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Carrollton High School Student Curriculum Guide

Cavalier Pride


Curriculum Guide for Students This Curriculum Guide has been compiled to provide information for students and parents to aid them in planning a meaningful educational experience. The four years of education at Carrollton High School will greatly influence and determine what opportunities will be available to students in their future. We urge that serious consideration be given to the Educational Development Plan to develop an appropriate program of study. In each year of high school, certain courses shall be required and are designed to give you basic skills necessary to make a positive contribution to our society. Use your elective courses to explore and develop your own interests and prepare yourself to meet your individual goals. Teachers and counselors will make recommendations for appropriate courses for individual students; however, we do not encourage you to choose a less challenging course. You do have the right to enroll in a higher level class, contrary to teacher and/or counselor recommendations. The major responsibility in developing an individualized program must come from you. We hope you will utilize the Guide to answer important questions such as: 1. Will I fulfill the requirements for each year and graduation? 2. Will I fulfill the requirements for employment at the end of high school or for further education? 3. Are my selected courses appropriate to best serve my interests and abilities? Carrollton High School Mission Statement The community of Carrollton High School is committed to the goal of providing a safe, respectful and progressive learning environment. We will empower students to be productive, lifelong learners who have an awareness of being responsible, global citizens. Non-Discrimination Policy Statement In compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disability Act of 1990, and the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act of 1977, it is the policy of the Carrollton Public School District that no person shall, on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, sex, disability, height, weight, or marital status be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to, discrimination during any program, activity, service or in employment. For information, inquiries, or to file a complaint, contact the Superintendent of Carrollton Public Schools at PO Box 517, Carrollton, MI 48724. (989) 754-1475


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Math (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, one additional) Science (Biology, Physics or Chemistry, one additional) English Social Studies (World History, U.S. History, Civics/Econ) Physical Education Health Foreign Language (2 credits beginning with class of 2016) Computers Fine Arts ****Academic Collegiate Transitions ****Foundations Class Total Units of Required Classes Total Credits Required Total Credits Possible

4 3 4 3 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 20/21 24 28

*40 documented hours of community service due by end of first semester senior year. Transfer students are required to earn 10 hours per school year. **Required to complete all sections of the Michigan Merit Exam. ***Required to complete 4 years of advisory. ****Students who are deficient in core content subject areas as evidenced by performance on the EXPLORE, PLAN or MME tests will be required to complete foundations coursework and all juniors must complete an ACT course to graduate in addition to completing the graduation requirements. *****As a component of the English 12 course, all seniors are required to complete the senior project, including attending the senior symposium. In addition, all seniors are required to participate in a day of community service working with the Senior to Senior project in Carrollton. Units of Credit All courses in the curriculum are organized to give one-half (½) unit of credit for each semester of acceptable work (D- or better as the semester grade) with the exception of the SCC and BACC courses which are worth a total of one and one-half (1½) units of credit for each semester of acceptable work (D- or better as the semester grade).


Class Standing Students will not be offered the privilege of achieving a certain class standing if they do not meet the minimum credit requirements. The following is the credit schedule.    

Seniors: Must have 17 - 24 credits Juniors: Must have 11 - 16.5 credits Sophomores: Must have 5 - 10.5 credits Freshmen: Must have 0 - 4.5 credits

How Class Rank is Determined A student’s class rank is based upon the average of his/her semester grades. To determine graduation honors for seniors, rank is computed at the end of the seventh semester using the following scale: A 4.0 C 2.0 B3.7 C1.7 B+ 3.3 D+ 1.3 B 3.0 D 1.0 B2.7 D0.7 C+ 2.3 There are several advanced classes with weighted grades that may impact grade point average and class rank. Please refer to the Student Handbook for more detailed information.


A MESSAGE TO STUDENTS One of the most important decisions you make each year in high school is the selection of your course of study. By selection he appropriate classes and then by putting forth the maximum effort in learning you will begin to reach your educational goal. Please seriously consider the decisions you make regarding course selection. Seek information from the Curriculum Guide, counselor, principal, teaching staff, and parents to help you in this process. You should select the best course of study to meet your educational needs. You should be planning now for what you want to do after you leave high school. You should select courses that lead toward that career goal, whatever your goal may be. Many students pick classes for the wrong reason: “My friends are in it,” “There are good looking guys or girls in that class,” “It’s easy”. These are all the wrong reasons for choosing a class. This method of picking a class leads nowhere. There are some suggested programs of study in this Curriculum Guide. There are other additional options available to you at the Bay Arenac Career Center and the Saginaw Career Complex. You may choose to design your own plan-that’s fine. The important thing it to have a plan. The more information you have, the better career choice you can make. This Curriculum Guide is a start. You can obtain more information by talking to counselors, teachers, students, and others. Ask the teacher what the class is about. Remember, too, that you MAY NOT BE ALLOWED to change your classes after the first week of a new semester, this makes wise planning and selection even more important. The following pages contain descriptions of the courses offered at Carrollton High School. It is important that you read these descriptions carefully so that you make good choices for your class schedule. Be sure to notice the prerequisites for each class. Do not sign up for a class unless you have met the prerequisite. Failure to plan is planning to fail!


Carrollton High School Four Year Plan Total of 24 Credits to Graduate

Freshman 1) English 9 or Honors English 9 2) Algebra I or Geometry/ Honors Geometry 3) Biology I or Honors Biology I 4) World History 5) PE/Health 6) Foreign Language I or II 7) Elective a. ____________________

Sophomore 1) English 10 or Honors English 10 2) Geometry/Honors Geometry or Algebra II/Honors Algebra II 3) Physical/Earth Science or Chemistry/ Honors Chemistry 4) U.S. History 5) Foreign Language I or II 6) Elective 7) Elective a. ____________________ b. ____________________

Junior 1) English 11 or Honors English 11 2) Algebra II/Honors Algebra II or Trigonometry or Geometry/Honors Geometry 3) Chemistry/ Honors Chemistry or Physics or Chemistry II or Anatomy & Physiology 4) Civics/Economics 5) Elective 6) Elective 7) Elective a. ____________________ b. ___________________ c. ___________________

Senior 1) 2) Math 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) a. b. c. d. e.

English 12 or AP Lit. & Comp. Trigonometry or Calculus or Consumers Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________


Sequence of Required Courses English Course Sequence Grade 9- English 9 or Honors English 9 Grade 10- English 10 or Honors English 10 Grade 11- English 11 or Honors English 11 Grade 12- English 12 or AP Lit. & Com. * All students must earn credits in English 9, 10, 11 and 12. Four total credits required!

Mathematics Course Sequence Grade 9- Algebra 1 or Geometry/Honors Geometry Grade 10- Geometry/Honors Geometry or Algebra II/Honors Algebra II Grade 11- Algebra II/Honors Algebra II or Trigonometry Grade 12- Consumers Math, Trigonometry, or Calculus * All students must earn credit in Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II plus one other math credit. A math class much be taken during the Senior year. Four total credits required. * Accelerated track available, see counselor for details.


Social Studies Course Sequence Grade 9- World History Grade 10- U.S. History Grade 11- Civics/Economics * All students must pass World History, U.S. History and Civics/Economics to graduate.

Science Course Sequence Grade 9- Biology I or Honors Biology I Grade 10- Physical/Earth Science or Chemistry/Honors Chemistry Grade 11- Chemistry/Honors Chemistry or Physics or Chemistry II or Anatomy and Physiology Grade 12- Physics or Chemistry II or Anatomy and Physiology * All students must earn a minimum of three (3) science credits. These must include Biology I, Chemistry or Physics and at least one other science class.

*In addition to the required courses listed above all students must take two (2) foreign language credits (beginning with the class of 2016‌. one credit for the class of 2015), one (1) credit of Computer Science or Online Research, and one (1) Fine Arts credit. These credits may be taken any year of high school. Once the first credit from the fine arts and computer science classes have been earned, subsequent advanced courses for these disciplines may be taken with credit earned counting as an elective. Additional elective courses are listed under electives in the Curriculum Guide.


ACADEMIC COURSE DESCRIPTIONS *****COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT***** Computer Applications I (required) This course is designed to teach students the basics of computer software including word processing, spreadsheet application, presentation, internet usage, and email basics. Additional skills such as computer literacy, keyboard development, business document and formatting, problem solving and decision-making are taught and emphasized. Students will utilize Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher and other available software to produce business and personal documents. Technology is constantly changing and many of the things we learn today are obsolete tomorrow. The focus is to teach you methods to learn, explore, discover, apply and solve so that the skills you learn today will help you tomorrow. Computer Applications II Prerequisite: Computer Applications I This course is designed to be project based, focusing on the Microsoft Office package and web page development using HTML programming. Students will complete a variety of lessons that incorporate different areas of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and the Internet into real life scenarios. The emphasis is on application of practical business and personal business situations. Students are encouraged to be creative, solve their own problems, and use resources available to prioritize and organize their work for maximum efficiency. Cooperation with other students in the classroom is essential. Desktop Design (Yearbook) Prerequisite: Computer Applications I This course is designed to teach students the basic rules of good design as applied to business documents and personal creations. The students will utilize Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Publisher, along with Photoshop Elements and Dreamweaver to produce brochures, letterhead, business cards, web pages, and other business publications. The Internet and email will also be utilized. Students will learn how to use digital cameras, scanners, CD & DVD burners, and will understand how technology is used in the real world. The emphasis is on application of good design, utilization of resources, and practical desktop publishing production. Students are encouraged to be creative, solve their own problems, use the resources available, and to prioritize and organize their work for maximum efficiency. Cooperation with other students in the classroom is required and encouraged. *******ENGLISH DEPARTMENT******** English 9 (required) English 9 is a required course in the study of the English Language and Literature focusing on Interrelationships and Self Reliance. This course covers transitional skills for success in high school, usage and mechanics of grammar, the writing process, and reading, thinking, and response skills. The focus of the literature genres is on the short stories, poetry, drama (Romeo & Juliet), epic poetry (The Odyssey), and the novel (Mississippi Trial, 1995 and To Kill a Mockingbird). English 9 students will demonstrate understanding and mastery of concepts through the use of oral, written, and multi-media communication.


Honors English 9 Prerequisite: Recommendation, writing sample, and a minimum score on the Explore Test. Honors English 9 is a more intense and self-directive course in the study of the English Language and Literature focusing on Inter-relationships and Self Reliance. The curriculum focus for the Honors English 9 is the same as English 9 with additional reading and writing requirements. This course moves at a faster pace and requires the students to be more independent in their studies. English 10 (required) English 10 is a required course in the study of English Language and Literature. The course will study various American authors through the use of novels, short stories, poetry, and film with a focus on Critical Response and Stance. Students will demonstrate understanding and mastery of concepts through the use of oral, written, and multi-media communication. Honors English 10 Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Honors English 9 and/or teacher recommendation. Honors English 10 is a more intensive and self-directive study of English Language and Literature. The course will study various American authors through the use of novels, short stories, poetry, and film with a focus on Critical Response and Stance. Students will demonstrate understanding and mastery of concepts through the use of oral, written, and multi-media communication. English 11 (required) English 11 is a required course in the study of English Language and Literature. The course will study various British authors through the use of novels, short stories, poetry, and film, with a focus on Transformational Thinking. Students will demonstrate understanding and mastery of concepts through the use of oral, written, and multi-media communication. Honors English 11 Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Honors English 10 and/or teacher recommendation. Honors English 11 is a more intensive and self-directive study of English Language and Literature The course will study various British authors through the use of novels, short stories, poetry, and film, with a focus on Transformational Thinking. Students will demonstrate understanding and mastery of concepts through the use of oral, written, and multi-media communication. English 12 (required) English 12 is a required course in the study of English Language and Literature. The course will study various novels from diverse authors and time periods that will focus on student leadership qualities. Students will demonstrate understanding and mastery of concepts through the use of oral, written, and multi-media communication. Students will complete a senior project. AP Literature and Composition Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Honors English 11 and teacher recommendation. AP English Literature is a yearlong study of World literature, poetry, language, thought and composition. A full year is required for graduation. The course is designed to explore literature through close reading, analysis, and writing/speaking using a thematic approach. There is also a Senior Thesis which requires the student to develop a project/presentation displaying their qualification for graduation. This class will prepare students for taking the National AP Literature and Composition exam in May.


Reading Students will read, interpret and analyze a variety of texts. They will work on reading comprehension strategies and vocabulary. Students will also bring in own reading material for daily independent reading. ******FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT****** Art This year-long course is designed to expand the development of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional art forms. Students will learn and apply different art and design skills to intentionally use art materials to communicate ideas. Students will practice critical thinking and problem solving skills. Some art history and exposure to different artists and art styles/periods will be taught. Projects will include: drawing, ceramics, printmaking, and painting. $3.00 Clay/Glaze fee. Band As a member of the Carrollton High School Band Program, you have a great opportunity to perform and develop your personal artistic ability. With the best music as our goal, your responsibility is to always strive for your personal best in the atmosphere of team goals. This band rehearses all year during the school day, as well as during co-curricular, after-school and before school rehearsals. Performances include all home football games, pep rallies, local parades, various marching invitations, school concerts, festivals, and competitions. This ensemble is the most visible performance group in high school. The marching activity is demanding, both musically and physically. All participants must commit themselves to maintaining high musical performance standards and good physical condition. Concert Choir Prerequisite: Previous choral experience and/or teacher recommendation. Concert Choir is an entry-level performance group that studies and applies vocal techniques and basic music theory. Candidates should possess a voice of reasonably good quality and should show evidence of musicianship. Students will perform a variety of literature and sight-reading exercises. Attendance at choral festival and all concerts is mandatory. Women’s Choir Prerequisite: Concert Choir or previously demonstrated ability, and approval of instructor. Women’s Choir is an advanced performance group, composed of treble voices only, that studies and applies vocal techniques, intermediate music theory, and sight reading exercises. Previous experience in singing and performing is necessary. Candidates should possess a voice with good tone quality and should show evidence of strong musicianship. Musical literature will consist of a cappella, foreign language, choreographed, and other diverse pieces. Attendance at choral festival and all concerts is mandatory. Music Appreciation Music Appreciation is a class designed to broaden every student's musical horizons, no matter what genres of music they currently listen to. We will study music from thousands of years ago to the modern day, and see how music has developed over a long period of time. Students will learn how today's music relates to music from 10, 100, or even 1000 years ago, in addition to being introduced to the fascinating lives of composers and performers from throughout history.


Theatrical Arts This class will focus on the acting process and theatre appreciation. Students will learn about the basic theories of acting and character development. Performance and theatre productions will be evaluated through observation, acting, and script analysis. The culminating project for this course will be a staged production/ performance for the public. Students will demonstrate the ability to stage a production and create a character for a play.

********FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT******** French I Students will be introduced to basic French vocabulary and grammatical structures. Students will also be introduced to French speaking practices, perspectives and products. Learning will occur through listening, reading, writing, speaking, viewing and creating projects in French and some English. Students will also learn by comparing and contrasting the language and culture to English. French II Prerequisite: Successful completion of French I Students will expand their knowledge from French I through further study of the language and culture. Students should expect to use the language more in learning and producing. High emphasis will be placed on speaking and writing in French. Spanish I This is a beginning level course where students will use conversational Spanish in interesting, real-life situations to practice structures and vocabulary. Students will also explore culture of the Spanishspeaking world. Spanish II Prerequisite: Pass Spanish I This is a continuation of Spanish I. Students will expand their acquisition using not only the present tense, but also past and future tenses. Students will continue to explore cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. ********MATH DEPARTMENT******** Algebra 1 (required) The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Because it is built on the middle grades standards, this is a more ambitious version of Algebra I than has generally been offered. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.


Content Standards include the following Domains that will be studied: The Real Number System, Quantities, Seeing Structure in Expressions, Arithmetic with Polynomials and Rational Expressions, Creating Equations, Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities, Interpreting Functions, Building Functions, Linear, Quadratic and Exponential Models, Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data. The Mathematical Practice Standards include: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Model with mathematics. Use appropriate tools strategically. Attend to precision. Look for and make use of structure. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Algebra II (required) This class is designed to develop proficiency in the following mathematical areas: Linear, Quadratic, Polynomial, Exponential, and Logarithmic, Rational and Radical, and all of the properties and attributes these functions have to offer. If time permits in this rigorous curriculum, we will develop skills necessary to be successful in Probability and statistics, Sequences and Series, and Trigonometric Functions. Honors Algebra II This class is designed to develop proficiency and a deep understanding in the following mathematical areas: Linear, Quadratic, Polynomial, Exponential, Logarithmic, Rational and Radica, Probability and Statistics, sequences and Series, and Trigonometric Functions, and all of the properties and attributes these function have to offer. Honors Algebra II moves at an accelerated pace and the material is studied in more depth. Geometry (required) Prerequisite: Algebra I Students will be able to: 1: Use construction tools to investigate ideas and patterns from Ancient Greece. 2. Make and test conjectures, and experience deductive reasoning in the form of direct and indirect proofs. 3. Analyze problems and apply algebraic functions. Topics covered include: geometric figures, deductive reasoning, constructions, and problem solving involving geometric figures. Honors Geometry Prerequisite: Algebra I Students will be able to: 1. Investigate foundations and patterns associated with geometry. 2. Make and test conjectures, and experience deductive reasoning in the form of a direct and indirect proofs. 3. Analyze problems and apply algebraic functions as they relate to geometric concepts. Honors Geometry is a more intense and self-directive course and moves at a faster pace and requires the students to be more independent. Topics covered include: geometric figures, deductive reasoning, constructions, and problem solving involving geometric figures. Consumers Math Seniors only This course gives students a consistent framework for thinking through financial choices in order to improve their well-being. Decisions require action. Students who take charge of their finances are better prepared to invest in themselves and cope with the ups and downs that life will bring. An activity and project-based approach will be used.


Calculus Prerequisite: Trigonometry/Pre-calculus Students will be able to: 1. Analyze a function. 2. Differentiate formulas. 3. Utilize logical thinking and problem solving skills. 4. Deepen their understanding of area, distance, volume, polar coordinates, sequences and vectors. Topics covered include: limits, graphing functions and inverses, integrals, differentiation and solving problems. ******PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT****** Physical Education (required) Physical Education gives all students the opportunity to enhance personal physical fitness on a daily basis. The course concentrates on development of all components of physical fitness (flexibility, cardiovascular conditioning, muscle strength, muscle endurance, and agility.) All levels of fitness are taken into account and programs are designed to meet individual needs/strengths. Also, students learn rules and game strategy in the following team sports: soccer, lacrosse, doubles badminton, floor hockey, basketball, and volleyball. Students are evaluated on daily class participation, knowledge acquisition, and gains in levels of personal physical fitness. Health (required) Health is a comprehensive program of interrelated components that stress choices and skills necessary for wellness. Topics of study include: emotional wellness and stress management, drug, alcohol, and tobacco awareness, healthy nutritional choices, human sexuality, environmental awareness, and disease prevention. Students are evaluated on daily class-work, projects, and unit quizzes/tests. Strength Training and Conditioning This course is designed to give students an opportunity to learn to develop muscle strength and endurance through methods beyond mere weightlifting. All aspects of physical fitness will take focus in this course (including developing flexibility, cardiovascular conditioning, and agility/speed.) Individual programs are designed by the students to reach specific training goals. Students are evaluated on daily class participation, knowledge acquisition and personal gains. *******SCIENCE DEPARTMENT******* Earth Science Explore a variety of topics including meteorology, geology, climatology, astronomy, tectonics, and movement of water. Students should complete this course with a good understanding of the natural processes that occur on the Earth. Students will be able to apply this knowledge to their local environment. In depth research and projects will be required throughout the year. Physical Science This course integrates the study of Chemistry and Physics in order to prepare students for advanced science studies. Students in Physical Science will learn measurement skills, mathematical calculations, structure of atoms, principles of bonding, properties of matter, Newton’s Laws of Motion, principles of electricity and magnetism, structure and uses of waves, and study of energy and heat. Many hands-on labs and experiences are included.


Biology I (required) Biology is a survey course generally taken in 9th grade. The course provides an overview of the following: study of life, Ecology, Chemistry in Biology, Cell (structure, energy, reproduction), Genetics, Human Systems, Evolution and Biodiversity. The course utilizes a variety of learning styles to incorporate “scientific” learning. Honors Biology Honors Biology is a more intensive and self-directed study. Biology is a survey course generally taken in 9th grade. The course provides an overview of the following: study of life, Ecology, Chemistry in Biology, Cell (structure, energy, reproduction), Genetics, Human Systems, Evolution and Biodiversity. The course utilizes a variety of learning styles to incorporate “scientific” learning.

Greenhouse/Recycling Greenhouse /Recycling – is a course generally taken in 11th or 12th grades. The course is the fundamental principles of a Greenhouse environment along with components of school-wide recycling. Topics include: Soil Science, Plant Science (L2.p3, B3.1), Plant Propagation, Pest Control and Identification, Greenhouse Management and Crop Production, Scientific Inquiry (B1.1) – Labs, Scientific reflection and social implications (B1.2), Ecosystems (B3.2), Human Impact (B3.4x), Environmental Factors (B3.5x) and Recycling. The course includes hands on experiences in the Greenhouse and other outside venues. Chemistry (required) Prerequisite: Algebra, Physical Science Chemistry is the study of matter and the changes that matter undergoes. Students in chemistry will learn the following general concepts: scientific measurement and calculations, matter, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, creation and organization of the periodic table, bonding, chemical names and formulas, chemical reactions, behavior of gasses, and salts. Laboratory experiences are included.

Honors Chemistry Prerequisite: Algebra, Physical Science, a B or higher in Biology, teacher approval Chemistry is the study of matter and the changes that matter undergoes. Students in Honors Chemistry will learn the following general concepts: scientific measurement and calculations, matter, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, creation and organization of the periodic table, bonding, chemical names and formulas, chemical reactions, behavior of gasses, and salts. Laboratory experiences are included. This class includes additional laboratory activities, mathematical practices that are not included in general Chemistry. This class is for the advanced science student.

Chemistry 2 Prerequisite: C grade or higher in Chemistry. Chemistry 2 is the continuation of the Chemistry class. Students in Chemistry 2 will learn the following general concepts: Properties of the states of matter at a molecular level, acids, bases, neutralization, heat


of reaction, reaction rates, water quality, solutions, oxidation and reduction. Laboratory experiences are included. Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy and Physiology is an advanced course that focuses on the human body. The major structures and functions of the body’s systems will be covered in great detail. Laboratory experiences, including the dissection of a fetal pig, will help to enhance student learning.

Physics (required) Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I Introductions to areas of translational and rotational mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. Students do a variety of laboratory experiments, and should be committed to incorporating math and science. *******SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT******* World History (required) World History is a global and comparative approach to studying the world and it’s past. To develop greater understanding of the development of worldwide events, processes, and interactions among the world’s people, cultures, societies, and environment. U.S. History (required) This course covers American History from 1877 through the end of the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the United States becoming a world power through its industrial, urban, and global development and specific periods, namely World War I & II, The Great Depression, the Cold War, Civil Rights and the Vietnam War eras. Civics/Economics (required) Students will engage in a comprehensive survey of American Government and our Economic System. Government topics include: the role of government, alternative government systems, American values and historical sources of those values, U.S. Constitution and Constitutional Principles, The Federal system, foreign policy, State and Local governments, and an Active citizenship project. Economic topics include: the American Market Economy, global economics, and the economy and the individual. *******ELECTIVES******* Career Connections Students are only enrolled upon applying and acceptance into the program through SVRC. The Career Connections curriculum is geared in preparing students for their future career and employment. The class is held after school Monday through Thursday. Topics include: personal discovery, decision making, goal setting, career exploration, career assessments, scholarship writing, attitude, job shadowing, communication skills, volunteering, resumes, cover letters, references, and portfolio. Students will attend a career fair and a college visit. Students will also be placed in a 5 week work experience in the summer


Criminal Justice Students will learn about the history, processes, and functions of the criminal justice system. The course follows the progression of the criminal justice system. Beginning with what is the law, then examining the why of criminal activity, next investigating what occurs at the arrest phase, then learning about trials and the American Court system and participating in mock trials, and finally examining the pros and cons of the American corrections system. Additionally students will learn about the five types of careers in the criminal justice system (security, police, lawyers, courts, prisons). Film and Literature Students will examine and analyze films and works of literature through a variety of perspectives. Focus will be on elements of plot, characterization, setting, and point of view. Students will explore the differences and similarities between written works of literature and film versions of the same work and/or stories that focus on the same theme. Students will learn critical approaches to viewing and reviewing films. Outside reading is required for the class. High School Success HSS is a course designed to assist/support students with their homework and assessments. Students work individually on assignments given to them in other classes. Students will receive extra assistance with assignments or test preparation when needed. History of Michigan This course will explore the social and economic development of Michigan, linking these to political developments. We will particularly focus on categories of race, class, and gender, as they were defined and redefined over time. Themes will include related changes in Michigan's population, environment, and economic development. Leadership Application required Leadership is designed to promote individual growth in self-esteem and character development through involvement in group projects, individual projects, volunteerism, goal setting and analysis, and team building skills. The promotion of “Cavalier Pride� and school spirit is encouraged throughout the entire school year. Students in Leadership are required 20 additional volunteer hours per semester. Online Research This project based class introduces participants to a whole new world of information problem solving and communicating. Taught in a blended format, both online and face-to-face, it focuses on learning those 21st Century skills that will help students be successful in their other classes, in the work force and in higher education. Emphasis is placed on writing, research and creativity. Peer Counseling I/II Open only to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors This elective course is designed to provide students with effective coping, problem solving and mediation skills. The year-long training program prepares students to become Peer III counselors. Peer III counselors offer their services to the general student population by helping to problem solve personal issues as well as mediate disputes among peers.


Peer Counseling III Prerequisite: Peer I and II and approval of the Peer Counseling Coordinator This course is for students who have successfully completed the Peer I and II training program, and have been approved by the Peer counseling Coordinator. Peer III student’s staff the Peer Counseling Office on an hourly basis. Students offer their services to the general student population by helping individuals with personal problems or mediating disputes among peers.

Social Skills Placement based on teacher recommendation Social skills class is devoted to helping students learn and practice social skills in a fun and supportive environment. The class format of direct, focused, skill-based instruction in a classroom environment allows new skills to be practiced through specific individual and team activities. In a small group setting, students are given the opportunity to learn, review and practice important social skills in an affirming and supportive atmosphere. Benefits of the class include growth in self-confidence, pride in achievement, improved self-esteem, new friendships and social opportunities. WCAV News Throughout this course students will learn to conceive, write and produce such media as podcasts, public service announcements, the news, event coverage, music videos, stop action videos, and virtual field trips. Woods Woods class will require the student to develop advanced skills and knowledge common to the woodworking industry. Planning and problem solving will be an important part of this course. Woods class will allow the student to further develop and apply basic math skills in a hands-on learning environment. World Investigations The course will cover human civilizations through the medieval period. Emphasis on exploratory discussions and in-depth research will be primarily student driven with extensive use of computers as well as simulations. *******WORK/COLLEGE RELATED COURSES******* ACT Prep course Required for all Juniors This class is designed to make students aware of and comfortable with the features and format of the ACT college entrance exam. The main purpose is that students will learn test-taking strategies and timemanagement skills. All students will take the equivalent of at least two full-length sample ACT exams during the course of this class and record their progress. They will review all of the math formulas, English grammar rules, scientific methods and models, and reading comprehension* strategies using two full ACT exams and sample questions as practice. Students will be given opportunity to sample the format of the MME and Work Keys tests. Post ACT portion of the class will focus on using the ACT scores to relate to college preparation and career related skills such as resume building, interview skills


and college entrance preparation. Noted- a 4 point jump for students in 21 and above range and 1 point for students 16 and below has been seen in other schools offering ACT prep courses. Cooperative Education (see counselor) Cooperative Education (Co-op) is open to juniors and seniors on a limited basis. In this program, students are able to earn high school credit while in paid employment in a job related to a career area of their interest. A special training plan and training agreement between the employer, student, and school are developed. Only students in good academic standing are eligible.

Delta Skilled Trades Career Exploration Course This course is taught on the campus of Delta College, four days per week in the afternoon. Students must be a junior or senior to enroll in this course. All students are required to be transported by bus to and from class each afternoon. This course provides an in depth study of safety procedures, fire science, drafting and blueprinting, machining, computer numeric controls, CAM, Pneumatics, manufacturing, solid modeling, welding, construction, small engines and computer hardware repair. Students are exposed to a wide variety of careers as mentioned and dual enrollment opportunities exist after completion of this course. Dual Enrollment (see counselor) Dual enrollment is a program which allows high school students to enroll in college classes at the high school’s expense. Students are responsible for transportation to and from class, however the cost for tuition and textbooks will be reimbursed. To be eligible, students must meet the following criteria:  Take all sections of the MME test.  Pass the MME area of Dual Enrollment. Exceed high school’s curriculum in the area of Dual Enrollment. **All Dual Enrollment classes must be approved by the Principal. Only Fall and Winter term classes will be paid for by CHS. Saginaw Career Complex and Bay Arenac Career Center (see counselor) SCC and Bay Arenac offer a broad range of career and technical education programs. These programs provide students in depth exposure to a variety of career opportunities with the opportunity to earn articulated credits through local colleges and universities. More information is available through the counseling center or you can find them on the web at: Bay Arenac Career Center: www.careercenter.baisd.net Saginaw Career Complex: www.saginawcareercomplex.com


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