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Presenting News And Views From around Smith County Volume 101 Number 1-USPS No. 092-180

INSIDE ...

Where’s Scoop?

Entry Form, Contest Rules & Last Week’s Winner . . . . . . . . A4

Staff Writer

Hackett Pours In 41 Points vs. Sevier Co. . . . . . . . B1

County High School Hoops Teams Combine For 21 Games Over The Holidays . . . . . . B1-B5

News

Beavers Weighs In

On Insurance Exchange . . . . . . . . A7

Local Help Center Receives $1,400 Grant To Assist In Utility Bills . . . . . . . . . A8

Briefly FLURRIES FLY

COUNTY Residents saw only flurries on Wednesday of last week as the first of what is likely to be several winter storms passed through the state. Forecasters are predicting above average precipitation for the mid-state this winter which means there could be

See Flurries Page A7 Auctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B8 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . B7-B12 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2 Ronnie Hughes, Sr. John Roberts Kenneth Tyree

Public Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1-B5

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Carthage, Tennessee 37030

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Additional resource officer eyed for middle school, elementaries By Eddie West

Sports

Etta Dockery Terry Mayo Leavell Smith Lucille Wilburn

January 3, 2013

School and county officials are looking at hiring an additional school resource officer. It’s not the recent school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut fueling support for a third resource officer for the county’s school system, rather local incidents. For instance, in December a 12-year-old boy attempted an armed robbery of Carthage Express convenience market, pointing a rifle at a clerk. This fall, a former alternative school student, who had just turned 18, was involved in the

armed robbery of Carthage City Councilman and longtime school system employee Phillip Brooks, a teacher at the alternative school. Also, there is an increasing number of reports of inappropriate conduct involving school system employees, requiring investigations into behavior which sometimes goes beyond misconduct or an inappropriate act and constitutes criminal behavior. Debate over hiring an additional school resource offi cer surfaced during the county school board’s December meeting. In addition to patrolling schools and investigating conduct complaints, Gordonsville High School

resource officer Sgt. Jason Stewart says resource officers are mentors to students. Some students grow up in families where police officers are portrayed negatively. “We’re the bad guys. We interact with the students and they see us in a different light,” Stewart told school board members. “Jason and I have been talking about an additional school resource officer for four years,” said Smith County Middle School Principal Ronnie Scudder. The veteran administrator indicated there were instances which occur at school which require police investigations.

Funding is a main obstacle to hiring a third school resource officer. Resource officers are assigned to Gordonsville and Smith County high schools. The two offi cers are paid approximately $70,000 or $35,000 each annually. While the resource officers are employed through the sheriff ’s department, the school system reimburses the department for the salary. The sheriff’s department provides uniforms, offi cer training, transportation, etc. In addition to the school re-

See Resource Officer A7

2012 year of tragedy, triumph in county Death stuns residents; creates bullying awareness in schools By Eddie West Staff Writer Tragic, as well as triumphant, stories topped the news during 2012. In January, the tragic death of 14-year-old Phillip Parker Jr., who committed suicide, stunned the community. Parker’s death raised awareness of bullying in the local school system. The youth’s legal guardians said the eighth grade Gordonsville student was gay and often harassed at school by fellow students. Parker was described by his family as being full of life and having compassion for others. The teen’s death made state and national headlines. Counselors with the Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network were dispatched to the school to aid grieving students, faculty and school staff. Following the youth’s death, the county’s school board requested an investigation into the incident and bullying in county schools. The school board also held a community meeting on suicide prevention. The youth’s death and the community’s reaction was one of the top news stories this past year. Other top stories: Director of schools search: The search for a director of schools began in the fall of 2011 and continued until the spring of 2012. The process took several unpredictable turns. By January (2012), the school board had taken applications, receiving 15. Applications for the position included sitting Director of School Roger Lewis. In addition to Lewis, the 15 applications included former Gordonsville Elementary School principal and former Gordonsville High School head football coach Mark Medley and former Defeated Elementary School principal and current maintenance supervisor David Nixon. Also among the 15 applicants was Smith County High School graduate and Austin Peay State University professor Dr. Benita (Sircy) Bruster. The field of 15 applicants was narrowed to six. Those six candidates included Lewis, Medley, Dr. Bruster, Nixon, Scott Porter of Bluford, Illinois and William Royal of Rogersville. The six candidates were each interviewed by school board members during an open meeting held at the courthouse in February. Each interview took approximately 45 minutes and each candidate was asked the same questions. Also during February, the field of six candidates was narrowed to three candidates. The final three candidates included Dr. Benita Bruster, Mark Medley and David Nixon. Lewis was eliminated from the process, meaning

See Tragedy A7

SOUTH CARTHAGE

SAV-WAY A BETTER WAY TO SAVE

Todd & Angela Appreciate Your Business

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

Santa and two of his reindeer made an appearance at the Tractor Supply store in Carthage on Friday of last week. Reindeer outside the North Pole are a curious sight. The reindeer were from Ronald Maynard’s Petting Zoo located in Putnam County.

Extra salt, salt brine stocked to clear state highways this winter By Eddie West Staff Writer Until this past week, it had been a relatively mild December. However, state transportation officials are preparing for a harsh winter. Salt piles have been replenished since last winter, snow plows are in place and there is a generous supply of salt brine on hand, transportation officials say. While last winter was considered mild, with little snowfall, transportation

officials say they have prepared for a severe winter with additional funds to keep roads clear of snow and ice. The department increased the amount it usually budgets for snow removal so it could purchase additional salt and salt brine and provide additional man-hours to clear interstates and state roadways. The department placed $19.7 million in its budget to keep roads clear this winter.

That amount is more than was budgeted in 2009 and 2010, winters which were particularly cold and snowy. Forecasters are predicting above average precipitation this winter. The meteorological winter includes the months of December, January and February. The calendar winter runs from late December until late March. Statewide, the transportation department has more

See Salt A7

Family tries to recover after pre-Christmas fire strikes By Eddie West Staff Writer A family of three is trying to recover from a pre-Christmas fire which left them homeless. Tracy Bryant and her two children have been staying with a friend since fire destroyed the mobile home they resided in. The fi re occurred about

two weeks before Christmas. When the fire occurred, the family lived at 125 James Court in Gordonsville. The fire destroyed the mobile home, which was rented, and all of the family’s belongings. Bryant and her two children were not home when the blaze started.

The day prior to the fire, the mobile home had been sprayed for bugs. When the fire occurred, the family was spending the night with friends. The mobile home was fully engulfed when firemen arrived at the scene. Through the state’s department of children’s ser-

See Family A7

SEE OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS INSERT INSIDE THIS ISSUE OR ONLINE BY 8 AM EACH MONDAY AT WWW.CARTHAGECOURIER.COM (Click on Weekly Specials or our ad at top right corner of website) Store Hours: Monday - Saturday 6:30 A.M.- 9 PM • Sunday 7 AM - 8 PM

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JANUARY 3, 2013  CARTHAGE COURIER  A – 7

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The Cordell Hull Bridge was under reconstruction in 2012. The reconstruction project is estimated to be completed in November of 2013.

Gordonsville High School celebrated its one hundredth anniversary this past fall.

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The former Foodland Shopping Center, located on Main Street in Carthage, was demolished this past year. Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation announced plans to construct its new corporate headquarters on the site. The South Carthage Upper Cumberland Electric facility will remain the district office.

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The county fair was named “Grand Champion” in its division.

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

In the fall of 2012, an almost seven million dollar renovation at Riverview Regional Medical Center began. The expansion will mean a larger emergency room and other improvements to the hospital.

Tragedy, triumph topped in 2012 From page – A1

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

A couple of reindeer, accompanying Santa during a visit to the Tractor Supply store in Carthage, Friday, were a curious sight for customers.

Beavers on insurance exchange State Senator Mae Beavers has weighed-in on Governor Bill Haslam’s recent decision not to set up a state-based insurance exchange. “I applaud Governor Haslam for his decision not to set up a state-based insurance exchange. It is the right decision for the citizens of Tennessee,” Senator Beavers says. “Tennessee now joins a growing list of states that have rejected this federal overreach, a move which I

hope sends a strong message to Washington,” the state senator says. “The federal law is very poorly written and gives far too much leeway for the Obama administration to change the rules down the road. As Governor Haslam illustrated in his letter, we are already seeing evidence that this is exactly what will happen.” Senator Beavers and Representative Terri Lynn Weaver were the sponsors of the Ten-

nessee Health Freedom Act, which became law in 2011. The Act states that it is the policy of this state that no government agency or official can force a Tennessee citizen to relinquish their right to choose their own mode of securing, or not securing, health care services or insurance. The Health Freedom Act was signed by Governor Haslam in one of his first ceremonial bill signings after becoming governor.

Resource officer discussed From page – A1 source officers, officers with the sheriff’s department routinely patrol school zones just prior to school beginning and as school is dismissed to monitor for motorists not obeying speed limits in school zones.

Sheriff’s department offi cers also make stops at elementary schools which do not have resource officers. Days after the Connecticut school shooting, officers with the sheriff’s department temporarily stepped up patrols of local schools.

If approved, the new resource officer would be headquartered at Smith County Middle School and serve the county’s elementary schools. The school board is expected to discuss the possibility of hiring a third resource officer during its January meeting.

Flurries pass through county From page – A1 several hits or near misses when it comes to snowfall amounts. Mainly rain fell on Wednesday as a low from the Gulf of Mexico made its way through the mid-state. A cold front from the midwest changed the scattered precipitation into light snow flurries by late afternoon. While the snow failed to

pile up, temperatures plummeted from the upper 40 degree range to the low 30’s. Around the county, less than an inch of rainfall was recorded at area CoCoRaHS weather stations. A weather station north of Carthage recorded .69 of an inch, .91 of an inch was recorded in Gordonsville, .78 of an inch was recorded in Dixon Springs and .82 of an inch was recorded west of Carthage.

The roads were wet most of the day, Wednesday. While there were some wrecks during the day, none were attributed to iced-over roadways. Through Wednesday morning, forecasters were predicting anywhere from a dusting to half-inch of snowfall. Neighboring Macon County was placed under a winter weather advisory during the storm.

State highway crews pay particular attention to problem areas for snow and ice accumulation. Those areas include hills, curves, ramps, bridges and interchanges. Temperatures this December had been relatively mild until last week. Since a cold front passed

through the county on Wednesday, temperatures have remained in the 30 to 40 degree range for daytime highs. Rain and snow flurries fell on Wednesday. Friday, rain fell again in the mid-state.

Salt supply replenished for winter From page – A1 than 200,000 tons of salt and more than 1.6 million gallons of salt brine in stock. Salt brine is applied to roads prior to the snow or ice falling. A mixture of salt and water, salt brine melts the snow and ice when temperatures are at or near the freezing mark.

Family recovering after fire From page – A1 vices, Bryant said she was able to make a deposit and pay the first month’s rent on a home located at 1424 North Main Street in Carthage. While Bryant says she has been able to obtain clothes for her family, she can’t afford to purchase furniture.

“We are staying with a friend because we don’t have a bed. We have to sleep on the floor,” said Bryant, who has been able to obtain a stove and refrigerator. The family has two electric heaters which she is hoping will help heat the house. In addition to beds, Bryant says the family doesn’t have other essential home furnish-

ings such as a coach or chairs. “We have a house but nothing to put in it,” said Bryant, who said she would gladly accept used furniture. Anyone who would like to help the family can contact 615-489-9785. Bryant says she doesn’t have a telephone. The telephone number is to her boyfriend’s telephone.

there would be a new director of schools. In March, the school board selected Medley as the county’s new director of schools. In April, the school board and Medley agreed on a three year contract with a base salary of $81,995. The following month, Medley resigned the position, apparently over a disagreement with school board members. Medley’s resignation came after he made a request to the school board concerning certain personnel. The board failed to act on the request. After resigning, Medley told the Courier,”I want the best for the Smith County school system. Under the circumstances, Mark Medley may not be the best person to lead the schools forward.” School board officials were left with the option of extending Director of Schools Roger Lewis’ contract or hire an interim director. In June, Lewis’ contract was extended for a one year period. School board members decided to let a “new” board decide the next director of schools. Four seats on the school board were contested in an August election. Four new school board members were seated on the eight person school board. Tigers state champions: The Gordonsville Tiger football team, which went 9-1 during the regular season, defeated Huntingdon 21-20 in the Class 1A state championship game in Cookeville. The Tigers’ quest for a state championship began in November with a first round bye. Ranked number one in the state, Gordonsville defeated South Pittsburg in week two of the playoffs, 14-13. The following week, the Tigers defeated Eagleville in the quarterfinals, 28-13. In their semi-final game, Gordonsville defeated Coalfield, 39-15. Several thousand fans traveled to Cookeville to attend the game. Schools were not in session the day of the game as the Tigers played at 11 a.m. on a Friday. The school won the state championship in 1984 and were runner-up the previous year. Also, Gordonsville standout lineman Tyler Coen , who played a pivotal role in the team’s accomplishment, was named Class A Mr. Football. County fair receives superior rating: After just four years, the county fair was named “Champion Fair” in its division by the Tennessee Fair Association. The naming came during the state fair association convention held in Nashville in January. The fair had received the “Merit Award” in years past. Other top stories: January •Two people were transported to the hospital as the result of a mysterious odor at the Riverwood Apartment complex located on Highway 53 in South Carthage. One unit of the complex was evacuated. One apartment, where the fumes were the

strongest, was temporarily deemed uninhabitable. Several tests were conducted at the apartment complex and surrounding area. No real cause for the odor was determined. •Members of the Ballard Chapel United Methodist Church celebrated their new church building. Fire destroyed their place of worship in 2011. The church is located in the Stonewall community. •High winds or a tornado damaged buildings at two homes located in the Graveltown community. February •Construction on a new bridge crossing Defeated Creek in the Defeated community continued. The bridge was completed later in the year and named the Joey Kemp Memorial Bridge. The bridge is located on Kemp Bottom Road, known by many locals as Harris Hollow Road. March Residents may not recall the name Rick Santorum. The Republican carried the county in the March Presidential Preference Primary election. Santorum won Tennessee, Oklahoma and North Dakota. Mitt Romney eventually won the Republican nomination. •March’s unemployment rate was at 7.6 percent, the lowest since the onset of the “Great Recession of 2008”. The 7.6 percent was the lowest county unemployment rate since the 7.3 percent recorded in August of 2008. •An unusually warm March meant an early spring growing season for plants and crops. March 2012 was the warmest March on record. •The Eads Museum opened in South Carthage. April •The state transportation department inspected the Benton McMillin Bridge which crosses the Caney Fork River in the Elmwood community on Highway 70. The state was taking bids for construction of a new bridge at the site. The bid application for the new bridge was pulled from the bid letting process because an item was not clearly explained in the bid specifications issued for the project. The project was bid this past fall. May •Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation announced plans for new corporate headquarters to be located on Main Street in Carthage at the former Foodland shopping center next to Capital Bank. •Demolition on the former Robertshaw building in Carthage began. •Beth Davis was named “Jail Administrator of the Year” for systems with under 2,500 inmates. June McCalls Real Estate purchased the former Smith County jail, located on the square in Carthage. The jail was purchased at a price of $42,000. July •A ban on outdoor burning was issued. The county was unusually dry because of an extraordinarily warm and dry spring. •Smith County was one of 21 school districts recognized by the state department of education for its improvements

on the annual Tennessee Comprehensive (TCAP) tests. The school system was designated as “exemplary” and noted for its “significant improvement in student performance and narrowing achievement gaps under the state’s new accountability system”. •The new $2.6 million Cordell Hull welcome center/ ranger office building opened. •The former Carthage General Hospital facility was closed as Riverview Regional Medical Center North and South campuses were consolidated to form Riverview Regional Medical Center. August •Steve Coble was elected as road commissioner and Terry Collins assessor of property in a county election. •County commissioners settled on a county budget which required a $2.23 property tax rate. •Gordonsville High School celebrated its one hundredth anniversary. September •Plans are announced for a $7.5 million renovation at Riverview Regional Medical Center in Carthage. The plans call for a major expansion of the hospital’s emergency room. •A Louisiana company proposed taking over management of the county landfill with plans to construct a multi-million dollar waste conversion facility on the property. Billed as a “first of its kind” facility, the facility would be known as a biomass conversion plant and would convert garbage trucked to the plant into electricity. Harrelson & Associates is the name of the company promoting the facility. The company asked for a 20 year lease of the landfill to implement the project. •After being delayed since spring, bids for the replacement bridge for the Benton McMillin bridge were taken. October •A state comptroller’s office showed Upper Cumberland Human Resource Agency officials “squandered” thousands of dollars on lavish Washington D.C. trips and the annual Christmas party. •A Gordonsville resident, Jay Slatton, was one of several mid-state residents to contract fungal meningitis from tainted medication. November •Rod Harkleroad, RN, was named administrator at Riverview Regional Medical Center. •Milton (Duck) Gibbs was elected mayor of Gordonsville. •Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney carried the county. Democratic candidate Barack Obama was re-elected to a second term, nationally. December •Flu season arrived unusually early. Some mid-state schools had to close because of the high number of absenteeism. The county’s health department began offering free flu shots. •Reconstruction of a section of Highway 80 in the Graveltown community was completed and the detour barriers removed. •Contract negotiations with Director of Schools Roger Lewis begin.


THIS ISSUE:

11 Help Wanted 239 Real Estate Listings 1 Auction

A Prize-Winning Newspaper

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INSERTS:

UT-TPA Press Awards 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

■ Sav-Way Grocery

Presenting News And Views From around Smith County Volume 101 Number 4-USPS No. 092-180

INSIDE ...

Where’s Scoop?

January 24, 2013

Carthage, Tennessee 37030

By Eddie West Staff Writer

Sports

Lady Owls, Tigers, Tigerettes Trump District Games . . . . . . . B1-B3

Smith County Middle Sweeps GJHS . . . . . . . . . B2

News

Cordell Hull Lake

Roadway Tiles To Be Replaced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7

Road Signs Theft A Continuing Problem . . . . . . . . . . . A7

Briefly

DIALING GORDONSVILLE CARTHAGE Some area residents and businesses looking to call the 683 exchange (Gordonsville) had to use the 615 area code or ten digit number (area code plus the number) before their call could be completed. Residents began noticing a difference as early as Friday and have raised questions

See Dialing Page A7

Auctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B8 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . B6-B10 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2, A3 Etta Bates Augusta Carter Mildred Hix Jerry Kittrell Doyle Meachum Marty Speck

Mary Brock Ken Deebanks Junior Jones Chris Long Joy Mooneyhan W.J. Woodard

Public Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1-B3

Online

www.carthagecourier.com

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Print, Online, or Both Special Advertisements ■ Breaking News ■ Classifieds ■ Obituaries ■ Archives ■ Crossword Puzzles ■ Recipes ■ Local Weather ■ US & World News ■ Online Features… Automotive, Bridal, Decorating, Fashion/Beauty, Food/Entertaining, ■ Weekly

Single Copy 75¢

One killed in Thursday wreck

Entry Form, Contest Rules & Last Week’s Winner . . . . . . . . A5

Elementary Basketball Tourney Dates Set . . . . . . B1

18 pages

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

One person was killed in a motorcycle accident which occurred on Hogan’s Creek Road, Thursday.

A motorcycle accident claimed the life of a Hogan’s Creek area resident, marking the second fatal accident in as many weeks on local roadways. Marty Speck, 47, Ballenger Road, was killed when the motorcycle he was riding collided with a vehicle on Hogan’s Creek Road around 4:30 p.m., Thursday. One person, Billy Shoemake, 49, Carthage, was injured in the accident. According to the Tennessee Highway Patrol report, Speck was “traveling south on Hogan’s Creek Road on a 2004 Yamaha motorcycle. Shoemake was traveling north on Hogan’s Creek Road in a 2002 Chevrolet Impala. Speck was attempting to negotiate a

Maynord takes Cookeville head coaching position By Eddie West Staff Writer One of the most successful head football coaches in Smith County High School history has resigned. After 14 seasons with the school, head coach Jimmy Maynord is stepping aside to take the head football coaching position at Cookeville High School. On Friday, Maynord was named the new head coach of the Cookeville Cavaliers. The coach departs Smith County High School with a 133-39 won/loss record and an 18-14 playoff record. Overall, Maynord has a coaching record of 169-79 in 22 years. Maynord began his head

Jimmy Maynord coaching career at White County, heading the program from 1986-89. Maynord, an Overton County native and Putnam County resident, spent five years as the defensive coordinator at Riverdale High School in Rutherford County. M a y n o r d ’s n e x t h e a d

coaching position was a fouryear stint at Upperman High School in Putnam County before coming to Smith County. “It was a tough decision for me,” Maynord told the Herald-Citizen, Cookeville’s newspaper. “I’ve been at Smith County for 14 years now, and I’ve been traveling and coaching in a different place now for a long time. It’s an opportunity for me to be basically three miles from my home. I’ve lived in Cookeville for a long time, and I know a lot of people in Cookeville. We’ve had a lot of success at Smith County. I guess you get to a point where you feel like you’ve elevated that program as much as you can,

Staff Writer School board members have agreed on a new contract with Director of Schools Roger Lewis. By a 7-1 vote, the school board approved a three year contract with the director during its January meeting held on Tuesday of last week. The contract includes a base salary of $87,000 which included a two and one-half percent raise which coincides with state government raises. The contract includes two weeks of vacation time and one sick day per month.

Roger Lewis The only school board member to vote against the contract was District 3 school board member William Barrick who serves the New Middleton area. School board members

See Fatal A6

Two face charges following manhunt By Eddie West Staff Writer

opted not to consider other candidates for the position in December when they voted to negotiate a contract with Lewis. During that meeting, no school board member expressed opposition to Lewis retaining the position. Lewis has been the only director of schools since the position was changed from elected to school board appointed some years ago. The school board had the option of negotiating a new contract with the current director or accepting additional

Two subjects located in an overnight manhunt face theft charges. The incident began around 11:30 p.m. on Monday night of last week when a subject was discovered at a residence on Highway 141, east of Gordonsville, near the Stewarts Bend area. A homeowner alerted the sheriff’s department to a suspicious person in the area. Deputies arrived to find a truck, reported stolen from Railroad S e r v i c e s L L C . i n Davon Hudson-Boyd Nashville. stuck in the yard of a residence. A manhunt, which included a tracking dog, officers with the sheriff’s department, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Gordonsville Police Department, South Carthage Police Department and Fifteenth Judicial District Drug Task Force, was initiated, according to Sheriff Chelsey Crocker Steve Hopper. A reverse 911 call alerted residents of the area a search was taking place, the sheriff said. A Rutherford County female subject was

See Director A6

See Manhunt A7

See Coach A6

Director of schools gets three year contract By Eddie West

right curve and crossed the center line into the north bound lane and made a front impact with Shoemake’s vehicle.” The mo- Marty Speck torcycle struck the front passenger side of the vehicle. Upon impact, the victim was thrown several feet. The victim died at the scene. Shoemake was transported non-emergency to Riverview Regional Medical Center. The accident was investigated by Trooper Jeremy Wilhite.

Third school resource officer hired New position meets some resistence from commission By Eddie West Staff Writer A third school resource officer is expected to be in place this week. The move comes as school systems across the state and nation address heightened school security in response to school shootings and school safety.

The county and school board have agreed to fund the third officer until the end of the fiscal year which runs through June 30. The cost will be divided equally between the county and school board at $8,350. The sheriff’s department will provide the officer with training, clothing, equipment and a vehicle.

While the school board welcomed approval of a third officer with a unanimous vote, there was some opposition to an additional school resource officer from the county commission. “I have heard from some in my district who are against this,” Josh Kirby told fellow commissioners. Kirby, a District 4 commissioner

representing the Rock City and Rome areas, made a motion to have the county’s $8,350 payment pulled from a group of budget amendments to be addressed separately. The motion received a second from Charles Kent, who represents

See Third A6


A–6

 CARTHAGE COURIER  JANUARY 24, 2013

School board opposes state school vouchers By Eddie West Staff Writer School board members are on record as opposing implementation of a school voucher program and will be letting local state lawmakers know about it. During its January session held on Tuesday of last week, the school board unanimously approved a resolution opposing any state law which would allow a school voucher program to be established. School vouchers provide state (taxpayer) funds for students to attend a private school of their parents’ choice. School officials are opposed to school vouchers because it takes away state

funds from public schools which would mean a loss in revenue to the county’s school system. Through a school voucher program, parents can take public funds, which the state would have provided the local school system for their child to attend a public school, and apply those funds toward tuition at a private school. The local school board notes in its resolution, “vouchers still remain controversial, unproven and unpopular...have not been effective at improving student achievement or closing the achievement gap, with the most credible research finding little or no difference in voucher and public school students’ performance”.

The resolution also notes the state Constitution requires the “Tennessee General Assembly provide for the maintenance, support and eligibility standards of a system of free public schools with no mention of the maintenance or support of private schools”. It is also noted in the resolution, the state department of education, state and local school boards have established a “nationally recognized standards and measures for accountability in public education”. The resolution warns a voucher program would “channel tax dollars into private schools that do not face state-approved academic standards, do not make bud-

gets public, do not adhere to open meetings and records laws, do not publicly report on student achievement and do not face the public accountability requirements contained in major federal laws, including special education”. The resolution will be sent to State Senator Mae Beavers and Representative Terri Lynn Weaver and certain other officials. Debate over a state imposed school voucher plan is expected to be a hot topic for state legislators during their 2013 session. Last year, a state committee was formed by Governor Bill Haslam to study the issue. The committee issued a number of options for state

legislators to consider. While there are no private schools in the county, some parents transport their children to private schools in nearby counties. D u r i n g l a s t Tu e s d a y ’s meeting, the school board also adopted a resolution “opposing any legislation to create a statewide or alternate authorizer for charter schools that would bypass local boards of education and usurp the responsibilities entrusted to them by their constituencies”. Charter schools are primary or secondary schools which receive both public and private funds. A charter school has more flexibility that traditional public schools, but are expected

Fatal accident occured on Hogan’s Creek Road last week From page – A1 Funeral services for Speck were held at 1 p.m., Monday, from the Carthage Chapel of Sanderson Funeral Home. Speck was a 1985 graduate of Smith County High School. The victim was employed with MidSouth Exteriors. Speck was a Baptist in belief. An avid motorcycle enthusiast, Speck was a member of the Smith/Wilson CMT— EDDIE WEST/COURIER ABATE, a local motorcycle A fatal accident occurred in a section of Hogan’s Creek Road with several curves. The wreck club. occurred at the last curve along the stretch. Speck is the county’s sec-

and as a coach the challenge of going to another place...It’s 40 minutes to Carthage, and I guess the idea of being five minutes away from my work place and the opportunity to go into a 6A program and try to continue building the building process that Coach (Jerry) Joslin had started, it was that opportunity and just the change.” Joslin resigned from the Cookeville program two years ago to take the head coaching position with Pope John Paul II, a private school in Sumner County. After Joslin left the Cookeville High School

head coaching position, Scott Cook, an assistant with the school’s program, was named head coach. Citing the need to spend more time with his family, Cook resigned the head coaching position in December after one season. In addition to being a coach at Smith County High School, Maynord served as principal until last year. I n M a y, M a y n o r d a n nounced he was stepping down as principal but would remain at the school as head football coach. Maynord, who has more than 30 years in the education field, had served as principal for 10 years. During his tenure at Smith

County High School, Maynord guided the Owls to 14 straight playoff appearances. Under the coach, the 2004 Owls won 12 games, setting a school record. Coach Maynord led the Owls to two state semifi nal appearance (2004, 2006); three state quarterfinal appearances (2002, 2003 and 2009) and seven region or district championships (1999, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2010 and 2011). The coach’s 2011 team went undefeated in the regular season. During Maynord’s tenure, the Owls have averaged nine and one-half wins in 14 years. Maynord is the all-time winningest coach in the school’s history

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Two weeks ago, a Monterey woman was killed in a single vehicle accident which occurred on Interstate 40, west bound. The victim was a passenger in a car which ran off the roadway, striking a state road sign and a tree at the entrance to the rest stop west of the Alexandria exit. (See Sanderson Funeral Homes for additional information on Speck.)

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with 133 wins and broke the 1999—2-1. (Statistics compiled by Terry mark held by the late Turney Ford who had 109 wins in 18 Collins) seasons. Maynord’s playoff record with the Owls is 18-14. Maynord’s record by year includes: 2012—8-3; 2011— 10-1; 2010—10-2; 2009—94; 2008—9-3; 2007—102, 2006—11-3; 2005—9-3; 2004—12-2; 2003—10-3; 2 0 0 2 — 11 - 2 ; 2 0 0 1 — 8 - 4 ; 2000—7-4 and 1999—9-3. Maynord’s 18-14 playoff record includes: 2012—01; 2011—0-1; 2010—1-1; 2009—2-1; 2008—1-1; 2007—1-1; 2006—3-1; 2005—1-1; 2004—3-1; 2003—2-1; 2002—2-1; 2001—1-1; 2000—0-1 and

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ond motor vehicle fatality of 2013.

Coach Maynord to head Cookeville Cavalier program From page – A1

to produce certain results, set forth in each school’s charter. In exchange for flexibility, charter schools receive less funding than public schools. Charter schools often provide a specialized curriculum.

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Director of schools awarded new contract From page – A1 applicants as the school board did last year. Last August, school board members opted not to renew Lewis’ contract which opened the position up to other candidates. Lewis, along with several other candidates, applied for the position. After an approximate seven month search, school board members selected longtime school system employee Mark Medley to the director

of schools position in March of 2012. A three-year contract agreement between Medley and the school board was approved in April. However, Medley resigned the position in May. Lewis’ contract was to expire on June 30. In June, school board members and Lewis agreed on a one-year contract which continues through June 30, 2013. The school board had the option of negotiating a new contract with Lewis or ap-

pointing an interim director. School board members opted for the one year contract and allowed basically a new school board to decide the issue. During an election in August of 2012, four new school board members were seated, dramatically changing the makeup of the board. New school board members include: Scott Hensley holds the District 2 school board seat (Tanglewood, Riddleton, Dixon Springs); Robin Moore holds the District 1

school board seat (Defeated, Difficult, Pleasant Shade), Eddie Dale Sykes holds the District 5 school board seat (Gordonsville area) and Brian Smith holds the District 7 school board seat (South Carthage area). In addition to Barrick, incumbent school board members include District 4 Joe Taylor, vice chairman, Rock City, Rome area; District 6 Michael Collins, Carthage and District 8 Tim Maynard Elmwood, Chestnut Mound.

Third school resource officer for system From page – A1 District 6 which is Carthage. The vote to pull the item failed. Kirby and Kent were the only two commissioners voting to pull the item from the list of budget amendments. Carolyn Boles, a New Middleton Elementary School teacher and District 3 commissioner representing the New Middleton area, and Pam Billington, a District 3 commissioner, abstained from the vote. A resource offi cer is stationed at Smith County High School. Another resource offi cer serves the Gordonsville High School and Gordonsville Elementary School campus. The new resource offi cer is to serve the Smith County Middle School and elementary schools. During the discussion, it was asked how the officer’s time would be divided among five elementary schools and one middle school.

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The Budget and Finance C o m m i t t e e ’s r e c o m m e n dation was for Director of Schools Roger Lewis to determine where the individual was needed. County commissioners voted on funding for the third offi cer during their January meeting held on Monday night of last week. The county’s school board voted on the proposal the following night during their January meeting. During Tuesday night’s meeting, school board member Robin Moore, who represents the Defeated and Pleasant Shade areas, said she felt there should be a resource officer stationed at every school in the county. A school board member asked Director Lewis about funding for the officer after the end of the fiscal year. County offi cials are hoping the federal or state governments or a combination of both will commit some funding for school resource offi cers. Additional funding

would come locally. School resource officers were fi rst funded under the federal COPS grant which was implemented by former President Bill Clinton. The grant lasted two years. Since then, the school system has paid the officer’s salary and the sheriff’s department has provided the offi cer, training, equipment and vehicle. Discussion concerning a third school resource officer surfaced at the December school board meeting. The meeting came just days after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut in which 20 students were killed. During the discussion, school officials indicated there were local issues which have raised concerns for additional school security. However, no specific cases were mentioned during the school board’s discussion. In December, a student posted what has been termed by law enforcement as threat-

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ening comments concerning Smith County High School on Facebook. The same month, a 12-yearold boy attempted an armed robbery of Carthage Express convenience market, pointing a rifle at a clerk. Prior to the incident, the youth fl ed from the school bus he was riding and had to be located by police. This past fall, a former alternative school student, who had recently turned 18, was involved in the armed robbery of Carthage City Councilman and longtime school system employee Phillip Brooks, a teacher at the alternative school. Also, there is an increasing number of reports of inappropriate conduct involving school system employees, requiring investigations into behavior which sometimes goes beyond misconduct or an inappropriate act and constitutes criminal behavior. A school resource officer is paid approximately $35,000, annually. 2012 Ford Expedition SUV

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THIS ISSUE:

9 Yard Sales 7 Help Wanted 257 Real Estate Listings 4 Auctions

A Prize-Winning Newspaper

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Presenting News And Views From around Smith County Volume 101 Number 17-USPS No. 092-180

INSIDE ...

Where’s Scoop?

Entry Form, Contest Rules & Last Week’s Winner . . . . . . . . A4

Sports

April 25, 2013

By Eddie West

Carthage. The incident began around 1:05 p.m., Wednesday (April 17), when Deputy Steven Ray, while on routine patrol on Highway 70, witnessed an individual standing by a car at an auto repair shop in South Carthage who had active warrants, according to a sheriff’s department report.

Staff Writer A Bradford Hill Road man faces drug-related charges and numerous other charges after attempting to fl ee from a sheriff’s department deputy. The deputy chased down the fleeing suspect on foot in South

The deputy approached the individual, asking him if he was James Franklin and he said he was not, according to the report. “I then asked if he had identification on him and he stated ‘no’,” according to the report. “I told him to come with me to my patrol car and he started to run away.” The officer notified the sheriff’s

The state’s department of labor and workforce de-

velopment has announced it will be consolidating the local career center with the Cookeville Career Center in Putnam County.

Located in the county’s satellite Upper Cumberland Human Resource/ senior citizen center building in South Carthage,

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EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The state’s department of labor and workforce development has announced it will be consolidating the local career center with its Cookeville office.

Intra-County Season Sweep Owls Erase 2-0 Deficit With 4 Runs, Victory Over Tigers . . . B1

Tigerettes Remain Atop 8A Gordonsville Blanks Trousdale In Pitchers’ Duel . . . . . . . . . . . B1

Drug Take-Back Set For Saturday At Chamber Of Commerce . . . . . . . . A8

New Commander Darnbush Named New 278th Colonel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A8

Briefly

VETERANS AFFAIRS CARTHAGE The veterans affairs office is now located in the courthouse on the square in Carthage. The office relocated on Wednesday, April 17, from the Turner Building. The address of the new location is 211 Main Street North, Carthage, TN 37030.

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department he was in a foot pursuit of the subject. Deputy Ray was able to detain the individual as additional officers were en route to the scene. “Once hand-cuffed, I frisked the subject and found an unmarked prescription bottle with

See Deputy A8

Career center to close with plan Staff Writer

News

22 pages

Deputy chases down suspect

By Eddie West

Cumberland Sees Double

Carthage, Tennessee 37030

the career center is where unemployed individuals search for employment at computer work stations which have Internet access. In addition, many local industries are encouraged by the local government to use the center to assist in recruiting and screening employees. Also, the center has a staff of two to assist individuals in searching for job openings and producing resumes. Late Friday afternoon, the Tennessee Department

of Labor and Workforce Development announced it would be consolidating 34 centers across the state, including the one located in South Carthage. Meanwhile, Monday, County Mayor Michael Nesbitt said he was optimistic through the assistance of the Upper Cumberland Human Resource Agency (UCHRA) the county may be able to keep the computer work stations open where individuals

See Career A8

School officials to ask for more resource officers in new budget By Eddie West Staff Writer With the 2013-2014 fiscal year budget talks nearing, school offi cials continue to focus on added school safety measures. Talks center mainly on additional school resource officers and more secure entrances to schools. Some school board members have expressed their opinion school resource officers are needed in each of the county’s schools. All school board members have acknowledged additional school resource officers are needed, but re-occurring salary funding, which is approximately $33,000-$35,000 annually, has led to hours of discussion. The latest discussion concerning more school resource officers came Thursday night

during the school board’s April meeting. Only weeks after the elementary school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, a number of Tennessee counties, primarily those with higher populations and a broader tax base, hired school resource officers for all public schools within their system. However, with no additional state and federal dollars designated for the cause, most school systems in less populated counties continue to struggle to find sufficient funding for added school resource officers. In the latest development, the school board will be asking the county for help in funding two new school resource officers in the upcoming fiscal year budget while the school system will pay

See School A8

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

Work on a culvert on Marina Lane leading to the Defeated Creek Recreational Area is continuing. One lane to the park, marina and campground is open to allow access to the facilities.

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More opposition to Corps boat restrictions By Eddie West Staff Writer The number of national representatives opposing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to restrict fishing from boats immediately below Corps operated dams along the Cumberland River and its tributaries continues to increase. Legislation eliminating the

Corps proposal, known as the Freedom to Fish Act, has been approved in the U.S. Senate and is pending in the U.S. House of Representatives. U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander has spear-headed opposition to the Corps proposal. In addition to Senator Alexander, U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (Kentucky),

Senator Rand Paul (Kentucky), U.S. Senator Bob Corker (Tennessee), U.S. Representative Ed Whitfield (Kentucky), U.S. Representative Hal Rigers (Kentucky), U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn (Tennessee), U.S. Representative Diane Black (Tennessee), U.S. Representative Stephen Fincher (Tennessee) and U.S. Representative Andy Barr (Kentucky) are

opposing the proposed restrictions. In the latest development, Senator Alexander sent a letter to Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy urging the Corps to “take immediate action to delay” implementing its plan. The letter was signed by each of

See More A8

Board to look at elementary basketball By Eddie West Staff Writer School officials will be taking a look at scheduling and other policies surrounding middle school/ elementary school level

basketball. At issue, notes one school board member, schools are not following TMSAA guidelines, particularly when it comes to scheduling. During their April meet-

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ing, Thursday night, school board member Robin Moore pointed out school board policy required schools to follow TMSAA guidelines which was not happening. Besides scheduling,

Moore noted there were issues with off-season practices, eligibility and factors determining tournament seeding when teams have the identical won/loss records. Moore explained she

was not promoting TMSAA rules, but felt the organization’s policies should be followed or new policies established. “We don’t need to have

See Board A8

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A–8

 CARTHAGE COURIER  APRIL 25, 2013

New colonel installed for 278th Armored Cavalry Regiment By Eddie West Staff Writer The 278th Armored Cavalry Regiment, which has a unit based at the Tennessee National Guard armory in Gordonsville, has a new commander. Col. Darell D. Darnbush was installed as commander on April 14 during a cere-

mony held at West High School football stadium in Knoxville. Darnbush previously served as the chief of joint staff for the Tennessee National Guard and deputy chief of staff for operations. The 278th, the largest National Guard unit in the state, had been under the command of Col. Frank C. McCauley since

May of 2011. The 278th, which has units stretching from Kingsport to Memphis, is composed of more than 3,700 soldiers in three maneuver squadrons, a support squadron, a special troops squadron, and a fires squadron. Col. Darnbush has 30 years of military experience.

Drug Take-Back Day set for Saturday By Eddie West Staff Writer Smith County will be participating in the National Drug Take-Back Day set for this weekend. Individuals can drop off out-dated medication at the chamber of commerce building located on Upper Ferry Road in Carthage from 10

a.m. until 2 p.m., Saturday. The event is being sponsored locally by the Smith County Drug Prevention Coalition. The state’s department of mental health and substance abuse service announced this week that 23 of the department’s county level substance abuse prevention coalitions are taking part in the take-

back event. Drug take-back events remove thousands of pounds of unused and potentially addictive medications and other substances from homes and raise awareness of permanently installed prescription drug disposal boxes in communities, according to department of mental health officials.

“The importance of removing unused medications from homes cannot be over emphasized, as more than 8,000 Tennesseans have died from drug overdoses in the past 10 years,” health officials say. Organizers estimate more than 5,775 pounds of medication will be collected at this weekend’s events in Tennessee.

Deputy chases down suspect in foot pursuit From page – A1 18 hydrocodone pills in it and also a container with crystal meth and regular meth in it,” according to Deputy Ray’s report. Franklin was transported to

the county jail by Lt. Ronnie Maynard who responded as backup. Franklin was charged with possession of a schedule II drug, evading arrest, false report/information, possession of a schedule III drug and fail-

ure to appear in connection with Wednesday’s incident, according to the report. Franklin was wanted for violation of probation, failure to appear and attachment/ child support, according to a sheriff’s department intake.

Deputy Ray suffered a severely skinned elbow and was treated and released at Riverview Regional Medical Center. Last week, Franklin was being held in the county jail without bond.

Career center to close with state’s plan From page – A1 search for jobs. If the computer work stations are closed, it will mean unemployed individuals will have to travel to Putnam County to search for a job. The career center also provides rent to the county which helps pay for the UCHRA/ senior citizen building. In a news release, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development acting commissioner Burns Phillips said the 34 career centers across the state would “relocate operations as part

of a restructuring of its career center network to more effectively serve Tennessee citizens within current budget constraints”. “Thirty-four career centers will permanently suspend job services in order to continue job placement activities with fewer dollars,” Burns said. According to the department of labor and workforce development, since 2004, career centers operated at a deficit and more than $32 million in one time federal funding was used to supplement the program. When those funds ran out, the governor included $5 million of state funding in

last year’s budget to give the department an opportunity to work on a plan to run the career centers efficiently and effectively moving forward. The Putnam County Career Center will serve Smith, Clay, DeKalb, Jackson, Overton, Putnam and White counties in addition to Smith County. In the absence of the department of labor’s career center, officials say the labor department’s mobile career coaches will increase frequency of public events in areas where service reductions occur. The department has a mobile center located in each

of the state’s three districts, middle, east and west. Mobile career centers are equipped with computer workstations, Internet access and other resources to connect workers and employers. Although no time frame for the consolidation was listed in the state’s news release, the closing of the local career center is expected to occur in the next few weeks. The Cookeville Career Center, which will serve the county when the South Carthage facility closes, is located at 580 South Jefferson Avenue in Cookeville.

School officials to ask for resource officers From page – A1 for upgrades to entrances to schools with its own funds. School resource officers have been stationed at the county’s two high schools for several years. Salaries for the two officers are paid through the school system’s budget. The offi cers are hired by the sheriff ’s department which provides training, a vehicle and equipment. Earlier this year, the school system and county agreed to pay for a third officer until the

end of the 2012-2013 fiscal year which ends June 30. While the offi cer’s offi ce is at Smith County Middle School, he is assigned to all elementary schools which he visits one day per week. School board members are hoping the county will continue to fund half of the third school resource officer’s salary within the 2013-2014 fiscal year budget. School board members are also hoping the county will provide funding for two additional school resource officers in its 2013-20214 fiscal year

budget. If approved, it would mean the school system and the county would each fund two and a half school resource officers. The town of Gordonsville has agreed to fund a school resource officer for Gordonsville Elementary School in its 2013-2014 fiscal year budget. Carthage and South Carthage were asked to pay for a school resource officer or contribute to the salary of an officer. When approached by Director of Schools Roger Lewis, city officials said they

could not afford it. The school system will fund upgraded entrances at certain schools, a one-time expenditure, which will route all visitors into a school’s office upon entering the school. Once inside the school, the visitor would sign-in and obtain a visitor’s pass. The architectural design is like that at Gordonsville High School where all front doors but one are locked. Individuals enter two unlocked doors leading to the offi ce. The project is expected to cost around $100,000.

More opposition to Corps’ boat restrictions From page – A1 the Tennessee and Kentucky lawmakers in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives listed above. In addition to delaying its plan, Senator Alexander is urging Corps offi cials to “work with state officials toward a compromise to address any safety concerns” the agency may have with fishing from boats immediately below dams. The Corps maintains the plan was approved several years ago because of safety issues and the government agency has only recently decided to enforce the legislation. Meanwhile, Corps officials say the agency “continues to finalize plans to permanently restrict waterborne access to hazardous waters near dams” and is following ongoing legislation. When a Corps boat with a crane and barge commonly used by the agency for dredging arrived at the Cordell Hull Dam two weeks ago, rumors surfaced the Corps was planning to begin installation of

its plan at the local dam. Corps officials were contacted by a Courier reporter and the following statement was issued: “The Corps will distribute a news release to the public when plans become final and implementation dates are established”. Also, opponents of the Corps plan to restrict fishing from boats immediately below and above dams held a Freedom to Fish rally this past weekend at the Lake Barkley Dam in Kentucky. Senator Alexander joined Kentucky representatives Senator Paul and Senator McConnell and Representative Whitfield at the Barkley Dam in Kentucky for Saturday’s rally. A crowd estimated at 200 people attended the rally, according to news reports. During Saturday’s rally, Lake Barkley area government officials announced plans to meet with Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear and make a request for the state’s attorney general to file an injunction against the Corps under a public trust doctrine

From page – A1

into the issue after receiving comments from constituents. During the discussion, Moore noted there needed to be a “dead” period or a time when no practice or games were taking place.

in an effort to block the Corps plan. In February, Senator Alexander announced he would take action to delay the Corps from implementing the plan; however, the Tennessee legislator introduced legislation to do away with the Corps’ plan under the Freedom to Fish Act. If the Corps plan is implemented, in addition to the Cordell Hull Dam, restrictions would include the Center Hill Dam as well as all hydroelectric dams along the Cumberland River and its tributaries. The Corps plan, known as “ER 1130-2-520 and statutory requirements of 33 C.F.R.”, calls for stretching a cable and buoys across restricted areas at each dam. The Corps projects it will cost $2.6 million to implement the plan. Since the plan was made public, Senator Alexander has called the restrictions “unreasonable” and will “destroy remarkably good recreational opportunities and many jobs”. In his argument against the

Corps plan, Senator Alexander says the Tennessee Valley Authority achieves its safety goals without using physical barriers to restrict fishing access to tailwaters below its dams, instead using warning signs, strobe lights and horns at 22 of its 31 dams to warn of times when water will spill through the dams. Restricted areas would vary at each dam along the Cumberland River and its tributaries. The restricted area below the Cordell Hull Dam would begin at the dam and continue for 800 feet downstream. The restricted area above the dam would begin at the dam and continue for 515 feet upstream. The restricted area for boats doesn’t include the dam’s lock where boats pass through. At Center Hill Dam, the restricted area below the dam would be from the dam to 700 feet downstream. The restricted area above the dam would begin at the dam and continue for 400 feet upstream.

The Colonel enlisted in the Tennessee Army National Guard in 1983 and received his commission in 1986 from the Tennessee Military Academy. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in political science from Middle Tennessee State University in 1986 and is enrolled in the Masters in Strategic Studies program at the United States Army War College. The Colonel served in all levels of leadership including Company Commander, Assistant S3, Squadron Executive Officer, Regimental S4, Regimental S3, Squadron Commander, Deputy G3, Deputy Chief of Staff - J3 and Chief, Joint Staff. In January 1991, Darnbush deployed in support of Operation Desert Storm/

Desert Shield as the Battalion Chemical Officer for the 7-158 Aviation Regiment. The Colonel became the Regimental S3 in March 2004 and served in this position during the Regiment’s first deployment to Iraq in 2004 and 2005. In May 2006, Darnbush took command of the Regimental Special Troops Squadron headquartered in Lebanon. Among his awards, Col. Darnbush has been awarded the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with four Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Achievement Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Iraqi Campaign Medal, and the Combat Action Badge.

No foul play suspected in man’s death By Eddie West Staff Writer Law enforcement authorities do not suspect foul play in the death of an Elmwood resident, according to Sheriff Steve Hopper. The body of Michael Atwood, 47, was located near Kurtz Lane off Horseshoe Bend Road in the Elmwood community, Thursday morning. Sheriff ’s department deputies were dispatched to the area after receiving a call from a relative who

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Board to look at elementary basketball program a conflict with school board policy and right now we do,” Moore said. The school board member noted she began checking

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A – 10

 CARTHAGE COURIER  OCTOBER 24, 2013

SCHS homecoming scenes

New program targets contraband in schools with detection dog By Eddie West Staff Writer Under a new program, schools will be routinely searched for contraband and illegal drugs. Interquest Detection Canines will conduct random searches of schools once a month using a specially trained dog. The county’s school board approved a contract which will pay the company for eight, one-half day visits to schools this school year at a cost of $250 per visit. Director of Schools Roger Lewis explained to the school board he learned about the company during a recent superintendent’s conference. At the director’s request, the company recently conducted an initial search at the county’s two high schools as a demonstration. “I saw the dog and was told what it could do. It piqued my interest,” said Lewis. “By no means am I trying to undermine the TBI (Tennessee Bureau of Investigation) or FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation). It’s a matter of convenience. They can come once a month.” While the sheriff’s department has a canine unit, it was noted by school officials during the discussion Interquest Detection Canine dogs are more highly trained in certain areas of detection. For instance, school officials say Interquest Detection Canine dogs can detect prescription medications, whereas many law enforcement dogs are trained to detect marijuana and other illegal drugs.

It was also noted during the discussion the Interquest dogs can detect an unopened can of beer, gun powder and weapons. The new program is viewed by school officials as a deterrent to students bringing contraband onto school campuses as opposed to law enforcement agencies conducting searches for illegal items which often result in criminal cases. “By no means am I trying to undermine the sheriff...I saw this as a deterrent to keeping drugs out of our schools,” commented Lewis, who noted many of the school contraband problems stem from students found in possession of their parents’ prescription medications. Under the Interquest Detection Canines program, if the dog locates contraband, the item or items are handed over to school officials who will be responsible for determining what course of action to take. “Our purpose is to be a deterrent. We had rather nothing be found,” said Rocky Washington, a representative with Intergroup, to school board members. “We don’t accuse the student of anything. When the dog finds something, it sits. We call the principal and school resource officer as a witness.” Some school board members were apprehensive about the program. Board member Robin Moore noted if a criminal act had been committed, the dog’s handler would likely be required to be in court to testify which would mean additional costs to the school system. The issue came before the school board during its October meeting which was held on Tuesday night of last week.

E-911 calls accessible on cell phones with program By Eddie West Staff Writer Residents can now receive local emergency alert notices from E-911 over their cellular telephones. The E-911 alert system relays both emergency warnings and certain non-emergency alerts to the entire county or specific communities, depending on the particular situation. In the past, the notices could only be received over land line telephones.

E-911 has partnered with the Hyper-Reach Emergency Notification System to expand notifi cations to cellular telephones, Emergency Medical Service Director Ricky Slack says. With the growing popularity of cellular telephones, Slack said he had received a number of requests from residents for the added service. Cellular telephones have become so popular, some residents have done away with land line and rely

entirely on cell phones. In order to subscribe to the new cellular telephone service, connect with the website www.hyperreach. com/tnsmithsighnup.html and fill out the information form on the website. “After filling out this page (form) the individual’s cell phone should receive any alerts from Smith County E-911,” according to Slack. The director says the new service helps improve the safety to residents of the county.

Fifth school resource officer hired during board meeting By Eddie West Staff Writer A fifth school resource officer position will be added to the county’s school system. Funding for the new officer was approved by the school board during its October meeting held on Tuesday night of last week. The new officer is in training and will be in place in January. The new officer will be the third school resource officer assigned at the elementary school level. While school resource officers have been assigned to the county’s two high schools for several years, after the elementary school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, school and county officials began looking at additional security for elementary schools. A school resource officer, Ben Silcox, was hired as the county’s first officer assigned specifically to elementary schools. Silcox’s salary was paid by the board of education and the county through the end of the 2012-2013 fiscal year. The county opted out of partial payment and the position is now funded by the school board. Silcox is headquartered at Smith County Middle School but is assigned to all elementary schools except Gordonsville Elementary. The town of Gordonsville agreed to fund the cost of a school resource officer at Gordonsville Elementary School. That position is held by former sheriff and Gordonsville police officer Ronnie Lankford. While some school board members have advocated the need to place a school resource officer in all schools, county officials have advocated school safety and public awareness programs instead of hiring additional officers. Funding has been the main issue in adding school resource officers. A school resource officer costs approximately $33,000 to $35,000 annually. In addition, the sheriff ’s department funds the training, patrol car, equipment and uniforms for the officers. Funding surfaced during the school board’s debate in hiring the additional officer at last week’s meeting. “This is a reoccurring expenditure. The well is going dry unless we receive

additional federal or state funds,” warned school board member Tommy Manning. Manning was making reference to the fact money to fund the additional school resource officer would have to come from the school board’s reserve funds. “Someday you’re (school board) going to be looking at program cuts and teachers being laid off. Maybe we have the money right now to pay for this school resource officer, but the well is going dry,” Manning added. Certain school board members have been critical of the county for the lack of support in funding for school resource officers. During 2013-2014 county budget talks this past summer, the issue was never discussed by the full commission. “...I thought we would have some support from the county on this,” commented school board member William Barrick. “If the county government is not going to step up, then someone has to...We need to,” commented board member Robin Moore, an advocate for placing school resource officers in all schools. Moore admits she is biased on the issue because her husband is a school resource officer in Wilson County. During discussions, Moore has pointed out numerous benefits school resource officers provide. In addition to funding, during previous meetings and at last week’s meeting, the role of school resource officers has been brought into question. During a recent school board meeting, Tommy Manning raised questions about the assignment of school resource officers. The issue surfaced again at last week’s meeting. Board member William Barrick felt school resource officers should have a greater role than providing security, such as teaching safety courses. “I’m not getting the impression they’re teaching programs. They should be working with the children. Teaching anti-bullying classes,” commented Barrick.

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Bridge work continues New bridge across Caney Fork

By Eddie West

Sports Putting It All Together Dillon, Defense Shine For Owls’ First Win . . . . . . . . B1

Knights In Another Gear Tigers Come Up Short In 93-Point, 929-yard, 13 TD Shootout . . . . B1

News

Criminal Action Two Men Charged In Area Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A15

Academic Achievements

Staff Writer Construction on a replacement for the Benton McMillin Bridge located on Highway 70 in the Elmwood community is continuing. Work on the project began in the fall of last year. The estimated completion date of the project is November of next year, according to Deanna Lambert, community relations officer with the transportation department. Concrete Structure Inc., located

See Construction A13

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

Construction on a replacement for the Benton McMillin Bridge in the Elmwood community continues.

Energy-wise company pledges thousands in savings to schools By Eddie West Staff Writer The county’s school system is poised to become more energy efficient.

An energy conservation company maintains its program will save the county school system thousands of dollars annually in utility

bills and breed a culture of energy conservation among school employees and students. Dallas based Cenergistic

estimates it can create a savings of more than one hundred thousand dollars during its first year of service through implementing

energy effi cient practices at schools and facilities throughout the school system.

See Company A13

Gordonsville, Union Heights Elementaries Recognized . . . A14

Briefly FIRE CALLS

COUNTY Fire departments responded to the following calls during the past week. •Rock City/Rome Fire Department was dispatched to a brush fire located at 459 Lebanon Highway at 5:46 p.m., Saturday. Firemen were at the scene until 6:08 p.m.

Festival Saturday By Eddie West Staff Writer A new annual festival centered around Smith County’s historical past will take place Saturday.

The county’s history unfolds with reenactors in the first annual William Walton Days, the county’s newest festival. The day long event will take place mainly at the county courthouse and feature musi-

cal acts. Throughout the day, reenactors will attempt to relive the lives of individuals who played a vital role in the development

See William Walton A13

See Fire Page A13

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

DeFord Bailey Jr. passed away on Sunday, September 15. Bailey was the son of Smith County native DeFord Bailey Sr., known in the music circles as the “harmonic wizard” and inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2005. DeFord Bailey Jr., who died at age 81, performed at the former Rendezvous on the Square festival in Carthage which honored his father. DeFord Bailey Jr. played bass guitar, fiddle, banjo, piano and organ and was a resident of Nashville. While his father was a founding member of the Grand Ole Opry, DeFord Bailey Jr. mainly played clubs around Nashville. Bailey was once a member of a group called the Grove Masters. Bailey’s funeral was held Saturday in Nashville at the Greater Bethel A.M.E. Church. Internment was in the Greenwood Cemetery in Davidson County.

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Rain breaks dry spell for county

DeFord Bailey Jr.

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By Eddie West Staff Writer Significant rain fell countywide over the weekend for the first time in several weeks. Most areas of the county received an inch or slightly less of rain which fell Friday night and into Saturday morning. The largest amount of rainfall recorded by a CoCoRaHS weather station was 1.23 inches in the Dixon Springs area. The Watervale area received 1.18 inches, while 1.19 inches fell in the Elmwood community. Less than an inch, .85, was recorded northwest of Carthage and .84 of an inch was recorded in Gordonsville. It was the first time measurable rain has fallen in the county since September 12. It was also the most significant rainfall event recorded since the first of the month.

See Rainfall A13

Events reported by paper relate life in 1913 By Eddie West Staff Writer (The Courier is in its 100th year of publication. The following is another in a series of articles commemorating the milestone in the newspaper’s history.

This is part II of a two part story.) Scanning the pages of the 1913 editions of the Courier, readers can learn about life during that period. Some samples of life in 1913 through stories from

SOUTH CARTHAGE

SAV-WAY A BETTER WAY TO SAVE

Todd & Angela Appreciate Your Business

the Carthage Courier. Destruction Fire destroyed Lamberson Brothers store in Lancaster in October. The fire spread to M. Nixon and Son’s store and about $500 worth of items were saved from it. The fire continued

to the home of the widow, Betty (no last name given), in which the Home telephone exchange was stationed. The residence was destroyed, cutting off communications to the community for a few days. The total loss was valued at $13,000. County commission The county commission included 49 representatives.

Industrial news W.L. Mitchell of Scottsville, Kentucky spent two days in Carthage with a

See NewspaperA13

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Newspaper relates how people lived in 1913 through its stories From page – A1 view of putting in a soft drink bottling plant here. The proposed plant will be capable of manufacturing an almost unlimited supply of soft drinks such as Pepsol, Soda Pop, Royal and all the favorite soft drinks on the market. Mr. Mitchell said in order for a plant of this

kind to be successful, it will be necessary for the trade to demand at least 12 to fifteen thousand cases of his goods per year. There is no doubt in his mind that Carthage and its territory will easily consume this amount and even a great deal more. The sales from this amount of bottled goods will amount to more than $10,000. Entertainment

The Dearie Amusement Company, composed of Dr. C.A. Womack and Maurice McNellie, two of our business men, have purchased a moving picture machine and proposes to give Carthage a real moving picture show. For the present, the Dearie Amusement Company will give their shows in the courthouse. They have made arrangements to

get on the circuit with the Nashville show houses and by this means they will have a complete change of program each night, showing the same pictures you would see in the big city. The shows are expected to run three nights each week. Shop locally The Courier was encouraging residents to shop at home. Cumberland River The Cumberland River Improvement Association promotes locks on the river. Proposal to incorporate Brush Creek A bill was written to incorty during August. porate Brush Creek as a town. In July, most areas of the county received around 10 to Nature Reward of $5 will be paid eleven inches of rainfall. for information leading to Some areas received more the arrest and conviction of than 12 inches. anyone violating the recently

Rainfall occurs over weekend From page – A1 Average rainfall for September is 3.59 inches. As of Monday, Septem-

ber has been relatively dry compared to August and July when above normal rain fell in each of the two months. Anywhere from six to ten inches of rain fell in the coun-

enacted steel-trappers’ law or the law prohibiting the killing of foxes or other fur-bearing animals with gun or trapping for quail and $25 will be paid for same information with

reference to dynamiting. Report to the local game warden. Information will be kept confidential. W.D. Howser, state game warden in Nashville, issued the warning.

Company pledges to save schools thousands in utility payments From page – A1 Rather than promoting energy efficient products, Cenergistic uses technological data, energy saving methodology and advise of energy conservation experts to create savings in utility costs. By examining existing facilities, the company creates individual energy saving plans for each client including schools, healthcare facilities and churches. One of the company’s newest clients is the Smith County school system. During its September meeting held on Tuesday night of last week, the county’s school board agreed to partner with the energy saving company. Through its program, Cenergistic will provide the school system energy saving methods through instruction and software devised by experts in the energy conservation fi eld and train an employee within the school system as a liaison in energy conservation.

“This program will require a part-time inspector to work with the company. This would be someone within the system who has good people skills and would work as a liaison,”said Cenergistic Regional President Truman Akins during his presentation to the school board. In addition to learning energy saving methods, the liaison will be responsible for ensuring the program is implemented at school operated facilities. During the discussion, it was noted implementing the system would require behavioral changes from principals, faculty, etc. School board member William Barrick questioned who would ensure those changes take place. Director of Schools Roger Lewis said he would ensure recommendations made by the company would be enforced. The director told school board members he had requested Cenergistic formulate

a proposal for the school system. The director said he learned of the company from a longtime school official who recommended the company. Money saved would be used to pay the company a fee for its services and mean additional funds for the school system for educational purposes. In addition to saving the school system utility bill costs and promoting energy saving measures, the company’s program encourages students and employees to become energy conservation minded. In its presentation, the company guarantees the school system a savings greater than its investment or it will refund the difference. In a booklet given to school board members, Cenergistic noted Tennessee school systems already clients of the company have shown energy savings ranging from 22 to 43 percent, amounting to millions of dollars in savings. On average, a school sys-

tem can expect to save 20 to 30 percent, according to material submitted by the company. School systems in Tennessee which are already clients of Cenergistic include Bradley County School District, Dyersburg City School District, Cleveland City Schools, Hickman County Schools, Greeneville City Schools, Fanklin Special School District, Stewart County School System, Jefferson County Schools, Franklin County Board of Education, Johnson County Department of Education, Henderson County School District, Greene County Schools, Freed-Hardeman University, Hawkins County Schools and Robertson County Schools. Cenergistic was established in 1986 as Energy Education Inc. In its presentation to the school board, the company listed the following savings to school systems and clients: Dyersburg City School District $2.5 million over a

48 month period or a savings of 43 percent; Cleveland City Schools a saving of $2.1 million over a period of 44 months, a 32 percent savings rate; Franklin Special School District a savings of $1 million over a 30 month period or a savings of 31 percent; Hickman County Schools a savings of $1.1 million or 28 percent savings; Bradley County School District a savings of $6.9 million

over a 129 month period or 27 percent savings; Hope Presbyterian Church a savings of $378,000 over a 34 month period or a savings of 25 percent; Johnson County Department of Education a savings of $175,650 over a period of 10 months or a savings of 24 percent and Greeneville City Schools a savings of $566,394 during a period of 31 months, a savings of 22 percent.

Construction on bridge over Caney Fork River From page – A1 in Charlotte, was awarded the project in September of last year. The company was low bidder for the project at $5,784,162.73. Transportation officials estimated the project to cost $5.4 million. Last year, the bridge construction project was delayed during the bidding process.

The project was pulled from the state transportation department’s March (2012)bid letting when it was learned an item pertaining to a bridge pier had been left out of bid specifications, according to transportation officials. In April, state department of transportation officials took another look at the bridge, inspecting the bridge from a barge in the water. In August of last year, the project was

placed in the September bid letting. In 2011, state officials announced funds for the bridge project were included in the 2011-2012 state transportation budget. The new bridge will be constructed beside the existing structure on the south side. The project includes the removal of the existing 1,277 feet steel truss bridge. The new structure will be a 963.5 feet, eight-span, concrete girder bridge.

William Walton Days takes place Saturday Reenactors will revive thage; Daniel Smith (who the Captain William Walton— county was named in honor presenting the history of Car- of)—presenting the history of Smith County; James Hogan—presenting the hisSchedule of events tory of Hogans Creek; John 8 a.m.—First annual Rotary Club 5K Run on the River Gordon—presenting the his9:30 a.m.—5K Run awards at Courthouse 10-10:30 a.m.—Walton Grave dedication performed by tory of Gordonsville; John Trousdale—presenting the DAR and SAR 10:45 a.m.—March from courthouse to Heritage Museum by history of Elmwood; John SAR to kickoff the dedication of the William Walton exhibit Lancaster—presenting the 11-11:30 a.m.—Unveiling of the William Walton exhibit at history of Lancaster; Thomas Smith—presenting the history the Smith County Heritage Museum 11:30-12 p.m.—William Walton reenactment to include of Hickman; William McClure—presenting the history history of Carthage of McClure’s Bend; James 12-12:30 p.m.—Music on courthouse steps 12:30-1 p.m.—Reenactment of Daniel Smith and Smith Bradley—presenting the hisCounty history and reenactment of James Hogan and history tory of Riddleton and Tilman Dixon—presenting the history of Hogans Creek of Dixon Springs. 1-1:30 p.m.—Music on courthouse steps President George Washing1:30-2 p.m.—Reenactment of John Gordon and Gordonsville ton and wife Martha will make history and reenactment of Eliza Jane Ward Gwaltney and an appearance at the event. Hickman history The courthouse lawn will 2-2:30 p.m.—DAR essay award presentation be transformed into a colo2:30-3 p.m.—Music on courthouse steps 3-3:30 p.m.—Reenactment of John Lancaster and history nial exhibit with individuals of Lancaster and reenactment of Thomas Smith and Hickman demonstrating old-fashioned crafts and trades. history

From page – A1 of the county and its communities.

3:30-4 p.m.—Music on courthouse steps 4/6 p.m.—Horse and wagon rides on Main Street (free) 4-4:45 p.m.—Reenactment of William McClure and McClures Bend history and reenactment of James Bradley and Riddleton history and reenactment of Tillman Dixon and Dixon Springs history 4:45-5 p.m.—Visit with President George Washington and Martha 5-6:30 p.m.—Music on courthouse steps; Walton Days supper on the lawn 5-6:30 p.m.—Walton Days supper on the lawn

Horse and wagon rides (free) will be taking place during the festival. The local Daughters of the American Revolution and Sons of the American Revolution will be holding a grave dedication at the Walton Cemetery located on Myer Drive (road leading to Wal-Mart). The event will be used to

Fire departments responded to calls From page – A1

•Gordonsville Fire Department was dispatched to Apartment A at 140 Meadow Green Lane after a resident reported a smoke detector was sounding and she could smell smoke. No fire was located. The incident occurred at 4:15 a.m., Thursday. Firemen were at the scene until 5:34 a.m. •Riddleton Fire Depart-

ment was dispatched to back up Trousdale County on a house fire at 10:25 a.m., Tuesday. The fire was located at 2245 Lick Creek Road in Trousdale County. Firemen were on the scene until 1:39 p.m. •Gordonsville and Carthage fire departments were dispatched to a brush/grass fire at 213 Main Street East

in Gordonsville at 1:33 p.m., Tuesday. Firemen were at the scene until 3:34 p.m. Flames were extinguished before the fire reached a barn. •Rock City/Rome and Central District fire departments were dispatched to a kitchen stove fire at 5:31 p.m., Tuesday at 681 Lebanon Highway. Firemen were at the scene until 5:59 p.m.

reveal the latest exhibit at the Smith County Heritage Museum, a Captain William Walton exhibit. The day’s events will begin with a modern tone, a 5K run. The event will end with a free Walton Days supper on the lawn of the courthouse. The supper is free but tickets are required. Tickets are available at the chamber of commerce and county officials. Food vendors will be a part of the event.

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A – 10

 CARTHAGE COURIER  OCTOBER 24, 2013

SCHS homecoming scenes

New program targets contraband in schools with detection dog By Eddie West Staff Writer Under a new program, schools will be routinely searched for contraband and illegal drugs. Interquest Detection Canines will conduct random searches of schools once a month using a specially trained dog. The county’s school board approved a contract which will pay the company for eight, one-half day visits to schools this school year at a cost of $250 per visit. Director of Schools Roger Lewis explained to the school board he learned about the company during a recent superintendent’s conference. At the director’s request, the company recently conducted an initial search at the county’s two high schools as a demonstration. “I saw the dog and was told what it could do. It piqued my interest,” said Lewis. “By no means am I trying to undermine the TBI (Tennessee Bureau of Investigation) or FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation). It’s a matter of convenience. They can come once a month.” While the sheriff’s department has a canine unit, it was noted by school officials during the discussion Interquest Detection Canine dogs are more highly trained in certain areas of detection. For instance, school officials say Interquest Detection Canine dogs can detect prescription medications, whereas many law enforcement dogs are trained to detect marijuana and other illegal drugs.

It was also noted during the discussion the Interquest dogs can detect an unopened can of beer, gun powder and weapons. The new program is viewed by school officials as a deterrent to students bringing contraband onto school campuses as opposed to law enforcement agencies conducting searches for illegal items which often result in criminal cases. “By no means am I trying to undermine the sheriff...I saw this as a deterrent to keeping drugs out of our schools,” commented Lewis, who noted many of the school contraband problems stem from students found in possession of their parents’ prescription medications. Under the Interquest Detection Canines program, if the dog locates contraband, the item or items are handed over to school officials who will be responsible for determining what course of action to take. “Our purpose is to be a deterrent. We had rather nothing be found,” said Rocky Washington, a representative with Intergroup, to school board members. “We don’t accuse the student of anything. When the dog finds something, it sits. We call the principal and school resource officer as a witness.” Some school board members were apprehensive about the program. Board member Robin Moore noted if a criminal act had been committed, the dog’s handler would likely be required to be in court to testify which would mean additional costs to the school system. The issue came before the school board during its October meeting which was held on Tuesday night of last week.

E-911 calls accessible on cell phones with program By Eddie West Staff Writer Residents can now receive local emergency alert notices from E-911 over their cellular telephones. The E-911 alert system relays both emergency warnings and certain non-emergency alerts to the entire county or specific communities, depending on the particular situation. In the past, the notices could only be received over land line telephones.

E-911 has partnered with the Hyper-Reach Emergency Notification System to expand notifi cations to cellular telephones, Emergency Medical Service Director Ricky Slack says. With the growing popularity of cellular telephones, Slack said he had received a number of requests from residents for the added service. Cellular telephones have become so popular, some residents have done away with land line and rely

entirely on cell phones. In order to subscribe to the new cellular telephone service, connect with the website www.hyperreach. com/tnsmithsighnup.html and fill out the information form on the website. “After filling out this page (form) the individual’s cell phone should receive any alerts from Smith County E-911,” according to Slack. The director says the new service helps improve the safety to residents of the county.

Fifth school resource officer hired during board meeting By Eddie West Staff Writer A fifth school resource officer position will be added to the county’s school system. Funding for the new officer was approved by the school board during its October meeting held on Tuesday night of last week. The new officer is in training and will be in place in January. The new officer will be the third school resource officer assigned at the elementary school level. While school resource officers have been assigned to the county’s two high schools for several years, after the elementary school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, school and county officials began looking at additional security for elementary schools. A school resource officer, Ben Silcox, was hired as the county’s first officer assigned specifically to elementary schools. Silcox’s salary was paid by the board of education and the county through the end of the 2012-2013 fiscal year. The county opted out of partial payment and the position is now funded by the school board. Silcox is headquartered at Smith County Middle School but is assigned to all elementary schools except Gordonsville Elementary. The town of Gordonsville agreed to fund the cost of a school resource officer at Gordonsville Elementary School. That position is held by former sheriff and Gordonsville police officer Ronnie Lankford. While some school board members have advocated the need to place a school resource officer in all schools, county officials have advocated school safety and public awareness programs instead of hiring additional officers. Funding has been the main issue in adding school resource officers. A school resource officer costs approximately $33,000 to $35,000 annually. In addition, the sheriff ’s department funds the training, patrol car, equipment and uniforms for the officers. Funding surfaced during the school board’s debate in hiring the additional officer at last week’s meeting. “This is a reoccurring expenditure. The well is going dry unless we receive

additional federal or state funds,” warned school board member Tommy Manning. Manning was making reference to the fact money to fund the additional school resource officer would have to come from the school board’s reserve funds. “Someday you’re (school board) going to be looking at program cuts and teachers being laid off. Maybe we have the money right now to pay for this school resource officer, but the well is going dry,” Manning added. Certain school board members have been critical of the county for the lack of support in funding for school resource officers. During 2013-2014 county budget talks this past summer, the issue was never discussed by the full commission. “...I thought we would have some support from the county on this,” commented school board member William Barrick. “If the county government is not going to step up, then someone has to...We need to,” commented board member Robin Moore, an advocate for placing school resource officers in all schools. Moore admits she is biased on the issue because her husband is a school resource officer in Wilson County. During discussions, Moore has pointed out numerous benefits school resource officers provide. In addition to funding, during previous meetings and at last week’s meeting, the role of school resource officers has been brought into question. During a recent school board meeting, Tommy Manning raised questions about the assignment of school resource officers. The issue surfaced again at last week’s meeting. Board member William Barrick felt school resource officers should have a greater role than providing security, such as teaching safety courses. “I’m not getting the impression they’re teaching programs. They should be working with the children. Teaching anti-bullying classes,” commented Barrick.

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10 Help Wanted 237 Real Estate Listings 1 Auction

A Prize-Winning Newspaper

~

INSERTS:

UT-TPA Press Awards 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

■ Sav-Way Grocery

■ Tractor Supply ■ Save-A-Lot

Presenting News And Views From around Smith County Volume 101 Number 3-USPS No. 092-180

INSIDE ...

Where’s Scoop?

Entry Form, Contest Rules & Last Week’s Winner . . . . . . . . A6

Sports

Challenging The State’s Big Girls And Boys . . . . . . . B1 Gordonsville Tigers Football Awards . . . . . . . . . B1

News

Local Volunteers Stock Bags For Backpack Program . . . . . . . . . A9

West Fite Avenue No Parking Signs Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A9

Briefly

January 17, 2013

Woman killed as flurry of wrecks take place during week By Eddie West Staff Writer A single vehicle wreck on Interstate 40, last week, claimed the life of a Putnam County woman, marking the county’s first fatal accident of 2013. Jaclyn E. Phillips, 20, Monterey, was killed in the accident. A second person, Byron D. Howard, 23, Monterey, was seriously injured in the wreck. The crash occurred shortly before 3 p.m, Wednesday, at the entrance to the rest stop just west of the Alexandria exit. Howard, the driver of the 1994 Nissan four-door car in which the two were traveling, was transported by the Smith County Ambulance Service to Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Phillips, a right front passenger in the vehicle, died at the scene.

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

A single vehicle wreck killed a Monterey woman. The accident occurred on Wednesday of last week on Interstate 40. A second person was injured in the accident.

According to investigating Tennessee Highway Patrol Trooper Bobby Johnson’s report, the vehicle in which the two were traveling ran “off the right side of the roadway, striking a state road sign

By Eddie West

COUNTY The Tennessee Highway Patrol will be conducting driver license roadside safety checkpoints during the week of January 25 (2013) n U.S. Highway 70 North in Smith County. Recognizing the danger presented to the public by unqualified drivers, troopers

Local law enforcement authorities continue to warn individuals that threatening remarks, verbally or through any social media, concerning the local school system will be taken seriously. Taken seriously means the individual, whether a juvenile or adult, will likely be charged. The warning comes as school security continues to be a significant issue

Helen Bennett Betty Grisham Dartha Key

James L. Fletcher Mike James

and then made an angle impact with a tree.” The vehicle, traveling in the west bound lanes, struck a large, state road sign located at the entrance to the rest stop and a tree located on the

One being monitored following threat to school; all comments being taken seriously Staff Writer

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Year’s first fatal accident occurs

CHECKPOINTS

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at the local, state and national level. In December, a local 16-year-old male posted what investigators with the sheriff ’s department termed “threatening remarks” about Smith County High School. The remarks were posted on Facebook and followed a national trend of students making threats of violence at schools via social media networks following the school shooting at Sandy

See Youth A7

shoulder of the roadway. In addition to the ambulance service and rescue squad personnel, the New Middleton Fire Department was dispatched to the

See Fatal A7 Jaclyn Phillips

Man charged following TBI investigation By Eddie West Staff Writer One person faces charges after law enforcement officers located a large amount of marijuana at a Gordonsville area residence last week. Joshua Key Evitts, 24, has been charged with manufacture, delivery and sell of a controlled substance and felony possession of drug paraphernalia as the result of a Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) probe. On Monday afternoon of

last week, a search warrant was executed at Evitts’ McKinney Road residence. TBI agents located six p o u n d s o f Evitts marijuana “which was packaged for resale”, according to an arrest warrant. Drug paraphernalia was

See Man Charged A9

Two in custody after search

First Baby of 2013

By Eddie West

Public Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . B12 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1-B5

Staff Writer Two Rutherford County subjects were being held in the county jail, Tuesday morning, as suspects in connection with a truck stolen from Nashville. The two subjects, a male and a female, were located following a manhunt in the Lancaster Highway, Bowling

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Branch, Stewart’s Bend and Interstate 40 areas, east of Gordonsville. The two were being held for questioning at presstime and a third person was being sought, Sheriff Steve Hopper said. The incident began around 11 p.m., Monday, when a railroad service truck be-

See Two A9

Home invasion occurs in Sykes By Eddie West Staff Writer

Photo Submitted

Riverview Regional Medical Center (RRMC) announced its first baby born in the new year was Caleb Isaiah Harris, born on Sunday, January 6, at 12:40 p.m. to Clarissa and Wilson Harris of Lafayette. Weighing in at 7 pounds, 12.8 ounces, and 19 inches in length, he was delivered by RRMC OB/GYN Richard Rutherford, M.D.

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The sheriff’s department is investigating a case in which a Sykes community resident was tied up and robbed in his home. The incident occurred last Wednesday afternoon at the Sykes Road home of Milton Harris. “Two male subjects travel-

ing in a small truck came to Mr. Harris’ front door, pulled open the door, went inside and tied him up with plastic ties,” Sheriff Steve Hopper said. “They told him they were looking for money.” The individuals made their way through the house and took what police described as a “few small items”.

See Home Invasion A7

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Enrollment in Leadership program underway By Eddie West

Having lived here all my life, I thought I knew all there was to know about Smith County. Shortly into the class I found out I was wrong. There is so much to learn about how our county, businesses, schools, organizations, cultural, and recreational areas operate. The leadership program provides an avenue not only to teach you those things, but also the opportunity to come in contact with people you might not otherwise meet.”

Staff Writer Enrollment in Leadership Opportunity Smith County 2013 is taking place. The program is expected to begin in late February with an overnight retreat to Beershaba Springs resort. After the retreat, the class meets once a month through October. Whether you’re someone who is a Smith County native and suspects they know all there is to know about our county or an individual who has relocated or maybe works here and wants to learn more about the county, you’re a candidate for Leadership Opportunity Smith County, says chamber of commerce Executive Director Denise Hackett. “The program is ideal for those who are a part of our business community or want to become a part of it. It’s also ideal for those who are in government or plan to enter a government offi ce,” says Hackett. “During the monthly sessions, individuals learn about the county’s and cities’ governments, and various government services, as well as insight into business techniques and information. Individuals completing the course also learn vital leadership skills. Those individuals can take the new ideas they learned from the program and apply them at their company or workplace.” “Also through the program, individuals form a relationship with other business and government leaders. These relationships can continue after the program, fostering a community and business network which benefits their company or business,” explains Hackett. Sessions are held from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. every fourth Thursday of each month. The course costs $200 per person. To enroll in the program, interested individuals should contact the Smith County Chamber of Commerce at 735-3290. Description of program: Leadership Opportunity Smith County consists of a one and one-half day retreat in February, seven topic-oriented one-day sessions, and a graduation ceremony in Oc-

tober. Presentations include lectures, panel presentations, tours and a wide variety of group activities. Participants are given the opportunity to meet with county leaders and to explore issues of interest to our county. The opening retreat provides structured exercises and presentations which explore theories of leadership, problem solving skills, and community goal-setting through group discussion and analysis. The one-day seminars, held on the fourth Thursday of each month from March through September, focus on major areas of community life in Smith County. Participants are made aware of various components that contribute to the quality of life in our area. Class sessions focus on government, lifestyles, business and labor, agriculture, health and social services, education, and law and order. In order to graduate from this program, class participants are required to attend the opening retreat and all program activities. Participants are required to do various homework assignments, to be completed outside the classroom, group projects and individual projects relative to program topics. History of Leadership Opportunity Smith County: Leadership Opportunity Smith County was formed following several meetings between county leaders, representatives of Leadership Upper Cumberland and the Smith County Chamber of Commerce. In 1998 the governing board was formed and officers were elected. The late Jerry H. Futrell was chosen to be the first chairman of the organization. The fi rst Leadership

Opportunity Smith County Board of Directors included Futrell, Joe Vance, John Foster, County Executive Billy Bass, Gordonsville Mayor Joe Anderson, Jerry Cole, Faith Young, David Glover, April Martin and Regina Brooks. Following numerous organizational meetings, the first leadership class was set to begin in February 1999. Since the program’s inception in 1998, thirteen classes have graduated from the leadership program with 124 graduates. Each leadership class is asked to complete a class project after graduation. The class of 2000 chose as their project to establish a Youth Leadership Opportunity Program, which began in September 2001. The youth leadership is a combination of students from Gordonsville and Smith County High Schools. Class sessions are held on Wednesday of each month and extra project activities are required for graduation. The Youth Leadership Program has graduated 12 classes and will graduate a thirteenth class of 32 students in April of 2013. What former Leadership Opportunity Smith County graduates have to say about the programs: When asked about their year in the program, most graduates recall it as a learning experience. Graduates also cherish the continuing friendships that began during the retreat or program days. The overriding element that led to these good feelings was participation. Phyllis McKinney comments... “Being a part of the very first Leadership class in 1999 was such a privilege for me.

Barbara Kannapel comments...

“Being a part of leadership was a wonderful experience. As a long time resident of Smith County and a county commissioner, I felt I knew the workings of our community. I was amazed to find out so many details about the county, cities, and industry that I was unaware of. The most fascinating part was the uncovering of our history that gave me an entirely new view of Smith County. I saw history come alive as people talked about how busy downtown Carthage used to be, and the life that the river used to have, including the Rome Ferry. It also gave me a new determination to serve our community and do my part to see it continue to be thriving for generations to come.” Leadership Opportunity Smith County presidents: The late Jerry Futrell served as president of the or-

ganization through 2002. John Foster was elected president for the leadership program in 2003, serving through 2007. Phyllis McKinney was elected president of the organization in 2008 and served through 2012. As of 2013, Denise Givens became president. Leadership Projects…….. Class of 1999—Continue Adult Leadership Program Class of 2000—Established Youth Leadership Program Class of 2001—Work on health center at industrial park and donated money to Youth Leadership Program Class of 2002—Monument for fallen Smith County heroes (firemen, rescue, police, etc., located on courthouse lawn) Class of 2003—Beautification of courthouse lawn Class of 2004—Kidz Central Playground Class of 2005—Helped with Kidz Central Playground Class of 2006—Walking Trails in South Carthage (Rails to Trails) C l a s s o f 2 0 0 7 — Yo u t h Leadership graduates and Senior Scholarship programs for Smith County High School and Gordonsville High School

Class of 2009—“Welcome to Smith County” signage at interstate Class of 2010—Working on the seal for Smith County and

projection screen for agriculture center (Class of 2011—No leadership group) Class of 2012 – Developed brand for Smith County to be used in tourism and promotional literature. Graduating class of 2012: Laura Swanson with Smith County CASA; David West with Smith County Bank; Matt Gentry with DeKalb Telephone Cooperative; Josh Kirby, Smith County commissioner; Linda Nixon, Smith County commissioner; Sabra Hodge, Carthage mayor; Denise Hackett, Smith County Chamber. Smith County Leadership Opportunity Smith County 2011-2012 governing committee: Denise Givens, president; John Foster, board chairman; S u e Te a t , v i c e p r e s i dent; Denise Hackett, secretary; Billy Bass, treasurer; Phyllis McKinney, past president; Ruby Crawford, board member; Cindy Hawkins, board member; Barbara Vantrease, board member; Sue Collins, board member; Member: Michael Nesbitt.

avid supporter of the community and county. A native of the Buffalo Valley community, Fletcher was instrumental in lobbying with postal officials for a new Chestnut Mound Post Office which is located on Highway 70 in the heart of the community. A veteran of World War II, Fletcher wrote a series of articles for the Courier detailing local veterans’ war experiences. The Chestnut Mound resident returned to Smith Coun-

ty after retiring from Melrose Electronics. A retired U.S. Air Force sergeant, Fletcher was a member of a number of organizations including the VFW, Smith County Historical and Genealogical Society, Air Armed Force Association, American Legion and Smith County Library Board. Fletcher was a resident of Kindred Health and Rehab Center when he passed away. (See Bass Funeral Home obituaries for additional information.)

Class of 2008—Held election debates for upcoming candidates

Resident known as ‘mayor’ of Chestnut Mound dies By Eddie West Staff Writer A Chestnut Mound resident known for his civic contributions has died. Funeral services were held Monday at the Chestnut Mound United Methodist Church for James L. Fletcher. Fletcher, who passed away Friday, was affectionately known as the “mayor” of Chestnut Mound by many of his friends and acquaintances. The 89-year-old was an

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The KIdz Center Playground was a project of a Leadership Opportunity Smith County class.

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

State troopers investigate an accident in which a woman was fatally injured. The wreck occurred on Wednesday afternoon of last week.

Fatal accident one of several wrecks EDDIE WEST/COURIER

From page – A1

(Top) The Welcome to Smith County signs at the exit ramps in Gordonsville, off Interstate 40, were a project of a Leadership Opportunity Smith County class. (Right) A monument to veterans located on the courthouse lawn was also a project of a leadership class.

Highway patrol checkpoints From page – A1 will concentrate their efforts on vehicles being operated by drivers who violate the

driver license laws of Tennessee. The Tennessee Highway Patrol has found these driver license roadside safety checkpoints to be an effective

means of enforcing driver license laws of Tennessee while ensuring the protection of all motorists.

The incident occurred around noon.

doesn’t believe the incident was random and feels the two individuals knew Harris or knew of him.

Home invasion in Sykes community From page – A1 The two are described as white males wearing masks. The two were traveling in a small, camouflage color pickup truck with a roll bar in the back. The truck’s muffler made a loud, roaring noise. Harris managed to get free and contacted his son who called police.

Several law enforcement offi cers were patrolling the area when the incident was reported but the truck was not located. A bolo for the vehicle and two men was issued for surrounding counties. Sheriff Hopper says he

Anyone seeing a vehicle fitting this description in the area or having other information is urged to contact the sheriff ’s department at 735-2626.

Youth charged with threat monitored From page – A1 Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. The individual was charged with harassment and committing an act of terrorism. The sixteen-year-old made one of what could be several

court appearances before Juvenile Court Judge David Bass on December 21. The individual was released to his parents and is being monitored. In addition, Judge Bass banned the youth from having

any electronic communications. “We will address any act of this nature accordingly and investigate any case diligently,” said Sheriff Steve Hopper, whose department investigated the case.

scene because the vehicle was smoking. The rest stop is located at the 252 mile marker. Neither individual was wearing a seatbelt. In the opinion of the investigating state trooper, seatbelts may have made a difference in the outcome of the wreck. The Tennessee Highway Patrol’s Critical Incident Response Team was dispatched to the scene to help investigate the accident. The investigation into the cause of the accident is ongoing. A memorial service for Phillips was held at 7:30 p.m., Saturday evening, at the Goff Funeral Home in Monterey. Phillips, a homemaker, was a native of Cookeville. While the accident marked the first fatal wreck in the county this year, (as of Thursday of last week) it was the fourth in the Upper Cumberland region in 2013. The fatal wreck was the fi rst of three wrecks which occurred in a span of 35 minutes, Wednesday. While emergency personnel were en route to the fatal

accident on Interstate 40, a Defeated man ran off the roadway near the overlook (Mushroom, Tater Knob) in the Turkey Creek community. That accident occurred at 3:12 p.m. The driver of the vehicle, William Edens, was not injured in the accident. However, rescue personnel were dispatched to the scene because Edens was unable to climb up a steep embankment. Rescue squad personnel had to use the “stokes” basket to transport Edens up the embankment to the roadway. At 3:32 p.m., an SUV was involved in a rollover accident at 34 Opossum Hollow Road near the Grant community. No one was injured in the wreck. The New Middleton Fire Department and rescue personnel responded to the call. Overall, it was a busy week for emergency personnel as a tractor-trailer truck overturned in the median of Interstate 40 just west of the Gordonsville Exit around noon on Thursday. The truck was hauling 41,000 pounds of frozen foods, according to Emergency Management Agency Director Sonny Carter. Work to clear the wreck

began at 12:20 p.m. and concluded at 3:30 a.m., Friday morning, Carter said. The frozen food, which was condemned by a state department of agriculture representative, was off loaded using a front end loader and taken to the county landfill, Carter said. While the work was taking place, west bound traffic along the interstate was down to one lane. The driver of the Primer Incorporated truck was not injured. The accidents continued Friday. A minor, single vehicle wreck with no injuries occurred around 6:30 a.m. in the Dixon Springs community. A second wreck occurred at 10:55 a.m. at 549 Dixon Springs Highway involving two vehicles. There were no critical injuries in the accident. An ambulance was dispatched to check out an individual. The wreck occurred at the intersection of Highway 25 and Peytons Creek Road. Rain fell much of last Wednesday and Thursday morning. Slick roads may have contributed to some of the wrecks.


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January 10, 2013

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Seven charged in meth probes

Deputies discover Shoplifting call results lab in van at house in charges against five By Eddie West

people for illegal drug

Staff Writer

By Eddie West

Two people have been arrested in connection with a methamphetamine lab discovered in operation in the Elmwood community. The two were manufacturing the illegal drug inside a van when the lab was discovered on Kurtz Lane, according to law enforcement officials. Andrew Kenneth Gibbs, 35, Kurtz Lane, faces charges of promotion of the manufacture of meth, felony criminal conspiracy, felony possession of drug paraphernalia and initiate process to

phetamine production. Joshua David French, 27, James Court, Gordonsville, faces promotion of meth manufacturing, carrying a prohibited weapon and

Staff Writer

Scott Bennett Andrew Gibbs manufacture meth. Garry Scott Bennett, 35, Hogans Creek Road, faces charges of felony criminal conspiracy, promotion and manufacture of meth, felonious possession of drug para-

See Meth Lab A8

Five people face drug-related charges filed by the sheriff’s department in connection with an investigation involving metham-

French

Graves

See Five A8

Neal

Hines

Butcher

Carthage police investigate series of church burglaries Incidents occur during December

Reward offered in Methodist church thefts

Emergency

By Eddie West

Three Rescued

Staff Writer

By Eddie West

Black & Gold Sweeps Gordonsville . . . B1

News From Hickman Creek . . . . . . . . . . . A9

U.S. Army Corps Meetings Set On Boat Restrictions At Dams . . . . . A8

Briefly GED TESTING

COUNTY The GED test will be given on February 2 at the Smith County Education Center, located in the board of education building off Highway 53/Gordonsville Highway in South Carthage. In order to take the test, individuals must sign up as soon as possible. For additional information contact 735-8246

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Carthage police are investigating a series of church burglaries. During the month of December, three church burglaries were reported within the town. One church, Carthage United Methodist Church, located at the corner of Main Street and Fisher Avenue, was burglarized twice during the month. Also, two of the three burglaries were discovered on the same day, December 19. The burglaries were believed to have occurred

overnight. The burglary in which the most costly items were taken occurred at North Carthage Baptist Church, located on Smotherman Avenue. More than $2,000 in electronic equipment was reported stolen from the church. Among the items taken were a sound mixer, headphones and microphones. A rear door to the assembly hall had been broken to gain entrance. The burglary was discovered on December 19. A burglary was discovered the same day at Car-

thage United Methodist Church. Approximately $40 in cash was reported missing from the church. A burglary was also discovered at the Methodist church on December 29. No items were reported missing in the second burglary. A one thousand dollar reward is being offered for the arrest and conviction of persons responsible for the burglaries at the Methodist church. Anyone who may have information concerning any of these burglaries should contact the Carthage Police Department at 735-2525.

Staff Writer A one thousand dollar reward is being offered in connection with the burglary of a local church. Carthage United Methodist Church, located at the corner of Main Street and Fisher Avenue, has been burglarized twice in recent weeks. While only a small amount of cash was discovered missing from one of the burglaries, nothing was reported missing after a second burglary. The most recent burglary was discovered on December 29. While nothing was reported missing from the church, a front window at the church was broken out and a second window located on the Fisher Avenue side of the church was also broken out. Damage was also done to an offi ce door and individuals went through a filing cabinet.

See Reward A8

School vouchers opposed by officials Program would take funds away from public schools By Eddie West Staff Writer School officials are opposing any plans by state legislators to consider a school voucher program. School vouchers provide state (taxpayer) funds for students to attend a private school of their parents’ choice. School officials are opposed to school vouchers because it takes away state funds from public schools which would mean a loss in revenue to the county’s school system.

At this month’s school board meeting, board members are expected to approve a resolution opposing any state plan to implement a school voucher program. The resolution will be sent to State Senator Mae Beavers and Representative Terri Lynn Weaver. School officials will be asking the state legislators who represent Smith County to oppose a school voucher program. Debate over a state imposed school voucher plan is expected to be a hot topic for state legislators during their 2013 session. Last year, a state committee was

formed by Governor Bill Haslam to study the issue. The committee issued a number of options for state legislators to consider. While there are no private schools in the county, some parents transport their children to private schools in nearby counties. One of the closest private schools is Friendship Christian, located in Wilson County. At one time the private school had a bus which transported local students to the school. Through a school voucher program, parents can take public

funds, which the state would have provided the local school system for their child to attend a public school, and apply those funds toward tuition at a private school. Depending on the individual school voucher program, public funds could also be used to reimburse parents for home school expenses. Individuals who support a school voucher program are mainly those parents whose children attend private schools. The main argument for a vouch-

See School A8

Pleasant Shade Post Office reviewed with plan By Eddie West Staff Writer A local post office is undergoing a review process under the U.S. Postal Services POST Plan. The Pleasant Shade Post Office is the latest postal facility to undergo a review as part of the U.S. Postal Service’s plan to cut costs. “Under the plan, there are no plans to close post offices, but the hours could be cut back at some,” said David Walton, a spokesperson with the U.S. Postal Service. Residents along the Pleasant Shade route recently received notification by letter the Pleasant Shade Post Offi ce was under review as part of the POST Plan.

The letter included a “POST Plan customer survey” listing four options concerning the post office and customer service. The first option is to “keep the office open with realigned weekday window service hours, based on actual offi ce workload. In the case of the Pleasant Shade Post Office, hours would be changed from nine hours each weekday to four hours each weekday. Current Saturday window service hours will not change as a result of the POST Plan and access to your (customer) delivery receptacles will not be impacted by the POST Plan”. The second option is to “conduct a discontinuance study for the office and

See Pleasant Shade A8

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The Pleasant Shade Post Office is under review by the postal service. Window hours could be cut with the plan.


A–8

 CARTHAGE COURIER  JANUARY 10, 2013

Meetings set on boat restrictions at dams By Eddie West Staff Writer The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will hold two public information meetings in the mid-state on plans to restrict boat access at area dams including Cordell Hull and Center Hill dams. Meanwhile, it’s apparent the Corps plans to implement the restrictions despite opposition to the proposal, according to Corps officials. The meetings are being held mainly to inform interested members of the public

and other agencies and organizations. However, Corps offi cials indicate some input gathered from the meetings could be used to modify its proposal. The two mid-state meetings will be held in Nashville and Cookeville. In all, the Corps plans to hold four public meetings on their plan to restrict fishing from boats below and above dams along the Cumberland River and its tributaries. Other meetings will be held in Grand Rivers, Kentucky and Somerset, Kentucky. The Nashville meeting, set

for 6-8 p.m., Tuesday, January 15 in the auditorium at McGavock High School, will be the second in the series of four public meetings to be held on the issue. The meeting nearest to Smith County will be the third in the series of four meetings which will be held in the auditorium at Upperman High School in Baxter. The meeting will take place from 6-8 p.m., on Thursday, January 17. Last month, the Corps announced it would hold a series of public meetings on the proposed plan to restrict boats

near dams along the Cumberland River and its tributaries, but locations and times had not been set. The Corps plans to restrict “waterborne”/boat access to what the agency terms “hazardous water immediately upstream and downstream” from Corps operated dams and locks. The restricted area for the Cordell Hull Dam, below the dam, would begin at the dam and continue for 800 feet downstream. The restricted area above the dam would begin at the dam and continue for 515 feet

upstream. The restricted area for boats doesn’t include the dam’s lock where boats pass through. At Center Hill Dam, below the dam, the restricted area would be from the dam to 700 feet downstream. The restricted area above the dam would begin at the dam and continue for 400 feet upstream. The restricted areas will be identified with signs, buoys and physical barriers. The Corps is expected to begin installation of warning signs for the restricted area

in April. The plan will be implemented in stages. Besides safety issues, the Corps says the plan is also being implemented because of security purposes. “Recent studies conclude there’s a 50/50 chance of another catastrophic 9/11 style attack in the next 10 years, an even greater chance if the world becomes less stable,” Corps officials say. “A recent inspection by the Department of Defense Inspector General and the Security Office revealed that fully impleSee Corps page – A9

The above graph shows the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to restrict boat acess immediately below and above the Cordell Hull Dam.

Pleasant Shade Post Office review From page – A1 provide mailbox delivery. Retail and delivery service would be provided through a rural carrier”. The third option is to conduct a discontinuance study for the office and find a suitable alternative location operated by a contractor, usually a local business”. The fourth option is to “conduct a discontinuance study for the offi ce and relocate P.O. box service to a nearby post office”. Residents have until January 22 to respond to the survey. A meeting with postal officials and customers will be held at the post office at 4 p.m., February 5. During the meeting, postal officials will answer questions and provide additional information about the POST Plan. Also, during the meeting, postal officials will reveal results of the survey, answer questions and solicit input regarding the time of day the post office will be open. The letter says “the postal

service will not make a final decision regarding this office (Pleasant Shade) until after the public meeting”. Last year, the postal service announced plans to cut hours at smaller post offices in an effort to cut costs. The postal service’s plan is being implemented over a two-year phase which is expected to be completed in September of 2014. By reducing hours at smaller post offices, the postal service is looking to cut a half billion dollars annually. The Pleasant Shade Post Office is the latest post office targeted for change in the postal service’s efforts to cut costs. The Riddleton Post Office was recently reviewed under the POST Plan. A meeting for the post office was held in December of last year. No changes had been made to the post office’s hours as of this week. Last year, the Chestnut Mound Post Office was one of 3,700 post offices nationwide and 60 in Tennessee under review.

Located in one of the newest postal building in the county, postal officials elected to keep the post office open and direct additional mail to the facility. Elmwood and Granville (Jackson County) rural routes are dispatched to rural customers by letter carries from the post office. Also last year, office hours at the Elmwood Post Office were reduced. A few years ago, the Lancaster Post Office came under review. The office was closed and a cluster box was placed in the community for those who wanted to pick up their mail from a postal box instead of mailbox at their residence. The postal service routed rural route delivery service to individual residencies through the Hickman Post Office. The Lancaster address was retained. In addition to Pleasant Shade, local post offices include Carthage, Gordonsville, Elmwood, Chestnut Mound, Dixon Springs, Riddleton, Hickman and Brush Creek.

Five arrested in meth probe From page – A1 felonious criminal conspiracy charges. Cassie Lynette Graves, 28, Carthage Highway, Lebanon, faces promotion of meth manufacture, possession of a schedule VI drug, felonious possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a schedule II drug, theft of merchandise and felonious criminal conspiracy charges. The two were traveling in a white Ford Ranger pickup truck suspected in a shoplifting incident at the new Dollar General store, located on Highway 70 in the Rome community. Law enforcement authorities say items located in the pickup truck were consistent with the manufacturing of meth. Meanwhile, the investigation led to the search of a residence in Gordonsville, leading to three additional arrests. Earnest Michael Neal, 51, Maple Street, Gordonsville, Randall Jake Hines, 28, Fairview Circle, Gordonsville and Romanda Elaine Butcher, 38, Gordonsville, each face possession of a schedule II drug and felonious possession of drug paraphernalia. The sheriff’s department

investigation began with the report of shoplifters at the Dollar General store located on Highway 70 in the Rome community, around 9 p.m. on December 21. An employee of the Dollar General reported two shoplifters had fled the store, traveling in a white Ford Ranger pickup truck. In addition to a description of the vehicle in which the two suspects fled, the Dollar General store employee was also able to obtain a license plate number as the pickup truck left the store’s parking lot. Shortly after the shoplifting incident was reported, while traveling west on Highway 70, sheriff’s department deputy Junior Fields stopped a vehicle fitting the description of the one suspected in the alleged shoplifting. The vehicle was pulled over near Lolly’s Place bar on Highway 70 for a broken taillight. The truck also had the same license plate number as the vehicle involved in the reported shoplifting incident. Some of the items reported stolen from the store were located in the vehicle in which Graves and French were traveling, according to Sheriff

Steve Hopper. Among the items located in the vehicle were batteries, coffee filters, cold compresses, sea salt, crystal drain cleaner and a box of cold and allergy medication. Also located in the vehicle was a small amount of a “green leafy substance” identified as marijuana. After the pickup truck in which the two were traveling was stopped, Sgt. Dustin Hailey arrived at the scene and assisted in the investigation. The truck was confiscated and the two were transported to the county jail for questioning. During the investigation, law enforcement officers obtained information the two were traveling to a residence in Gordonsville, the sheriff said. The Gordonsville residence was searched, leading to the arrests of Butcher, Neal and Hines, according to Sheriff Hopper. Bond for French was set at $22,000. Bond for Graves was set at $26,500. French and Graves were wanted on charges in Dickson County. Bond for Neal, Hines and Butcher was set at $5,000 each.

Burglaries in Carthage By Eddie West Staff Writer Carthage police are investigating a series of burglaries which occurred during the month of December. Last month, burglaries were reported at a Main Street business and two churches. Owners of TNT Tire Service, located at 102 North Main Street (former Marathon service station), discovered their business had been burglarized on December 29. An estimated $500 in items, mainly tools, were reported missing. Among those items missing were a welder, wrenches, and change from a gum ball machine. A bay window to the

shop was broken out to gain entry. In addition to the burglary at TNT, North Carthage Baptist Church, located on Smotherman Avenue, and Carthage United Methodist Church, located at the corner of Main Street and Fisher Avenue, were burglarized. Carthage United Methodist Church was burglarized twice during the month of December. The church is offering a one thousand dollar reward to anyone who provides information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the Carthage United Methodist Church burglaries. The TNT Tire Service and second burglary at Carthage United Methodist Church were discovered

the same day, December 29. The first burglary at Carthage United Methodist Church and North Carthage Baptist Church were reported on the same day, December 19. More than $2,000 in electronic equipment was reported stolen from North Carthage Baptist Church. Approximately $40 in cash was reported missing from the Carthage United Methodist Church when the first burglary was reported. No items were reported missing in the second burglary. Anyone who may have information concerning any of these burglaries should contact the Carthage Police Department at 735-2525.

Reward offered by church From page – A1 The fi rst burglary at the church was discovered on December 19. Individuals went through a file cabinet, the wire to the church’s alarm system had

been cut and approximately $40 in cash was reported missing. A knife was located in the church which is believed to have been used to cut the wire to the alarm system. A one thousand dollar reward is being offered for

information leading to the arrest and conviction of individuals involved in the burglaries. Anyone who may have information about either of these burglaries should contact the Carthage Police Department at 735-2525.

When offi cers arrived at the scene, Gibbs was witnessed exiting the van in which the meth operation was located. Bennett was located inside the van. When approaching the van, law enforcement offi cers said they could smell a “strong chemical odor” coming from the vehicle. Among the items located in the van were a Coleman stove and glass dish sitting in ice which are known to be used in a clandestine meth lab. The Fifteenth Judicial

District Drug Task Force was called to the scene to remove and document items associated with the meth lab. Bond for Gibbs was set at $48,000. Gibbs is being held for Wilson County law enforcement authorities on outstanding warrants. Bennett is being held in the county jail under $48,000 bond. The investigation began in the late hours of December 29 and continued into the next morning. The van was confiscated during the incident.

Meth lab discovered in van From page – A1 phernalia and initiate process to manufacture meth. “We received information that individuals were possibly cooking meth at a residence on Kurtz Lane, leading to the arrests,” Sheriff Steve Hopper said. “The two individuals were discovered cooking meth in a van located behind a house.” Sheriff’s department officers Sgt. Dustin Hailey and deputies Junior Fields and Jimmie Lankford went to the Kurtz Lane residence to investigate the complaint.

School vouchers opposed by officials From page – A1 er system is the parent pays state taxes to support public schools while funding their child’s private school education, therefore funding both public and private schools simultaneously. Another argument for the voucher system is that a par-

ent whose child may attend a school deemed as “failing” may not have the means to send their child to another school. Opponents of school vouchers say this type of program threatens the stability of the public education system by taking away state tax dollars because of declining enrollment.

The Tennessee School Board Association is opposed to a school voucher program for the state. State funds would be diverted from the public school system at a time when a number of state and federal school programs have been implemented aimed at improving public education.


THIS ISSUE:

17 Yard Sales 12 Help Wanted 250 Real Estate Listings 8 Auctions

A Prize-Winning Newspaper

~

UT-TPA Press Awards 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

INSERTS:

■ Sav-Way Grocery ■ Save-A-Lot

Presenting News And Views From around Smith County Volume 101 Number 20-USPS No. 092-180

May 16, 2013

Carthage, Tennessee 37030

24 pages

Single Copy 75¢

INSIDE ...

Where’s Scoop?

Entry Form, Contest Rules & Last Week’s Winner . . . . . . . . A3

Sports

Tigerettes Nail Down Sub-State Will Host Sub-State On Friday With Region 4A Title Win

. . . . . . . . . . . B1 2013 Campaigns Come To End For Three County Teams . . . B1 Area Baseball Leagues In Full Swing . . . . . . . . . . . . B2, B4

News

Mrs. Bridewater’s Chicken Extravaganza . . . . . . . . . . . . . A12 Rock Slide Photos . .. . . . . . . A9

Briefly

Tons of rock block travel along Highway 25 after a bluff collapsed in the Tanglewood community, Thursday morning.

Bluff collapses on highway State highway to reopen next week, officials say By Eddie West Staff Writer It will be later this month before Highway 25 in the Tanglewood community reopens, following Thursday morning’s collapse of a bluff on the north side of the state

By Eddie West

GORDONSVILLE/CARTHAGE Graduation was held at Gordonsville High School on Friday night and Smith County High School on Saturday night. Photos from the graduations are inside this edition.

Staff Writer

Betty Jo Beechboard Lee Roy Bennett Ruth Carter Jim Handy Sybil Smith

Public Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1-B4

Online

www.carthagecourier.com

■ Subscribe…

Print, Online, or Both Special Advertisements ■ Breaking News ■ Classifieds ■ Obituaries ■ Archives ■ Crossword Puzzles ■ Recipes ■ Local Weather ■ US & World News ■ Online Features… Automotive, Bridal, Decorating, Fashion/Beauty, Food/Entertaining, Gift Ideas, Home Improvement, How-To, Lawn Garden, Money/Finance, Pets, Senior Living, Tech Talk, Travel ■ Weekly

highway. Tuesday morning, transportation officials issued a statement saying they expect the state highway to reopen to motorists “no later than Friday, May 24”. On Monday, an emergency bid was awarded to low bidder Lojac

Enterprises at $116,987. The contract requires all repair work be completed on or before Wednesday, May 22. If repairs are not completed by then, the transportation department will fine the contractor $2,500 a day.

Once the debris has been removed, the transportation department will have to make needed repairs to the highway’s surface. “An emergency bid package was put together, Friday, with bids due

See Bluff A9

Sykes resigns seat on school board

GRADUATIONS HELD

Auctions . . . . . . . . . . . B7, B8, B12 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . B5-B12 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

School board member Eddie Dale Sykes has resigned his position.

Sykes, who represented District 5 (Gordonsville area), submitted his letter of resignation to the school board at the end of a special called meeting held on

Tuesday night of last week. Sykes told fellow school board members he did not feel complaints concerning a tenured teacher at Gordonsville High School had

been properly addressed. The special called school board meeting was set to discuss four items including tenured teacher placement at Gordonsville

High School, school security options and junior high sports regulations. A workshop concerning Patient

See Sykes A7

New renovations, emergency rooms to open EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The new emergency room area and renovated section of Riverview Regional Medical Center will open Monday. A ribbon cutting ceremony was held Monday afternoon. From left are Emergency Medical Agency Director Ricky Slack, Riverview Regional Director of Emergency Department Lori Nixon, Riverview Regional Medical Center board member Debe Pilant, County Mayor Michael Nesbitt, Riverview Regional Medical Center board member Jamie Winkler, Riverview Regional Medical Center board member Charlie Bob Hughes, Riverview Regional Medical Center board member Bill Adkisson, Carthage Mayor Sabra Hodge, HighPoint Health System CEO Susan Peach, Riverview Regional Medical Center Administrator Rod Harkleroad and Intrim CNO Patty Anderson. Photos and additional information on the renovation will appear in next week’s edition of the Courier.

Former hospital to be assisted living facility By Eddie West Staff Writer The former Riverview Regional Medical Center South campus/Carthage General Hospital is being renovated into what will be an assisted living facility. A group of Wilson County investors are developing the facility under the name

of Carthage Assisted Living LLC. “We plan to open a 45 bed assisted living facility in the former hospital. Smith County doesn’t have a facility of this kind and we think the community needs one to provide this type of care for its

See Former A12

EDDIE WEST/COURIER

The former Carthage General Hospital building is being renovated into an assisted living facility. The facility could open as soon as the last of this year or the first of next year.

Courier receives advertising contest awards

The Carthage Courier recently picked up eight first-place awards and 20 total for advertising and circulation in the

state’s annual competition among Tennessee member newspapers. The presentations came at the 2013 Tennessee

P r e s s A s s o c i a t i o n ’s Ideas Contest held at the D o u b l e Tr e e N a s h v i l l e Downtown Hotel on May 3.

Competing among NonDailies with circulation less than 5,000, the Courier garnered First Place awards for: Self

Promotion of Newspaper, Sales Promotion for Retailer, Black & White

See Courier A7


MAY 16, 2013  CARTHAGE COURIER  A – 7

Sykes resigns seat on county’s school board From page – A1 Protection and Affordable Care Act was held following the meeting. The school board approved a motion to send letters of intent to rehire all tenured teachers at Gordonsville High School for the upcoming school year, the first item on the night’s agenda. The issue surfaced during the school board’s regularly scheduled April meeting. During that meeting, Sykes said he had received an anonymous letter of complaint concerning a faculty member at Gordonsville High School. Sykes indicated he had also received complaints concerning the faculty member by telephone. School board chairman Michael Collins said he had received the anonymous letter of complaint and assumed other school board members had also.

Some indicated they had. During the discussion, Director of Schools Roger Lewis said he was open to discussing the complaint with anyone individually. Sykes requested the matter be discussed further so it was listed on the agenda for last week’s special called meeting. Also, the board voted to send letters of notice to rehire all tenured teachers except those at Gordonsville High School. At last week’s meeting, Chairman Collins said he had received additional letters concerning the teacher since the April meeting. Chairman Collins said he felt the school board could not put a lot of stock in anonymous letters. The letters were apparently sent anonymously for apparent fear of reprisal. During last week’s meeting, Director Lewis said he would not allow any teacher or administrator to discrim-

inate against any student because their parent had complained about a faculty member or the school system. No teacher or teachers were named nor allegations discussed during either of the two school board meetings. When all three items had been addressed and the special called meeting was coming to a close, Sykes asked to address the board. During last year’s election, Sykes said rumors were spread he “had an agenda” if he were elected to the school board seat which he stated was not true. “I feel like I have to make a stand and do what’s right. I feel like I have been hung out to dry. I’m not questioning anybody and this (resignation) is not open for discussion,” Sykes told fellow school board members. “...sometimes you don’t have to be politically correct. I was elected by the people to do the best job I could...I feel this is

best for the school system.” Sykes was apologetic to the people he represented. While Sykes requested no discussion about his resignation, fellow school board members William Barrick and chairman Michael Collins asked him to reconsider. “I wish you would reconsider...there are things we’re going to be discussing where we need your take on,” commented Barrick. Sykes was elected to the school board seat in August of 2012. The District 5 school board seat will be filled by the county commission. The vacancy will be advertised and prospective candidates can present themselves at the July county commission meeting. The county commission met Monday night for its May session, however, proper public notice of the vacancy could not be given prior to the meeting.

Courier receives advertising contest awards From page – A1 Ad, Automotive Ad, Professional Services Ad, Single Copy Promotion,

NIE Promotion and Internet Subscription Promotion. In addition, the Courier received five (5) Second Place awards in the categories of:

TENNESSEE PRESS ASSOCIATION 2013 IDEAS CONTEST ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION AWARDS

CARTHAGE COURIER FIRST PLACE • Self Promotion of Newspaper

(Color Ad for Education Smith County School Tab)

• Sales Promotion for Retailer (Dr. Staton - Southern Medical)

• Black & White Ad

(Carthage Family Healthcare - new location)

• Automotive Ad

(Smith Co. Motors - “A New Year & Prices Are Falling”)

• Professional Services Ad (Dr. Staton - Southern Medical)

Overall Website, Single Copy Promotion, Sales Promotion f o r R e t a i l e r, M a r k e t i n g Materials and Classified Section. Seven (7) Third Place awards were presented to the Courier staff as well for: Marketing Materials, Niche Publication, Reader Contest, Subscription Promotion Idea, Food Store Ad, Use of MultiColor Ad and Sales Promotion for Retailer. “This recognition is welldeserved not only for our advertising department but for the entire staff of our publication,” stated Courier publisher and advertising d i r e c t o r S c o t t Wi n f r e e .

“Becky Watkins and Bob Stangenberg have the primary responsibility of designing and building ad materials for our clients here in the Smith County business c o m m u n i t y. T h e i r w o r k is seen in print each week among the pages and website ( w w w. c a r t h a g e c o u r i e r . com) of the Courier and they do a commendable job. Our remaining staff is to be commended as well - with their input in the areas of ideas, proofing, layout, etc. This is a team-effort and we are happy to share these accolades with our advertisers as well as our readership.”

FISH DAY!

• Single Copy Promotion

Presents

(Stuffed - promotion for Thanksgiving inserts)

• NIE Promotion

IT’S TIME TO STOCK YOUR POND!! Delivery Will Be: Wednesday, May 29

(Education Smith County School Tab)

• Internet Subscription Promotion (Courier Mobile Website)

SECOND PLACE • Overall Website

(www.carthagecourier.com)

• Single Copy Promotion

(Promotion for GHS Football State Championship Commemorative Section)

Hartsville 7:30 - 8:15 @Macon Trousdale Co-op Carthage 8:45 - 9:30 @ Smith Farmer’s Co-op

(Steve Mull Plumbing - Sports Banner)

“LIKE” us on Facebook!

(Courier Media Brochure)

FISH WAGON

• Sales Promotion for Retailer • Marketing Materials • Classified Section

To Place an Order Call

THIRD PLACE

www.fishwagon.com

Mid South Stone / PROCEEDS GO TO DOLLY PARTON’S IMAGINATION LIBRARY SMITH COUNTY

• Marketing Materials • Niche Publication

Wish someone

(2012 Smith County Fair Program)

• Reader Contest

Happy Birthday

• Subscription Promotion Idea

with a

• Food Store Ad

Courier

(I Found Scoop)

(Courier - “Read All About It”)

(SavWay Grocery - Front Banner Truckload Sale)

• Use of Multicolor Ad

(Stuffed - promotion for Thanksgiving inserts) (SavWay Grocery)

Call Raymond Martin 281-0836 Jr. Brown 489-6955 Frankie James 281-0908 Joey Harper • Owner

Commercial • Industrial • Residential • Licensed & Insured 421 NEW MIDDLETON HIGHWAY • GORDONSVILLE, TN 38563 PHONE: 615-351-6219 • FAX: 615-683-5146

www.harperelectriconline.com

harperelectric@yahoo.com

Attention: To everyone that has gift certificates to Smith County Serenity Spa, please call to schedule your appointment for your massage

as soon as possible. Due to unforeseen circumstances, after May 31, 2013, I will not be doing massage therapy in town. Thank you to all of the customers that have come in. I’m running a special for a 60 min. massage for $40 until May 31, 2013. To schedule appointments, call 615-418-5793. Sonya Thompson/Smith County Serenity Spa

Subscribe to the Carthage Courier today to read your local news, sports, advertisements and circulars. THE 9TH ANNUAL

CARTHAGE ROTARY CLUB GOLF TOURNAMENT MAY 18, 2013 Cookeville Golf Club INTRODUCTION: 8:45 - 9 a.m. • TEE OFF: 9 a.m.

*Hole sponsor available for $100. Your company’s name will be placed at tee areas showing your support * ** Send checks and entry forms to: Smith County Library, ATTN: Elaine West • 215 Main Street North • Carthage, TN 37030 **

Last year, the Carthge Rotary Club, Sponsors & Golfers raised

$4,125

The format will be a four player scramble. Normal rules apply. There will be separate tees available for seniors, women, and children. Dress code applies (no denim, shirts must have a collar). Cash Prizes - 1st Place: $400, 2nd Place $300, 3rd Place: $200 (will play 2 flights if field permits) *Closest to the pin prizes* *Entry Fee - $200 per team* *Free box lunch & drinks*

greeting ad.

• Sales Promotion for Retailer

Trimming, Chipping, Removal, & Clean-up. Locally Owned & Operated and Insured. Free Estimates

REGISTRATION: 8 - 8:45 a.m.

Toll Free 1-800-643-8439

(Brochure - We’ll Put You Right At Their Fingertips)

Trees & More

1500 Country Club Road • Cookeville, TN 38501 • 931-526-5526

735-2898 Experience Delivers Excellence

Rock Sliding, Prices Falling Coupon Sale

$

COUPON

MUST BRING IN COUPON

ROCK SLIDE SERVICE SPECIALS DRIVE IN ONLY COUPON

OIL CHANGE Includes 5 quarts of oil & Filter

$

1/2 PRICE

1995

FRONT BRAKE REPLACEMENT

75

UT6461

2005 Honda Pilot ...................................................... $8,995

UT8043

2008 Ford Ranger Supercab ............................. $10,900

UT3382

2007 Chevrolet Equinox ................................... $11,988

DO1000

2008 Chrysler Sebring Convertible ............ $12,900

UT2761

2009 Ford Escape ................................................. $12,988

UC2013

2011 Nissan Versa ............................................... $13,900

UT6051

2007 Ford F-150 FX2 ........................................... $13,900

UT0514

2009 Nissan Rogue ............................................... $14,495

UC0127

2012 Chrysler 200 ................................................. $14,850

UC6510

2012 Ford Focus SE ............................................. $14,900

UT9287

2010 Ford Escape ................................................ $15,900

UC7150

2011 Chevrolet Cruze LT ..................................... $16,900

UC3056

2012 Nissan Altima ............................................. $17,450

UC3987

2012 Toyota Camery LE ....................................... $18,900

REDUCED

UC5019 2011 Ford Mustang Convertible...... $19,500

COMPUTER DIAGNOSTIC

$

2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee ................................. $3,495

*

COUPON

COUPON

UT8453

** * Price does not include shop supplies or tax. ** Brake special includes replacing brake pads, but does not include resurfacing rotors or rotor replacement

UC0041

2013 Chevrolet Impala ....................................... $19,601

MC1000

2012 Dodge 1500 4x4 Quad Cab .................... $24,900

UT9044

2013 Ford Escape SEL ....................................... $25,900

UC0983

2012 Chrysler 300 ................................................ $29, 749

2 1 1 D i x o n S p r i n g s H w y. • C a r t h a g e , T N 3 7 0 3 0 • 7 3 5 - 2 8 7 8 • W W W. S M I T H C O U N T Y M O T O R S . C O M


Page 2

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


In Recognition . . . Teaching / Education is one of the most important professions in the world. Other than parents, teachers are the main source of knowledge and values for children . . . and good schools are an essential component of society. Without question, the sustainability of a community is connected to its school environment. In that regard, the Carthage Courier and this publication’s advertisers join in recognizing the employees of our Smith County, Tennessee education system and the importance and significance they serve in our community.

DIRECTORY SMITH COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION BOARD MEMBERS ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL, RETIRED CENTRAL OFFICE STAFF

4 5 5 6, 7

GORDONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL STAFF

8 9, 10, 11

SMITH COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL STAFF

12 13, 14, 15

SMITH COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF

CARTHAGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STAFF

March 14, 2013

16 17, 18

20 21, 22, 23

DEFEATED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STAFF

24 25

FORKS RIVER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STAFF

26 27

GORDONSVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STAFF

28 29, 30, 31

NEW MIDDLETON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STAFF

32 33, 34

UNION HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STAFF

34 36, 37

SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION DRIVERS MONITORS, SHOP

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

38 39

Page 3


SMITH COUNTY

BOARD OF EDUCATION

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 4

Thank you to all of the citizens of Smith County for the tremendous support given to our schools. Each resident is a stakeholder in the Smith County School System, and on behalf of the Smith County Board of Education, I thank each of you for your continued support. Our school system has great leadership provided by our teachers, supervisors and administrators. We are blessed with dedicated teachers and principals who not only teach our students, but genuinely care for them daily. Also, I am grateful for the support staff members who are an asset to our school system. It is an honor to serve as Superintendent of Smith County Schools. Our school system has been progressive in meeting the challenges of educational demands. Locally, our students have scored above their counterparts across the state on the Tennessee Department

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

of Education Report Card. I am grateful to be a part of this process in offering the best opportunity available for each student to receive an excellent education in Pre-K-12. Currently we have over 3,200 students enrolled in Pre-K- twelfth grade in the nine schools of our system. I desire they will all graduate from high school and continue their education or successfully enter the workforce. The future of our youth will be impacted by the education they receive in our school system. As Superintendent, I am so appreciative of all Smith County School employees and wish them continued happiness and success in the position they hold. ROGER LEWIS Superintendent of Schools

March 14, 2013


BOARD MEMBERS

Robin Moore District 1 Pleasant Shade, Defeated

Connie East Forks River

Scott Hensley District 2 Tanglewood

John Gore Gordonsville High

William Barrick District 3 New Middleton, Brush Creek, Sykes

Joe Taylor District 4 Rock City, Rome

Barbara Harville Central Office

Michael Moores Carthage Elem.

Eddie Dale Sykes District 5 Gordonsville

Bobby Phillips Forks River

Tim Maynard District 8 Elmwood, Chestnut Mound

Era Underwood Alternative

Sandra Vaden Gordonsville High

Jill Wilmore Carthage Elem.

FLOWERS BY LEANNE

 48 Old Kemp Hollow Lane • Pleasant Shade, TN 37145 

Pam Huffines

Brian Smith District 7 South Carthage

RETIRED

ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL

Phillip Brooks

Michael Collins District 6 Carthage

Carol Webster

735-2978



All business greatly appreciated. Thank you to all employees of the Smith Co. School System. May God Bless you all in the job that you do.

10th Annual 5K Run / Walk

Saturday

May 4th March 14, 2013

Branch Of Citizens Bank Of Lafayette

Carthage - Main Street Office - 735-2800 Highway 25 Branch - 735-2618 24 Hour Banking - 735-2419

MEMBER F.D.I.C.

24 Hour Automatic Teller Machine

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 5


SMITH COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION CENTRAL OFFICE

Amanda Mahaney Family Resource Director

Alicia Wills Payroll Clerk

Debe Pilant Supervisor of Instruction Pre-K-4

Barry Smith Special Ed. Supervisor

Diana Gochcoff Transportation Supervisor

Becky Cookston School Nutrition Supervisor

Elaine Baker Supervisor of Evaluation

Bonnie Stafford Federal Bookkeeper

Eric Swann School Psychologist

Cindy Garmon Adult Education Admin. Asst.

Heather Wilmore Attendance Supervisor

Helen Owen School Nurse

Danny Claire Technology Assistant

Janice Enoch General Bookkeeper

David Nixon Maintenance Supervisor

Jennifer Maynard Instructional Assistant

Smith Farmers

Diamond

Carpet Cleaning “Guaranteed Most Thorough Cleaning Ever”

Phillip Evitts – Manager

931-510-5953

Thanks to our Teachers! We know it’s not your job to raise our kids, but Smith County is blessed to have such a great group of educators.

Smith Farmers Cooperative 81 Cookeville Highway Carthage, TN 37030-1894

Supports & Appreciates the Smith County School System

• Office (615) 735-0404 • Fax (615) 735-2680 • Mobile (615) 418-6335 • E-Mail smithfarmerscoop@bellsouth.net

Thanks For Your Service To The Youth In Our School System

JUDGE DAVID BASS Smith County Juvenile Court Judge Page 6

Connie Holder Coordinated School Health

Home Address 9 Stone Branch Rd. Pleasant Shade, TN 37145 (615) 677-6212

Thank You

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest” ~ Benjamin Franklin

to everyone in the Smith County School System for your dedication and investment into the lives of our students.

Smith County Chamber of Commerce Industrial Board of Smith County, Inc.

939 Upper Ferry Road - P.O. Box 70, Carthage, TN 37030 • 615-735-2093 www.smithcountychamber.org

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


SMITH COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION CENTRAL OFFICE

Jera Huff Administrative Assistant

Jerry Wilson Technology Coordinator

Julia Elmore Adult Education Teacher

Kevin Miller Technology Assistant

Scared of the dentist? Give us a call and ask about

SEDATION DENTISTRY. You don’t have to

Kim Maynard Coordinated School Health

Michelle Allen School Nutrition

Bookkeeper / Payroll

Kristie Windham Countywide Math Coach

Mike Lytle

Supervisor of Instruction 9-12, CTE Director

Matilda Graves Graduation Coach

Misty Smith Social Worker

Melinda Spivey Supervisor of Instruction 5-8

Patricia Oliver SPED Admin. Assistant

avoid the dentist anymore.

Let us help you.

Jon Alan Long, D.D.S. Family Dentistry 120 Hospital Drive – Carthage

Regina Morris Federal Programs Supervisor March 14, 2013

Stephanie Johnson Adult Education Supervisor

Terry Woodard Tech. Support Coordinator

Traci Bratcher Human Resource

(615) 735-0808 Hours: Monday-Thursday 7 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 7


GORDONSVILLE

GORDONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 8

Gordonsville High School serves 7th-12th grades for the Gordonsville community. What began back in 1912, as the first public high school has grown into a school that continues to strive to help students become responsible, self-directed learners capable of functioning in today’s ever-changing society. At GHS, we are fortunate to have various technology available to help aide in the teaching of students. We have two computer labs that are utilized on a daily basis. Along with computer labs, GHS has several rolling labs with laptops that can be shared among the classes on a daily basis. With these capabilities, teachers are able to incorporate novel teaching strategies to ensure the success of our digital and technology learners. Our administration, faculty, and staff consciously strive to being committed to hard work, and all want to play a part in helping to form “successful adults.” GHS is a place filled with pride and dedication to the students as well as the community. Along with the many standards that must be taught, faculty and staff at GHS ensure that all students know the true definition of pride, teamwork, and commitment.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER

Gordonsville High School principal Annette Hord

March 14, 2013


GORDONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

Amanda Mason Technology

Amy Phillips EA Guidance

Angela Reed English

Anthony Geist Science

Ashlee Hackett English

Barbara Duke Bookkeeper

Beth Jenkins FACS

Bob Dillard Math

Brian Leslie Math

Bruce Timmons Math

Butch Agee History

Christy Smith Reading

Diane Bush Custodian

Felicia Huddleston Cafeteria Staff

Donna Bush Custodian

Davy Baker Automotive

Hailey Randolph Science

Hazel Jarvis Cafeteria Staff

BASS FUNERAL HOME, INC.

Carthage / Gordonsville

Serving Smith County and Surrounding Area Since 1916

Gordonsville - Carthage - Alexandria

683-8212

735-1212

529-2323

Thanks to the employees of the Smith County School System for your dedication and service. • Pre-Planned Funeral Arrangements • Granite Monuments

• Cremations - Memorial Services • Bronze Markers

OBITUARY LINE 683-8200 735-2500 529-2221

March 14, 2013

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

K BAN ON ION T A C EDU

We appreciate the Smith County School System Page 9


GORDONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

Jessica Biggs Language Arts

Mac Petty Assistant Principal

Jonathan Bush Social Studies

Mark Medley Wellness Drivers Education

Mary Tripp Custodian

Karen Sliger Special Education

Caitlin Triplett Math

Melinda Cothron Librarian

Larissa Miller Spanish

Pannie Tisdale Cafeteria Staff

Lee Allison Health Science

Rene Armistead Secretary

Leigh Petty Math

Robin Bennett Cafeteria Manager

Lisa Dillingham Special Education

Ronald Marshall Science

Ryan Rogers Agriculture

70 Main St. East • Gordonsville

FBC Gordonsville would like to say thank you to our school employees, faculty, administration, and staff. Thank you for investing in the children of Smith County. May the Lord continue to bless your efforts as you educate our children. “Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.” Proverbs 22:6 Page 10

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


GORDONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

Chandra Gillilan Guidance

Scott Clemons History

Tommy Washer Music

Tracy Alexander Technology

Gordonsville Flower & Gift

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Shane Smith EA Special Education

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Shawn Frye Assistant Principal

Trey Sanders Science

Stacy Reeves English

Vonda Hackett Cafeteria Staff

Kimberly Bush SPED Paraprofessional

We appreciate our education system!

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Steve Armistead History

Teresa Seagraves Cafeteria Staff

Janice Ballard Library EA

Thomas Gibbs Welding

Jason Stewart SRO

Tommy Ray Custodian

Cheryl Lagalbo EA Guidance

The Town Of

Gordonsville

would like to applaud the personal and professional contributions of school staff throughout the year. Teachers and school staff are the front-line workers of the public school system. Every day they offer their many talents in every aspect of a student’s life. Thank you so much for all the extra time and effort you put into making our school system a special place to learn and grow.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 11


CARTHAGE

SMITH COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 12

Smith County High School was established in 1914. The initial enrollment was approximately 30 students compared to 600 students enrolled this school year. The students of Smith County High School are composed of grades nine through twelve. Smith County High School underwent new construction beginning in 2002, additionally renovating parts of the existing building. The construction and renovation was completed in 2004. Smith County High School has been fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools since 1985. The school offers a variety of clubs and programs for student involvement. The faculty and staff of Smith County High School are led by Steve Robbins, who is serving his first year as principal. The high school also has one full time assistant principal,Cindy Prater, and two part-time assistant principals, Larry Silcox and Chuck Gentry. SCHS has approximately 50 full-time teachers, two school counselors, one media specialist, seven educational assistants, and twenty-one staff members. The faculty, staff, and students consciously strive to apply the school’s motto of “Smith County Pride” (SCP) daily. The high school stands behind its mission “to constitute a strong, structured foundation for lifelong learn-

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER

Smith County High School principal Steve Robbins

ing by directing, guiding, and challenging all students to achieve their ultimate potential so they can lead fulfilling and productive lives in a rapidly changing and increasingly complex society.”

March 14, 2013


SMITH COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

Amy Gentry Health Occupations

Anthony Hibbard Teacher Band Director

Bobby Huffines Teacher Health

Brad Tackett Teacher Math

Brandy Grisham Teacher Math

Brett Hackett Special Education Assistant

Christy Scudder Teacher French

Christy Williams Cafeteria

Chuck Gentry Assistant Principal

Cindy Evert Teacher English

Connie Dyer Teacher English / Drama

Connie Massey FCCLA

Charles Gross Teacher Math

Connie Smith Special Education Assistant

Cheryl Lawson Cafeteria

Christopher Dill Teacher Science

David Foster Teacher Math

Debbie Fulton Teacher English

THANK YOU to all Smith County educators, administrators, and staff for helping to build the future one mind at a time. From Poindexter Realty & Auction and The Walton Hotel

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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 13


SMITH COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

Debbie Napier Cafeteria

Debra Dillehay Cafeteria

Denise Hackett Teacher Science

Denise Locke Teacher Math

Erica Gregory Teacher Math

Genia White Teacher Office Occupations

Janet Bailey Teacher Economics

Jason Harville Teacher Science

Jessica Klaus Teacher English

Joanna Angel Teacher Cosmetology

John High Teacher Automotive

Judith Webb Cafeteria

Kathy Bennett Cafeteria

Kay Maynard Cafeteria

Kelly Goodman Guidance

Ken Bailey Teacher Welding

Blair Speck 3rd Grade Teacher CES Larry Silcox Assistant Principal

Linda Lankford Cafeteria

Lindsay Hall Librarian

Lisa Hembree Teacher Special Education

There’s no one quite like a special teacher, and no teacher quite as special as you!

A truly special teacher is very wise, and sees tomorrow in every child’s eyes. ~ Author unknown

Hensley Family Care Clinic, P.C.

Lucinda Sharp Office

Marvin McDonald Teacher Special Education

Mary Suliano Special Education Assistant

133 Hospital Drive Suite 700 Carthage, TN 37030 615/735-1650

Anne Hensley M.S.N., R.N., C.F.N.P.

Page 14

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


SMITH COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

Mike Dickerson Teacher P.E.

Molly Goolsby Nurse

Olivia Bush Teacher Math

Patty Agee Office

Peggy Sevier Cafeteria

Rebecca Whimpey Teacher Special Education

Richard Melton Teacher History

Scott Apple Teacher History

Scott Pope ISS / Tech Inter. / History

Sheron Silvey Teacher History

Stephanie Cox Special Education FCCLA

Susan Coats Special Education Assistant

Susan Daniel Teacher English

Tabitha Dick Library Assistant

Wendolyn Kittrell Teacher History

Pam Andrews Guidance Counselor

Rachel Brooks Bookkeeper

Kristen Kyte Teacher History March 14, 2013

Sara Tenpenny AP English

Jimmy Maynord Teacher Drivers Education

Holly McMillian Teacher Spanish

Bill Reece Teacher Art

Tiffanii Brown Assistant Band Director

Steven Clemons Special Ed. Assistant

Morgan Cupp Teacher Science

Brooke Grimsley Special Ed. Assistant

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Wesley Foster Teacher Agriculture

Rachael Layman Special Ed. Assistant

Karly Johnson Teacher Science

Tracy Holder School Resource Officer

Cindy Prater Assistant Principal Page 15


SOUTH CARTHAGE

SMITH COUNTY MIDDLE

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 16

Smith County Middle School serves 5th through 8th grades in their facility located in South Carthage just behind the Smith County Board of Education. SCMS is comprised of 45 faculty and staff members who educate the school’s 370 students. As we embark on the eleventh anniversary of Smith County Middle School, we are continuing to strive for excellence. As a SACS accredited school, we take pride in our academic record. Smith County Middle School achieved all A’s in achievement and value added for the 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010 school years. In 2008, 2009, and 2010 the Educational Consumer Foundation recognized us as one of the most highly effective schools in Tennessee. Furthermore, SCMS is taking the necessary steps to ensure that the school maintains its effectiveness and remains one of the best. Smith County Middle School continues to evolve to meet the needs of its community by trying to improve parent/school communication through the use of our website (boe. smithcounty.com/scms), new email notification system, and various surveys throughout the year. Over the past few years, several additions/implementations have taken place to increase achievement and make our rigorous standards relevant. With the help of Title I funds and allocations from the SCBOE, we have been able to purchase classroom technology, iPods, iPads, document cameras and create a Science Lab. We have also started “Enrichment labs” across all the content areas. These are designed to be supplemental and to give our “handson” learning students a different perspective on standards.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER

Smith County Middle School principal Ronnie Scudder displaying the school’s new technology with an Apple iPad.

We have two computer labs that are being utilized on a daily basis to help provide additional support for all learners. The use of technology at SCMS is at an alltime high. With this infrastructure, teachers are able to incorporate innovative teaching strategies to ensure the success of our digital learners. We also offer avenues for our student leaders through Junior Beta, Student Council, FCA, and 4-H. A free tutoring service is being provided weekly by the 5th grade teachers and our Jr. Beta Club to help students reach higher levels of understanding. Whether it be the hard work of our administration, faculty, staff, or students, we all stay true to our motto “Strong Commitment Marks Success.”

March 14, 2013


SMITH COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL

Barbara Amspaugh Paraprofessional

Pauline Alvis Cafeteria

John Sanders Teacher 7th grade

Jennifer Ankney 5th-6th grade Special Education

Pam Davis Teacher 8th grade

Jennifer Bamford Teacher 7th grade

Shawn Baker Teacher 6th Grade

Connie Baxter Teacher 5th grade

Hollie Farmer 7th and 8th grade Special Education

Jim Bare Custodian

Cara Fleenor Teacher 7th and 8th grade

Tiffanii Brown Teacher Band

Teresa Gentry Office Staff

Donna Bush Teacher 6th grade

Denise Graham Cafeteria

Kim Knapp Paraprofessional

Beth Grisham Teacher 5th grade

Carthage Family Practice Specialists, P.C. Richard Rutherford, MD • Larry Turner, MD Pete Alfano, PA • Jacqueline Reid, CNM Anna Locke, PA and Staff

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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 17


SMITH COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL

Kathy Martin Cafeteria

Mary Harvey Paraprofessional

Allison Carver Teacher 5th grade

Nancy Smith Teacher 7th grade

Page 18

Martha Holladay Librarian

Connie Martin Paraprofessional

Lisa Steele Teacher 7th and 8th grade

Roberta Jackson Cafeteria

Autumn McDaniel Teacher 7th and 8th grade

Susan Stevens School Counselor

Vicki Johnson Librarian Assistant

Jamie Donoho Teacher ISS

Christina Watts Special Education

Deeanna Mullinax Paraprofessional

Tammy West Teacher 6th grade

Teresa Jones Teacher 5th grade

Carmie Johnston Teacher 6th grade

Dusty Whitaker Teacher P.E.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Bill Reece Teacher Art

Jamie Kelley Assistant Principal

Wendy Robinson Office Staff

Nichole Williams Paraprofessional

Teresa Kemp Cafeteria

David Silcox Teacher P.E.

Kristy Spurgeon Teacher 7th and 8th grade

Christy Mock Teacher Special Education

March 14, 2013


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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 19


CARTHAGE

CARTHAGE ELEMENTARY

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 20

Carthage Elementary School is a SACS accredited school that is the home to 480 PreK through 4th grade students. Mr. Tim Nesbitt is our principal, and Mrs. Leslie Pope is our assistant principal. We have 35 highly qualiďŹ ed regular and special education teachers and 27 wonderful support staff members. Our students are blessed to have the opportunity to receive 30 minutes of guidance, library, music, and art classes and 60 minutes of PE and computer lab classes each week. Our faculty strives to differentiate instruction by offering advanced math classes, accelerated reader, and response to intervention to meet the needs of all of our students. A wide variety of technology such as I Pads, I Pods, Mac Books, Interwrite Pads, and clickers are also used to enhance instruction. Finally, second through fourth grade students may attend our after school program, The Owls Nest. It offers academic enrichment, remeJENNIFER BUSH / COURIER diation, snacks, and special programs from 3:00- Carthage Elementary School principal Tim Nesbitt and Leslie Pope - assistant principal 6:00 pm. invite you to visit our campus or our website http://ces. The faculty and staff are proud of our school and the success of our students, and we would like to smithcounty.com.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


CARTHAGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Alicia Blair Teacher Pre-K

Alva Lawson Educational Assistant

Callie White Teacher Special Education

Blair Speck Teacher 3rd grade

Judy Spivey Educational Assistant

Amanda Bridgewater Educational Assistant

Deanne Roney Computer Lab

Julie Harville Bookkeeper

Angela Hackett Teacher Music

Dee Climer Educational Assistant

Jyl Smith Teacher 2nd grade

Angie Bamford Teacher Physical Education

Dianne Kemp Cafeteria

Karen Hackett Teacher 2nd grade

Anita Dunbar After School Program

Janet Wiggins Teacher 4th grade

Karen Yarbrough Educational Assistant

Jeanette Massey Literacy Leader

Kathaleen Replogle Teacher 1st grade

Beth Payne Teacher 3rd grade

Barbara High Educational Assistant

Jill Beechboard Secretary

Kathey Fahner Teacher Speech

Joan McGrath Educational Assistant

Kaye Shores Teacher 4th grade

Phil Upchurch Scott Upchurch Owners

Smith County Hardware & Rental Co. SmithCountyHardware@gmail.com Keitha Webb Educational Assistant

March 14, 2013

Kelly Martin Teacher Spec. Educ. / Pre-K

Kristi Byrne, Teacher Kindergarten

Kristi Scurlock Educational Assistant

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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Compliments of

Terry Collins & staff Smith County Property Assessor Page 21


CARTHAGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Kristie Dixon Teacher Kindergarten

Kristy Buckler Teacher 2nd grade

Kristy Taylor Teacher Kindergarten

LaShae Johnson Teacher 1st grade

Lesley Logan Educational Assistant.

Leslie Pope Assistant Principal

Lisa Pigg Teacher Special Education

Marcie Smith Educational Assistant

Martha Dawson Teacher Kindergarten

Melissa Mundy Educational Assistant

Michael Graham Custodian

Joseph Hiett Teacher Special Education

Michelle Flynt Teacher 1st grade

Mitzi Long Educational Assistant

Myra Enoch Educational Assistant

Penny Daigre Cafeteria

Rachel Wheeley Teacher 3rd grade

Rebecca Rezny Teacher 1st grade

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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


CARTHAGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Risa Triplett Educational Assistant

Rita Treadway Cafeteria Manager

Samantha Kirby Teacher 3rd grade

Selicia Collins Teacher Special Education

Shawn Hix Cafeteria

Shelly Wood Teacher 2nd grade

Snowi Brune Teacher Special Education

Tammy Harper Teacher 4th grade

Tammy Smith Educational Assistant

Tammy White Librarian

Teresa Whitmire Cafeteria

Terra Enoch Educational Assistant

Venessa Denney Educational Assistant

Abby Shivers Guidance

Destin Gentry Educational Assistant

Jennifer Reece Educational Assistant

Sabrina Mahler ELL

Steve Gray Custodian

SOUTH CARTHAGE

Ray, Angela and Todd Scurlock

SAV-WAY

“Thank you to these and many others who have played a part in Ray’s education.”

A BETTER WAY TO SAVE

We Often Take For Granted The People Who Most Deserve Our Gratitude Thanks To Everyone In The Smith County School System For Your Dedication To The Students Of Smith County • Central Office Staff • School Board Members • Principals •Teachers • Cafeteria Workers • Custodians • Bus Drivers March 14, 2013

Tim Nesbitt CES Principal

Kristi Byrne Kindergarten

Blair Speck 3rd Grade

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Jill Wilmore 1st Grade

Jyl Smith 2nd Grade Tammy Harper 4th Grade

Page 23


DEFEATED CREEK

DEFEATED ELEMENTARY

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 24

Defeated Elementary School is located in the northeastern corner of the county, overlooking Cordell Hull Lake. The original building was completed in 1954, with the most recent renovations occurring in 2008. DES is home to approximately 200 students and 30 employees and serves Pre K-8th grade. The school is consistently rated a safe school and remains in high standing on the annual report card. With the reform of education in TN and the implementation of Common Core Standards, DES is taking all necessary JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER steps to help students and teachers reach Defeated Elementary School principal Meranda Cook these high expectations. Our educators are on the forefront of implementing techbuilding a positive relationship with everyone involved nology in the classroom with the use of iPads, Apple tv’s, iPods, Science manipulatives, clickers, in your child’s education. Our community’s continuing and educationally beneficial media presentations. With involvement and support cannot be emphasized enough. online testing in the near future, we are striving to pre- We encourage visitors to our website at boe.smithcounty. pare our students for successful outcomes through key- com/defeated for news, information, and updates. I am so proud of the professional and loving staff you boarding at all grade levels. Along with strong educational goals, DES encourages students to find their niche will find at DES. Your children are our #1 priority as we and participate in many activities offered such as sports, work as a team to maintain a positive learning environment with high expectations. I consider it a great blessing cheerleading, Junior Beta, Student Council, and 4-H. It is an honor for your child’s educational journey to be- to come to Defeated Elementary every single day and feel gin at DES. I encourage you to stay in close contact with confident that I have the BEST job in the world! the school because we believe that education is a joint Meranda Cook, Principal effort in school and family. Communication is the key to

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


DEFEATED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Anne Leslie Wakefield Secretary Educational Assistant

Becky Howell Teacher 5th & 6th

Beth Overstreet Teacher Literacy Leader

Christy Schoolfield Educational Assistant

Crissey Yarbrough Custodian

Diana Preston Teacher Assistant Principal

Heidi Massey Teacher Art

Jeff Craighead Teacher 5th & 6th

Jessica West Teacher Kindergarten

Katie Wheeler Teacher Pre-K

Kelli Martin Teacher 3rd

Kelly Edens Teacher 1st

Hannah Rich Educational Assistant

Kristy Randolph Educational Assistant

Stacey Brinkley Educational Assistant

Rion Rigsby Teacher 2nd

We Appreciate The Leadership in Our School System Stacey Claywell Educational Assistant

Tamara Browning Teacher Special Education

Michelle Hendry Educational Assistant

Tonya Craighead Teacher 4th

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March 14, 2013

Vicki Russell Teacher Kindergarten

Whitney Shrum Teacher 7th & 8th

615-774-3230 Brandon Powell Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Jason Powell Page 25


ELMWOOD

FORKS RIVER ELEMENTARY

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 26

Forks River School serves grades Pre K through 8th grades. It is located at 611 Cookeville Highway in Elmwood which is located in the eastern part of Smith County. The school was built in 1955 to serve students in 1st through 8th grades. Since then, FRS has undergone several renovations and improvements. The highly qualified faculty and staff of 32 members at Forks River School are led by Principal Holly Anderson. This is Mrs. Anderson’s first year as the administrator at FRS. Forks River maintains a safe and accountable school status and is in high standings each year on the academic report card. FRS also offers our students a variety of extra-curricular opportunities in addition to the rigorous curriculum with intense common core standards. We offer basketball for boys and girls, softball, baseball, band, Junior Beta Club, Student JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER Council, 4-H, and Cheerleading. Forks River Elementary School principal Holly Anderson Forks River School continues to strive to maintain a strong home- school connection pads, Classroom Response Systems, and a mobile comand meet the needs of its community through the use puter lab. The use of technology is at an all-time high at of our website (http://boe.smithcounty.com/forksriver), FRS. Teachers are able to incorporate innovative teachnew e-mail notification system, our community safe call ing strategies to ensure the success of our digital learnsystem and various surveys throughout the year. Com- ers. munication is the key to building a positive relationship At Forks River you will find a caring and compaswith everyone involved in a child’s education. sionate environment with high expectations for all while With the help of Title I funds and allocations from also keeping a common goal in mind which is to provide the SCBOE, FRS has been able to purchase classroom students with the education they need to be successful in technology, iPods, iPads, document cameras, Interwrite whatever they choose to pursue in life.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


FORKS RIVER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Mandy Beaty Teacher 8th Grade

Maeghan Brown Teacher 3rd grade

Fay Holland Teacher 2nd grade

Barbara Hutson Custodian

Nancy Mimms Educational Assistant

March 14, 2013

Kathy Carr PE Teacher Basketball Coach

Paula Ipock Educational Assistant

Charles Daigre Special Education

Jessica Dillehay Teacher 6th grade

Sheryl Taylor Teacher 1st grade

Amy Gibbs Educational Assistant

Paula Gibbs Teacher 4th grade

Pershetta Graybeal Cafeteria

Donna Kemp Secretary

Renee Kemple Educational Assistant

Pam Lewis Educational Assistant

Beth Matoy Teacher Kindergarten

Pam McClanahan Teacher Literacy Leader

Jennifer Elrod Teacher 5th grade

Ellie Spike Teacher Pre K grade

Amanda Thompson Teacher 7th Grade

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Janice Whitaker Cafeteria Manager

Kim White Educational Assistant

Page 27


GORDONSVILLE

GORDONSVILLE ELEMENTARY

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 28

As you walk the halls of Gordonsville Elementary School, you may see students using iPhones, iPads, Kindles, Smartboards, interwrite pads, Clickers and other technology in their every day learning. With the great support from our parents, community, and school board, GES is preparing students to learn using hands-on techniques in new and inventive ways. The faculty and staff at GES are working diligently to make the implementation into the new Common Core Standards as interesting and successful as possible. While students are held to high expectations at Gordonsville Elementary School, they are also involved in a great deal of fun and enriching programs such as the Veteran’s Program performed by the 4th and 5th grade classes, the Holiday Program performed by the 2nd and 6th grade classes and the Tennessee Program performed by the 3rd grade classes. GES is fortunate to have parents, community members, and staff who truly care about each individual student’s learning. With the continued support from all of the GES stakeholders, Gordonsville Elementary School will continue to be successful and produce well-rounded, educated, and responsible citizens for our community.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER

Gordonsville Elementary School principal Angel Williams

March 14, 2013


GORDONSVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Amy Manning Paraprofessional

Ann Craighead Teacher 2nd grade

Barbara Agee Office Staff Secretary

Carol Finley Teacher 2nd grade

Carol Smith Paraprofessional

Loretta Cook Cafeteria Staff

Elaine Hawthorne Paraprofessional

Connie Halliburton Office Staff Bookkeeper

Cynthia Williams Paraprofessional

Denise Randolph Pre-K Educational Assistant

Earah Lankford Teacher 6th grade

Fay Crawford Teacher 3rd grade

Ferlin Sevier Custodian

Ginger Ramsey Paraprofessional

Janelle Langford Paraprofessional

Janice Ballard Paraprofessional

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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 29


GORDONSVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Jennifer Dixon Cafeteria Staff

Laurie Glover Teacher 5th grade

Jennifer Shores Teacher Special Education

LaVonne Walker Teacher 4th grade

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Lesa Manning Teacher Literacy Leader

Jerry Young Custodian

Lisa Nixon Teacher Kindergarten

Lynn Vaden Teacher 1st grade

Julie Leslie Teacher 3rd grade

Julie Thomas Teacher Kindergarten

Lynn Woodard Paraprofessional

Lacey Williams Teacher 6th grade

Mary Katherine Hearn Teacher 2nd grade

Tommy Ashford Custodian

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Jona Fitts Cafeteria Staff

Lyndsey Foster Teacher 5th grade

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Page 30

Jenny Ford Teacher Art

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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


GORDONSVILLE ELEMENTARY

Molly Goolsby School Nurse

Pat Willoughby Cafeteria Staff

Patricia Hamlet Librarian

Rachel Kelley Teacher 1st grade

Renee Tisdale Teacher 5th grade

Rose Sampson Cafeteria Staff

Scott Bennett Teacher 6th grade

Shane Vaden Assistant Principal

Stephanie Griffin Teacher 4th grade

Susan Boyd Cafeteria Staff

Tina Driver Paraprofessional

Tracy Bradford Teacher 1st grade

Tracy Clemons Teacher Kindergarten March 14, 2013

Vivan Krajewski Teacher 4th grade

Wendy Moss Teacher Pre-K Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 31


NEW MIDDLETON

NEW MIDDLETON ELEMENTARY

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 32

New Middleton Academy was the name of one of the first schools after Porter Hill Academy and Clinton College. The school was built between 1856 and 1859, and its curriculum included subjects such as higher mathematics, Bible Literature, Astrology, World History, and Botany. The New Middleton Academy School JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER building burned on September 8, 1919, Mrs. Lesli Smith’s second grade students at New Middleton School show off their artwork. but was immediately built back. The Pictured from left: Abby Malone, Jada Maddox, Naudia Connell, Logan Parsley, Makenna Kelly, Victoria Winfree, Mrs. Susie Woodard – NMS principal, Thomas Flynn, Drew Hughes, structure was very similar to the origiDavid Caban, Jeremiah Musgrove, Roman Neathery, Simon Long, Jacob Bane. nal building with the Masonic Hall (established 1856) occupying the second floor. This school set of restrooms, a new cafeteria, and renovations to the previously existing structure. To date, New Middleton building was also destroyed by fire in 1924. Additional land for a new school and campus was ob- School consists of classes: Pre-K through 8th grade with tained from Mr. Roscoe Lancaster, where a new one-sto- a student population of 243, faculty: (16 full time and 6 ried building was built in 1924 with four classrooms, part time), staff: Paraprofessionals 6, Secretary 1, Cafea library, and an auditorium. After the fire the Masonic teria 3, Janitors (1 full time and 1 part time), and PrinciLodge built a separate building that remains today as an pal; with a total campus population of 276. We are very proud of our school and the community it historical landmark. The school building that was built in 1924 served serves. Without the support and involvement of our parthe community until 1958. In 1958, Smith County then ents, grandparents, and others we would not be advanced completed a more modern one-storied building. This to the position where we are today. We are part of an building consisted of 5 classrooms, cafeteria, gymnasi- exemplary county and we owe that distinction to the hard um, and a set of restrooms. The continued growth in the work, dedication, and competence of everyone that plays community and the student population called for further a part in helping our children be successful in life. I want expansion of the walls to the existing building. This ex- to say, THANK YOU, for all the support and hard work pansion was started by the Smith County Board of Edu- you put into our school and your child’s education. Susie Woodard, Principal, New Middleton School cation in 2000. The renovation of the existing building that was startINVOLVED PARENT + MOTIVATED STUDENT + ed in 2000 and completed in 2001, consisted of an addiCARING TEACHER = GREAT SUCCESS tion of 7 new classrooms, a teacher workroom, another

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


NEW MIDDLETON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Alicia Barrett Teacher Kindergarten

Becky Hackett Teacher 2nd grade

Billy Parkerson Custodian

Jasmine Stafford Physical Education

Lindsey Key Teacher 5th & 6th grades

Jenifer Davenport Vision Specialist

Tim Lea Custodian

Donna Livingston Assistant Principal 7th & 8th grades

Emily Vaden Teacher 1st grade

Joyce Parkerson Cafeteria

Kathy Shea Educational Assistant

Megan Campbell Teacher 5th & 6th grades

Lesli Smith Teacher 2nd grade

Paulette Shoemake Special Education Assistant

Peggy Massey Secretary

Rachel Alvis Pre-K

Rachel Dunn Educational Assistant

Bonnie Grandstaff Literacy Leader

Carolyn Boles Teacher Kindergarten

Cindy Hix Teacher 4th grade

Jeffrey Grisham Music

Jill Huddleston Teacher 3rd grade

Jill Smith Special Education

Melinda Huddleston Pre-K Assistant

Michelle Prichard Teacher 1st grade

Nancy Bradley Teacher 5th & 6th grades

Betty Wilkerson Cafeteria Manager

Ken Lawrence (615) 489-3603 Robbie Stepp Teacher 7th & 8th grades

March 14, 2013

Rose Glover Cafeteria

Tammy Woodard Educational Assistant

Tiffany Duncan Special Education Assistant

• Licensed TN Contractor • Licensed Pesticide Applicator P.O. Box 185 • Gordonsville, TN 38563 lawrence landscaping@yahoo.com

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Proud to work with all the schools in our county! Call today to schedule your in-class painting or field trip! Call 615-489-5743 or Visit our website: www.ThePaintPail.com Page 33


ROCK CITY

UNION HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY

2013

COURIER

CARTHAGE

Page 34

Union Heights Elementary School is proud to serve the families in the western portion of our county. The school presently has approximately 275 students in grades PreK through 8. One hundred percent of all teachers at UHS are highly qualified in their specific grade or subject. Our teachers are supported through various professional development opportunities, curriculum, and technology, as well as our central office staff, Mr. Joe Taylor and his colleagues on the Smith County School Board. In an effort to address the various needs of our student body, we maintain a quality Response to Intervention plan at the school level, and utilize other state and federal programs. Union Heights strives to maintain a strong home-school connection. We begin every new school year with an Open House. Parent-teacher conferences are held in both the fall and spring semesters and as needed. The primary grades honor their grandparents each year with their Grandparents’ Day Celebration. Holidays are celebrated beginning with our annual Halloween Costume Parade followed by a Holiday Music Program in December. Reading is also celebrated at our school-wide Literacy Night. Grades 5 - 8 have the opportunity to participate in the county basketball and band programs, and grades 7 - 8 can JENNIFER BUSH / COURIER participate in the Smith County Middle School football Union Heights Elementary School principal Richard Anderson program. Honor students and athletes are recognized at the end of the school year at our annual Academic school year. The students, faculty, and staff at Union and Basketball Banquet with Pre-Kindergarten, Kinder- Heights invite you to visit our campus or our website at garten, and eighth grade graduations rounding out the http://www.boe.smithcounty.com/union_heights.

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


UNION HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Amy Key 5th grade

Trudy Miller Teacher PreK

Christel Hall Secretary

Ashley Smith Teacher 4th grade

Cindy Dowell Teacher 2nd grade

Belinda Williams Custodian

Gayle Uhles Literacy Leader

Ben Malone 6th, 7th, 8th grade Social Studies

Heather Brewer Teacher 2nd grade

Billie Butler Teacher Kindergarten

Jamie Wallace Guidance

Stephanie Inyart Paraprofessional

Jennifer McKinney Paraprofessional

Brenda Owens Teacher 1st grade

Jenny Smith Teacher 4th grade

Brian Roberts 6th, 7th, 8th grade Science

Jessica Baird Teacher 1st grade

Thank You! The Carthage Courier joins with this special publication’s advertisers in recognizing the importance and impact all individuals involved in our Smith County School System have had and continue to have in all of our lives.

CARTHAGE COURIER STAFF

March 14, 2013

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 35


UNION HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Judy McGowan Nutritionist

Kelly Pyburn P.E. & Assistant Principal

Lori Stiggins Music

Lori Winfree Bookkeeper

Jill Fariss Paraprofessional

Lynn Taylor PreK Paraprofessional

Mahalia McCall 6th, 7th, 8th grade Math

Amanda Bryant Special Education

Mary Denney Teacher 5th grade

Melanie Hassell 6th, 7th, 8th grade English, Reading

Pam Billington Teacher Kindergarten

Peggy Denton Teacher 3rd grade

Phyllis Cowan Nutritionist

Connie Oldham Cashier

Terry McGowan Custodian

Terry Wyant Speech

Town of South Carthage Wanda Andrews Teacher 3rd grade

Wilma Moore Nutritionist

Sarah Mofield Paraprofessional

Supports Smith Co. Schools Mayor Jimmy Wheeler City Council Members Councilwoman Christy Grisham Councilman Robert E. Hewitt Vice Mayor Terry Hunt Councilman Hollis Mullinax

Page 36

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


Making a Difference with In-School Banking Through CBSC’s School Bank program, students are… ŸLearning hands-on-lessons in

financial responsibility and banking operations! ŸAdding money to their very own savings accounts! ŸDeveloping good money habits while saving for the future! Thank you, Smith County school employees, for everything you do to give our students a bright future!

Community Bank of Smith County Ofce of Wilson Bank & Trust Lebanon, TN • Member FDIC

March 14, 2013

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

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SMITH COUNTY SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT DRIVERS

Anthony Dixon

Barry Cook

Brian Leslie

Buddy Culbreath

David Agee

Debbie Bernal

Debra Dillehay

Evelyn Kelley

Geri Dillon

Hazel Gregory

Horace Wright

Jack Gregory

Jean Harden

Jerry Hackett

Jerry Young

Johnny Brown

Juanita Thomas

Linda Lankford

Liza Allen

Page 38

Mary Williams

Robbie Wilkerson

Sheree Sapp

Steve Armistead

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Steve Dowell

Tommy Ray

James Kinsey

March 14, 2013


TRANSPORTATION SHOP

Danny Shaw

Diana Gochcoff

Devin Goad

Mark Dosch

MONITORS

James Sanders

Connie Smith

Karen Yarbrough

Tonya Gochcoff

“Veterans Still Serving America” Charles E. Price

Post 57

Carthage, TN

Sue Johnson

Terry Agee

Wartime Veterans Helping Veterans both Past and Present

Charene Kinsey

Eligible veterans are those who served during: 4/6/17 — 11/11/18 WWI 12/7/41 — 12/31/46 WWII 6/25/50 — 1/31/55 Korea 2/28/61 — 5/7/75 Vietnam 8/24/82 — 7/31/84 Grenada/Lebanon 12/20/89 — 1/31/90 Panama 8/2/90 — 1/31/Cessation of hostilities (Persian Gulf)

Meetings - 7:00 p.m. 2nd Tuesday of the month Ag Center 195 Ag Center Lane South Carthage (Behind Crump Paris Park) For Information call: Bob Baker - 683-6101 Jerry Solimine - 735-3615

We welcome all veterans March 14, 2013

Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

Page 39


Hats Off to the Faculties, Staffs and Administration of the Smith County School System! Educators play an enormously important role in the development of our county’s youth. They teach and inspire, guiding our kids toward bright, successful futures. They act as leaders, role models and coaches, broadening minds and encouraging achievement.

158 Hospital Drive, Carthage,TN 37030 • 615.735.1560 • www.myriverviewmedical.com Our Community. Our Hospital.

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Carthage Courier • Education Smith County

March 14, 2013


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