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Black Masons BRINGING TOGETHER THE PIECES


A vision starts with an IDEA.


ONTENTS

Features 14 Black Wall Street 18 History of Black Masons 22 Summer Love Fashion Departments 2

Editorial Letter

Photo: Brad Ogbonna justbrad.com

What’s Poppin’

6 8 10 12 34 36 38 40

Technology - SheGeeks.com Music - Black Thought Sports - The Professor Film - Sanaa Lathan Spotlight - Fresh Daily Good Looking Out - Robert Battle Get Right - Juice for Life/Styles P Homage


Editorial Letter

Queon Martin Ceo/Founder

Datwon Thomas Co-Founder/Spokesperson

Kali Abdullah Creative Director

Brian Christion Operations

Aidah Muhammad Program Director

Sundree Brand Mgmt Art Direction

Marlon Cole Associate Art Director

Ejazz Joseph Art Assistant

Rayon Richards Photographer

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he Pride & Joy of Bed-Stuy... A title phrase held prominent to a man by the name of Frank N. Mickens, former principal of Boys & Girls High School in Brooklyn, NY. Everyone who had the privilege of entering his building, was his pride and joy. We have some really cool articles inside for your reading pleasures... With Sanaa Lathan and Black Thought interviews leading the way and Corvida and Fresh Daily changing the game, the future shines brighter than ever, for a culture that has now become VICTORIOUS! Our fashion section THREADS, keeps raising the bar. With the addition of Alexander Allen style/direction, CARTER™ gives you the best in the industry under one roof HANDS DOWN. We strive daily and bi-monthly to acknowledge and reflect on the glorious, selfless contributions to our existence made by many, ancestral and living. Our double cover featuring Black Wall Street and Black Mason holds true to this statement. Our glorious past has become present and relevant to our readers through CARTER™. It was almost four years ago the Black Wall Street riots crossed my radar and stuck in my head and heart. Sending a special acknowledgement to Hip Hop artist “The Game” for enlightening me indirectly by naming his label Black Wall Street and Gil Noble host of Like It Is for presenting the truth about ourstory. No longer will there be a divide between old school and new school; at CARTER™ we build bridges.

THE EVOLUTION OF REVOLUTION WILL BE PUBLICIZED!

Q, Founder *I pay homage to Frank N. Mickens by working with the students of Boys & Girls High School for this issue.

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Queen Walker Marketing/Branding

Tony Sweeny Director of Community Affairs

Chimene Teixeira Public Relations/ Amada Entertainment

Joe Masters Contributor

Marvin Scott Contributor


The idea is brought into existence by MOVEMENT.


Contributors Alexander Allen Contributing Image Director/Fashion Director Alexander Allen is an eleven-year fashion veteran. During the past three years, as an image director, Mr. Allen as worked with the likes of Takashi Murakami, Pat McGrath, CoverGirl, Max Factor, and Donna Karan, just to name a few. “It feels like I’m starting all over again and I love it! The biggest difference between now and eleven years ago is, more than ever, I know exactly what to do and what not to do, without having to go through the growing pains. I’M READY!� - Mr. Allen.

Syreeta Gates Writer Through the power of popular culture, Syreeta Gates has created an unparalleled connection with young people. As the founder of The SWT Life and author of Just BE Cause (Spring 2011), she has inspired, educated and impacted hundreds of American youth in the past seven years. Gates, a 23 year old from South Side Jamaica Queens, was honored as one of Glamour’s “Top 20 Young Women Under 25� at the 2010 Glamour Women of the Year Awards. Her accomplishments as a youth development consultant and philanthropist have established her as one of the most promising cultural leaders to watch.

Amelia Rawlins Copy Editor Journalists, are usually known for their clever demeanor, open minded personality and their ability to take a story, tear it apart and put it back together again. Hailing from Brooklyn NY, Rawlins grew up in Crown Heights and attended Boys and Girls HS under the supervision of Dr. Frank Mickens, graduating in 2006. She attended Utica College of Syracuse University where she studied Journalism and Psychology while meeting, studying and traveling with some of the world’s most aspiring journalists. After graduating from college in 2010, Rawlins returned to Boys and Girls High School and now holds a position as Assistant to the EnVide Tech Academy, where her passion for journalism started. She also freelances for several magazines and is proud to join the CARTER™ team as Copy Editor.

Boys & Girls High School )RUPDQ\%R\VDQG*LUOV+LJK6FKRROLVDSLOODURIWKH%HGIRUG6WX\YHVDQWFRPPXQLW\DQG DQXQRIILFLDOODQGPDUNRI%URRNO\Q6LQFHWKHKLVWRU\RI%R\V+LJKDQG*LUOV+LJKZDVVRULFK ,WZDVLQHYLWDEOHWKHWZRVFKRROVZRXOGPHUJHLQFUHDWLQJZKDWZHNQRZWRGD\DV%R\V DQG*LUOV+LJK,QUHFRJQL]LQJWKHPDMRUFRQWULEXWLRQVPDGHE\DOXPQLOLNH6KLUOH\&KLVKROP DQG&RQQLH+DZNLQVZHYLVLWHG)XOWRQ6WUHHW1RZXQGHUWKHOHDGHUVKLSRI3ULQFLSDO %HUQDUG*DVVDZD\DQG$FDGHP\'LUHFWRU9LFWRULD%R]HPDQ%R\VDQG*LUOV+LJKKDVSUR GXFHGILYHH[FHSWLRQDO\RXWKWRFRQWULEXWHWRWKH&$57(5jUHYROXWLRQ5HLJQLQJIURPWKH (Q9LGH7HFK (QWHUWDLQPHQW9LVXDO$UWV'HVLJQDQG7HFKQRORJ\ $FDGHP\RI%*+6DUH &DVVLG\'DQLHOV-HZHOO-DFREV/H6HDQ0RRUH5D\PRQG0RWDDQG%ULDQQD:DONHU

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There’s no turning BACK...


TECH

SHE GEEKS ON TECHNOLOGY

Photo Courtesy of Corvida Raven

by Cassidy Daniels

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Don’t be fooled by her stature or converse sneakers, Corvida can handle her own in a room flooded with technologies gurus. This young woman wears her mohawk high and stands behind every tweet and blog post she shares with her followers. If you haven’t had the pleasure of meeting or reading about her, she shares why she is the future of the technological world. CARTER: What inspired you to create your website SheGeeks.net? I was in a tough situation. I couldn’t afford to go back to college. I was in the middle of my senior year and a friend reached out to me and encouraged me to start SheGeeks.net. People would come to me about advice on technology. It was just plain ole’ having fun. Has your website changed the way they have viewed technology? Yeah, I think that it would make them more comfortable using technology. People would want to see the way they have viewed technology in a different perspective and that’s why I pretty much started. Do you think that the social media and technology are important topics in today’s society? It can be, depending on the topic. I do think that it’s important. Do you personally know people who have had difficulties in technology and the social media? Yeah, my mom. She definitely has the hang of it now, but the older generations have a bigger problem now. A conference that I went to spoke about a workshop called “Girl Camp” that teaches people from ages 25-84 to use technology. I found out that just because they don’t use technology doesn’t mean that they don’t want to learn from it. Do you think that most people should use a social media or technology outlet at least once in their lives? I definitely think that they should dabble, especially the basic stuff. At least know how to send an email. It’s really simple to do once you (people) get pass (the basics.) How do you encourage older generations to use technology and not be afraid? The same way I encourage the younger generation, to just go after it and do what you think is necessary, but it’s all about getting past your fears and benefiting from it at the end of the day.

What was one of your most memorable experiences when you attended the SXSW (South by Southwest) Festival in March? Oh, man. Just being there. It’s rewarding and really awesome. It was a lot of interaction with technology and networking. To me, it’s for a lot of networks. A lot of people were there to encourage others and put their ideas out there and enjoy what other people have to offer. What do you think are the most important pieces of technology that someone should have today? Well I always have my iPhone with my headphones, which are a must. A laptops or desktops are definite, along with good headphones. As for what’s popular iPads, tablets, Android phones or any Smart phone. To you, what are the pros and cons of having an i-Pad? PROS: Interactive on-line streaming. It’s better to use than a laptop because it’s lighter. It also has a bigger app market. CONS: The size and the price, ranging from about $499 to $600. What Twitter app would you use for your mobile device, for music and texting? For music, I use an app called “Sound Tracking” but I like another app called “Sound Pound.” But I like “Sound Pound” because it keeps a description of songs that I listened to before. “Sound Tracking” sends out an update from Twitter. My Twitter apps are “Tweet Net”, because it provides updates from Twitter. Other than social media or technology, is there something else (topic) that you feel passionate about? Oh, yeah, totally! Art, Music and Fashion. I also have a blog called “F.A.M. Life” (style, fashion, music, and art) What advice would you give the CARTER Magazine reader who’s interested in following your footsteps? Follow your heart and dreams and be honest about what you want to do, fight for what you can get.

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MUSIC

ROOTED IN HIP HOP A Conversation with Black Thought by Brianna Walker

If you know Hip Hop, you should undoubtedly know who The Roots are. If you know who The Roots are, you know the emcee by the name BLACK THOUGHT. This amazing band has been holding down Hip Hop for over a century, and whenever Black Thought opens his mouth on the mic, its magic. With the worldwide success of the band, landing the job as house band on Jimmy Fallon’s Late Show and even a few movie appearances, its safe to say that Black Thought shines awfully bright.

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CARTER: What is the story behind your entertainment name “Black Thought”? BT: If you want to get the color Black, you mix everything. I felt like that paralleled my style of rhyme. I was kind of everything; you know it was some street stuff, some soul. It was reggae inspired; it was just different colors of my musical spectrum to come together. When you aren’t making music what philanthropic interests are you involved in? I am involved in a sports organization in Germantown, Philadelphia. It’s called the Triple Threat Foundation. We contribute to their organization a couple of times a year as well as Common’s Common Ground Foundation. We’re active in raising money for that. Recently, as in right now, I am in the process of starting my own grass roots organization that’s called “Grass Roots” (pun intended). Our focus is on young girls’ health and resolutions for obesity. Its something that has been relatively new and I have been getting letters of content. We are just spreading the awareness and we have already had a few events. The next major thing we are doing for this is an E.P., where we are going to record a record and all the proceeds are going to go to this charitable organization. What made you go in that direction for your organization? I have a young daughter and you know raising a little girl. My wife is also trying to launch a different type of initiative as far as lunch in school. She is trying to create a service that is organic and health conscious lunches for the kids; boys and girls. From her doing research in that it just struck me as interesting.

Photo: Mel D. Cole, villageslum.com

What are two credos that you live by daily? “Winners never quit and quitters never win” & “Practice makes perfect” hard work is always going to pay off. No matter what it is, the more you practice and work at it you become more efficient. The Roots is one of the most highly respected bands in history in hip-hop culture. Why transition to television as the house band for the Jimmy Fallon show? We have been doing this for a little over two years now and when Jimmy made us an offer to do this gig it was the beginning of the slump of the music industry. Sales where people usually sell 2million records guaranteed are now selling 500k records and the media of CD’s was on its way out, making way for the download era. It was a good opportunity and we all as a band weighed the pros and cons. We don’t feel discomfort in doing this. We don’t feel that this is the end or that we are going to stop here, it’s a good place to create alliances and build bridges with people to take us to the next level.

Many would profess that you are one of the greatest emcees of Hip Hop. How do you feel about the future of Hip-Hop, the artists and the direction of the industry? As far as other people coming out claiming that they are the best to do it, their entitled to feel that way too, I mean if you don’t believe in yourself, who is? You know I may disagree that some other cat isn’t the best or one of the best where as someone else may feel they are. After working with all the artists over the years, what would you say is your most memorable collaboration? Of course some people like BB King and Anita Baker. You know, like I have shared the stage with almost every artist I could imagine, but I get star struck and feel a kind of way when working with BB King, Stephen Marley and Anita Baker. Given the opportunity, what would you do differently as a youth knowing what you know today? I don’t know if I would change anything. I feel like my experience in Philadelphia, in the city, in the hood growing up, kind of gave me a different edge on the entertainment world and on the cooperate world. All this has made me the man I am today. As a family man, what would you say is the best thing about being a father? The best thing about being a father is the feeling you get from being a provider and being the head of the house. Knowing that you are the provider and having the responsibility of providing for your family. What advice would you give to the young readers of Carter Magazine about pursuing your dreams? I would say just don’t be afraid to pursue your passion, don’t be inhibited. Be dedicated, consistent and uninhibited.

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SPORTS

ONE-ON-ONE WITH...

THE PROFESSOR by LeSean Moore

The Professor is known for the work he puts in on the street ball courts all around the world. One blink and he’s gone. One wrong move and he will cross you over and have the entire stadium on their feet cheering him on. But what makes Grayson Boucher different from any other ball handler? Ever wondered what it feels like to be known everywhere for “schooling” ball players twice your size? We talked to The Professor, and he let us know it all…

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Everyone knows who The Professor is, can you tell us, who is Grayson Boucher? Truthfully, it’s the same person. People in my everyday life call me the Professor. The only people that call me Grayson is like family and close friends that date back from High School. How did you get the nickname the Professor? I got it from Kangol the tour MC. He was the original voice of Street Ball in Rucker Park and in 2003 he always said I was “schooling people” on the court. So the Professor came from that. What was it like growing in Keizer, Oregon? I had a good up bringing, grew up in a small town, something like a suburb, went to small schools up until high school then I graduated high school in a private school, and anytime after that I played basketball.

The Professor vs Robbie Jones: Courtesy of Getty Images for Ball Up; The Professor: Imagez by LB

How difficult was it getting on the AND1 Street Ball Tour? Now that I look at it in hindsight, it was pretty difficult. I don’t think if I had to do it over I can’t duplicate it. At the time I was 18 years old and I had one year of college under my belt, I was like a fan of AND1. When the tour came to Portland, Oregon I was going to have a good time and see a good game; I didn’t really think it could turn into a career opportunity. When I tried out and they asked me to play, I was excited about the opportunity. The goal is to win in style and entertain the crowd. Who are your favorite basketball players whether it’s in the NBA or Street ball? Truthfully, I don’t watch the NBA as much as I use to, I watch the playoffs; but since we travel on the road-year round I tend to catch the highlights. I wouldn’t say I have a favorite but I always like point guards, like Steve Nash. I grew up liking Allen Iverson and if I had to pick a team, my favorite team is the Blazers because I’m from Oregon so I like Brandon Roy. Players like that. Where you ever involved in any organizations or mentoring programs growing up to get to where you are today? I had a couple of influential people in my life that steered me in the right direction. One was my father who introduced me to the game of basketball at a very young age and another one was a guy by the name of Rodney Howard who had given me basketball instruction classes from fifth grade all the way to college. They helped mentor me on and off the court to keep me goal driven. When did you realize that you had incredible talent playing basketball? Probably around the 7th or 8th grade, I realized I loved basketball, I was pretty

good and this was going to be what I put all my time and energy into. So I’d say middle school. How has your life changed now that you’re a Street ball celebrity? A lot changed, when I turned 18, I had got on the Mixtape Tour. It was kind of overwhelming for me at first because I was use to the regular life. I was in school, I had a part-time job, I was just Grayson. When I got some exposure on ESPN with the Mixtape Tour, I started getting a lot of attention and notoriety, signing autographs and pictures, becoming a role model for kids, so you have to carry yourself a certain way. It was a 180-degree turn. What motivates you in life other than playing basketball? God first, I’m a Christian so that’s number one. Second probably are my fans, people that supported me all the way through and third I would be so-call haters or nonbelievers. Those that don’t support are just a strong motivation. Are you doing anything to give back to the community such as basketball camps? Yeah, I actually started doing basketball clinics for children a couple of years ago its called Ball Handling Academy. In order to start, I did a bunch of free clinics, since I was starting something new. I did a couple in the Bay Area, one in Oakland and collaboration with an academy for about 200 kids. Also one in Angola, Africa, Japan and now I’m looking to expand from there. In total I’ve done about ten. I’m in a role model position and I can do something to give back to the basketball community. If you hadn’t joined the AND1 Street Ball Tour, what would you be doing? Somebody asked me that not too long ago and it’s hard for me to say because since I was in middle school, I always wanted to play professional basketball. I had never really aimed to do anything else in life. I guess I would still have something to do with the game, whether in the clothing aspect, sports marketing, coaching or something along with basketball, if I was playing. What advice do you have for teens that want to follow in your footsteps and play professional basketball? What I usually try to relay, is to be goal-driven and set their goals high. Its kind of crazy because I didn’t know that knowledge, but I kind of did it anyway because I loved the game of basketball. So everything I d i d I dedicated my life to basketball so everything was goal-driven towards that, and eventually ended up as a career. If I could relay that knowledge to kids now hopefully it will help them a little more in life. Check out The Professor and his Ball Up Streetball teammates on Fox Sports or MSG, every Sunday night at 5:00pm and 9:00pm. Also, stay tuned for The Professors series of instructional applications releasing this year available on the iPhone and iPad. CARTER-MAG.COM

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A WORK OF ARTISTRY

By Raymond Mota

Sanaa Lathan is one of the most talented women in the acting business and represents the legacy of black actresses well. She’s known for many roles such as Monica in ‘Love & Basketball’, Sidney in ‘Brown Sugar’ and Beneatha in ‘A Raisin in the Sun’. Off the screen she has an amazing personality and a true passion for her craft, which comes through in this interview. Now in a successful run on Broadway, Sanaa is taking the stage, in “By the way… Meet Vera Starks”. Her work and her talent is an inspiration to many. 12

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For those of us that live under a rock, who is Sanaa Lathan? She is an actress who has been fortunate enough to make a lot of movies. Some include: Love and Basketball, Brown Sugar, & Something New. I have a long resume of films that I am very proud of. I am currently doing a play called By the Way, Meet Vera Starks in New York at second Stage Theatre and I am also the voice of Donna on The Cleveland Show. I have been fortunate for all the roles that I have been able to play over the years. I’m just really passionate about my job and very grateful for the type of success that I have had.

When I got the script I connected with it because it was so funny, so moving, and so relevant to what actually goes on today. It was a play about a black actress and you don’t come across that very often. I’m a black actress and this character Vera Starks is an aspiring black actress in the 1930’s. This play has things that will make you laugh, but then have you think about it. It had everything an actor could want. To prepare for it I watched a lot of 1930’s movies and watched interviews with older television actresses like Judy Garland and Eartha Kitt.

Was there ever a role that was the hardest for you to approach? Did having parents that were grounded in the show business really push you during your career really push you to be the Sanaa Lathan that we all know today? I think just by the nature of me being surrounded by the art all the time I was kind of influenced by it, but never forced into it. I was always in dance classes and I would always be backstage with my mom when she was doing her shows. My parents never forced me to do it, but it came naturally. They have always been very supportive of me. Contrary to what a lot of people believe, my father has never given me a job, but maybe one day we’ll work together. He is very old school in the way that people have to build their own career by their own means.

At what point did you decide that you would be devoted to acting, be it on stage or in front of a camera? Well I went to UC Berkley College and I was an English major. One of my classes was actually a workshop with African American actors. We worked on plays by that were written by African American playwrights. We would also do improvisational pieces. We did our own scene work for our plays. It was after I had so much fun with these groups of people, the few years that I was with them, that I decided to apply for drama school. I knew how rough it could be out there, so I wanted to be as prepared as possible when I went out into the real world. I ended up applying to the Yale School of Drama and fortunately I got accepted. I just continued to do plays and after that I just knew that acting was for me.

Photo Courtesy of True Public Relations

Would you prefer acting in front of a camera better than on stage or vice versa? And why? I love them both. I love that I get to meet so many people and having the ability to tell stories on both sides of the acting world. I love the feeling that a movie in the cinema can bring about. I just love being a part of that process for people. You get to experience so many things with movies. On the other hand, theatre is so immediate and especially opening night it creates that atmosphere. You have the ability to play off of your audience’s reactions and emotions from beginning to end and that is really satisfying. They each have special qualities that attract me.

You are currently performing the play By the Way, Meet Vera Starks, now what attracted you to this role and how did you prepare for it?

Most likely it would have to be when I did Cat on a Hot Tin Roof where I played Maggie the Cat. That role is just one of the giant roles in theatre for a female actress. That is a very emotional character and to produce all those emotions became the most challenging for me so far. It required so much stamina emotionally and physically.

In your spare time, do you play any sports? Basketball maybe? (Laughing) I don’t really play any sports and I haven’t touched a basketball since the movie Love and Basketball. I like to do yoga, walking, hiking, and basically just working out.

What is it like to play an animated character in The Cleveland Show or just an animated character in general? It’s really fun. The studio is like a music studio where you have the microphone and the booth. You get to go and say all of these great lines. I play Donna and I think she is as real a character to me as any other characters I have played. Even though she is animated it doesn’t make her any less real to me. I love that in animation you can just roll out of bed and just go to work in sweats and a baseball cap without having to worry too much about make-up or anything like that. It’s also great that I get to keep laughing because these writers are so brilliant with what they come up with.

The name Sanaa is Swahili for “a work of art”, do you think through your work that you’ve lived up to what your name means? Mmm. Oh, that’s not for me to say but I will strive for that, but that’s not for me to say.

What advice would you give to someone who would like follow in your footsteps? I would say that if you’re going to try and become an actor, then just go out and be the best actor you can be. That means going to classes, getting good grades, doing plays, doing community theatres and most importantly just to get a great education. The actors that I respect read books and know their history. The more you know the better of an actor you can be because you can draw from what you know and express it in your craft. Also, try to diligent in being in acting classes and getting as much experience as possible. You would use the experience you have to develop your technique just like you would with any other craft.

The script was written by an amazing writer named Lynn Nottage.

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BLACK WAL 14

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LL STREET By Raymond Mota

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THIS IS ONE OF THE GREAT PINNACLES OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, BUT IT HAS BEEN LONG FORGOTTEN BY MANY WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. BLACK WALL STREET EMBODIES THE SPIRIT OF CAPITALISM IN AMERICA AND COULD BE SYNONYMOUS WITH NOT ONLY AFRICAN AMERICANS, BUT EVERYONE, NO MATTER THEIR RACE. THIS GREAT GROUP ROSE BY THE “AMERICAN DREAM”, BUT FELL BY THE RACISM THAT FLOURISHED IN AMERICA DURING THAT TIME AND THE JEALOUSY THAT SUCCESS IN AMERICA PRODUCES. THEY ARE THE BLACK WALL STREET. t all began during the early 1900’s in northern Tulsa, Oklahoma. Black Wall Street was a community of some of the wealthiest black people in America at the time. One of the biggest businesses that African Americans took a big chunk of during that time was oil. Oil was the money maker for many Black’s in that area at the time. Because of how oppressive segregation laws were during that time, Black’s were forced to use their own stores, telephone booths, and water fountains. The African American people of that time took these inhumane segregation laws and made it work for them. They were forced into a situation where the odds were stacked against them and they created a community that helped each other flourish economically. A few examples of how successful this African American community became includes a woman named California Taylor, who was married to a successful Black banker. Every three months she would take a trip to Paris to have new clothes made. Another example would be a man by the name of Dr. Berry who also owned a bus system. Dr. Berry earned $500 a day. The community was made up of 600 businesses and a population of 15,000. The Ku Klux Klan and the high-ranking police officials in

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the area were waiting for anything to use against Black Wall Street. They finally got their opportunity when Dick Rowland, a Black shoe shiner, stumbled into an elevator and just instinctively grabbed the White elevator attendant, Sarah Page, as he was falling and she shrieked because he startled her. They took this and turned it into the typical story of the Black boy trying to rape the White girl in the elevator. Members of the Ku Klux Klan were then suddenly being deputized and on June 1, 1921 all hell broke loose in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Everything that they worked so hard for was now gone, just like that. Led by the Ku Klux Klan, a riot ensued as buildings were burned down. People were shot and killed. Bombs were set off in the town. An estimated 3,000 African Americans died that day. Some people may ask, “Why?”, and the answer is simple. Racism and jealousy overcame a once great area of wealthy, hard working Americans. They dared to dream the American dream, but some people couldn’t face that fact and they took it upon themselves to end it. Although, they may be gone, the people of the Black Wall Street left a legacy and a lesson for us. “There are two ways of exerting one’s strength: one is pushing down, the other is pulling up.” – Booker T. Washington


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BL CK M SONS By Syreeta Gates

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Since the beginning of time there were Masons. As told in the dictionary a Mason is a builder and worker in stone. A Mason is like a craftsmen, tailor, blacksmith, someone that holds a certain skill, and that expertise is sharpened by building with others who also share that talent. This is also true of the Prince Hall Freemasonry also known as the Black Masons. When thinking of Masons, one might imagine a secret society, but if you look closely the potency is much stronger than what popular culture has deemed it. For the Prince Hall Freemasons are a brotherhood, a collective of African American men held together by morals, passion and purpose.

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heir goals are to take good men and make them better, by giving them the tools, resources and support they seek. When Rick Ross declared “A lot of great thinkers and a lot of great inventors”, he could have been referring to the late Prince Hall. Prince Hall was born in 1738 by way of England or Africa, a servant. On April 9,1770 Prince Hall was freed with these worlds “he is no longer to be reckoned a slave, but has been always accounted as a freeman by us”. This phenomenal man was ahead of his time. He sought to educate African Americans therefore he taught many how to read and write in Boston. While on his quest to edify his people he realized that “the persons that were listened to, be they the governor, the mayor, selectmen, or leading citizens, were all freemasons”. With that in mind his journey as a Freemason began. As an entrepreneur, Hall’s owned a leather dresser and there he was able to assemble connections with Freemasons. Because he knew the importance of building relationships, he used those to his ad-

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vantage and was made a Mason on March 6,1775, one of the first made in America. With his first goal accomplished, he knew their was more to be done, he then organized African Lodge #1 on May 3, 1776. Hall’s legacy was left through a school in Boston and the work that was done through African Lodge #1. Prince Hall died on December 4,1807 but his legacy continues in Harlem USA. The Prince Hall Grand Lodge of the State of New York calls home 454 West 155th Street Adelphic Union Lodge #14. With “ancient wisdom valuable like gifts of gold” the Black Masons have taken Hall’s legacy and amplified it. The have found a way to “Give More” to the community at large by being exceptionally active in education and social change. Prince Hall Masons have taken their template and exposed it for the next generation to use. Some of the most known members including Phillip Randolph, Alex Haley, William “Count” Basie, Thurgood Marshall, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Scottie Pippen, and W.E.B. Dubios, have all re-imagined what it is to be a Black man in America.

What will your legacy be?


Has Freemasonry been misunderstood to the general public? What are your thoughts to how popular culture perceives it?

How much of Black Mason knowledge is public? & If not a lot, why is it not?

Yes Freemasonry has been misunderstood because it is an ancient, honorable institution that still holds claim to its vast history, yet uses many of its old customs to present itself to the public. And although that is how it should be, the public often misunderstands its very nature;which at its heart is to take good men and make them better by giving them the tools and support they need to be better.

With today’s internet world almost all information to some degree can be accessed by the public. But it is not the information that makes one a Mason, it is the information that cannot be recieved thru the internet. It is the brotherhood and it is through living the ritual and the core values through we have as masons. It was once said about Prince Hall Freemasonry from a mason friend to one who was not a mason, “From the inside looking out, I can’t explain it and from the outside looking in, you can’t understand it,”and to be honest, this is somewhat true

As a Black Mason it is obvious that leadership is important, how do you intergrad that to the younger generations (passing the torch)? Prince Hall Masons in the State of New York have worked to promote young leaders in the 1st Masonic District and over half of the worshipful masters (leaders of lodges) are relatively young men who are actively taking up the mantra of leadership in the Lodge and in the community as a whole. We encourage young men and young women when they are ready to ask how to become a member, how to get information on Prince Hall Masonry, and how to join our family.

What makes the Black Masons different from any other masons, besides the color factor? What makes Prince Hall Masons different from all other masons is our very rich heritage, and a celebration of African-American culture in this country. Remember that Prince Hall Freemasonry was established in 1775 before America declared its independence, and Prince Hall was an abolitionist, a teacher, and an activist in a time when our forefathers had no rights. Yet he found it important to deliver the sacred teachings of Masonry to his own people to help them be better.

If you could give young people words of advice on the importance of coming together as a people, what would it be? Simply put, we as a divided people are a less powerful people, and at a time when our children and our young people need us most, we cannot afford to waste any of our power or influence on the things that divide us.

What do you want the outside world to know about Black Masons and your lodge specifically? I want readers to know that many of the people throughout our past and present were, and are part of this organization. And I hope that readers would ask a member for more information. Those that seek it, and knock upon the door of Freemasonry will receive it. Regarding Adelphic Union Lodge #14 – I would want them to know that my Lodge is older than the Emancipation Proclamation and has had many great community leaders that come from its membership. We hope to continue serving the community at large and Prince Hall Freemasonry forever.

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Summer SUMMER R Photography by Rayon Richards

Image/Fashion Direction by Alexander Allen

Dre: BBC straw hat; Ice Cream pink stripe polo; vintage wash jeans, bbcicecream.com

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r Love ROMANCE Hair: Danielle Williams ¡ Makeup: Candice Crawford using MAKE UP FOR EVER Chelsea: Callula Lillibelle printed silk charmeuse strapless cocktail $449, Vert & Vogue 919-251-8537; DSQUARED2 Blue Furia Sandal $690, dsquared2.com; Laruicci gold spotlight earrings $90, laruicci.com; Laruicci rosegold Tongo bracelet $245; Laruicci gold mixed metal ring $245; NY Industrie neon pink skully (stylist’s own); Betmar5L^@VYRW\YWSLÅVWW`OH[Z[`SPZ[ZV^U

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Chelsea: Callula Lillibelle silky twill wrap blouse $242, FRENCH TWIST 508-555-5555; Callula Lillibelle blue mini printed linen cross short $209, Callulalillibelle.com; DSQUARED2 Blue Furia Sandal $690, dsquared2.com; Laruicci black/gold ignition earrings $220; Laruicci gunmetal single enchantment necklace $195; Laruicci gold frinze lights bracelet $563, laruicci.com; Anna Sui green headband (stylist’s own); Jimmy Choo green and beige Dahla/S sunglasses, solsticesunglasses.com Dre: BBC army jacket; BBC vintage wash blue jeans; BBC army fanny pack, bbcicecream.com; DSQUARED2 octopus sneaker $650, dsquared2.com; Bob Marley bracelet (stylist’s own); Nooka orange watch, nooka.com

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Dre: BBC sailor shirt; ICE CREAM plain khaki short, bbcicecream.com; Ubora Linx bracelet; Louis Vuitton bracelet, LouisVuitton.com; DSQUARED2 new runner sneaker $510, dsquared2.com Chelsea: Ghost hat (stylist’s own); Callula Lillibelle beige/orange stretch cotton sateen belted wrap $449, Callulalillibelle.com; Kali Brown leather feather earrings $30; Kali Brown leather braid bracelet $40, kalibrown.com; Laruicci gold Fiji ring $120, laruicci.com; DSQUARED2 Isla Bonita Sandal $730, dsquared2.com

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’s own) $$$ ring (stylist nglasses.com; su ice lst so , , es ria Sandal $690 cci leather shad ARED2 Blue Fu een v-neck; Gu QU gr C DS ; BB ; om irt .c sh lle ci.com 85,Callulalillibe Dre: BBC white ring $170, laruic scade dress $3 pearl pom pom i d linen belted ca an icc n ru tto La ; co om ed 0, kalibrown.c la Lillibelle strip ain necklace $7 Chelsea: Callu Brown pearl ch li Ka ; m co 2. dsquared

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ICE CREAM shorts, bbcicecream.com; Marc Jacobs green belt, (stylist’s own); DSQUARED2 octopus sneaker $650, dsquared2.com

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Happily Ever After.

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Chelsea: Callula Lillibelle red leopard tanning suit $198, Callulalillibelle.com; DSQUARED2 Isla Bonita Sandal $730, dsquared2.com; American Apparel gold headband, AmericanApparel.net; Laruicci gold sunrise necklace $110; Laruicci gold electra ring $245, laruicci.com Dre: BBC grey/red shirt; BBC blue faded jeans (rolled up to capris), bbcicecream.com; DSQUARED2 new runner sneaker $510, dsquared2.com; Ubora Linx blue bracelet; GShock white watch, gshock.com

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FRESH DAILY Artist Name

Place of Origin Brooklyn, NY How long have you been working on your craft It’s been at least 10 years. And I have been evolving as an artist every step of the way. Greatest Influence The borough of Brooklyn is my greatest influence. My upbringing, struggles and victories stirred the ingredients of this melting pot environment that I grew up in. Tell us why the SPOTLIGHT is on Fresh Daily? I’m an emcee from Brooklyn, NY. I’m also a freelance graphic illustrator and designer. My mission is to create quality, fun, and thought-provoking dialogue. It’s inspiring art for mass amounts of people to feel, hear, see and appreciate. I enjoy growing, meeting new people, and learning new things about the world I live in. I am culturally aware, socially conscious and unintentionally educational through open dialogue amongst my peers. My passion is music; art, fashion and my strong love for the Hip Hop Culture.

Photo: Brad Ogbonna, justbrad.com

-Fresh Daily website: http://freshdailymc.com

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For whom I believe in,

now believes in ME. –Q www.carter-mag.com “The Evolution of Revolution”


ROBERT BATTLE

By Jewell Jacobs

Robert Battle is a prestigious dancer who has dedicated his life to the art of dancing for over 25 years. He started his life work in high school while attending the New World School of Arts in Miami, Florida. In 1990 he attended Julliard School, one of the most remarkable performing arts schools in the country. After graduating from Julliard, he joined, performed and choreographed for Parsons Dance Company for seven years. 36

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Before Robert began dancing, at 3 weeks old, his great aunt and uncle never imagined that he would land a position as the Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey. To them he was just “a bow legged baby in need of braces.” In 2001 Mr. Battle left Parsons to create his company Battle Works, where he directed and choreographed pieces for the next nine years. He created new artistic pieces and restaged his ballets for companies such as: Hubbard Street Repertory, River North Chicago Dance Company and Ballet Memphis. Beginning, July 2011, Robert Battle will be the third person to head the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater since it was founded in 1958. Battle got his start at Ailey in 2003, when he choreographed his first piece for the company, titled Juba, where he worked alongside the phenomenal Judith Jamison. Some of Robert Battle’s greatest contributions to date, includes his residences at universities throughout the United States and his offerings of master classes around the world. In 2005, he was also honored as one of the Masters of African American Choreography by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. After great consideration, in 2010 Judith Jamison, Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater who is also a dancer and choreographer, select Battle to be her successor. According to

Judith Jamison, “Robert Battle is the giant leap I want to take to ensure that this company stays vibrant in the future.” He was not only chosen by Jamison, but also by a committee because of his skills and talent for developing high powered dancers and his ability to choreograph for the company. The Alvin Ailey Dance Company plays a special role in many lives. The works of the company stirs a passion in everyone that experiences a performance. Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater inspires young African-Americans to achieve greatness and build self confidence. Through the company’s international tour they are able to broaden their influence to the African Diaspora around the globe. As a dancer, I am greatly inspired by Battle’s triumphant story of how he overcame criticism at such an early age. I’ve learned, no matter what people say about you, no one determines your future, but you. What really motivates me to dance, is that it relieves me from outside stresses with school and in my environment. When I dance, I feel a different type of energy flowing through my body that makes me feel free and happy. Robert Battle, a role model to my life, has given me the motivation to achieve my dreams. I respect him. I thank him.

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BRONX KEEPS CREATIN’ IT... Fresh The Bronx has a rich history and connection with the Hip Hop culture, but isn’t necessarily synonymous with healthy living. Juices For Life is making that their mission and is giving the community of Unionport a healthy hang out that helps make your insides smile. This community establishment serves up tasty, all natural juices, with more than 200 combinations on their menu. 38

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Aside from the beautiful colors that come from blending these natural ingredients, these juices also offer up 6 servings of fruits and vegetables with no artificial sweeteners, flavors or dyes. Leo Galvez, Nyger Rollocks, and Hip Hop lyricist David “Styles P” Styles partnered up to make this healthy spot one of the most talked about juice bars in the Bronx. The plan was simple. Provide the community with a healthier alternative to what the neighborhood corner stores offer and make it cool for the culture. So, now that summer has officially started, CARTER™ Magazine’s youth writers took a trip to Juices For Life to test it out and share their opinion with the readers. We asked ourselves, Could freshly blended fruits and vegetables actually taste good? We were challenged to open our minds and try something new. We tried five different drinks and rated them on taste, texture and smell. Here’s what we had to say… But you don’t have to take our word for it. SCORE

TASTE y Cassid Jewell

n LeSea nd Raymo a Briann

APE

ACNE

REVIVE

1 2 3 1 2

4 4

4

4

5

5

1

1

5

5

3

3

REVIVE

5

5

4

3

5 5

Jewell LeSean Raymond

Brianna

REVIVE

3 2 3

APE JUICE

SLAMMIN’ PROTEIN FUTURE

2

4

2

4

3

Jewell

4

5

5

1

2

LeSean

4

5

5

1

5

Raymond

3

5

3

1

3

Brianna

4

3

4

3

5

SCORE ARD ACNE

1 4

ACNE

Cassidy

SMELL Cassidy

SCORE ARD

TEXTURE

IN’ E SLAMMEIN FUTUR T O R P JUICE

5

5

ARD

5 5 2 3 4

APE JUICE SLAMMIN’ PROTEIN FUTURE

5

5 3 4 4

5 1 2 5 5

3 1 4 2 5

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Homage

Lena Horne 1917 - 2010

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The rise and fall of

BLACK WALL STREET

CARTER™ Magazine Jun/Jul Issue  

This is CARTER™ Magazine June/July issue which feature Black Wall Street and Black Masons.

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