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EXCLUSIVE: An "extraordinary" academy amid orange groves

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http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/sdcounty/article_d21cbbc9-15af-50c...

EXCLUSIVE: An "extraordinary" academy amid orange groves By CHRIS NICHOLS cnichols@nctimes.com | Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 7:00 pm Take away the blue-trimmed cottages next to San Pasqual Academy's main office, and at first glance, you would think you had stumbled across a traditional high school amid the orange groves and brown, boulder-pitted mountains outside Escondido. Boisterous teens laugh and joke with each other outside the academy's cafeteria, some wearing baggy shorts, others wearing baseball caps. Others sit quietly inside sending text messages. A few students sport lettermen's jackets. But when appearances are peeled away, it's clear this academy is no ordinary place. The rural campus serves as a first-of-its-kind high school and residential home for 130 foster teens from across San Diego County. It opened in September 2001 as a joint project of San Diego County education and health agencies. Since then, it has won high praise from county leaders and outside experts for providing foster teens with a focus on education, residential stability and a path to success. San Diego County Supervisor Greg Cox, who spearheaded the academy's development, called its performance over the past decade "nothing short of extraordinary." "There just isn't anything like this in the country," added Supervisor Ron Roberts, who also championed the academy. Graduation rates are one reason for the academy's acclaim: They regularly reach 90 percent or higher. Twenty-eight of 29 seniors graduated in June, the academy said. A decade ago, the graduation rate for foster teens in the county was just 50 percent. That rate, with the academy's help, is now up to 85 percent, Cox said. During that time, the overall number of foster children in the county has dropped from 7,000 to roughly 4,000, as the county has worked to reunite more families, officials said. The percentage of academy students enrolling in college is impressive, too. Enrollment rates have steadily increased from about 60 percent in the academy's first few years to 90 percent or even 100 percent. In 2010, all 17 seniors who graduated from the academy enrolled in either a two-year or four-year college, the academy reported. In 2009, 24 of 27 seniors, or 89 percent, enrolled in college. Enrollment figures for 2011 are not yet known. Along with steering students toward college, job placement is a priority at the academy. San Pasqual reported this month that of its 243 total graduates, 45 percent were employed and enrolled in college; 20 percent were enrolled in college only; 29 percent were working only and 6 percent were neither working nor in college. Experts say the key to the academy's success is two-fold. First, there's help for nearly every student need: Teens receive job training, academic and career counseling, tutoring, medical check-ups and visits with social workers, all on the neatly maintained, 238-acre campus. The second ingredient is teamwork. Academy staff range from teachers hired by the county's office of education, to "house parents" contracted to supervise students at their on-campus cottages, to social workers hired by a separate county health agency. They work together at the same site, preventing communication failures that can stunt students' progress or even harm their health, officials said. Alan Litrownik, associate director of San Diego State University's Child & Adolescent Services Research Center, said this coordinated effort has led to the academy's "very positive reputation." Seeking "a normal experience" The academy's coordinated and comprehensive approach is designed to prepare the teens for life on their own ---- foster youths leave county guardianship once they graduate high school and reach 18 years of age.

8/25/2011 4:57 PM


EXCLUSIVE: An "extraordinary" academy amid orange groves

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http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/sdcounty/article_d21cbbc9-15af-50c...

Most of the academy's students have been legally separated from their biological parents for years. Many have bounced among a half-dozen or more foster homes before enrolling at the campus. By design, the academy offers the trappings of a typical school, to go along with its atypical services. There's a full-size gymnasium, where banners tout the San Pasqual Academy Dragons' eight-man football championships. There's a newly built football field and a technology center, too. "We are out in the middle of nowhere," said Margo Fudge of the county's child welfare office, giving a reporter and photographer a tour of the campus, which is a few miles east of the San Diego Zoo Safari Park off Highway 78. "We want kids when they get here to feel like this is a regular school ... that they can have a normal experience," Fudge said. A permanent home Students are encouraged by academy staff to stay throughout their high school years. Such continuity offers students the best prospects for the future, school leaders say. Suzanne Miyasaki, the academy's principal, said she employs everything from math and literacy tutors to academic counselors to keep students on track to graduate. "I want to exhaust everything I can, so I'm not looking back thinking I should have done this or I could have done that," Miyasaki said from her office at the campus, a former Seventh-day Adventist boarding school. She knows that the foster teens at the academy won't have the safety nets that other children have once they're finished with school. Without parents to fall back on, many foster teens end up homeless once they become adults and leave the foster care system. The academy cites studies from early in the decade showing 30 percent of emancipated foster teens experience homelessness within a year of leaving the system. To head off such outcomes, the academy works repeatedly with students that other schools might expel. For example, students found abusing drugs are removed from the academy but offered a chance to return after completing an offsite rehabilitation program, Fudge said. "We know once we ask them (students) to leave, that's devastating to them ... (and) may push them onto a downward spiral," Fudge added while speaking outside an English classroom where students used Web-based Google documents and blogs to write their peer-reviewed assignments. Tracking medical records San Pasqual students have more than just their academic and housing needs met on campus. They also receive mental and physical health services at the academy's onsite medical centers. A health and wellness center has exam rooms and offers nutrition, fitness and stress management workshops, the academy said. A rehabilitation clinic next door, housed inside the former church run by the Adventists, counsels youths on "impulse control, team work, leisure skill development ... and relieving depressive and anxious symptoms," an academy brochure said. The clinic's director declined to elaborate on its services. Having the medical centers onsite means the academy can more easily track students' medical records. Such tracking at traditional foster youth centers is no easy task. Paperwork may be spread across several counties and multiple doctors. The academy's onsite medical center helps organize the records. Advocates for foster children say accessible and complete records can make the difference between a child receiving treatment that keeps an ailment at bay, such as asthma, or neglect that turns it into a lifelong condition. Some say medical record-keeping across California's foster-care system needs vast improvement. Fudge, of the county child welfare office, said the academy uses a paper-based Health and Education Passport and an electronic case management system to track students' medical records. She said San Diego County initiated the passport system in 1994. The paper and electronic systems include information on a foster child's education, home placements and medical history. During check-ups at the academy's wellness center, nurses record students' medical information on standard forms. The nurses then

8/25/2011 4:57 PM


EXCLUSIVE: An "extraordinary" academy amid orange groves

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http://www.nctimes.com/news/local/sdcounty/article_d21cbbc9-15af-50c...

fax or mail those forms to county foster care nurses to be entered into the electronic system, Fudge said. "We don't see that there's a problem here in San Diego County," she said. "If it has been, I haven't heard about it." A village approach Advocates for foster youths are sprinkled across San Pasqual's campus. The San Pasqual Volunteer Fire Department operates on the same property, and offers job shadowing and internship programs, the academy said. Academy staff members such as Jackie Taylor and Kristie Buckley, who run the campus's career center and work training program, respectively, say they embrace both their "professional" and "parental role" at San Pasqual. The academy relies on a handful of "grandparents," too. "We just fill a different niche," said Lauren Pickard, one of several surrogate "grandparents" who live on campus and assist the academy's students in exchange for a reduced rent. Pickard, who coaches softball at the campus, says his role is: "Not to judge the kids in any way. Just listen to them, help them. Give them advice. ... We just try to do what's best for them."

8/25/2011 4:57 PM

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