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Bike your vote! Ballots due Aug. 6 Let's ride! High Pass Challenge, Sept. 8 and Kitsap Color Classic, Sept. 29 A message from Mercer Island cyclists, page 3

AUGUST 2013 / Vol. 43, No. 8

Your pro-bike candidates: 2013 primary endorsements

Fun bike events during the dog days of summer

by Evan Manvel, Director of Policy, Planning and Government Affairs

PhinneyWood Summer Streets

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e all want a better world for our children, and that means creating communities where both an eight-year-old kid and an 80-yearold grandparent can safely and comfortably ride a bicycle. Having the right leaders in office is essential to make this happen, and this year’s Washington state primary election ballots have arrived in your mailbox. Please join the Cascade Bicycle Club in supporting the following ballot measure and candidates on the primary ballot:

175 miles of regional trails that comprise the King County Parks system. Proposition 1 will complete key missing links in the regional trail system, pay for critical repairs and maintenance, and keep our parks clean, open and safe. As you know, our regional trails are some of the best places to ride with families and for recreation, as well as good connections to get to work, school and to shop.

• Yes on King County Parks Levy, Proposition 1 • Seattle Mayor: Mike McGinn • Seattle Council Position 2: Richard Conlin • Seattle Council Position 8: Mike O’Brien • King County Executive: Dow Constantine • King County Council Position 1: Rod Dembowski • Bellevue City Council Position 6: Dual endorsement: Lynne Robinson and Vandana Slatter • Mukilteo Mayor: Jennifer Gregorson Be sure to turn your primary ballots in by August 6.

No other candidate for Seattle Mayor comes close to Mayor Mike McGinn’s commitment to creating a better community through bicycling. Mayor McGinn has shown strong leadership in making Seattle a safer place for families to bike. He has pushed for more bike funding, championed a world-class Bike Master Plan Update and fought to fix the Missing Link of the Burke-Gilman Trail. And under Mayor McGinn’s leadership, Seattle is building neighborhood greenways and separated, protected bicycle lanes across the city. It’s leadership like this why the Sierra Club, UNITE HERE, Northwest Energy Efficiency Council, Seattle Transit Blog, The Stranger and national environmental leaders Van Jones, Michael Brune, Bill McKibben, and Bill Nye “The Science Guy” have all endorsed Mike McGinn. With the Bicycle Master Plan update this year, an update to the City’s overall transportation plan next year and key transportation funding ballot measures expected over the next three years, Seattle needs a mayor who has the proven leadership to stand up for what he believes in and support safe streets for bicyclists and all users.

Yes on King County Parks Levy, Proposition 1

Seattle City Council Position 2: Richard Conlin

Richard Conlin has long supported transportation choices, including Seattle’s complete streets law. He backed the Portage Bay Bridge bike lane and has championed bike-transit connections, including investing millions of dollars for bicycle infrastructure at Northgate such as the bicycle-pedestrian bridge across I-5.

Seattle City Council Position 8: Mike O’Brien ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115 www.cascade.org

TIME DATED MATERIAL

PRSRT STD US Postage Paid Seattle, WA PERMIT No. 2172

The Parks Levy is a renewal of two expiring levies supporting over 200 parks and

Re-Elect Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn

While not riding the STP, Mike O’Brien has been a pro-bike leader on council, pushing forward-looking policies, helping secure funding for bike counters and advocontinued on page 2

Is your membership expiring?

RENEW AT

www.cascade.org/renew

Friday, Aug. 9 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. Greenwood Avenue/Phinney Avenue from N 87th to N 67th Street  Tell your neighbors, tell your friends! Friday, Aug. 9 is a party along Greenwood. This free event opens the city’s largest public space - its streets - so people can walk, bike, roll, run, skip and shop - without having to watch out for cars. Summer Streets is partnering with the Phinney Neighborhood Association for some good old fashioned fun. Cascade will be out decorating bikes and promoting bicycle fun for everybody.

Rainier Valley Summer Streets

Saturday, Aug. 17 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Parade from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with Summer Streets following Rainier Avenue S between S Alaska and S Brandon Streets This year’s theme is “Eat in the Street.” Bicycle over with your blanket, lawn chairs and picnic basket and lounge along Rainier. Restaurants will be serving picnic food and expect to have of fun playing lawn games. This is perfect opportunity to try out the bike basket you bought. Cascade will be there decorating bikes and promoting how to picnic by bike.

Central Area Community Festival Dust-Off Days Saturday, Aug. 17 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Garfield Community Play field

Check out the Dust-Off Days article in this issue.

The Northwest Film Forum Bike-In Saturday, Aug. 24 5 - 11 p.m. Cal Anderson Park

Where bikes, community and the arts meet you’ll find the Seattle Bike-In, now in its eighth year at Cal Anderson Park, hosted

by Northwest Film Forum and The Vera Project. Come hang out on Capitol Hill on Saturday, Aug. 24 and enjoy a bike fair from local cycling organizations, live bands + DJs, and a free screening of Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure. The party starts at 5 p.m., free and open to the public—summer night never felt so right to be on two wheels!

Bicycle Sunday

Sunday, Aug. 25 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Lake Washington Blvd Close out the summer with a leisurely family ride along the car-free Lake Washington Blvd. Volunteers will selling $15 Bicycle Helmets at Seward Park from 1 to 4 p.m.

Bike Fridays at the Henry Art Gallery University of Washington

With the days getting longer and the evenings warmer, now is the perfect time to hop on your bike, trike, or extra-cycle and head to the Henry Art Gallery! All summer, the Henry is offering complementary admission to cyclists on Fridays and hosting a variety of bike-friendly summer programs.

In This Issue Bike to School Day report.............................2 Board of Directors seeks nominees...............2 Bike to Work Breakfast wrap up..................2 Summer classes.................................................3 Bike Maintenance volunteers needed.............3 Bike to School month wrap up.....................3 Support Share the Road.................................4 Volunteer for CanBikeSeattle...........................4 Partner News....................................................4 July Rides......................................................5-8 Bikenomics........................................................8

Family Biking Learn 2 Ride...........................8 David Herlily presents rare photos................8 Helmet sales.....................................................9 Dust Off Days a success.................................9 Major Taylor......................................................9 Cyclist of the Month......................................10 Volunteers........................................................11 Cascade Contacts............................................11 Welcome New Members................................12


August 2013

An Evening with Bob Roll Saturday, Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. Hales Palladium behind Hales Brewery 301 Leary Way North West Seattle, Washington 98107 Advance tickets $30. Cascade members: $3 discount On sale at Brown Paper Tickets Doors open at 7 p.m. All ages OK

continued from page 1 cating to bring bike sharing to Seattle.

King County Executive: Dow Constantine

In his first term, Dow Constantine championed King County’s purchase of 20 miles of the BNSF rail corridor on the Eastside, to be converted into a trail route for pedestrians and bicyclists, with the possibility of commuter rail in the future. In addition, his administration has updated county plans to strengthen smart growth, safe routes to school, complete streets, and regional trail policies.

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ob Roll is one of America’s most well-known ex-professional cyclists who rode on both the Motorola and 7-Eleven teams in the 1980s. He has been a regular commentator on international cycling events for many years on several different North American networks. He brings a wealth of fun, insights and colorful humorous commentary on the world of professional cycling. This evening party includes a 90-minute presentation followed by a short Q&A and a meet and greet/autograph session. Don’t miss this special Saturday night event featuring an exclusive presentation by one of the biggest names in U.S. cycling! This fun party is a special fundraiser for the Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation. The intimate Hales Palladium Brewery

Your pro-bike candidates: 2013 primary endorsements

King County Council Position 1: Rod Dembowski venue is Seattle’s home for the eclectic Moisture Festival, and is located in Freemont-Ballard area. There will be Hales award-winning beer on hand, plus snacks. Do you want to spend even more up close time with “the Bobke”? Then be one of 50 lucky people to join us on Sunday morning Oct. 27 to “Roll with The Bobke” on a moderately paced 30-mile ride. This event brought to you by Hales and Marqueen Inn at Queen Anne.

We’re hiring a Commute Programs Manager

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ascade Bicycle Club is looking to hire a Commute Programs Manager, someone who develops, oversees and implements Cascade’s commute programs in partnership with the Policy, Planning and Government Affairs team and other Cascade staff. The Commute Programs Manager is expected to further the goal of getting more people riding bikes, with specific focus on the Puget Sound region. He or she will advocate for, and mobilize allies to support, bicycle-friendly policies and infrastructure related to commuting, with a particular focus on workplace support. The Manager will implement and improve Cascade’s signature commute programs including: • BizCycle, a best practices guide and LEED-style certification system for bike-friendly businesses • BizForum, a periodic gathering of business leaders supporting bicycling • Bike Month, Cascade’s largest annual event held each May (including the Bike Commute Challenge and Bike to Work Day) Please read the announcement and full job description online at www.cascade. org/jobs Submit a cover letter, resume, three professional references and a relevant writing sample (no more than four pages long) all in a single PDF document to resume@cascadebicycleclub.org. Please mention how you heard about the position. Applications are due August 4, 2013.

Rod Dembowski believes in creating better communities through bicycling. He understands the importance of designing our streets to be safer for all users so tragedies like that on NE 75th Street can be avoided. As a recent appointee to the King County Council, he will continue his leadership in support of better regional transportation policies.

Bellevue City Council Position 6: Lynne Robinson & Vandana Slatter Cascade is making a dual-endorsement of Lynne Robinson and Vandana Slatter. Both candidates have been involved in recreational and competitive cycling for decades and want to expand our trail systems while also making our streets safer for all users. This will be a marked difference from incumbent Don Davidson who has long frustrated improving transportation choices. We look forward to either Lynne Robinson or Vandana Slatter, or both, moving onto the general election.

Mukilteo Mayor: Jennifer Gregorson

As a Mukilteo city councilmember, Jennifer Gregorson has shown strong leadership in making Mukilteo a safer place for families to bike. She has worked to build support for building more bicycle trails to connect with the region, to build new bicycle lanes to make streets safer, and to to slow neighborhood streets through quality design. She is literally a regional expert on creating great communities through bicycling, having graduated from the University of Washington with a Masters in Urban Planning & Design and having written the study on how to create a regional bike share program.

General Election

To date, the Cascade Bicycle Club has also endorsed the following candidates for the General Election: • Bainbridge Island City Council, South Ward: Roger Townsend • Issaquah Mayor: Fred Butler • Kirkland City Council Position 1: Jay Arnold • Kirkland City Council Position 3: Penny Sweet • Kirkland City Council Position 7: Doreen Marchione • Seattle City Council Position 4: Sally Bagshaw • Seattle City Council Position 6: Nick Licata

Volunteer

Getting these candidates elected takes more than a single vote, it takes people like you volunteering to educate folks. Sign up to volunteer with a candidate, and help build political power for the bicycling movement. Contact Emily Kathrein at emily.kathrein@cascadebicycleclub.org.

M.J. Kelly, Editor Diane English, Editorial Assistant; Susan Hiles, Photography; August contributors: Ryann Child, Diana Larson, Serena Lehman, Evan Manvel, Hanna McFall, Robin Randels, Anne-Marije Rook, Gail Benezra Rudee, Peter Verbrugge

The contents of this newspaper do not necessarily represent the views of the Club or any of its members. The views expressed are those of the individual contributors. Submissions guidelines: Article ideas should be discussed with the Editor in advance as the publication calendar is planned two months prior to publication. Final materials are due the first Tuesday of the month, though earlier is appreciated.  Articles submitted after that will be considered on a space-available basis. Queries can be emailed to. m.j.kelly@cascadebicycleclub.org. If you send text attachments, please format files as native MS Word files or .RTF. For line art please use an .eps format and for photos please use .jpg or .tiff format. The Courier is printed at 300 dpi, so a small 72 dpi photo will not reproduce. If you attach your name and phone number, I will do my best (conditions permitting) to discuss any major changes with you. All submissions are subject to editing for comprehension, grammar or space requirements. Please be concise!

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Inserts:  We have room for 6 single sheet qualifying inserts in each issue.  Please contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah. pistorius@cascadebicycleclub.org, for a copy of our insert policy and request form. The request and fee are due by the first of the month prior to the desired month. Advertising: Advertising: Display ads can be placed in the Courier. To check availability and reserve space, contact Leah Pistorius, (913) 579-7629 leah.pistorius@cascadebicycleclub.org Reprints:  Articles may be reprinted or abstracted in publications of nonprofit groups provided that the author and Club are credited.  Please send us a copy of the reprinted material. Membership Information:  Club records and finances are available to members upon request from the club office at 206522-3222.

www.cascade.org


Vol. 43, No. 8

BizCycle Round II: Applications for certification due Friday, Sept. 20 by Ryann Child, Commute Programs Assistant, AmeriCorps Member

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ast May, Cascade certified 20 bicyclefriendly businesses as BizCycle workplaces, connecting more than 83,000 employees across the Puget Sound region with bicycle-friendly best practices. Modeled after LEED certification for green buildings, BizCycle rates workplaces on a 50-point scale for their work to increase bicycle commuting in internal policies, tracking of commute habits and barriers, end-of-trip facilities, programming and messaging and community leadership. Our inaugural round saw businesses of all types gain certification, from a three-person law firm to some of Seattle’s signature employers such as Starbucks Coffee Company and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The bar was set high: Seattle Children’s earned 43 out of 50 possible credits to achieve the hospital’s Gold level award, and still fell two credits short of Platinum. We certified one Bronze workplace, thirteen Silver and seven at Gold level. The average score of all applicants was 31 credits—a high Silver, evidence that this first cohort of BizCycle applicants represented a high-achieving honors class of bike-friendly businesses. Why are organizations across the region turning to BizCycle to recognize and improve their bicycle commuting program? A few things we’ve heard from interested workplaces: Increasing bicycling makes business sense. Bicycle commuters are healthier, happier and more productive employees. Bicyclists have lower rates of absenteeism and make 14 percent fewer health insurance claims. Furthermore, many businesses are finding that bicycle facilities, programming and incentive policies represent pennies on the dollar compared to expanding parking capacity at a work site. Objective and quantitative rating. The BizCycle credit list represents an objective, quantitative and research-based criteria for

what increases bicycle commuting. As a result, credits not earned in either the selfassessment or in the final certification score create a clear and detailed “to-do” list for how your organization can improve to more effectively feed the benefits of bicycling to work. BizCycle provides the resources and the reason. Move your workplace from passive perusal of information into active implementation of best practices. Several organizations seeking certification implemented some significant improvements before finalizing their score. Recognition feels great. Does your workplace boast an impressive bicycle commuting program? BizCycle certification recognizes the great work that businesses across the region are doing to encourage bicycling. BizCycle workplaces are using certification as a means to promote their work both internally among employees interested in bicycling, as well as externally to better compete with peer organizations, attract customers and recruit highly-desirable creative class talent that values walkable, bikeable places to live, work and play, and transportation choices beyond driving. With the first cohort behind us, our second round of certifications is rolling. Do you work for a bike-friendly workplace? Whether your business deserves accolades or could use a little help in encouraging bicycling to work, BizCycle is simple and effective. The deadline to apply in our second round has been set for Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Start the process today by emailing bizcycle@ cascadebicycleclub.org or by filling out the Get Started BizCycle interest form online at bizcycle.cascade.org/apply-now.

August class offerings

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ake advantage of our summer classes while the weather is fine. Up and coming at Magnuson Park. Register online at www.cascade.org.

Fix a Flat – Aug. 5 Learn this simple and important skill to minimize delays the next time your tire fizzles. We’ll take the mystery out of wheel and tire removal, patching a tube and putting it all back together. Learn what tools to carry for a quick and speedy repair. Our class is hands-on-your-bike -- so bring it along. We’ll send you home with patch kit and a step by step guide for the next encounter with a flat tire.

Chains and Derailleurs – Aug. 13 Learn basic methods for working on chains and derailleurs that will keep your drive-train and shifting system in tip top shape. We’ll cover chain maintenance, derailleur adjustment and troubleshooting system problems. This is a hands-on-your-bike class, so bring it along with a multi-tool if you’ve got one – we will have tools available if you don’t. You will go home with a smoother shifting bike and our new refresher how-to guide booklet.

Back 2 Basics of Bicycling – Aug. 25

our Urban Cycling Techniques course. Students will learn basic bike handling skills and maneuvers, including stopping and starting, how to shift the gears smoothly and effectively, proper braking technique, where to ride in the road, signaling, road infrastructure and bike facilities. Learn laws and safety as well as on-bike handling drills. We will apply our newfound skills on a group ride using neighborhood streets and the Burke-Gilman Trail. Course is designed for those who already know how to ride a bike but need additional practice. Bring a bike in working order and a CPSC approved helmet. Bring a snack and be sure to wear weather appropriate clothing.

Editorial / Opinion

Riding Safe: A Message from Mercer Island Cyclists

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s longtime members of the Cascade Bicycle Club, avid cyclists, and Mercer Island residents, we would like to ask for your help by observing some common sense safety rules when riding on Mercer Island Mercer Island is an understandably popular destination or ride segment for many cyclists and bicycle groups, but it also has its challenges. East and West Mercer are heavily shaded, narrow and hilly with limited shoulders. They also are main north-south arteries for motorists. Numerous runners and walkers make them popular pedestrian routes. Over the past 10 years there have been more than a hundred bicycle-car accidents on this loop. Complaints to the City Council from motorists were so numerous that several years ago the City considered passing ordinances aimed at reducing pelotons or other groups cycling on the Island. After convincing the Council not to impose restrictions on cyclists, a group of Mercer Island cyclists decided to take another approach. Since then we have worked to improve relations and safety among all those who use our streets and roads: pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. A secondary goal was to position cyclists as both good citizens and leaders in improving road safety. Over a year ago with the City’s help, we held an open Road Safety Summit, which both on and off-Island cyclists attended as well as local pedestrians and motorists. We spent several hours listening and discussing how to improve safety and courtesy without new laws or heightened enforcement. In the end we created a Mercer Island’s Best Practices for each major user group: drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists. The Best Practices recommends common sense steps such as cyclists and pedestrians wearing bright or reflective clothing in low light conditions; motorists not talking on cell phones while driving; and cyclists pulling over when they are holding up five or more other vehicles. In February, the City Council approved these Best Practices as a recommendation, not as enforceable ordinance. Now we are asking the cycling community, including members of Cascade, to demonstrate leadership by observing them. We are asking the same of motorists and pedestrians. Given the potential benefit of improving the behavior of all three groups, we hope that our like-

minded cycling brethren will sign on. These Best Practices are posted on https://sites.google.com/site/neighborsinmotion/ You should know that large groups of cyclists (aka pelotons) remain a hotbutton issue for many Island motorists, especially for commuters driving home at the end of the day. East and West Mercer are curving, two-lane roads with many stretches where it is unsafe to pass large groups of cyclists. We ask you as individuals, as well as ride leaders, whenever possible to ride in groups smaller than six. The Best Practices also suggests that, when safe to do so, cyclists ride single file on a paved shoulder. For the past 10 years the City of Mercer Island has paved miles of shoulders on East Mercer and West Mercer, in part to allow for a safer alternative for cyclists and pedestrians. This summer additional stretches of East Mercer have already been paved. We are not suggesting that anyone be “required” to yield to motorists by riding on a paved shoulder, especially if it is unsafe to do so, although state law does prohibit impeding more than five vehicles if it is safe to pull aside. Again the Best Practices are simply a request do so whenever possible out of courtesy for other road users. Another recommended “Best Practice” is to wear brightly colored clothing and use bike lights. Many parts of the Island are heavily wooded, and with all the cloudy weather and darkness in the rainy months, it just makes sense to improve visibility whenever possible. Too often we see cyclists and pedestrians without lights and wearing all black on rainy afternoons and evenings. The better course is to minimize the chances of being overlooked. Many of us have seen the angry letters to the editor and online comments complaining about dangerous drivers or inconsiderate cyclists. We hope you will help us in our effort to break this vicious cycle by demonstrating the same courtesy and consideration that we expect from other road users. Cyclists in particular will benefit from the goodwill of motorists using the Mercer Ways by demonstrating consideration for others. Thank you for your help. Jim Stanton, Bob Olson, Mark Clausen, Lucia Pirzio-Biroli, Graham Hunter, Jolanne Stanton, Erik Jansen, Kirk Griffin, Frank Buty, on behalf of MI_Cycling

Brakes, Wheels and Tires – Aug. 28

Learn basic methods for working on various types of rim brakes. We’ll cover rim care and cleaning, brake pad inspection, cleaning, adjustment and replacement. We’ll also cover how to inspect spokes for correct tension and tires for wear. Bring your bike and any tools you have -- we’ll have tools on hand if you don’t. Remember, Urban Cycling Techniques is on hiatus until Sept. 26 and 28 but there’s no need to wait to sign up until then. Insure your space and sign up now!

If you’re new to bicycling or just getting back on your bike after years out of the saddle, we’ll help you gain the skills necessary to ride safely and confidently. This entry-level course prepares new and returning riders for “Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

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August 2013

BIKENOMICS

From shop rats to parenthood to business owners, G & O Cyclery owners pursue a dream by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer Business: G & O Cyclery Owner: Tyler Gillies and Davey Oil Industry: Bicycling

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hile many people dread the daily grind of dropping the kids off at school, commuting to work and hauling the kids to and from playdates or sport practices, Tyler Gillies and Davey Oil consider it some of the most precious bonding time they get with their kids. They’re not bothered by the stop-and-go rush hour traffic or by the continuous roadwork and detours on Seattle’s major arterials. Undisturbed even when the gas prices listed at the nearby gas station are yet again higher than the day before. The reason? Their kidtransporting, grocery-hauling vehicles of choice are bicycles. “My bikes take me and my daughter everywhere I need to go, it gives me joy, it’s fun to talk about and it keeps me healthy. It’s such a blessing,” said Davey. “It gives me time with my kids every time we go to school or a friend’s house.” Inspired to help families become less cardependent and to share the fun of bicycling with children, Davey and Tyler are opening G & O Cyclery this summer, a bike shop that specializes in cargo and family bikes. “There isn’t any shop in Seattle that specializes in the products that we’ll carry. In fact, there are only a few shops like this in the country,” said Davey. Located along the vibrant Greenwood Avenue, Tyler and Davey said they couldn’t be happier to be joining the Greenwood neighborhood. “We’re located in a neighborhood with a need of a shop but with a lot of cyclists,” said Davey. “And while our specialty is cargo and utility bikes, we are ready and excited to fix any bike that comes in the door.” A self-proclaimed ‘bike nerd’ Davey has been riding his whole life. Originally from Long Island, he never learned how to drive and is inspired to help people become less

car-dependent. Until recently, Davey worked as a mechanic, bike repair instructor, volunteer coordinator and cycling advocate at Bike Works. He is also a founding member of the Bikery Collective and spent a few years working as a Cascade Bicycle Club Ambassador, doing part-time outreach work as well as teaching classes. In fact, if it’s a Seattle-based organization or movement involving bikes, Davey has probably been part of it somehow, with his best friend Tyler not far behind. “I grew up riding BMX bikes but I hadn’t had a bike since I was a kid. When I got to Seattle in 2001, I got a Schwinn,” Tyler said. “If you were riding in those days, the number of commuters was small and if you commuted, you knew everyone. [Davey and I] were shop rats at 20/20 Cycles. They gave us access to work stands and tools and we would come up with creative solutions to bike repairs.” Since then, they’ve supported each other in their work and life. “Davey and I both had our first kids within a year of each other,” said Tyler. “And we both knew we wanted to bike with our kids.” So they started tinkering with putting kid seats on bikes, trying cargo bikes, seeing what’s possible, how to get around. “We are constantly learning about these bikes and improving options,” said Tyler. But what they found was that it’s absolutely doable to live a car-free lifestyle with kids. “We’ve been riding with our kids for over three years now and it’s been magical,” said Davey. “There’s so much value in the bonding time we get with our kids.” With more cargo bikes and family-biking products on the market than ever before, technology has been improving to make family-biking easier, fun and more accessible. “Good ideas shouldn’t serve only those who are already biking,” said Davey. “I want to give everyone access to experience the awesome fun of biking with kids. It’s so special

Geared up to Volunteer? by Diana Larson, Volunteer Coordinator

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e always have room for helping hands and smiling faces! Whether you’re a die-hard cycling fan or just a fan of the outdoors, you are welcome to join us! All upcoming volunteer opportunities are listed on our web site and can be found at www.cascade. org/volunteer. Listed below are a few volunteer needs for the month of August. DUST OFF DAYS Date and Time:  Saturday, Aug. 17th, 10:30 a.m. – 3:15 p.m., (4 volunteers). Task or Event: Dust off Days Where: Garfield Community Center, 2323 East Cherry St, Seattle WA 98122 How Long: 5.5 hours. Doing What:  Volunteers are needed to sign attendees in, perform helmet fitting and sales and provide general event assitance. Director of Task: Please contact Hanna McFall, cmpa@ cascadebicycleclub.org HELMET SALES Date and Time:  Saturday, Aug. 17th, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., (2 volunteers). Task or Event: Greenlake Helmet Sales Where: Evans Pool, 7201 E Green Lake Dr. N. Seattle WA How Long: 5.5 hours. Doing What:  Volunteers are needed to perform helmet fitting and sales and. Director of Task: Please contact Hanna McFall, cmpa@cascadebicycleclub.org Date and Time:  Sunday, Aug. 25th, 1 – 4 p.m., (2 volunteers). Task or Event: Bike Sundays Seward Park Where: 5895 Lake Washington Blvd S, Seattle WA How Long: 5.5 hours. Doing What:  Volunteers are needed to perform helmet fitting and sales and.

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Director of Task: Please contact Hanna McFall, cmpa@ cascadebicycleclub.org

RSVP Date and Time: Friday, Aug. 16th thru 18th, two drivers for the weekend (2 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP Baggage Truck driver (may bring an assistant). Where: RSVP route. How Long: The weekend. Doing What: Driving a baggage truck for the event. Involves driving, handling radio/phone communications, lifting of heavy bags and luggage in loading and unloading trucks. Must have a current (clean) driver’s license, auto insurance and a current passport or Enhanced Driver’s License, as you will be crossing the Canadian border. (Candidates on this particular task can earn a “volunteer registration” to ride the 2014 Group Health STP or RSVP). Date and Time: Friday, Aug. 16th thru 18th (2 volunteers). Task or Event: Washington RSVP Gear and Food Truck driver and helper. Where: Meet at the CBC Office and pick up gear truck (to be ready on Thursday by 5 p.m.). How Long: Working Friday and the weekend. Doing What: Delivering food to the food stops and returning material back to the CBC office. Set up Machias food stop, a water stop, and Mt Vernon food stop. Help with breakdown of stops. Saturday is a repeat of Friday schedule. Must feel comfortable driving

“I want a bike I can ride everyday regardless of what comes up that day – from picking up my kids and groceries to going up a hill for a meeting,” said Davey. “Most cargo bikes [today] fit exactly that lifestyle.” to have that time together.” To give people the chance to see a range of bikes, technology and options, G & O Cyclery will have ten bikes on the floor and experience with each and every one of those bikes. “There is not a bike on the floor that we haven’t ridden and aren’t passionate about,” said Tyler. They’ll be carrying bikes ranging from $800 to $6,000 as well as child seats and other accessories. “Family cycling does not require a cargo bike” Tyler emphasized. “We want to be the place to help folks get around with their kids – from using their existing bikes to high-end specialty bikes. For Davey, the passion for cargo bikes comes from their utility – one bike to do it all. “I wasn’t interested in new bikes at all until I got interested in cargo bikes,” Davey admitted. “But I want a bike I can ride everyday regardless of what comes up that day – from picking up my kids and groceries to going up a hill for a meeting. Most cargo bikes [today] fit exactly that lifestyle.” With Davey’s long-time commitment to making bicycling a more accessible and viable option for everyone, G & O Cyclery is as much about serving a niche market with specific products as it is about bicycle education and advocacy. “I spend hours answering people’s questions and concerns,” said Davey. “Bikes are part of a world-saving solution and people are interested. There are more people riding now, the streets are getting safe –not fast enough and not in all of Seattle – but it’s getting better and we’ll be working hard to make sure it does,” said Davey. “Bicycling is sustainable and practical,” added Tyler. “I don’t have to look for parking or sit in traffic. I think we’re at a critical time now when cargo bikes are looking more and more appealing. Traffic is only going to get worse. We want to expose people to these

ideas, and show that the transition to less car use is a positive and fun thing.” That doesn’t mean that they’re not nervous about opening a start-up. “This is coming out of our own pockets, running on passion. Are we nervous? Extremely,” admitted Davey. “But I do believe it’s a good time to open and I really believe in this model, these bikes and this lifestyle. I get nervous until I ride my bike and people ask me questions everywhere I go.” Tyler and Davey are planning to host events and classes to address the hurdles that keep people from biking, while at the same time, fix any flat tire or broken spoke that comes through the door. Look for the G&O Cyclery opening announcement on familycyclery.com soon. Bikenomics is a feature series to spotlight the greater Seattle area’s growing bike businesses. Know a business that should be featured? Send me an email at  amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org.

Need a helmet? by Hanna McFall, AmeriCorps Community Programs Assistant

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ascade Bicycle Club sells helmets for $15 and also provides them for free* throughout the Puget Sound region to those in need. You can be fitted for a helmet at the Cascade office Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. by making an appointment with the Community Programs Assistant at (206) 957-6623 or emailing cmpa@cascadebicycleclub.org. In August, Cascade will be outfitting youth competitors with helmets in a skateboard competition as a part of the annual Umoja Fest African Heritage Festival and Parade. The festival takes place on August 2-4 in Judkins Park, and will include the African Heritage parade, UNCF Walk & Cook Off for Education, a basketball tournament, voter registration, a vendor marketplace & community resource fair, and three stages of live music including African drum & dance, jazz, soul, hip-hop and spoken word. We are in need of volunteers to help with our community helmet sales. If you can help us get more helmets on heads, contact Hanna at (206) 957-6623. *Funding for our free helmet program is generously provided by the Steve Sitcov Law Group.

through congested areas of riders and pedestrians, and be able to lift up to 40 pounds. Must have a current (clean) driver’s license and auto insurance. (Candidates on this particular task can earn a “volunteer registration” to ride the 2014 Group Health STP or RSVP). Date and Time: Friday, Aug. 16th, 5 – 7:30 a.m. (3 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP parking. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Help to control and direct parking traffic.

Date and Time: Friday, Aug. 16th, 5 – 7:30 a.m. (3 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP cashiers. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Cashier for parking tickets. Previous experience working with cash and checks is desired. Date and Time: Friday, Aug. 16th, 5 – 7:30 a.m. (8 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP baggage loaders.

continued on page 11 www.cascade.org


Vol. 43, No. 8

Major Taylor Project and the Group Health September Events Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic by Gail Benezra Rudee, YMCA Camping Services Board of Managers, Major Taylor Program supporter and Club member With the support of dedicated volunteers and generous donations students had the opportunity to take part in the experience of a lifetime. Gail Rudee one of the Major Taylor Project volunteers tells us about her experience with the students on STP this year.

Sunday, Sept. 29

The autumn equinox ushers in a great time to ride a bike up, down and all around the Kitsap Peninsula on the 20th annual Kitsap Color Classic. Make your way across Puget Sound on Sunday, Sept. 29 for a pleasant event on the lovely Kitsap Peninsula. The Kitsap Color Classic is a fine way to finish out the Cascade event season, with rolling hills, scenic views and great company.

The routes

M

y 3:40 a.m. alarm came very early Saturday “morning”. It was still dark--the middle of the night on any other day. But, I dragged myself out of bed and headed to Cascade Bicycle Club offices in Sand Point. It was here we would find out which students we would actually ride with on our impending interstate trek. There was a flurry of activity when we arrived at Cascade’s offices. Young people stumbled around trying to grab some breakfast as bikes were readied for the 206-mile trek, and the adults scrambled with last second details. As the sun began to rise, thankfully promising a beautiful Northwest summer day, all students and adult volunteers gathered in the parking lot, bikes in tow. Regrouping at the start line, we exchanged a few words of encouragement, took some photos, and we were off! This is a big deal. We were riding with a group of students from such varied backgrounds: socio-economic, ethnic, cultural. How many of them would have an opportunity like this without the Major Taylor Program? The chance to ride STP was just one of the many opportunities opened up to these students by way of a bicycle. The support evidenced by so many adult volunteers made it all possible. The feeling of being a part of this life-changing program was truly awesome, for a few minutes at least. Soon, inspirational thoughts of the Major Taylor Program gave way to more immediate concerns as we began to wend our way through Seattle streets on our way to the midpoint. Along the way, we picked up another student rider here and there, but Abdi persevered the whole trip. As we helped Abdi stay stocked in food and water and having his bike repaired as needed, we came to learn a bit about Abdi’s background. He does not have adults in his home life now. So, perhaps our adult-heavy group was tailor-made for him. Despite a few figurative (as well as literal) bumps in the road, by the end of the first day, we each had become quite close with Abdi. Lots of fun and memories were made along the way at rest stops, and the Chehalis campground. At each stop, we spotted the recognizable orange, black and white Major Taylor jerseys and felt an instant kinship. We rolled out into the cold by 5:45 am on Sunday morning, set against another breathtaking sunrise The impressive ascent and descent on the Longview bridge going into

Ride the Kitsap Color Classic

Take on the High Pass Challenge Sunday, Sept. 8 114 miles, 600 rider limit 10-hour time limit

Oregon, I believe struck each one of us with its awe-inspiring vista, instantly making the grueling miles behind us worth the effort. Finally in Oregon, we pedaled onward. More blood sugar drops, fixed by more food stops. Watching road signs, “Portland 48 miles”, “Portland 39 miles”, and, finally, “Entering Portland”. WHOOHOO! We rested in the cool grass near the finish, waiting for everyone to arrive so we could roll through the Finish Line as one group. We waited over two hours. By 5 p.m. we were ready to hit the last seven miles to the official Finish Line. As soon as I glimpsed the giant redlettered “FINISH” banner overhead, an unexpected wave of emotion washed over me. Not only had I completed my first STP, but each of these almost 30 students had achieved a major goal they had set for themselves months ago, a goal they couldn’t have even dreamed of setting a short time ago. What a huge accomplishment! As we entered under the banner, we shouted, “Major! Taylor!” over and over. There was unity, and group pride. So many spectators lined the entry into the Finish Line park, cheering for Major Taylor students. It was overwhelming. Love and pride was so demonstratively shown for the students, most of whose home lives bear little resemblance to our own. But, now, we felt the accomplishment as one. We felt immense pride as a single group. These students have learned that they can set and accomplish big goals. Goals they may never have thought attainable, now can be within their reach. Though they know it may be difficult, with lots of ups and downs, they now have the experience of achievement.

Have you out on our tours and taking in some long rides on the weekends? Did you breeze through the Group Health Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic this year? It’s time for a new challenge -- the High Pass Challenge. The 2013 HPC is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 8, and it’ll knock your socks off. If you’ve thought about signing up for the HPC but haven’t committed, perhaps the beautiful route will entice you. The HPC course follows a spectacular, challenging route. Expect incredible views of Mt. Rainier, Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams, and of course, of Mount St. Helens. Windy Ridge offers closeup views of the volcanic blast zone. Riders get a real feel for the destruction wrought by the 1980 eruption (the one that canceled STP that year), especially when peering down at Spirit Lake on the way up to the viewpoint. If you’re planning on riding in this Cascade event, you’re in for a real treat.

HPC registration

Online registration is open until 9 a.m. on Sept. 6 and costs $80. All riders will receive a complimentary BBQ coupon good for an entrée and a soft drink at the finish line party. Visit www.cascade.org/hpc to sign up. There will be no day-of-event registration.

2012 Results

• 9% female; 91% male – Come on, we know there are more hill-loving women out there! • Best male elapsed time: 5 hours, 18 minutes • Best female elapsed time: 6 hours, 46 minutes • Gold medalists (before 2 p.m.): 43% • Silver medalists (2 - 4 p.m.): 51% • Bronze medals (4 - 5 p.m.): 6% While the High Pass Challenge is billed as an intermediate-level, it’s doable if you’ve got a good fitness level. It’s a recreational ride, not a race. Beginners who want to try organized events for the first or second time would be better advised to try the Kitsap Color Classic on Sept. 29.

The Kitsap Color Classic base routes range from 14 miles to 36 miles with combination loops up to 64 miles. Stats for the 64-mile loop: • Uphill distance (miles) 23 • Uphill altitude (cumulative feet) 3,597 • Maximum altitude (feet) 374 • Downhill distance (miles) 27 • Flat distance (miles) 13

Registration

Online registration is open through Sept. 25. Adult registration is $28. Kids under age 13 are $10. Cascade members receive a $5 discount. Ferry fare for you and your bike is included in the fee. The registration is $5 less if you start from Kingston, with no ferry trip included. You can register the day of the event at a slightly higher rate.

Ferry schedule

Be sure to leave enough time to catch one of the morning ferries. Ferry times will be posted closer to the event, and are subject to change. Visit Washington State Ferries website to confirm sailing times. Your KCC bib is your ferry ticket. Fees for other ferries are not covered. Return rides are free.

Edmonds pancake breakfast

The Edmonds Bicycle Group is holding an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast at the Masonic Lodge in Edmonds from 7 to 10 a.m. Funds raised support local bicycle advocacy work. Your riding season has been going great, so what are you waiting for? Sign up for the High Pass Challenge and the Kitsap Color Classic for a full sweep of Club riding events!

Central Area Dust Off Days

R

eady for another free maintenance opportunity? Join us at the Central Area Community Festival! We’ll host a Dust Off Days on Saturday, Aug. 17 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Garfield Community Center, the Central Area Community Festival “strengthens community pride, integrity and spirituality while promoting cultural diversity throughout the Central Area Community”. Volunteer mechanics from local shops will be wrenching on bikes while Ambassadors answer your questions. In need of a helmet? There will be low-cost helmets for sale as well. Get that dusty bike out of your basement, because now is the time to ride!

Member of Cascade Bicycle Club and Bicycle Alliance of Washington. Sponsor of Fischer Plumbing, Bikesale.com, Recycled Cycles Racing, Garage Racing, Cucina Fresca, Blue Rooster Racing, SCCA/Starbucks and Lakemont Cycling Teams.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

5


August 2013

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF THE 2013 GROUP HEALTH STP FINISHERS! 2013 event stats:

T

he Group Health STP is Cascade’s largest fundraising event and supports bicycle education, advocacy, commute and riding programs throughout the greater Puget Sound region.

• 10,000 registered riders • 34th annual ride. Sold out on Feb. 14, 2013. • 6 countries (at least!) and 45 states represented • Eldest rider: 90 • 25% female riders; 75% male riders • 62 riders will have ridden 20+ times • 309 riders will have ridden 10+ times • Jerry Baker (72) of Seattle has ridden each of the 34 rides • 8187 Washington riders (2117 from Seattle) • 1216 Oregon riders (578 from Portland)

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• 100 safety and medical riders on the course • 30 Ride Referees on the course • 12 support vehicles • 200 Gold Wing Touring Association motorcyclists • How much food? Here’s a sample: o 35,000 sandwiches o 17,000 fresh baked cookies o 35,000 snack bars o 11,000 fig bars o 17,200 servings of bananas o 10,000 servings of oranges o 12,000 servings of grapes o And a LOT more!

www.cascade.org


Vol. 43, No. 8

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF THE 2013 GROUP HEALTH STP FINISHERS!

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

7


August 2013

AUGUST RIDES More daily rides are listed online at www.cascade.org/dailyrides

Cascade Bicycle Club Ride Classification In order to pick the rides that suit your skills and energy level, use the following guidelines: • PACE: The speed on level ground without breaks: Easy: Under 10 mph Leisurely: 10-12 mph Steady: 12-14 mph Moderate: 14-16 mph Brisk: 16-18 mph Strenuous: 18-21 mph Super Strenuous: 22+ mph • TERRAIN: These descriptions should be considered in the context of the pace and length of the ride: Mostly Flat: Trails and/or mostly flat roads with a possible gentle upgrade Rolling: Climbs are short and easy, not too numerous. Some Hills: A few short steep hills, some moderate upgrades and/or longer gentle climbs. Hilly: Many true hills, but none outrageous.

Thursday, Aug 1 More Cycle Tuesdays 25-35 mi • Super-strenuous • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 5:45 p.m • Gene Coulon Park/Next to Kidd Valley, Renton • No rain cancellation • Brian Ohlemeier, 425985-6980 cell • Lola Jacobsen, 425-829-8765, lolaj@outlook.com Year-round training rides for one day STP riders. Rides stress safety, cooperation and group riding skills. Fast pacelines with regroups from Renton to surrounding areas. Large turnout splits into multiple groups. ** No parking in Coulon parking lot.

Gas Works Thursday Social < 20 mi • Leisurely • Hilly • Map • Stay together • 6:30 p.m. • Seattle: east end of the Gas Works Park parking lot • Ice/snow cancel • Scott Kralik, 206-523-6042, scottk@cascade.org Explore Seattle’s backstreets at a comfortable pace with a sociable crowd. Every Thursday, a regular crowd of old friends and a curious crowd of new friends ride as far as evening light permits, venturing places seldom seen via routes seldom taken. We don’t go looking for a challenge (we’ll never ride the Counterbalance), but neither do we avoid one (we’ve topped a hill or two and waited for the sightseers among us). Bring money for dinner afterward. Heavy rain means we eat early.

Friday, Aug 2 FRUMPS: Snohomish/Lake Roesiger/ Monroe 48 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Centennial Trail, Maple & Pine, Snohomish • Showers cancel • Bill Blake, 206-856-6387, wpblake@comcast.net Sociable ride in rural Snohomish County. Pace will start out Steady, but may increase to Moderate depending on the abilities of the group-no one will be left behind. No restrooms at trailhead; public restrooms on corner of First and B Aves in Snohomish and again 4.8 miles into ride. Bring snacks; lunch stop is 31 miles into ride. Contact ride leader if doubtful about weather; leader will not be at start if ride has been cancelled due to weather.

FRIDAY RIDERS: Go to Seward Park ~25 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • No Map • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Gas Works Park, Seattle • Showers cancel • Bill Lemke, 206-2842843 There will be a coffee/lunch/brown bag stop. Senior and new/slower-paced riders welcome. We will ride VERY slowly up the hills.

Sat. Aug 3 & Sun. Aug 4 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www. cascade.org

Monday, Aug 5 MUMPS: Head Up North 60-80 mi • Brisk • Moderate • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Tracy Owen Station/Logboom Park, Kenmore • Steady rain cancels • Craig Mohn, 425-890-5234 cell,

8

Extremely Hilly: Steep & long climbs with grades >9% and/ or mountain passes Unlimited: “Out of category”; only for those very sure of their ability to climb any grade, any length at the advertised pace. Off Road: Significant unpaved sections. • MAP: Whether a map or cue sheet is provided. • R EGROUP: None and Occasional regroup categories expect experienced riders who can fix their own mechanical problems and follow a map/cue sheet if they are separated. • R AIN: Weather conditions that cancel the ride. Helmets are required on all rides. When using a cell phone you must pull off the road/trail and STOP. Put away all earbuds/headphones/music devices before the ride starts. All riders are required to sign a waiver form. Rides are cancelled or are no longer considered Cascade rides in the event that the ride leader does not show up or does not

cmohn_cycling@comcast.net, (texts preferred to VM) A fun loop ride in south Snohomish County with a food stop en route. Distance and pace may vary to suit weather conditions and group. The pace will be Brisk; a Moderate pace group may be added if certified ride leader volunteers are available for both paces-if not, the needs of moderate riders will be addressed with more frequent regroups. Check with leader if weather appears questionable. Note the earlier start time this month. Ride leader will try to have the route available on ridewithgps.com at least one day before the ride-search for “MUMPS 201308xx”, where xx is the date.

Tuesday, Aug 6 TREATS: KBR Loop 35-45 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Juanita Beach Park, Kirkland • Showers cancel • Jane Volta, 425828-0138 • Don Volta, 425-828-0138, 425503-7186, don.volta@cascadebicycleclub.org A HILLY ride in and out of Eastside neighborhoods with a lunch stop. Note: Park in gravel parking lot across from park entrance.

Cycle Tuesdays 25-35 mi • Super-strenuous • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 5:45 p.m • Gene Coulon Park, next to Kidd Valley, Renton • Ice/snow cancels • Vince Haag, 425-7857451, vehaag@comcast.net Russell Moul, 206-200-7314, 253-657-9568 Year-round training rides for one-day STP riders. Rides stress safety, cooperation and group riding skills. Fast pacelines with regroups from Renton to surrounding areas. Large turnout splits into multiple groups. No parking in Coulon parking lot.

provide a waiver form for signatures of riders. Riders are expected to be ready to ride at the time listed (i.e. that’s not the time to drive into the parking lot with a full bladder and empty tires) and to ride in a safe, courteous, legal manner. Riders are expected to cooperate with the leader(s) and ride within the advertised pace. If unsure of your ability to keep up, try a slower level ride to get an idea of ride paces. For “Hilly” rides, consider choosing a pace down from your usual level. Unless indicated, it is not necessary to RSVP the ride leader to participate in a ride. Youth riders may also join regular club rides. Permission must be obtained from the ride leader at least 24 hours in advance for youth to join a regular club ride. Children 15 and under must be accompanied by parent or legal guardian OR must have parent/legal guardian sign a consent form designating a guardian for them on the ride; youth ages 16-17 may ride without a parent or guardian with advance permission of the ride leader AND a signed parental

consent form (available at www.cascade.org) which must be given to the ride leader at the start of the ride. Cascade does not sponsor or endorse any non-bicycling activities that people may participate in while on these rides. Each cyclist is responsible for his/her conduct and decisions while on a Cascade ride. Cascade membership and activities are open to anyone able and willing to participate in a safe, courteous and cooperative manner and in support of the purposes of the club. Ride information is also available at: www.cascade.org. Only Cascade certified ride leaders may post and lead Cascade Daily Rides. See Ride Leader Information on our website or email the Rides Chair at cbcrides@cascadebicycleclub.org. On Twitter? Tag your tweets and twitpics with #dailyrides.

Thursday, Aug 8

is on a Saturday. Take the West Seattle exit (stay to the left if you are heading North on I-5; stay to the right if you are heading South on I-5); follow the signs to Fauntleroy Way SW; stay on Fauntleroy Way SW until you come to the Park on the right hand side of the street. You can also follow the signs for Vashon (Fauntleroy) Ferry. The ferry terminal is south of the Park (you will come to the Park before you get to the ferry terminal.) Then bicycle down to the dock terminal building and pay, bypassing the long line of cars. Meet at passenger ferry terminal (on left where you pay) at 9:15 for departure on 9:45 a.m. boat.

THUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, • Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 8/1.

Gas Works Thursday Social See Gas Works Social, 8/1.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride 20-30 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 6:30 p.m. • Marymoor Park, east (free) parking lot, Redmond • Showers cancel • Eric Gunnerson, 425-753-6032, eric_ gunnerson@hotmail.com Join us for our 16th year of evening rides as we explore the Eastside. The route varies from week to week. Our pace on the flats is approximately 17 MPH. This is a hilly ride; we will climb around 1500 feet on an average ride. Hills are climbed at your own pace and we regroup at the top of all hills. Please see website for more details before attending.

Friday, Aug 9 FRUMPS Deep South #1

20-30 mi • Brisk • Hilly • No Map • Frequent regroup • 6:30 p.m. • Marymoor Park, east (free) parking lot, Redmond • Showers cancel • Eric Gunnerson, 425-753-6032, eric_gunnerson@ hotmail.com Join us for our 16th year of evening rides as we explore the Eastside. The route varies from week to week. Our pace on the flats is approximately 17 MPH. This is a hilly ride; we will climb around 1500 feet on an average ride. Hills are climbed at your own pace and we regroup at the top of all hills. Please see website for more details before attending.

40-45 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Stay together • 10:00 a.m. • Tacoma’s Skyline Park, east side of Narrows Bridge, Tacoma • Showers cancel • Jim Shedd, 206-772-0955 A tour of Chambers Bay, Steilacoom, Dupont, Fircrest, and North Tacoma. We start at Tacoma’s Skyline Park (7100 6th Ave, Tacoma, east end of the Narrows Bridge) and ride 5 miles to Chambers Bay for a bathroom break (no bathrooms at the start), then through picturesque Steilacoom and on to DuPont for coffee. After a caffeine pump, we make our way across Lake Steilacoom and on to Fircrest for lunch. We’ll then tour parts of north Tacoma and back to start. Drive south on I-5, pass the Tacoma Dome & take Hwy-16 West (about a mile past the Dome). In another 5 miles (6 past the Dome) take Exit #4 (Jackson Ave). Turn Left (south) at traffic light on Jackson, then 0.2 miles to 6th Ave (traffic light) and turn left (east). In another 0.2 miles turn left (McArthur St) into Skyline Park. On day of ride, you can contact me at 206-321-2655.

Wednesday, Aug 7

Saturday, Aug 10

Eastside Tours Evening Ride

WRUMPS: Home for Lunch 20-35 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Stay together • 9:30 a.m. • Leschi Starbucks, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Mike Nelson, 206-325-9068 Be home in time for lunch after some urban exploration. Fixies and single speed bikes welcome. Ride leader will be riding a single speed.

S.P.O.K.E.S. (Sunday Pedalers On Kinda Easy Streets) Return to Port Orchard’s Farmers’ Market 30 mi • Leisurely • Some hills • Map • Frequent regroup • 9:15 a.m. • Lincoln Park in West Seattle, 8011 Fauntleroy Way SW, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Michelle Burton, 425-890-4936 cell • Jim Hunt, 425-681-4640 cell S.P.O.K.E.S. will start from Lincoln Park, catch the 9:45 a.m. Fauntleroy Ferry ($6.95) to Southworth, then on to Port Orchard for lunch and to take in the Farmers’ Market. Note this

Sunday, Aug 11 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org.

Monday, Aug 12 MUMPS: Head Up North See MUMPS, 8/1.

RIDE LEADER CERTIFICATION CLASS 6:30 p.m. • CBC Office, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Bldg 138, Seattle • No rain cancellation • Ride Leader Certification Coordinator, 425828-0138 Have you cycled on 5 or more Cascade Free Daily Rides this year or last? Would you like to lead your own rides? Become a Certified Cascade Ride Leader! To register, send an email with your NAME, CASCADE MEMBER NUMBER, and a CONTACT PHONE NUMBER (home, cell, or work) to rlcert@cascadebicycleclub.org. Class size limited to 15. Check out Details about becoming a Ride Leader at http://www.cascade.org/EandR/ Ride_Leader_Info.cfm.

Tuesday, Aug 13 TREATS: Eastside Hills 32 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Redhook Brewery, 14300 NE 145th St, Woodinville • No rain cancellation • Clarice Sackett, 425-478-8306 Meet at Redhook Brewery, ride over Education Hill, Novelty Hill, Union Hill. Lunch at QFC on Redmond Ridge. We’ll ride across Redmond Ridge and Hollywood Hill to get back to the Brewery. Please park away from the brewpub entrance.

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 8/6.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 8/6.

Wednesday, Aug 14 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org.

Thursday, Aug 15 THUMPS: Home for Lunch See THUMPS, 8/8.

More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 8/1.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 8/8.

www.cascade.org


Vol. 43, No. 8

AUGUST RIDES www.cascade.org/dailyrides Gas Works Thursday Social See Gas Works Social, 8/1.

Friday, Aug 16 FRUMPS: Tour of Wilkerson 50 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:30 a.m. • Orting City Park, Orting • Showers cancel • Michael Moreland, 206-439-9890 We will be riding on paved rail trails and country roads. Some highlights will be South Prairie, Wilkerson, Buckley (lunch stop) and Lake Tapps. Take SR-167 south to SR-410 east to Valley Ave. (SR-162) south to the center of Orting. The City Park is alongside the bike trail in the center of town. Note the 9:30 a.m. start time.

Sat, Aug 17 and Sun, Aug 18 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org

Monday, Aug 19 MUMPS: Head Up North-POSSIBLE CANCELLATION POSSIBLE CANCELLATION: The regular ride leader is unavailable today, so unless a substitute is found, today’s MUMPS ride will not happen. In the past, we have always found a leader, so check the website.

Tuesday, Aug 20 TREATS: Do the Dahlia Pedal to Bud’s Garden 30 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Magnuson Park, BEACH Parking Lot, Seattle • Steady rain cancels • Bud Hunt, 206-546-3371 Meet at Magnuson Park, Sand Point Way NE and NE 65th St, at the BEACH Parking Lot, 10:00 a.m. We will pedal to Bud and Sue’s home to see prize winning Dahlias. Bring a sandwich. Host will provide drinks and desert.

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 8/6.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 8/6.

Wednesday, Aug 21 WRUMPS: Summer Hills 35-40 mi • Steady • Hilly • Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Juanita Beach Park, Kirkland • Showers cancel • Don Volta, 425-828-0138, 425-503-7186, don.volta@ cascadebicycleclub.com • Jane Volta, 425-8280138 A HILLY ride in and out of Eastside neighborhoods with a lunch stop.

MEETS S. Bellevue: Brisk 21.4 mi 1667’ • Brisk • some hills • Map • Occasional regroup • 6:00 p.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Way SE, Bellevue • Steady rain cancels • Wilfried Mack, wilfried.mack@gmail.com • Alexa Volwiler, alexa.volwiler@gmail.com Please RSVP on the Meetup link above, and check back for updates the day of the ride. RSVP is not required, but would be MUCH appreciated. Midweek Eastside Evening Training Series, MEETS rides, are held Wednesday evenings at 6 p.m. These training rides incorporate local hills and range between 20-25 miles and from ~1200 to 2000 feet of elevation. Three paces are offered: Strenuous (18+ mph on flats); Brisk (16-18 mph on flats); and Moderate (14-16 mph on flats). All use a common course each week. Riders should be able to sustain the appropriate pace for their selected group, read a cue sheet, change a flat (and have the requisite equipment), and have a positive attitude! Faster riders and better climbers are welcome to join but for them the ride becomes self-paced and self-guided. Riders can ride on their own, in small groups, or with the appropriate pace ride leader. A limited number of cue sheets will be available at ride start so please print your own just in case. The final route and cue sheets will be available the weekend prior to each ride. Rest stops: There are no planned rest stops as these are short rides. There is a restroom

at the park & ride but is a little distance away, so please plan accordingly. Regroup policy: This is a training series, so we ride with the best interest of the group in mind. Riders may need to fall back to a slower pace group, unless you are riding in the last group, in which case the group will regroup as needed to avoid dropping riders. We want everyone to ride hard and have fun and there are multiple pace options to support all riders so no one should feel left behind. Please make sure that you print a cue sheet in case you want to ride ahead or get separated for some reason. Please make sure to print your contact information clearly on the waiver so that we can reach you.

Thursday, Aug 22 More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 8/1.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 8/8.

Gas Works Thursday Social See Gas Works Social, 8/1.

Friday, Aug 23 FRIDAY RIDERS: Early Start-Roads and Trails 22-30 mi • Leisurely • Rolling • No Map • Frequent regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Logboom Park, Kenmore • Showers cancel • Jan Johnson, 425-672-0617 EARLY START. It is August and could be hot. A recreational ride on the road, and some parts of the trail. There could be a few short hills and some traffic. Weather will determine the route. There will be a food stop.

FRUMPS: Woodinville/Snohomish/ Monroe 45-55 mi • Moderate • Hilly • No Map • Occasional regroup • 10:00 a.m. • Woodinville Sports Fields 17139 131st Ave NE • Steady rain cancels • Chris Nelson, 206-349-4846, chris. nelson166@gmail.com This scenic ride goes through UW Bothell, Cathcart, Lowell, Snohomish and Monroe then back to Woodinville. Park at Woodinville City Sports Fields across from Wilmot Gateway Park. Route is hilly but we’ll regroup at the tops of the big ones. Lunch in Snohomish.

Saturday, Aug 24 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org.

Sunday, Aug 25 Iron Horse Trail Over Snoqualmie Pass 42 mi • Moderate • Off-road • Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Iron Horse Trail Parking Area, North Bend • Showers cancel • Marizel Miller, 818-590-8167, marizelsmiller@kmmiller. net • Brad Coston, 206-414-8851, costonbw@ gmail.com The Snoqualmie Tunnel is open, so LIGHTS and a jacket are required through the tunnel. Let’s enjoy a fun off-road ride with beautiful views. We will meet in the Iron Horse State Park parking area near the bathrooms, ride the soft surface Iron Horse Trail up a 2% grade for 19 miles, through the 2.3-mile-long Snoqualmie Tunnel, have lunch at Hyak, then return to the parking lot. Leave your carbon road bikes at home, you’ll want a touring, mountain, cross or hybrid bike with wide, low pressure tires. The tunnel is dark, wet, and cold; so lights and jackets are necessities, and fenders are a good idea. Bring food and a minimum of TWO LARGE WATER BOTTLES, or a 2-3 liter hydration pack. The only water source on the ride is at the Hyak Trailhead. NOTE: This is an off-road ride; effort level will be similar to pace and distance on the road. Take I-90 to Exit 32; go south on 436th Ave SE, turning into Cedar Falls Rd SE; follow this main road 3.1 miles. For free parking follow the signs to the Rattlesnake Lake parking (to get to the Iron Horse State Park).

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

Monday, Aug 26 MUMPS: Head Up North POSSIBLE CANCELLATION: The regular ride leader is unavailable today, so unless a substitute is found, today’s MUMPS ride will not happen. In the past, we have always found a leader, so check the website.

Tuesday, Aug 27 TREATS: Cycle Mercer Island to Issaquah 35 mi • Steady • Some hills • Map • Stay together • 10:00 a.m. • Mercer Island lid, west parking lot, Mercer Island • Steady rain cancels • Peter Hallson, 425-673-4816 Cycle to Issaquah via May Valley Rd, lunch at Starbucks/Safeway then return to Mercer Island via Newport Way. From eastbound I-90, take Exit 6, W Mercer Way; turn left; lid parking lot on left. From westbound I-90, take Exit 7; follow N. Mercer Way, becomes W Mercer Way; lid parking lot on right just before the on-ramp.

Cycle Tuesdays See Cycle Tuesdays, 8/6.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 8/6.

Wednesday, Aug 28 Snohomish/Lake Stevens/Everett and Ebey Island 39 mi • Moderate • Some hills • Map • Frequent regroup • 10:00 a.m. • South Centennial Trailhead, Maple & Pine, Snohomish • Steady rain cancels • Saul Snatsky, 425-4857896, 425-273-4156 cell, saulsnatsky@comcast. net WRUMPS ride from Snohomish to Lake Stevens, Ebey Island and Everett for lunch. We’ll go back on rural roads by cow pastures and farms in the valley. We regroup frequently and at the tops of hills. See URL for link to route details.

MEETS S. Bellevue: Brisk 22 mi (1560’) • Brisk • Some hills • Map:Online • Occasional regroup • 6:00 p.m. • South Bellevue Park & Ride, 2700 Bellevue Way SE • Steady rain cancels • Alexa Volwiler, alexa. volwiler@gmail.com • Wilfried Mack, wilfried. mack@gmail.com Please check the MEETS S. Bellevue: Brisk ride, 8/21, for all details concerning this ride series.

Thursday, Aug 29 THUMPS: Home for Lunch See THUMPS, 8/8.

More Cycle Tuesdays See More Cycle Tuesdays, 8/1.

Eastside Tours Evening Ride See Eastside Tours, 8/8.

Gas Works Thursday Social See Gas Works Social, 8/1.

Friday, Aug 30 FRUMPS: Monroe-Index 60 mi • Moderate • Some hills • No Map • Occasional regroup • 9:00 a.m. • Riverside (Lewis St) Park, Monroe • Steady rain cancels • Dan Garretson, 425-985-8570 The rain stopped us from reaching Index in June, so let’s try it again. From the old Country Ride Series, this beautiful ride takes us from Monroe up to the hills above Sultan, and then along the Skykomish Valley both on but mostly off Hwy 2 to Index. We will stop at the famous Sultan Bakery for lunch on the way back to Monroe. Find Riverside Park on the south side of Monroe on Lewis St (SR-203) just north of the bridge crossing the Skykomish River; from the Seattle area follow SR-522 to Monroe; take the Main St (1st) exit and follow Main to Lewis (1.8 miles); then right for .6 miles on Lewis to the Park on left.

saturday, Aug 31 For a complete list of this month’s rides, see www.cascade.org

Jan Johnson found an easy way to save money – and give back to Cascade. You can too, but only through 2013!

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hen longtime ride leader Jan Johnson met with her accountant this year she was made aware of a new federal policy that allows people age 70 1/2 or older to save taxes when they make their annual required retirement distribution. And she wants you to know about it. Jan will turn 74 this year, which means – like everyone over the age of 70.5 – she’s required to withdraw a certain percentage from her IRAs every year to avoid paying heavy penalties. These withdrawals, called “Required Minimum Distributions,” are taxed every year at a percentage that – like the withdrawal amounts themselves – increases each year as you grow older. Thanks to the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, signed into law by President Obama in January 2013, you can fill out a form with your financial institution or financial advisor and have those Required Minimum Distributions sent directly to the bank account of the non-profit organization of your choice. Even better, you won’t have to pay taxes on them. It’s called a “Charitable IRA Rollover Gift, and the maximum donation amount is $100,000. When Jan made this discovery, she headed right for her representative at Edward Jones, who told her, “Oh yes, we do that all the time.” He pulled out the form, which they filled out together. Within a couple of weeks, her donation made its way to Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation. Being a generous soul, she even added the amount she would have had to pay the IRS in taxes to her donation amount. “It was easy,” she said. “Much easier than I thought it would be.” It may be easy, but it won’t last forever. The American Taxpayer Relief law expires in December 2013, which Charitable Rollover Gifts could be rolling away at the end of the year. If you’re over age 70, talk to your financial institution soon about giving a Charitable IRA Rollover Gift to Cascade Bicycle Club Education Foundation. You’ll save on taxes – and more importantly, you’ll help us create healthy, livable communities where bicycling is safe, convenient and fun.

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August 2013

PARTNER NEWS

CYCLIST OF THE MONTH

Building steam, the East Lake Sammamish Trail achieves another milestone

GABE CASTILLO by Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer Age: 54 Wheels: Cervelo Soloist. “I did my first five STPs on a mountain bike with slicks. I have now seen the light and ride a Cervelo I got for my 50th birthday.” Occupation: Associate Project Manager at Washington Mutual

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ike many riders out there, Gabe Castillo rediscovered cycling later in life, after a knee injury forced him to find a new sport. It was lonely at first, so for the past 16 years he’s been helping new rec riders find community and friendships while training for Cascade events. Growing up in Seattle’s View Ridge neighborhood, Gabe remembers how much he enjoyed riding. “I rode as a kid and still have the scars to prove it. I had a simple, single-speed red bike my father bought for me from Goodwill. I thought it was the coolest bike!” said Gabe. “My funnest [sic] memories of childhood was riding that bike. I rode to school, rode it with friends and did my paper route with it.” Gabe said he grew out of it when he got his first car but rediscovered cycling when he was 37. “When my knee had gone out playing basketball, I needed a new sport. I’m terrible at golf so I thought, ‘I like biking,’ and gave it a try. I started watching the Tour and this is when Armstrong inspired so many Americans to try cycling. It motivated me,” said Gabe. “And I’m really glad I rediscovered [cycling].” Gabe rode his first Group Health Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic in 1997. “I did it alone and it was lonely,” Gabe recalled. “This was back in the day when it was held on the Solstice weekend. It was pouring rain and it was hard. I vowed I wouldn’t do it again.” Yet in July Gabe finished his 17th consecutive STP. He rode it in one day, and supported first-time STP-riding Gruppetto members the next day. The Gruppetto Cycling Club is a riding group Gabe founded after his miserable and lonely STP experience. After he returned from the STP that year, he found others to ride with and started a club. A Tour de France fan, Gabe named the club after the group of riders that forms at the back of a multi-day cycling race. They ride at a pace just fast enough to finish within the day’s time limit but aren’t about to win anything. “It seemed a fitting name for the group,” said Gabe. Now in its 16th year, the club welcomes all levels of riders who are interested in riding Cascade events, especially the STP.

Sunday, September 15th, 2013 Issaquah, WA

10

by Rosanna Snyder, Program Manager, King County Parks

T “Members come and go. There are no dues, no requirements. The group’s mission is to get people to meet with cycling as the common ground,” said Gabe. “Many of us have become lifelong friends, and some have met and gotten married. We have a nice cross section of the pie with riders of all ethnicities, ages and socio-economic statuses. Our only requirement is that you enjoy cycling and ride safely. “ The Gruppettos ride a full season of events, starting with the Chilly Hilly in February and ending with the Kitsap Color Classic in the fall. “The STP is our marquee event. It’s a bucket list item for so many. [With the Gruppetto Cycling Club] I try to provide them with as much training and preparation as possible,” said Gabe, who, in addition to rides, hosts an annual pre-STP BBQ to answer questions and prepare his members for the upcoming event. Over the years, Gabe said he’s ridden with more than 300 Gruppetto members at STP events. But having had STP as the marquee event for the past 16 years is both a blessing and a curse, said Gabe. “There are some years I get too busy to train but I can’t break the streak. So many people count on me to do it. I do it for the group. I may have to re-evaluate after my 20th STP. I may take a year off,” he admitted. “But I still get a kick out of watching people finish. The excitement of the newcomers revitalizes me. To see that accomplishment and that ‘I can do anything’ realization. It feels good.” And it helps him sleep. “Sometimes when I can’t sleep, I visualize the route in my head,” said Gabe. “I’m usually asleep by the time I hit Puyallup Hill.” Two offshoot “cousin groups” have come out of Gruppetto Cycling Club: Team LAFBL – Life After Forty Bicycling League –in Seattle’s south end and in Bellevue. “The membership takes care of itself – people will come and go –but my goal is to keep [the Club] going and provide people with training and preparation they need to help them achieve their bucket list items,” said Gabe. To start riding with Gruppetto Cycling Club, find them on Facebook. Know a cyclist who deserves some special recognition? Nominate them for cyclist of the month! Send your ideas to Anne-Marije Rook at  amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org.

he sounds of trains rumbling along the retired Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) railroad corridor on the east side of Lake Sammamish may be long gone, but bicyclists are quickly filling a newly-paved 2.2-mile-long stretch with new sounds of gears shifting and bells chiming as they explore a smooth and safer section of trail. King County Parks reached an important project milestone this summer in its ambitious master plan to convert 11 miles of the former BNSF railroad corridor into the multi-use recreational East Lake Sammamish Trail (ELST). The highly anticipated Issaquah segment was reopened in June – just in time for an active cycling season during long summer days. Trail users of all kinds – cyclists, pedestrians, joggers, skaters and others – are happy to see the interim gravel replaced with not only a smooth paved trail, but also a wider trail that makes overall safety and accessibility better for everyone. With two-foot soft surface shoulders on each side of the expanded 12-foot wide paved corridor, enhanced intersections, crossing treatments and drainage among the long list of improvements, the ELST is shaping up nicely. Soon enough, the ELST will no longer be considered the missing link in a 44-mile corridor that stretches from Puget Sound in Seattle to the Cascade Foothills. At the other end of the 11-mile stretch, the Redmond segment was the first phase of the project, which was completed in 2011 and features a 77-vehicle parking lot -- a welcome addition for King County’s most heavily used trails. Once the ELST is fully developed, a cyclist will be able to start a ride from Seattle’s urban Ballard neighborhood and continuously cruise on a dedicated, paved trail all the way to Issaquah. The next steps in completing the ELST master plan are connecting the Redmond segment to the Issaquah segment along the east side of Lake Sammamish, which is the most complex part of the project and will be broken into three sections. Construction on the north Sammamish segment from 187th to Inglewood Hill Road is expected to begin in early 2014 followed by construction of the final south Sammamish segments that are currently in the preliminary stages of design. “We’re very excited to see the momentum continue on this multi-year project as it addresses the needs of a fast growing cycling community,” said Kevin Brown, division director of King County Parks. “It will

certainly have a positive economic impact on the connecting communities, too.” More than 175 miles of regional trails throughout King County, including the ELST, are maintained by King County Parks and the long-term vision is to continue connecting more missing links to improve the regional trails system. King County is actively planning and developing a network of regional trails that will eventually total over 300 miles in length. Construction of the Redmond and Issaquah segments were funded by the 20082013 voter-approved King County Open Space and Trails Levy, the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Program, and the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program. Future phases, including construction of the south Sammamish segment will be pending funding availability. For more information on the East Lake Sammamish Trail construction project, visit www.kingcounty.gov/ eastlakesammamishtrail.

ROUTES: Little Sister (15 miles) Girly Girl (23 miles)

Middle Sister (42 miles) Burly Girl (59 miles)

www.cascade.org


Vol. 43, No. 8

Volunteers

CASCADE CONTACTS

continued from page 4

Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Loading baggage on trucks. Date and Time: Friday, Aug. 16th, 8 a.m. – 12noon. (3-4 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP Machias rest stop. Where:. Machias Road, Machias, WA. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Set up of the rest stop. Greet riders as they come into the stop. Rest Stop volunteers are responsible for the maintenance of Rest stops (water coolers, table and chairs, bike supplies, first-aid kit, trash bags, bananas and sports drink mix) Distribute food and beverages to riders. Provide encouragement and assist riders with questions related to the route. Break down the stop and clean up. Date and Time: Friday, Aug. 16th, 1st shift 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.; 2nd shift 4:30 – 7 p.m. (1 volunteer per shift). Task or Event: RSVP information booth. Where: Days Inn, 215 Samish Way, Bellingham, WA. How Long: 2.5 hours. Doing What: Providing rider information and information about CBC. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. (6 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP baggage unloaders. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Unloading baggage off trucks. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. (2volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP Bike Corral. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Direct cyclists on where to stow bikes in bike corral. Check in and checkout bikes. Monitor area to maintain security of bike corral. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 1st shift 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.; 2nd shift 1:45 – 3:45 p.m.; 3rd shift 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 4th shift 5:15 – 7 p.m. (12 volunteers, 3 per shift). Task or Event: RSVP Finish Line Greeters. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Greet riders as they cross finish line and direct them to bike corral. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 1st shift 1:45 – 3:45 p.m.; 2nd shift 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 3rd shift 5:15 – 7 p.m. (3 volunteers, 1 per shift). Task or Event: RSVP Finish Line Baggage Check. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Checkout baggage. Monitor area to maintain security of baggage area. Date and Time: Sunday, Aug. 18th (5 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP bike unload. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: Please contact for time. Doing What: Unloading bikes off trucks. Date and Time: Sunday, Aug. 18th, 3 – 5 p.m. (2 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP bike monitors. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 3 hours. Doing What: Monitor bike pickup. Check out bike to the rider.

RSVP2

Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th thru 19th, one driver for the weekend (1 volunteer). Task or Event: RSVP Baggage Truck driver (may bring an assistant). Where: RSVP route. How Long: The weekend. Doing What: Driving a baggage truck for the event. Involves driving, handling radio/phone communications, lifting of heavy bags and luggage in loading and unloading trucks. Must have a current (clean) driver’s license, auto insurance and a current passport or Enhanced Driver’s License, as you will be crossing the Canadian border. (Candidates on this particular task can earn a “volunteer registration” to ride the 2014 Group Health STP or RSVP). Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 5:30 – 7:30 a.m. (3 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP parking. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Help to control and direct parking traffic. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 5:30 – 7:30 a.m. (3 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP cashiers.

Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Cashier for parking tickets. Previous experience working with cash and checks is desired. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 5:30 – 7:30 a.m. (3 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP Souvenir Distribution. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Help in passing out the RSVP souvenir to riders. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 5:30 – 7:30 a.m. (8 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP baggage loaders. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Loading baggage on trucks. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 8 a.m. – 12noon. (3-4 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP Machias rest stop. Where:. Machias Road, Machias, WA. How Long: 4 hours. Doing What: Set up of the rest stop. Greet riders as they come into your stop. Rest Stop volunteers are responsible for the maintenance of Rest stops (water coolers, table and chairs, bike supplies, first-aid kit, trash bags, bananas and sports drink mix) Distribute food and beverages to riders. Provide encouragement and assist riders with questions related to the route. Break down the stop and clean up. Date and Time: Saturday, Aug. 17th, 1st shift 1:30 4:30 p.m.; 2nd shift 4:30 – 7 p.m. (1 volunteer per shift). Task or Event: RSVP information booth. Where: Days Inn, 215 Samish Way, Bellingham, WA. How Long: 2.5 hours. Doing What: Providing rider information and information about CBC. Date and Time: Sunday, Aug. 18th, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. (6 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP baggage unloaders. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Unloading baggage off trucks. Date and Time: Sunday, Aug. 18th, 1st shift 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.; 2nd shift 1:45 – 3:45 p.m.; 3rd shift 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 4th shift 5:15 – 7 p.m. (8 volunteers, 2 per shift). Task or Event: RSVP Bike Corral. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Direct cyclists on where to stow bikes in bike corral. Check in and checkout bikes. Monitor area to maintain security of bike corral.

Home Page: www.cascade.org Office phone: 206-522-3222 or 206-522-BIKE Fax: 206-522-2407 Email: info@cascadebicycleclub.org

Cascade Bicycle Club 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Suite 101S Seattle, WA 98115

STAFF

Joe Platzner, Interim Executive Director

Note: All email address are @cascadebicycleclub.org

joepcascade@gmail.com • (425) 679-9593

Jeff Aken, Principal Planner

Robin Randels, Classes Coordinator

(206) 300-5932 • jeff.aken@...

(206) 390-3945 • robin.randels@ …

Jenny Almgren, Education Program Assistant

Anne-Marije Rook, Staff Writer

(206) 694-9148 • jenny.almgren@ …

(208) 870-9406 • amrook@cascadebicycleclub.org

Ryann Child, Americorps Member, Commute Program

Julie Salathé, Education Director

(206) 861-9890 • cpa@ …

(206) 523-1952 • julies@ …

David Douglas, Event Producer

Lindsey Parker, Americorps Member, Youth Programs

(206) 522-BIKE • david.douglas@ …

(206) 861-9875 • ypa@ …

Noah Down, Development Specialist

Kat Sweet, Youth Program Manager

(206) 245-0001 • noah.down@ …

(206) 427-3090 • kat.sweet@ …

Liz Johnson, Americorps Member, Major Taylor Project

Anna Telensky, Events and Sponsorship Coordinator

(206) 957-6960 • mtpa@ …

(206) 778-6099 • annat@ …

Ed Ewing, Major Taylor Project Manager

Kim Thompson, Event Registrar

(206) 778-4671 • ed.ewing@ …

(206) 526-1677 • kim.thompson@ …

Ellison Fidler, Administrative Coordinator

Alan Van Vlack, Database and Accounting Coordinator

(206) 957-7944 ellison.fidler@...

(206) 226-1858 • alan.vanvlack@ …

Brock Howell, Policy and Government Affairs Manager

Peter Verbrugge, Event Producer

(206) 856-4788 • brock.howell@ …

(206) 399-9565 • peterv@ …

Hanna McFall , Americorps Member, Community Programs

Tarrell Wright, Development Director

(206) 957-6623 • cmpa@ …

(206) 240-2235 • tarrell.wright@ …

Mike Inocencio, Corporate Development Director

Tim O'Connor, Tech Manager

(206) 522-2403 • mikei@ …

(206) 660-7922 • tim.oconnor@ …

Emily Kathrein, Field Programs Manager (402) 699-4739 • emily.kathrein@... M.J. Kelly, Director of Communications & Marketing (206) 853-2188 • m.j.kelly@ … Diana Larson, Volunteer Coordinator (206) 852-6827 • diana.larson@ … Sander Lazar, Rides Program Coordinator (206) 694-9108 • sander.lazar@ … Serena Lehman, Community Outreach Manager

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Note: All email address are @cascadebicycleclub.org President Daniel Weise • daniel.weise@... Vice President Kevin Carrabine • kevin.carrabine@... Treasurer

(206) 291-4032 • serenal@ …

Don Volta • don.volta@cascadebicycleclub.org

Kathy Mania, Finance Director

Secretary

(206) 498-2607 • kathy.mania@ …

Charles Ruthford • charles.ruthford@...

Evan Manvel, Director of Policy, Planning,

Executive Committee Member-at-large

and Government Affairs

Maggie Sue Anderson • maggiesue.anderson@…

(206) 226-1040 • evan.manvel@... Kathy McCabe, Deputy Director (206) 409-0429 • kathy.mccabe@ … Erica Meurk, Grant Writer (206) 522-7517 • erica.meurk@ … Tim O'Connor, Tech Manager (206) 660-7922 • tim.oconnor@ …

Directors George Durham • george.durham@... Dr. Rayburn Lewis • rayburn.lewis@... Mo McBroom • mo.mcbroom@... Emily Moran • emily.moran@… (On leave of absence) Joe Platzner • joe.platzner@…

Leah Pistorius, Communications Specialist

Bill Ptacek • bill.ptacek@...

(913) 579-7629 • leah.pistorius@ …

Ron Sher • ron.sher@... Michael Snyder • michael.snyder@... Ed Yoshida • ed.yoshida@cascadebicycleclub.org

Date and Time: Sunday, Aug. 18th, 1st shift 1:45 – 3:45 p.m.; 2nd shift 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 3rd shift 5:15 – 7 p.m. (3 volunteers, 1 per shift). Task or Event: RSVP Finish Line Baggage Check. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Checkout baggage. Monitor area to maintain security of baggage area. Date and Time: Sunday, Aug. 18th, 1st shift 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.; 2nd shift 1:45 – 3:45 p.m.; 3rd shift 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 4th shift 5:15 – 7 p.m. (12 volunteers, 3 per shift). Task or Event: RSVP Finish Line Greeters. Where: Coast Plaza Suite Hotel in downtown Vancouver, B.C. How Long: 2 hours. Doing What: Greet riders as they cross finish line and direct them to bike corral. Date and Time: Monday, Aug. 19th, (5 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP bike unload. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: Please contact for time. Doing What: Unloading bikes off trucks. Date and Time: Monday, Aug. 19th, 3 – 5 p.m. (2 volunteers). Task or Event: RSVP bike monitors. Where: North end of UW E-1 parking lot. How Long: 3 hours. Doing What: Monitor bike pickup. Check out bike to the rider. Date and Time: Tuesday, Aug. 20th, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. (1 volunteer). Task or Event: RSVP bike monitors. Where: 7700 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, CBC storage, Mountaineers building. How Long: 8 hours. Doing What: Monitor bike pickup. Check out bike to the rider.

“Creating a Better Community Through Bicycling”

11


August 2013

Welcome New Members Kari Aguila Jeffrey Aken Ben Assefa Brody Barnes Jeanie Barnett Jason Bennett Patricia Bettasso Mary Blyth Gordon Book Brennan Bredl Charles Bredl Mitchell Bredl Reece Bredl David Britton Jason Brown Tom Camp Michele Catalano Lynn Colwell Cindy Comeau Kent Compton Mary Craig Paul Craig Peggy Craig Jeremy Creagan Matthew Creagan Maureen Creagan Aaron Darwin Jodi Davila Robin Dean Dorcas Dobie Douglas Dohan Bruce Flynn Scott Freschet Rachel Furman Kim Garland rick girard Leslie Handley

Jean-Claude Hauchecorne Elizabeth Haverkamp Julia Herbert Kelly Hight Justin Houghton Christy Hubbard Anthony Huff Britt Huff Robin Huff William Jackson John Jacobs Luke Jennings Gopi Jeyaram Katrina Johnson Fred Julian Elizabeth Kady Steven Kady Auden Kaehler Elizabeth Kaehler Jacqueline Kaye Robert Kennedy Alison King Bob King Jeannie King Stephanie Kirz David Klimek Manny Kohli David Korthals Sarah LaCombe Ming Man Lam Aria Lampi Christopher Lampi Kate Lampi Max Lampi Michael Lampi Darrin Lange Alannah Laret

Damien Laret Francois Larrivee Chris Larson Pamela LaVergne Judy Lawrence Linda Lee Erin Lintern Chel Loomis Matthew Maeda Lilla Marie Theresa Marshall Heather Martin Melanie McAllester Tom McGough Zora Monster Tasnim Morbiwala Sue Moreland Akinari Moriya Chelsea Morris Stephanie Mundel Yutaka Nakano Allison Nelson John Ochsenreiter Shannon Orr Steve Orser Somu Peri Mark Phillips Sarah Phillips Mike Pomeroy Emma Radich Jerald Radich Quinn Radich Haider Razi Mario Rivas Monte Robison Andy Rogers John Rowley

Patrick Russell Belinda Sams Kaitlyn Sams Madeline Sams Michael Sams Lisa Sanphillippo Christi Shaw Kathy Simmons Josh Simpson Luke Simpson Mark Simpson Stephanie Simpson Scott Slater Nancy Stokley P.J. Stoural Nikita Synytskyy Audrey Temes Jack Toland Laurian Toland Marv Toland Talia Toland Rachel Vance Ken Vander Stoep Jason Vein Ryan Vicente Julian Vrieslander Caitlin Wahlers Catherine Wells Nancy Whipple Trisha Winters Paul Wirsing Goldie Wooster

Ride country roads on beautiful Whidbey Island Washington State, USA

Saturday, September 21, 2013 tourdewhidbey.com tourwhidbey@whidbeygen.org Gold Spoke Sponsors

Platinum Spoke Sponsor

Physicians & Allied Health Providers of Whidbey General Hospital

Silver Spoke Sponsors

Team Health Northwest • Foster Pepper • Parker Smith Feek • Valic Financial Advisors

Check out our Women’s Ride Schedule for August! For Beginners and Intermediate riders. Sign up now at info@velobikeshop.com.

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NOW OPEN! Joining Velo Bike Shop in its new location at Sixth and Blanchard is ViaBike. You’ll find bike storage, locker rooms, showers, and towel service. ViaBike is all about making bike commuting easy.

VeloBikeShop.com free customer parking

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ViaBike. Seattle’s new bicycle club for downtown commuters.

ViaBikeSeattle.com / VeloBikeShop.com

The Cascade Courier is printed on recycled paper. We support recycling. Please recycle this paper when you are finished with it.

www.cascade.org


August 2013 Cascade Courier