South End Getting Ready to Ride Series (GR2R) #6 1:30 p.m., 32 mi from Bicentennial Park, Tukwila • Ride Leaders: Wang Yeung Sunday, March 23 S.P.O.K.E.S.: Cinnamon Rolls or Bust 9:00 a.m., 20 mi from Loehmann’s Plaza Starbucks, Bellevue • Ride Leader: Michelle Burton Saturday, March 29 Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #7 Seattle 11:00 a.m., 26 mi from Gas Works Park, Seattle • Ride Leaders: Machiko Threlkeld, Heidi Schillinger

CHEW Series #9 9:30 a.m., 45 mi from Marymoor Park East free parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leaders: Joni Griffis, Alexa Volwiler, Matthew Wong, Scott Blachowicz Tuesday, March 11 TREATS: The Preston-Snoqualmie Trail 10:00 a.m., 16 mi from Preston Park & Ride, I-90 Exit 22, PrestonRide Leader: Paul Brynes Saturday, March 15 Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #6 Seattle 11:00 a.m., 20 mi from Jack Block Park, Seattle • Ride Leaders: Byron Bryant, Mike Kelly Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #6 Eastside 11:30 a.m., 26 mi from Juanita Beach Park, Kirkland • Ride Leader: Windsor Lewis Sunday, March 16 CHEW Series #10 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from S Bellevue Park and Ride • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler South End Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #6 1:30 p.m., 32 mi from Bicentennial Park, Tukwila • Ride Leaders: Ida Chiu, Susan Krezelak Tuesday, March 18 TREATS: Ride to Alki 10:00 a.m., 35 mi from Green Lake, SW corner, Seattle • Ride Leader: David Bordewick Friday, March 21 FRUMPS: Kenmore to Snohomish 10:00 a.m., 50 mi from Logboom Park, Tracy Owen Station, Kenmore • Ride Leader: Peter Hallson Sunday, March 23 CHEW Series #11 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from Newport Hills P&R, Bellevue • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler Tuesday, March 25 TREATS: Go North from Mountlake Terrace 10:00 a.m., 28 mi from Ballinger Playfield, Mountlake Terrace • Ride Leader: Jan Johnson Saturday, March 29 Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #7 Seattle 11:00 a.m., 26 mi from Gas Works Park, Seattle • Ride Leaders: Andy Williams, Mike Kelly

South End Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #7 11:30 a.m., 28 mi from Burnett Linear Park parking lot, Renton • Ride Leader: Judy Auten

South End Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #7 11:30 a.m., 28 mi from Burnett Linear Park parking lot, Renton • Ride Leaders: Patricia Urton, Rick Urton

Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #7 Eastside 11:30 a.m., 21 mi from S Bellevue Park & Ride • Ride Leader: Deborah Munkbergh

Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #7 Eastside 11:30 a.m., 21 mi from S Bellevue Park & Ride • Ride Leader: Deborah Munkberg

STEADY PACE (12-14 mph) Saturday, March 8 Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #5 Seattle 11:00 a.m., 22 mi from Gas Works Park, Seattle • Ride Leaders: Machiko Threlkeld, Heidi Schillinger Getting Ready to Ride (GR2R) #5 Eastside 11:30 a.m., 26 mi from Marymoor Park East free parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leader: Deborah Munkberg Sunday, March 9 South End Getting Ready To Ride Series (GR2R) #5 1:30 p.m., 28 mi from West main Street and Interurban Trail, Auburn. • Ride Leader: Wang Yeung

Sunday, March 30 CHEW Series #12 7:45 a.m., 45 mi from Lincoln Park lower lot, West Seattle • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler

MODERATE PACE (14-16mph)

Friday, March 14 FRUMPS: Blyth Park 10:00 a.m., 40 mi from Blyth Park, Bothell • Ride Leader: Chris Nelson Sunday, March 16 CHEW Series #10 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from S Bellevue Park & Ride, Bellevue • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler Sunday, March 23 CHEW Series #11 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from Newport Hills P&R (Exit 9 off I-405), Bellevue • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler Thursday, March 27 MEETS: Marymoor, Thursday Edition 5.45 p.m., 25 mi from Marymoor Park, east (free) parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leaders: Sandi Navarro, Kimberly Smith Friday, March 28 FRUMPS: Kenmore Rumble 10:00 a.m., 40 mi from Logboom Park, Kenmore • Ride Leaders: Daniel Garretson Sunday, March 30 CHEW Series #12 7:45 a.m., 45 mi from Lincoln Park lower lot, West Seattle • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler

BRISK PACE (16-18mph) Sunday, March 9 CHEW Series #9 9:30 a.m., 45 mi from Marymoor Park East free parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leaders: Daniel Kelly, Alexa Volwiler, Carl Wainwright, Tim Thomas, Kimberly Smith Monday, March 10 MUMPS: Head Up North 10:00 a.m., 55 mi from Tracy Owen Station/ Logboom Park, Kenmore • Ride Leader: Craig Mohn Tuesday, March 11 Eastside Tours Evening Ride 6:30 p.m., 25 mi from Overlake Transit Ctr, Redmond • Ride Leader: Eric Gunnerson Thursday, March 13 Eastside Tours Evening Ride 6:30 p.m., 25 mi from Overlake Transit Ctr, Redmond • Ride Leader: Eric Gunnerson Sunday, March 16 CHEW Series #10 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from S. Bellevue Park & Ride, Bellevue • Ride Leaders: Wilfried Mack, Daniel Kelly, Alexa Volwiler, Tim Thomas, Kimberly Smith Tuesday, March 18 Eastside Tours Evening Ride 6:30 p.m., 25 mi from Overlake Transit Ctr, Redmond • Ride Leader: Eric Gunnerson Monday, March, 17 MUMPS: Head Up North 10:00 a.m., 55 mi from Tracy Owen Station/ Logboom Park, Kenmore Ride Leader: Craig Mohn

Friday, March 7 FRUMPS: Winter Ride South 10:00 a.m., 40 mi from Russell Rd Park, Kent • Ride Leader: Jim Taylor

Tuesday, March 18 Eastside Tours Evening Ride 6:30 p.m., 25 mi from Overlake Transit Ctr, Redmond • Ride Leader: Eric Gunnerson

Sunday, March 9 CHEW Series #9 9:30 a.m., 45 mi from Marymoor Park East free parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leaders: Alexa Volwiler, Sandie Smith, Cathy Henley

Thursday, March 20 Eastside Tours Evening Ride 6:30 p.m., 25 mi from Overlake Transit Ctr, Redmond • Ride Leader: Eric Gunnerson

Thursday, March 13 MEETS: Marymoor, Thursday Edition 5:45 p.m., 25 mi from Marymoor Park East free parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leaders: Peter Dunmore, Kimberly Smith

Sunday, March 23 CHEW Series #11 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from Newport Hills P&R (Exit 9 off I-405), Bellevue • Ride Leaders: Wilfried Mack, Tim Johnson, Daniel Kelly, Tim Thomas, Kimberly Smith

Monday, March 24 MUMPS: Head Up North 10:00 a.m., 55 mi from Tracy Owen Station/ Logboom Park, Kenmore • Ride Leader: Craig Mohn Tuesday, March 25 Eastside Tours Evening Ride 6:30 p.m., 25 mi from Overlake Transit Ctr, Redmond • Ride Leader: Eric Gunnerson Thursday, March 27 Eastside Tours Evening Ride 6:30 p.m., 25 mi from Overlake Transit Ctr, Redmond • Ride Leader: Eric Gunnerson Sunday, March 30 CHEW Series #12 7:45 a.m., 45 mi from Lincoln Park lower lot, West Seattle • Ride Leaders: Tim Johnson, Daniel Kelly, Carl Wainwright, Tim Thomas, Kimberly Smith Monday, March 31 MUMPS: Head Up North 10:00 a.m., 55 mi from Tracy Owen Station/ Logboom Park, Kenmore • Ride Leader: Craig Mohn

STRENUOUS PACE (18-21mph) Sunday, March 9 CHEW Series #9 9:30 a.m., 45 mi from Marymoor Park East free parking lot, Redmond • Ride Leaders: James Coliz, Robert Dennis, Alexa Volwiler Sunday March 16 CHEW Series #10 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from S Bellevue Park and Ride • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler Sunday, March 23 CHEW Series #11 9:30 a.m., 50 mi from Newport Hills P&R (Exit 9 off I-405) • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler Sunday, March 30 CHEW Series #12 7:45 a.m., 45 mi from Lincoln Park lower lot, West Seattle • Ride Leader: Alexa Volwiler

SUPER-STRENUOUS PACE (+22mph) Tuesday, March 11 Cycle Tuesdays 5:45 p.m., 35 mi from Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley Restaurant, Renton • Ride Leaders: Stephen Else, Russ Moul Tuesday, March 18 Cycle Tuesdays 5:45 p.m., 35 mi from Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley Restaurant, Renton • Ride Leaders: Stephen Else, Russ Moul Tuesday, March 25 Cycle Tuesdays 5:45 p.m., 35 mi from Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley Restaurant, Renton • Ride Leaders: Stephen Else, Russ Moul Tuesday, April 1 Cycle Tuesdays 5:45 p.m., 35 mi from Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley Restaurant, Renton • Ride Leaders: Stephen Else, Russ Moul

Weather conditions may cancel the ride. Helmets are required on all rides. Earbuds/headphones are not allowed on any Cascade ride. All riders are required to sign a waiver form. Children 15 and under must be accompanied by parent or guardian. Riders are expected to be ready to ride at the time listed. Participants do not have to RSVP, simply show up to join the fun!

On Twitter? Tag your tweets and twitpics with #grouprides.

For a complete listing of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org/calendar in order to pick a ride that suits your style, skills and energy level, use the ride guidelines at www.cascade.org/grouprides

Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling

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March 2014

Mountain Biking the Annapurna Circuit By Jwalant Gurung, Grand Asian Journeys

Ride Refs at Cascade events By Josh Miller, Classes and Camps Coordinator

Two friendly ride refs at the starting line of STP 2013

Photo courtesy of Grand Asian Journeys A ride of a lifetime: the Annapurna Curcuit by mountain bike

Trekking on foot around the Annapurna Circuit was for many years considered among the world’s top 10 treks. Now, the route around Annapurna is probably the best biking trip in the Himalayas. I had the opportunity to take this trip last year and hopefully my experience will inspire you to join me for another adventure this October. The trip started with a bus ride to Besi Sahar, snaking along the Trishuli and Marsyangdi rivers. But at Besi Sahar, with 10-15 miles left to go, I had had enough of the bumpy vehicle ride and decided to get out on my bike and soak in the amazing river and dramatic Himalayan vistas.

Riding through valleys, past waterfalls, paddy terraces, buckwheat fields and villages, I couldn’t help but notice the cultural change. Small stupas, mani-stone walls and Buddhist prayer flags dotted the trail as Hindu-dominated villages of the lowlands were replaced by Buddhist villages at the higher elevations. Even the landscape begins to change as jaw-dropping mountain views come into view. Past Pisang the trail becomes almost flat, allowing for an easy ride to Manang. There, I stayed an additional night to allow for acclimatization, using 10

that day to explore the surroundings including a holy cave and an alpine lake. And that was just the beginning!

Give me an R! Give me an E! Give me an F! Referee! If you’ve ridden Major Rides with Cascade before, maybe you’ve wondered to yourself “who are those people in the black and white jerseys?” These fine men and women are Cascade’s trained fleet of Ride Referees; a dedicated group of volunteers committed to keeping rides safe. All of the 2014 refs are returning from previous seasons with years of experience riding Cascade’s major rides both for fun and as officials. The two goals of the Ride Refs are to act as both safety and goodwill ambassadors, providing basic assistance to riders who may have encountered problems such as flat tires, and calling emergency responders in the case of an injured cyclist. The refs’ responsibilities do not end there, however. They go on to include a wide range of safe practices such as encouraging safe cycling behaviors and discouraging unsafe and inappropriate conduct (i.e

riding with earbuds, riding three abreast, running stop signs, etc.). In addition, Ride Refs may also report unsafe or inappropriate riders to ride officials. Lastly, Ride Refs are official Cascade representatives. They foster relationships with not only riders, but also community members, store owners and bystanders. Ride Refs remind riders of safe riding behavior and traffic laws. They encourage riders to: • Stop at stop signs and lights (riders do not necessarily have to unclip, but they must come to an obvious momentary stop) • Ride right/pass left and call out when passing • Signal and call out turns, obstacles • Ride single file - remember SINGLE FILE IS SAFER • Ride without earphones/headphones, and never use a cell phone while riding • Move off the road when stopping • Give other riders sufficient room when passing • Allow cars to pass

The Ride Refs are looking forward to an exciting and safe 2014 season and cannot to wait to see all of you out there at Cascade’s great events.

The main challenge of this trip is undoubtedly reaching Thorung La (17,700 ft.). An early start is critical, so I left the lodge at 4 a.m. and slogged for five hours to get to the summit. It was a beautifully calm day with a slight wind. From the summit of Thorung La, it was time to reap the rewards of my efforts with an almost 5,000 foot dramatic descent. Though technical for a while, the descent soon became less steep and I was really enjoying the ride. The last day was the longest. From Muktinath, I descended into the Kali Gandaki Valley which is the deepest gorge in the world – it is flanked by two of the highest mountains in the world: Annapurna and Dhaulagiri. I reached my destination and spent the evening drinking a beer at the natural hotspring in Tatopani. Sound like fun? Join me and my company this fall! Tour details: Oct. 20 – Nov. 3, 2014 • 15 days $2,195 - 2,750 per person www.cascade.org/international-tours www.cascade.org


Vol. 44, No. 3

Red-Bell 100 The Red-Bell 100 is a breathtaking one-day charity ride from Marymoor Park in Redmond, Washington to Boundary Bay Brewery in downtown Bellingham to benefit the global work of World Bicycle Relief and the local work of Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation. Limited to 600 riders, the fullysupported route offers 100 miles of scenic, rural back roads and bike paths. The best part, though, is that you’ll be pedaling in support of two great organizations: Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation and World Bicycle Relief. Cascade’s youth programming reaches 25,000 local kids per year! World Bicycle Relief changes lives in Africa by distributing transport style bicycles, providing thousands of people with access to healthcare, education and economic opportunity. This exciting partnership and ride offers participants a true way to affect direct change though their support and giving. • REGISTER NOW at worldbicyclerelief.org/red-bell100 • All riders will receive a jersey, t-shirt, catered lunch, dinner and beer. • Registration cost: $100 (due at registration) • Fundraising minimum: $150 (may opt to self-fund at registration)

Give $25, Get $25: Give your friends $25 off registration with your special referral code, and receive $25 off your own registration! If you refer up to 4 people, your registration is completely FREE! See website for details.

Litigation against Seattle Bicycle Master Plan withdrawn; New Westlake Advisory Committee to be created By Anne-Marije Rook, Communications Director

at

Ped d l e r B r e w in g c o . i n B a lla r d E v e r y t h ir d T h u r s d a y o !f t h e m o nt h

Join us for more beer, advocacy and prizes every third Thursday of the month. Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling

Cascadians sure felt the bike love this Valentine’s Day, when the Westlake Stakeholders Group announced they would withdraw their appeal of the “determination of non-significance” to the environmental review of the Seattle Bicycle Master Plan Update. In addition, Mayor Ed Murray announced the creation of a special “Westlake Cycle Track Design Advisory Committee.” The withdrawal of the appeal means that the current on-going design process for the Westlake Protected Bike Lane will proceed without the simultaneous ligation of the Bicycle Master Plan Update. “A huge valentine goes out to Mayor Murray and his staff for making today a great day for bicycling in Seattle,” said Elizabeth Kiker, Executive Director of the Cascade Bicycle Club. “The dark cloud of the over dozens of impor-

tant bikeway projects across the city has lifted, and now the Seattle City Council can adopt the nation’s best bicycle master plan.” “Cascade is excited to work with the Westlake Stakeholders Group, businesses, neighbors and our members to move forward on a shared vision of creating a protected bike lane through the Westlake Corridor,” said Thomas Goldstein, Policy Director for Cascade. More people in Seattle are switching to bicycling than any other mode. It’s easy to see why: bicycling makes us healthier and happier. That’s why it’s so important that our infrastructure keep pace to ensure bicycling can become an even safer way to get around. “Westlake is the number-one most desired bikeway project in the city right now,” said Brock Howell, Policy & Government Affairs Manager for Cascade. “We’re thrilled to have all parties back at the design table, ready to move forward. Let’s get it built.”

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March 2014

Be a part of cycling’s largest celebration! The 10th Annual

Tuesday, May 6, 7-9 a.m. Sheraton Seattle

Registration now open! Reserve your seat or full table now at: www.cascade.org/breakfast

Spend the most important meal of the day with

the bike community’s most important people.

Park your trusty steed at the largest bike coral you’ll ever see at 7 a.m.

Laugh till you cry with author and comedian Willie Weir.

Special guest speaker to be announced.

Thanks to our early-bird sponsors:

Lease Crutcher Lewis • Hoffman Construction Co. • ZGF Architects

For sponsorship opportunities please contact Tarrell Wright at (206) 240-2235 or tarrellw@cascadebicycleclub.org Benefitting Cascade Bicycle Club’s Education Foundation

Thanks to everyone who attended the sold out screening event of Rising From Ashes. It was a very inspiring film and great night for the Major Taylor Project.

Pictured: Event producer Peter Verbrugge with Team Rwanda rider Rafiki Uwimana and Executive Producer Peb Jackson

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www.cascade.org


Cascade Courier March 2014