Issuu on Google+

The Alabama School Librarian is a combined association newsletter and peer-reviewed (refereed) journal published by the Alabama School Library Association (ASLA). It is devoted solely to the field of school libraries and technology as related to school libraries. Contact Information: Carolyn Jo Starkey, Editor admin@jojo-starkey.com

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

In this Issue: ASLA Association Business ········ 2 2 3 4

Our Organization Greetings from the President Navigating the Standards: ASLA Summer Conference 2012 6 Recognition? Who Needs It? We Do! ASLA Awards and Scholarship 8 Third Annual School Library Week: Another Successful Venture 10 District 1 Conference 2011 12 Tornado Recovery Continues for Alabama School Libraries with ASLA’s Help 13 NBPTS Mentor Update

AASL National News ·············· 14 14 ASLA Members ’Turn the Page’ at AASL11 20 AASL Retirees Special Interest Group

21 Great Lesson Plan Database for School Librarians

Feature Articles ··················· 22 22 National Latino Children’s Literature Conference 24 Dr. Gordy Coleman: A Fond Fare well ….You Will Be Missed! 27 The University of Alabama’s SLIS Gives Over $7000 in Free Books to Black Belt Schools in the 2011 SLIS Book Bonanza for the Black Belt Program 28 Camping Out with Good Books! A Book Fair to Remember 32 Collaborate for Success 34 Gloria Denard, Director of Jefferson County’s Media Services, Retires

Author Instructions ··············· 38 Membership Form ················ 40 Save These Dates ················· 40 Our Website························ 42

Winter 2012 Issue Winter 2012

1


Our Organization

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Officers

Board Members

Committee Chairs

LeeAnna Mills, NBCT

Jennifer Anders

Carolyn Jo Starkey, NBCT

Northside Middle School Northport, AL President

West Jefferson Elementary School Quinton, AL

Buckhorn High School New Market, AL Editor, Alabama School Librarian

Elizabeth Hester, NBCT

Russellville Middle School Russellville, AL

Irondale Middle School Irondale, AL President-Elect

Michelle Wilson, NBCT North Highland Elementary School Hueytown, AL Past President

Molly Bates

Fairview High School Cullman, AL

Vestavia Hills Elementary School West Vestavia Hills, AL Membership/Awards/NBCT Mentor

Nicole McMickens

Annalisa Crews, NBCT

Mary June Chandler

Bottenfield Middle School Adamsville, AL

Kassie Millwood

Phyllis McClure

Big Spring Lake Kindergarten School Albertville, AL Secretary

Aliceville Elementary School Aliceville, AL

Dr. Susan Cordell, NBCT University of West Alabama Livingston, AL Treasurer

2

Tywanna Burton, NBCT

Holly Shepherd, NBCT Faucett-Vestavia Elementary School Northport, AL

Homewood High School Homewood, AL Webmaster/Intellectual Freedom

Barbara Bowling, NBCT B.T. Washington Magnet School Montgomery, AL Legislative Advocacy

Ann Marie Pipkin Sylacauga, AL Advocacy/Retired Librarians

The Alabama School Librarian


LeeAnna Mills, NBCT ASLA President Librarian, Northside Middle School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Greetings from the President Happy New Year and welcome to 2012! I know that we are all thankful for a brief rest during this school year and I hope you are as excited as I am to see the New Year. This school year is half over; I feel like we just got started! Many of us are learning to work differently this year. I, for one, am adjusting to being a solo librarian just as I know so many of you are. I am grateful for my job; our state has fared much better than some in the school librarian job situation. The economy continues to be sluggish. All of education is feeling the pain of little or no funding. We all know it has been three school years since we had any state monies for our libraries. However, I don’t believe that whining will do us any good. I intend to focus on the great things that ARE and WILL BE happening in our school libraries. I continue to

Winter 2012

be impressed with the creative and amazing talent and leadership we have among our membership. I had the opportunity to attend AASL in Minneapolis and was reminded of how respected Alabama school librarians are. I am so proud of how we contribute to our profession and our leadership in the school library world. I urge you to take the start of this New Year to set goals for your library program and for your professional growth. With our new evaluation system EducateAlabama in place, this would be a great opportunity to work toward more collaboration with your teachers and to clarify with your instructional leaders what is and should be happening in the library. It is a wonderful time to volunteer to be on the curriculum, technology and/ or budget committees and, if possible, be on the data review committee or work on the implementation of

the common core standards. I urge you to become visible and irreplaceable in your school. I also strongly encourage you to invest in yourself by becoming a member of ASLA and AASL and hope that you will encourage your fellow professionals to do so as well. Become active and take advantage of the many opportunities these organizations offer to grow professionally. Share your knowledge with others; get support whenever you need it. Make plans now to attend our ASLA Summer Conference coming on June 12th. And now I send best wishes and the hope that 2012 will bring you much happiness and success both personally and professionally. Thank you all for the amazing jobs that you do.

LeeAnna

3


Elizabeth Hester, NBCT ASLA President-Elect Librarian, Irondale Middle School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Navigating the Standards ASLA Summer Conference 2012 Need help navigating them? Who doesn’t?

ards to match our curriculum in the best way possible.

This year’s theme was born out of a need to streamline the standards and share our ideas with colleagues. With all of those retirements out there, we might find ourselves in the midst of lots of novice librarians and, as lifelong learners ourselves, there is always something new to learn.

With a dizzying amount of information to navigate, understand, and integrate into your daily life as a school librarian, we all turn to our colleagues for inspiration and an occasional helping hand. Here is where I would like to call on you as a colleague to share the wealth of information you have at your fingertips. Is there a lesson you teach that integrates technology?

Something new at the conference this year will be “mini” poster sessions. If you would like to share a lesson, program, or fundraiser idea with your colleagues, bring your laptop or other visual materials and we will have a room set up for viewing them. Everyone is welcome.

Have you ever thought about how many sets of Standards there are? We have the Common Core State Standards, the Standards for 21st Century Learners, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Local Standards, State Standards, and AASL’s Learning4Life Learning Standards, just to name a few.

Have you collaborated lately with a teacher on a great lesson on history, science, literature, math, art or any other subject area? Then you are qualified to lead a session at our Annual Conference this June. I say “our” because “we” are the conference – and together we can navigate the stand-

The theme for ASLA Summer Conference 2012 is “Navigating the Standards”. The conference will take place on June 12th at Mountain Brook High School.

4

If you would like to lead a session or share with a “poster session”, please e-mail me at elizabeth.hester@yahoo.com. I will send you a presenter form (or you may use the one on this page) and/or answer any questions that you may have. Download a Presenter Form Here: http://images.pcmac.org/Uploads/AIMA/ AIMA/Divisions/Forms/Presenter%20Form% 20for%20Alabama%20School%20Library% 20Association[1].pdf

The Alabama School Librarian


Elizabeth Hester is in her sixth year as the school librarian at Irondale Middle School. She taught 12th grade English for 12 years prior to that. She is a NBCT and loves to read.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Share

Share Winter 2012

5


June Chandler ASLA Board Member Librarian, Fairview High School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Recognition?!? Who needs it? We do! So, who gets your “pat-on-theback” these days? Tell me, do you work hard? (Well now, that’s a loaded question you may say to yourself.) I know you work hard if you are serious about your job as a school librarian. Do you find that you receive adequate recognition for your hard work and the efforts you expend building a quality library program? How about for all the mentoring you do for others in your field or district? What about some recognition for delivering top-shelf technology integration that you share with others? No??? What about recognition for others who have made a lasting impact on your program like a wonderful principal or supervisor? Probably none of us feel like we get the acknowledgment we de-

6

serve. And, many of us are no doubt lacking in an effort to offer our colleagues a well deserved pat -on-the-back for their extraordinary efforts. But, have we thought

advocacy tool to shine the light on our school library media programs and on our colleagues who so deserve to be recognized for their outstanding programs, their service, or perhaps their mentoring of others in the field. There is a very simple way to give well deserving recognition— nominate someone for an Alabama School Library Association award. We offer eight various types of awards and even a scholarship. We recognize those we honor at our annual summer conferences. We love to have multiple nominations for these awards as we know there are many in our state who so deserve the recognition.

that one way to be an advocate for our school library programs is to nominate some hard-working peer for an award? Yes! An award!

Please consider nominating someone who is special to you for these awards. The deadline for submission is May 15th, 2012.

An ASLA Award could be a great

The Alabama School Librarian


Mary June Chandler is a 1980 graduate of Auburn University with a Masters Degree in Educational Media and has served Fairview High School as their teacherlibrarian since 2003.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

The ASLA Awards and Scholarship The Coatest Carter Past President Award is awarded by the ASLA board to the immediate past president in recognition of service to the organization. The Carrie C. Robinson Award honors an Alabama librarian who provides an innovative, creative, and exceptional library program for children or young adults. Membership in ASLA, service to the organization, educational background and degrees earned are not criteria for this award. The award is based solely on the quality of an individual's library program. The Ruth H. Johnson Award is given for cumulative services to the library profession by a recently retired Alabama library media specialist. The nominee must have served in the library profession for at least ten years and must have been a member of ASLA.

Winter 2012

The Lois E. Henderson Presidential Award is given to a member for outstanding contributions to library service and to ASLA. The Distinguished Service Award For School Library Media Specialists is granted to a person who has shown outstanding leadership in advancing the theory and/or practice of school librarianship over a substantial period of time. The nominee should a member of ASLA. This award may be given posthumously. The Distinguished Library Service Award for School Administrators is a citation made by the Alabama Instructional Media Association annually, to an administrator of a school or group of schools, for developing an exemplary school library media program and for having made an outstanding and sustained contribution which has ad-

vanced the role of the school library media center as an agency for the improvement of education. The Charles E. Carr Award is given to an outstanding library media student who is currently enrolled in an Alabama college library media program. The ASLA School Library Media Intern Scholarship is a $500.00 scholarship will be awarded each summer to a member of ASLA for financial assistance during their internship. The Ann Marie Pipkin Library Technology Award honors an Alabama librarian with outstanding practice in the field of educational technology. The Judy Johnson Mentoring Award honors an Alabama librarian who exhibits outstanding efforts as a mentor to others over a substantial period of time.

7


Jennifer Anders ASLA Board Member Librarian, West Jefferson Elementary School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Third Annual Alabama School Libraries Week: safety quiz, they were entered into a drawing to win free books.

For the third year in a row the Alabama School Library Association has sponsored Alabama School Libraries Week on November 14th19th. This is a special week set aside by the Alabama School Library Association to showcase our libraries and how we serve the education community. Libraries across the State of Alabama used many creative ideas to celebrate their libraries. Elementary Schools At Minor Community School, School Librarian Jeanna Dennis hosted a Literacy Parade. The kindergarten students made signs that said, “We Love to Read!” and marched through the halls with kazoos, clappers and tambourines shouting “we love to read.” It was reported that even the “cool” 5th graders liked it.

8

Here at West Jefferson Elementary, we had our annual Bedtime Story day. Students dressed in pajamas one day, and were treated to juice and cookies while the whole school read in their classrooms. We also hosted a Celebrity Reader day and a dress as your favorite book character day.

Kindergarteners marching at Minor Community

At Mt. Olive Primary and Intermediate Schools in Ft. Mitchell, School Librarian Cyrone Overton hosted events for both schools. At the Primary School, they had special dress up days. For instance, one day was Rainbow Fish day and all the kids wore something colorful. At the Intermediate school, when students took their internet

Michelle Wilson, of North Highlands Elementary in Jefferson County had special events everyday to welcome kids to the library. One day, every student who visited the library got a special stamp. Another day, they got to vote for their favorite book character. Every morning, quotes about the library were read over the intercom and guest readers came throughout the week to read to classes.

The Alabama School Librarian


Jennifer is currently the School Librarian at West Jefferson Elementary, a small K-6 school. She has worked in this position for 4 years, and has been with Jefferson County Schools for thirteen years. She is married and has a four year old son.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Another Successful ASLA Venture Middle School There were also events for our middle school students. At Irondale Middle School, Elizabeth Hester held a book fair, and signed up students for Scholastic’s Read 100,000 minutes programs. Students who went to the library for quiet reading time were served hot chocolate. She also worked with individual students on poetry readings and preparing for the spelling bee. High School TOP: Hueytown Mayor reads to students at North Highland Elementary. Bottom: Dr. Julie Hannah, Deputy Superintendent of Jefferson County Schools reading at North Highland Elementary.

Shades Valley High School also participated in the week long celebration. They held a contest called, Change Our Books’ Looks! Students took one or more of their books with outdated covers or no cover and created one that will appeal to their peers. Then they took their pictures and put them on the back of the covers so that the students would have some kind of ownership /connection with the library and hopefully will visit more often. Additional Resources For more resources for next year’s ASLW, or for great ideas promoting your library, visit the ASLA website.

Winter 2012

9


Molly Bates ASLA Board Member Librarian, Russellville Middle School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

District 1 Conference 2011 Librarians from across District 1 gathered for a day of networking, collaborating, and professional development in Florence AL on November 4th. The Opening Session featured Kim Dozier of MKA Designs from Madison AL. Kim shared that she started her writing career quite unexpectedly. Her daughter, Ashlyn, was sick with pneumonia and not happy about being stuck at home. During one of her daughter’s naps, Kim “sat down at the computer and started typing. The Forgetful Princess seemed to just write itself!” When Ashlyn awoke, Kim read the story to her. Ashlyn loved the story and asked her mom if she could write another story. Kim wrote The Ear-less Kingdom, and later shared it with Ashlyn’s class where it was a huge success. Following that success, Ashlyn began illustrating the sto-

10

ries Kim wrote, and thus began Kim’s writing adventure. For more information about Kim Dozier and MKA Designs, visit her website at www.MKADesigns.com The breakout sessions offered two workshops: one for elementary school librarians and one for secondary school librarians. David Burrows of Burrows Library Services presented sessions entitled “E-Books and Interactive E-Books: How to integrate into a webbased library automated system”. David customized his sessions, featuring books for elementary students during his elementary librarian session and books for secondary students during his secondary librarian session. Denita Lester, Library Manager, Muscle Shoals Public Library; shared sessions entitled “What

Can Your Public Library Do for You?” Denita discussed children’s programming at the public library, including story time and summer reading programs, with elementary librarians. She reminded both groups that Alabama Live Homework Help is available via the public library. Denita’s session for secondary librarians featured the e-books offered by MSPL. She also shared resources for e-readers. Another way in which MSPL supports schools is through their homebound service. The library delivers books and A/V materials biweekly to the homes of those unable to come to the library. Following a delicious lunch provided by Burrows Library Services, everyone gathered for the business session. ASLA District 1 offers a grant

The Alabama School Librarian


Molly Bates has been a school librarian for 9 years. She began her career as a high school language arts teacher. After completing her MLIS from the University of Alabama, she became an elementary librarian before moving to her current position at Russellville Middle School. She also serves as her school’s technology representative and on several school and district committees. Molly is also a member of The Delta Kappa Gamma Society International which is an honor society for women educators.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

District 1 Conference 2011 honoring retired librarian, Charlotte Carr and a grant Charlotte began in memory of her husband Charles Carr. Each grant is in the amount of $250.00. However, this year, the committee felt three applications were worthy of recognition and voted to give three grants for $200.00 each. Michelle Prince from Meeks High School received a Charles Carr Memorial Grant with which to purchase high-interest/lowlevel books for her library. A second Charles Carr Memorial Grant was awarded to Debbie Kirby from Austin High School. Debbie will be adding “The Short of it All” poetry books to her collection with the funds she received. The Charlotte Carr Award was presented to Molly Bates from Russellville Middle School. Molly’s grant application was to purchase Internet safety curriculum from i-

Winter 2012

Safe. The business session continued with the election of new officers. ASLA District 1 officers for 2011-2012 are President – Julie Rhodes, Vice-President – Mary Kay Rogers, Treasurer – Philomena Jones, Secretary – Dihanne Westfield. The concluding activity was drawing for door prizes. John Zeller with Perma-Bound books donated door prizes for everyone! If you didn’t attend this year, mark your calendars now for the first Friday in November 2012 and make plans to attend!

11


Michelle Wilson, NBCT ASLA Past President Librarian, North Highland Elementary School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Tornado Recovery Continues for Alabama School Libraries with ASLA’s Help The thing about any type of recovery after a trauma is that it is a perpetual process. Though by now of course, the state has power, debris has for the most part been removed, and temporary measures set in place for schools to resume, Alabamians know that the devastation left by the April 27th tornadoes is something that will not soon be swept away. Alabama school librarians in affected areas are working feverishly each and every day to make sure that their students have even the most basic supplies they need to read. ASLA has worked hard to support the needs of these school librarians, and our efforts have included selling t-shirts and weather-related books, coordinating storytellers who have donated their services, and helping coordinate the donation of materials that school librarians and teach-

12

ers in their respective schools may find useful. One common response that ASLA has heard time and again has been that they have been overwhelmed by receiving an abundance of books, specifically used books. If you are serving in one of the affected schools, please know that ASLA continues to stand with you. We are still collecting students’ stories and art work for a book we hope to have published in the coming months and sold as a fundraiser effort for your schools. Remember that the American Association of School Librarians offers the Beyond Words grant for disaster recovery. AASL has contacted us in concern that no Alabama school libraries have yet applied for this grant, which could mean thousands of much-needed dollars for Alabama schools. If you have questions or

need help with this, contact AASL’s Allison Cline at acline@ala.org or 800-545-2433. The direct link to the grant is below. http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/ divs/aasl/aaslawards/ beyondwords/disasterrelief.cfm What the affected school librarians need more than ever is our encouragement. You may want to take time to have your students write words of encouragement and support to those who are still reeling from the loss of all sense of normal life, and the librarians could likely use the support as well. Please contact Michelle at mwilson518@gmail.com for more information on contacting on supporting these schools.

The Alabama School Librarian


Tywanna Burton, NBCT ASLA Membership/Awards/NBCT Mentor Librarian, Vestavia Hills Elementary School West

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Are You a NBPTS Candidate? ASLA encourages library media specialists to pursue National Board Teacher Certification. This intensive professional development experience is designed to provide "Better Teaching, Better Learning, Better Schools." (http://nbpts.org/) Please visit the ASLA website (http://www.alaima.org) for the 2011-2012 schedule of mentoring sessions. ASLA offers a support group for Library Media candidates, which has successfully mentored numerous candidates over the past several years. The group meets in the Birmingham area, and extends supports to candidates in neighboring states a well.

Congratulations to Alabama’s Newest NBCT Librarians The Alabama School Library Association (ASLA) is honored to recognize the following school librarians who completed and passed the rigorous portfolio entries set by the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards: TAMI GENRY SHELBY COUNTY Library Media/Early Childhood through Young Adulthood

HELENA, AL Valid Until: 11/18/2021 Year Achieved: 11/18/2011

SUSAN HUTTO JEFFERSON COUNTY Library Media/Early Childhood through Young Adulthood

LEEDS, AL Valid Until: 11/18/2021 Year Achieved: 11/18/2011

KELLEY PEOPLES ST CLAIR COUNTY Library Media/Early Childhood through Young Adulthood

ODENVILLE, AL Valid Until: 11/18/2021 Year Achieved: 11/18/2011

If you would like to join the current year’s Mentorship Group, contact Tywanna at burtontb@vestavia.k12.al.us.

Winter 2012

13


Carolyn Jo Starkey, NBCT Buckhorn High School Editor, The Alabama School Librarian

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

ASLA Members ‘Turn the Page’ at AASL11 During the last week in October, ASLA members of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) packed up for an exciting trip to the 15th National Conference and Exhibition in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Alabamians making the trip included ASLA president LeeAnna Mills, The Alabama School Librarian editor Carolyn Starkey, ASLA members Wendy Stephens, Cyndy Dunning, Dr. MaryAnn Robinson, Shannon Bogert, Sherry Dorrill, Dr.Betty Morris, as well as a few others.

Cyndy Dunning of Mt. Carmel Elementary School in the Madison County School System was unofficially Alabama’s Super Shopper and Exhibit Hall Visitor!

ASLA members were actively involved in the structure of the conference. The presentations of ASLA members ranged from the opening preconference sessions and Exploratorium posters to the fabulous concurrent sessions. On Wednesday Wendy Stephens of Buckhorn High School

14

The Alabama School Librarian


Carolyn Starkey has been in education for 23 years, the last 13 related to school library media. She served as the library media specialist at Sloman Primary School for seven years, obtaining her certification by the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards in library media in 2003 while there. After a 4 ½ year stint as Assistant Professor of Library Education Media at Alabama State University, Carolyn is currently serving as a school librarian alongside Wendy Stephens at Buckhorn High School and completing her dissertation in instructional leadership/ instructional technology at the University of Alabama.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

ASLA Members ‘Turn the Page’ at AASL11 collaborated with Laura Pearle, sonalized toolkit that enabled www.slideshare.net/wsstephens/ Buffy Hamilton, Angela Carstenthem to meet these challenges aasl-preconference-bibliographicsen, and Frances Harris in the preand to become change agents in enrichment and http:// conference session “Books, E-ink their local library communities. www.slideshare.net/wsstephens/ and Databases, Oh my! CollecResources for this presentation aasl-preconference-outstandingtion Development in the 21st can be accessed at http:// ios-ebooks. Continued on page 16 Century (BYOL*).” This all day workshop encompassed three themes: flipping the collection/ renovating the space, collection development and future planning. The presenters talked about best practices in purchasing and providing resources to the community and strategies for dealing with 20th -century educaFrom left to right: Frances Harris, Laura Pearle, Wendy Stephens, Buffy Hamilton, and Angela Carstensen tors. Participants presented the preconference session “Books, E-ink and Databases, Oh my! Collection Development in the 21st Century (BYOL).” left with a per-

Winter 2012

15


Carolyn Jo Starkey, NBCT Buckhorn High School Editor, The Alabama School Librarian

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

ASLA Members ‘Turn the Page’ at AASL11 On Thursday afternoon, Carolyn Starkey of Buckhorn High School participated in the Exploratorium through her poster and presentation of “Letting Our Voices Be

Heard: Development of the EDUCATEAlabama for Librarians Formative Evaluation System.” This session examined the EDUCATEAlabama Continuum of

Carolyn Starkey with her poster at her Exploratorium Session “Letting Our Voices Be Heard: Development of the EDUCATEAlabama for Librarians Formative Evaluation System.” Photo by LeeAnna Mills.

16

Practice for Librarians implemented in the fall of 2011. This tool is used statewide in Alabama to guide educator reflection, selfassessment, and goal setting for professional learning and growth and reflects the specialized practices of the school librarian profession. Resources for this presentation can be accessed at http:// www.slideshare.net/cjstarkey/ starkey-aasl-exploratorium2011 and http://livebinders.com/ edit?id=93898. Several ASLA members presented concurrent sessions on Friday and Saturday. Wendy Stephens also took part in the “Creating Tomorrow’s Leaders Today: A Guided Conversation about Leadership Programs” along with Margaux DelGuidice, Gwyneth Jones, Shannon Miller, and Laura Warren-Gross and moderated by former

The Alabama School Librarian


The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

ASLA Members ‘Turn the Page’ at AASL11 AASL president Sara Kelly Johns. This session discussed the programs established by the American Library Association, Gale Cengage, and School Library Journal to identify and cultivate leaders for the library profession. This session was discussed by School Library Journal in the article “AASL Conference 2011: Preparing Tomorrow's School Library Leaders” (http:// www.schoollibraryjournal.com /slj/home/892575-312/ aasl_conference_2011_preparin g_tomorrows.html.csp). Resources from the leadership panel can be found at http:// sljalaleadershipaasl.wikispaces.com/. Dr. Betty Morris and graduate student Stephanie Griffin from Jacksonville State University presented “Linking Virtual Libraries and Information Literacy to Enhance Student

Winter 2012

Front left to right: Sara Kelly Johns, Laura Warren-Gross, Wendy Stephens, Shannon Miller, and Gwyneth Jones presented the panel discussion “Creating Tomorrow’s Leaders Today: A Guided Conversation about Leadership Programs.” Not shown is Margaux DelGuidice. Photo by Carolyn Starkey.

Learning.” This session offered creative ideas on keeping research at the forefront of student learning and teacher instruction by highlighting information literacy skills in a virtual library. Handouts for this new and

innovative approach included an annotated list of websites appropriate for a virtual library. Dr. Morris’s virtual library can be accessed at http://drb.morris.weebly.com/. Continued on page 18

17


Carolyn Jo Starkey, NBCT Buckhorn High School Editor, The Alabama School Librarian

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

ASLA Members ‘Turn the Page’ at AASL11 Dr. MaryAnn Robinson from the University of South Alabama presented the session “Write, Illustrate, Pod-

cast-Collaborate, Create, Share: Middle School Action Research Using Graphic Novels, Comic Books, and Technology.” In this session Dr. Robinson described an action research project where she and sixth-grade teacher collaborated to make learning literary elements interesting, relevant,

and engaging. Students read and analyzed graphic novels, wrote and illustrated short books collaboratively, and podcasted the learning experience from their classroom thus shifting the role from knowledge consumers to knowledge producers. The 6th-Grade class site containing the podcast episodes

Dr. MaryAnn Robinson presents her session “Write, Illustrate, PodcastCollaborate, Create, Share: Middle School Action Research Using Graphic Novels, Comic Books, and Technology.” Photo by Carolyn Starkey.

18

The Alabama School Librarian


The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

ASLA Members ‘Turn the Page’ at AASL11

Shelley Dorrill (left) and Shannon Bogert (right) deliver their session “Turning the Page from the Past: Purposeful Programming for Your Patrons.”

and PDFs of student booklets can be found at http:// jbumpers.podbean.com/. Shannon Bogert and Shelly Dorrill of Paul W. Bryant High School in Tuscaloosa presented “Turning the Page from the Past: Pur-

Winter 2012

poseful Programming for Your Patrons.” In this session Shannon and Shelley offered an exciting journey through an energetic multimedia presentation and hands-on activities into claiming students and purposefully planning for their demographic.

Resources for this session may be found at http:// blogs.tusc.k12.al.us/ paulwbryanthighschool/, http:// blogs.tusc.k12.al.us/bhslibrary/, and http://blogs.tusc.k12.al.us/ sbogert/.

19


Ann Marie Pipkin Retired Former AIMA President, Former AIMA NBPTS Mentor, AASL Conference 2009 Co-Chair, and All Around Good Egg

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

AASL Retirees Special Interest Group The AASL Retirees Task Force is recommending to the AASL Board of Directors that a formal Retiree Special Interest Group be formed within AASL. In order to establish an AASL Special Interest Group ten or more active members must sign a petition. By joining this group in ALA Connect

you are “signing the petition” for AASL’s Retiree Special Interest Group. There are no membership fees associated with AASL SIGs. At ALA’s 2012 Midwinter Meeting it is our intention to present the petition and officially become a SIG within AASL. A membership roster will be kept through

this connect community and a meeting time and place will be set for ALA’s 2012 Annual Conference in Anaheim, CA. At the first official meeting of this SIG we will elect a chairperson for the group, as well as discuss possible strategic initiatives and projects. Go to http:// connect.ala.org/ node/157745 Once a person is logged into ALA Connect, if they view the community, they will see a "join" button next to the membership bullet. If you are within 5 years of retirement, we would love to have you as part of the group.

20

The Alabama School Librarian


Nicole McMickens Bottenfeld Middle School ASLA Board Member

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Great Lesson Plan Database for School Librarians Librarians are faced everyday with decisions on how to best create and implement innovative lesson plans that will keep their students actively engaged and win their interests. We also look for ways to bring forth powerful and practical collaboration with busy teachers. A great place to start is the AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner Lesson Plan Database found at www.ala.org/aasl/ lessonplandatabase. Here, you will find many lessons. You can search by keyword or use the guided search, browse by grade or content area, or sort by the title, author, rating, or the latest update of the lesson plan. There is also a Lesson Plan

Winter 2012

Checklist that allows you to include all of the right elements for a well rounded lesson. In addition, the Lesson Plan Rubric gives you a chance to critique and improve your own plans.

If you have a great lesson plan that meets the Rubric guidelines, and would like to share it with other library media specialists around the world, create an account and submit it. It will be

reviewed and possibly accepted by an AASL task force. By creating your own free account, you will also gain many benefits. Check them out in the FAQ section. If you want to learn more about or locate the AASL Standards and Indicators, check out the link http://www.ala.org/aasl/ guidelinesandstandards/ learningstandards/ standards. Scroll down to the Downloading and Ordering section, and click on High Resolution or Low Resolution. AASL also offers Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in Action for purchase online at the ALA Store. Go ahead; start off the new year with great lesson plans.

21


Carolyn Jo Starkey, NBCT Buckhorn High School Editor, The Alabama School Librarian

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

National Latino Children’s Literature Conference: John Para, Alma Flor Ada, Meg Medina, Rene Colato Lainez, Joe Cepeda, Monica Brown, F. Isabel Campoy… A galaxy of Latino literature stars await you at the National Latino Children’s Literature Conference sponsored by The School of Library and Information Studies at The University of Alabama. The “Connecting Cultures and Celebrating Cuentos”-themed conference will take place March 29-30, 2012, on campus of The University of Alabama and will include a special event at the Tuscaloosa Public Library on the evening of March 29th. Librarians, teachers, educators, and researchers will be afforded the opportunity to “discover how to meet the informational and literacy needs of Latino children via high quality, culturally-relevant literature and the latest educational strategies.”

22

Image copyright John Parra, 2011. Used by permission from Dr. Jamie Naidoo, SLIS, The University of Alabama.

Conference director Dr. Jamie Naidoo notes that “as the number of Latino children and their families continues to increase, so does the need for understanding these diverse cultures. This exclusive conference provides a forum for sharing current research and

practice addressing the cultural, educational, and informational needs of Latino children and their families. At the same time, the conference also examines the many social influences that Latino children’s and young adult literature have upon the develop-

The Alabama School Librarian


Carolyn Starkey has been in education for 23 years, the last 13 related to school library media. She served as the library media specialist at Sloman Primary School for seven years, obtaining her certification by the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards in library media in 2003 while there. After a 4 ½ year stint as Assistant Professor of Library Education Media at Alabama State University, Carolyn is currently serving as a school librarian alongside Wendy Stephens at Buckhorn High School and completing her dissertation in instructional leadership/instructional technology at the University of Alabama.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

“Connecting Cultures and Celebrating Cuentos” ing child and adolescent.”

Tentative Conference Schedule

Registration is open and space is limited at this exclusive conference. Registration and additional information may be found at the conference website: http:// www.latinochildlitconf.org/ index.html.

Thursday, March 29th 8:00 – 8:40 Onsite registration, Badge Pick-up, Book Sales 8:40 –8:50 Welcome & Opening Remarks 8:50 – 9:50 Opening Keynote Address 10:15 – 11:15 Breakout Sessions 11:25 – 12:50 Lunch on Your Own 1:05 – 2:05 Keynote Address

Left: Logo of National Latino Children’s Literature Conference. Right: Image copyright John Parra, 2011. Both images used by permission from Dr. Jamie Naidoo, SLIS, The University of Alabama.

Winter 2012

2:05 – 3:05

3:10 – 4:10

Research Poster Session, Networking Break, Author Signing, Book Sales Afternoon Keynote !

Thursday Evening 6:30 - 6:35 p.m. Welcome & Introduction 6:35 - 7:45 p.m. Storytelling and Readings 7:50 – 8:30 p.m. Book Give-Away to First 100 Children: The Tooth Fairy Meets El Ratón Pérez. Friday, March 30th 9:00 – 9:40 a.m. Onsite registration, Badge Pick-Up, Book Sales 9:40-10:40 Morning Keynote Address 10:50 – 11:50 Morning Breakout Sessions 12:00 – 12:40 Lunch & Networking 12:40 – 1:40 Luncheon Keynote Address 1:40 – 2:40 Research Poster Session, Networking Break, Book Sales, Author Signing 2:50 – 3:50 Afternoon Breakout Sessions 4:00 - 5:00 Author/Illustrator Small Groups: All Authors & Illustrators 5:10 – 5:30 Closing Remarks, Prize Drawing, Safe Travels

23


Michelle Wilson, NBCT North Highland Elementary School ASLA Past President

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Dr. Gordon Coleman: Dr. Gordon Coleman has been in the business of training school librarians for over 27 years. Affectionately known by many as “Gordy,” he began as an associate professor of school librarianship at the University of Alabama in 1984. Prior to this, he worked as a Vietnamese translator and intelligence analyst with the United States Army, English instructor, and high school librarian. Dr. Coleman has had quite a few adventures in his life! As the primary professor and advisor to school librarians in training, Dr. Coleman has influenced scores of school librarians in our state. His primary interests include school library management and organizational, and there are many of us who utilize the skills he taught us on a daily basis. Honors bestowed upon Dr. Coleman throughout his career include Librarian of the Year by Beta Phi Mu of Alabama, Educa-

24

tion awards from Kappa Delta Pi and Beta Phi Mu, and a Commendation Medal from the U.S. Army. Dr. Coleman wrote and was awarded a grant of approximately

$1,250,000 to support 12 PhD and 60 MLIS students at the University of Alabama. One of our greatest thinkers, he has also contributed at least 70 (combined) scholarly and professional articles and presentations to the field. One of the most significant as-

pects of Dr. Coleman’s career has been that though he has been at this a while, he has never stopped learning or growing as a school librarian, which is evident by his presence at every ASLA/formerly AIMA professional development conference and event in the history of our remembrance. In an impromptu interview, Dr. Coleman was so kind to provide the following reflections. What is the most significant change you have witnessed in the academic field of school librarianship during your tenure at UA? Despite what you may think, Johannes Gutenberg had already invented the printing press long before I came to Alabama! Without a doubt, the most significant change I have seen has to be the incredible advances in information and communication technologies

The Alabama School Librarian


Michelle has been a school librarian for eight and a half years. She began her career as an elementary classroom teacher, and after a few years became an elementary school librarian. Michelle achieved National Board Teacher Certification in 2009. She also works as her school's technology representative, principal's designee, and on numerous school and district committees. Recently she had the privilege of being part of the team charged with tailoring the EducateAlabama continuum to school librarians. Her interests and activities outside the school day include her family, serving in her church's preschool ministry, and advocating for orphans worldwide.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

A Fond Farewell‌ that will alter the education and library landscapes in ways we can't even imagine right now. For example, the area of "open education" using technology to deliver instruction as developed by Stanford, MIT, and the Khan Academy makes one wonder about the role of physical, brick and mortar schools in the future. Though primarily and predominantly STEMrelated, the "open education" instruction offered by each of these, and others, does have have some content in the humanities and the social sciences. Mobile learning, rather than seat-based learning, seems to be in the future. I suspect that our concept of "reading" in particular and "literacy" in general will evolve considerably from what we have today. What are your plans for retirement? A few years ago I went to a "retirement workshop" put on by

Winter 2012

the Alabama retirement system and the advice that we were given is that in addition to all kinds of financial planning in advance of retirement, we needed to develop a list of 25 things we wanted to do after we retire, and they could NOT all be travel-related. Well, as is usually my mode of operation, I'm going to play it by ear as I don't have a list of 25 things. That seems like too much pressure to me, and I thought retirement was all about not having pressure! ;-) I've always wanted to go to spring training to see the new baseball season bloom, so that is be on my list. Of course there is the usual "read for pleasure" and catch up on lots of movies. No doubt my wife will have a long "honey do" list waiting for me as she is a spring chicken when compared to me and expects me to be the house husband while she continues teaching. If her list doesn't keep me busy, I'll see about getting a part-time job as a greeter

at Wal-Mart! ;-) What would you would like to say to your former students who are now practicing school librarians? My students have always been the best part of my job. I'm forever amazed at how little I taught you guys and yet how much you have done with your careers. When we have done our SWOT analysis at SLIS as we go through periodic changes in leadership and direction, not to mention getting ready for the regular navel-gazing practice of preparing self-studies for reaccreditation, my Ss have always been the students we've had. You all have the energy, enthusiasm, imagination, and creativity to meet the challenges I alluded to in question #1 above. I'm confident you will make some sense of the seemingly ever-changing landscape of education occasioned by the in-

25


Michelle Wilson, NBCT North Highland Elementary School ASLA Past President

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

‌.You Will Be Missed! credible, mind-boggling advances in information and communication technologies which will alter our lives in many unexpected ways for the rest of your career. Thank you for all you have done and will continue to do for the youth, and some old teachers as well, you serve. The future is bright.....because of you! Gordy, know that the people of ASLA are greatly indebted to your leadership, guidance, wisdom, and support of school librarianship in our state. We wish you all the best in your next, greatest life adventure.

26

For more information about Dr. Coleman, see http:// www.slis.ua.edu/Coleman.html. For

those interested in wishing him well, please send your regards to by way of the UA’s SLIS.

The Alabama School Librarian


Jamie Campbell Naidoo, Ph.D. Assistant & Foster-EBSCO Endowed Professor School of Library & Information Studies

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

The University of Alabama’s SLIS Gives Over $7000 in Free Books to Black Belt Schools in the 2011 SLIS Book Bonanza for the Black Belt Program During December 2011, The University of Alabama's School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) awarded over $7000 in free books to elementary, middle, and high school libraries in the Black Belt region of the state via the SLIS Book Bonanza for the Black Belt Program. School librarians in the Black Belt region were asked to apply for the book give-away program in mid-November. Twenty deserving school libraries applied for the program and a total of 6 schools were selected to each receive over $1000 in brand new books for children or teens. Schools were chosen based upon criteria such as the current age of the school library collection (average publication date) and the number of books available per

Winter 2012

student. The winning schools for the 2011 SLIS Book Bonanza for the Black Belt Program are: J.E. Terry Elementary & Shiloh Elementary and 6th Grade Academy ( Plantersville , AL - Dallas County) Mount Olive Primary School & Mount Olive Intermediate School ( Fort Mitchell , AL - Russell County ) Carver Middle School ( Eutaw , AL - Greene County ) Francis Marion High School ( Marion , AL - Perry County ) Sunshine School ( Newbern , AL Hale County ) Southside High School ( Selma , AL - Dallas County ) Established in 2009, the SLIS Book Bonanza for the Black Belt is

an annual program that provides free books to school library media centers in the Black Belt region each December. The program is just one of the many ways in which the School of Library and Information Studies gives back to our local community, region, and state. Schools in the Black Belt region of the state are encouraged to apply again in November 2012 for a chance to receive free books for their school library media centers during the 2012 SLIS Book Bonanza for the Black Belt Program. If you need additional information about the program, please contact Dr. Jamie C. Naidoo at jcnaidoo@slis.ua.edu or SLIS at 205-348-4610.

27


Elizabeth Hester, NBCT ASLA President-Elect Librarian, Irondale Middle School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Camping Out with Good Books! This year’s Irondale Middle School Fall 2011 Scholastic Book Fair began with a huge group of Student Crew volunteers! We had 23 students who worked both leading up to – and during -- the Fair. Students are not only great resources for ideas and the whole reason for having a Book Fair, but they add a student element of energy that, if bottled and sold, would be worth millions! This fair needed to be the bestthemed and decorated fair we have ever had in order to attempt to win an author visit from Scholastic. This year’s visiting author for middle schools is Gordon Korman, author of Swindle. We decided to boost our Book Fair involvement more than ever this Fall to try and compete with middle schools across the country for this author visit. This is how:

28

The Student Crew volunteers and I began the planning process earlier. After brainstorming at our first meeting and deciding it would be awesome to win an author visit, we decided on the theme “Camp Out With a Good Book”. The entire school right down to the janitors brought in camping supplies. We have a large glass display case right beside the library and we filled it to the brim starting with a layer of pine straw on the floor and

worked our way up to the ceiling! Picture this: a two-man tent, sleeping bags all over the library and display case, an array of forest animals, a Coleman stove with authentic-looking food, a camp chair and stool, and, with our school sitting on the top of a

A view of the interior of our display case at Irondale Middle School.

The Alabama School Librarian


Elizabeth Hester is in her sixth year as the school librarian at Irondale Middle School. She taught 12th grade English for 12 years prior to that. She is a NBCT, loves to read, and loves buying and wearing camping clothing, but doesn’t actually go camping herself very often.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

A Book Fair to Remember mountain, there were plenty of small pine trees to chop down. What camping site in Alabama would be complete without one? Our camp food was ingenious! Our head custodian created it with Styrofoam toast, ping pong

balls cut in half and painted yellow to resemble eggs and realistic bacon made from colored paper.

thought, “What will I ever do with these?” but I hung onto them. One never knows!

Bugs completed the atmosphere. Years ago my brother gave me a whole box of finger puppet grasshoppers, ants, and butterflies. I

Our art teacher volunteered to paint an RV to use as a backdrop. What great collaboration! She did (continued on next page)

Irondale Middle Librarian Elizabeth Hester spreads pine straw (left). Camp food and bugs add a touch of authenticity (right).

Winter 2012

29


Elizabeth Hester, NBCT ASLA President-Elect Librarian, Irondale Middle School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Camping Out with Good Books! an amazing job right down to a fabric awning. Another teacher brought decorative lights to attach to the camper. Student drawn “wild animals” filled the case and hallways. Pun bubbles like “Can you ‘bear’ to be without a good book?” were attached to the animal posters. The students wanted to draw everything: bears, snakes, owls and we discussed what they would realistically see. They wracked their brains to come up with different types of animals. They did a remarkable job coming in before school every morning in the library which is something we have never done before! Since our school is increasing in its poverty level on a yearly basis, we brainstormed on how to include everyone – especially those not necessarily buying books. We

30

created a s’mores drawing for three or four students per class period to win a treat for a couple of consecutive days. It’s amazing how exciting graham crackers, Nutella (spreadable chocolate cream), and spreadable marshmallow can be to a middle schooler – winning one of those just makes the day better. And it was clearly popular! We also had a clear pumpkin jar filled with marshmallows and small forms to fill out and guess the number. At the end of the week, the winning student chose a free book from the Fair. To kick-off our fair, I contacted The Cahaba River Society to conduct a talk on the Cahaba River and camping. One of our sixth grade student’s fathers works at the Society. He actually brought his canoe in and sat it in the mid-

dle of the students. He showed the students a slide show of his family camping in the fall and canoeing down the Cahaba River towards Mobile. In this family’s free time, they read books in their camp chairs which were included in the show. Fifty-five students came and raised money for One for Books! This program supports purchasing more books for the library. This event raised a lot of excitement and awareness of The Cahaba River. Our Student Crew Members also selected some teachers for a friendly competition of dropping spare change in a decorated coke bottle. The winning teacher, Mrs. Duley, was crowned queen of reading (not everyone’s cut out for camping!) and received one class period of sustained silent reading in the library surrounded

The Alabama School Librarian


Elizabeth Hester is in her sixth year as the school librarian at Irondale Middle School. She taught 12th grade English for 12 years prior to that. She is a NBCT, loves to read, and loves buying and wearing camping clothing, but doesn’t actually go camping herself very often.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

A Book Fair to Remember by students who were also reading. The collected money is always donated to the library for purchasing books and this was our best ever! When students shopped, they

also signed up for Read 100,000 Minutes for our school. We plan on participating in Scholastic’s summer reading challenge. Adding an online fair increased adult interest and added a new way to

shop. We only sold $140 of product online, but that was the start of getting more people used to this new way of shopping a book fair – especially faculty. Lastly, our Scholastic representative stopped by to take a look at our Fair and asked if she could borrow and promote the theme “Camp Out With a Good Book”! Our Fair was successful in so many ways, but best of all we learned that with a little extra planning and getting the whole faculty more involved and in on the excitement can add more “buzz” about reading. As you can see, we took our Book Fair to a new level and had a lot of fun while in the process! By the end of the week, the library was anything but a calm and relaxing campsite, but instead more closely resembled the children’s book The Noisy Farm.

The Student Crew takes time out for a photo.

Winter 2012

31


Holly Shepherd, NBCT ASLA Board Member and Librarian, Tuscaloosa County Schools

and Laurie Copeland Reading Specialist, Tuscaloosa County Schools

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Collaborate for Success Would you like to make a larger impact on your students and school community? Perhaps you have a great idea but lack the confidence or resources to pull it off. Finding a collaborative partner may be the answer you are searching for.

we could be when we worked together. Starting with this singular project we each defined our roles, learning to complement each other’s strengths. Since then we have applied what we learned about this process to numerous projects with success.

According to Merriam Webster’s dictionary, to collaborate is to work jointly on an intellectual endeavor. That definition is rather matter-of-fact, much like 2+2=4, ordinary and unexpected. This definition is much too one dimensional to define my recent collaborative experiences. Given the right personnel combination, collaborative efforts can be explosive!

Whether you start with an idea and find a partner to help you accomplish your goal, or know of a person you would like to work with and then locate a project the first step is the same: brainstorming. Define the person, the project and some possible strategies for accomplishing the goal. A good idea will take you a long way, but it takes detailed work to bring any project to a successful completion. Clearly defining each task, the expected outcome and each person’s responsibilities for completing that task will keep the stress levels to a minimum.

When my Reading Coach came to me and began investigating how the library could assist her with tracking information for a small grant, I doubt either one of us realized just how productive

32

When looking for a collaborative partner, do not limit yourself to those that are closest to you; teachers, principals and librarians, but also extend your search to include community resources; public libraries, Adopt-A-School partners, students, parents, even schools in nearby districts. Any individual who has an interest in your school or concept is a likely candidate to become a collaborative partner. Project ideas are as limitless as one’s imagination but here are a few ideas; author visits, specialized programs, grants, scheduling, restructuring the library program, presenting at conferences, impacting student learning by increasing the volume of reading at your school. Our society is increasingly becoming data driven. Schools use assessment data to drive instruc-

The Alabama School Librarian


Left to Right: Holly Shepherd, Author Mike Thaler, and Laurie Copeland.

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Collaborate for Success tion by identifying strengths and weaknesses of students and programs. Goals are created based on the feedback from data. Take advantage of any data to support your project, including your own observations. Once a plan is realized, reflect along the way to determine how well the original concept is working. Determine what worked well and what parts could be improved making notes for future use. Take the time and effort to build a collaborative partnership with someone in your community. Here are a few of the goals/ projects that my Reading Coach and I have accomplished in the past few years; 1.

Reading Coach received a $3000.00 Dollar General grant.

2. Librarian received a $500.00 local school district grant.

Winter 2012

3. Coordinated an author visit with 3 other schools for D.W., Marc Brown’s sister. 4. Coordinated an author visit with 6 schools in two school districts for Nikki Grimes. 5. Collaborated with the local public library personnel and coordinated a County wide Art contest to assist the local public library publizing the visit of Kadir Nelson, illustrator. 6. Increased our school’s student participation for the Young Author’s conference from none to 13 students. Each student wrote and produced a book which they brought with them. 7. Altered the Master Schedule to increase student time in the library for lessons and book circulation.

8. Increased our school’s library circulation to almost double from about 3500 books to over 7000 books monthly for 460 students. 9. Near 80% of the student population, grades k-8 met their reading goal. 10. Improved DIBELS scores school wide, particularly targeting the fluency component. 11. Collaboratively presented at the ASLA summer conference and within our local school district to all Library Media Specialists, and Reading Coaches. 12. Coordinated an author visit with 6 schools for Diane Z. Shore. 13. Collaborated to write this article.

33


Meg Brooke, NBCT Librarian, Shades Valley High School and Jefferson County International Baccalaureate High School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Gloria Dennard, Director of Jefferson County’s Children, literacy, the arts, and golf all share the fervor of Gloria Dennard, retiring Director of the Library Media Services Department, Jefferson County School System. An honor graduate of Stillman College with a double major in English and Spanish, Gloria began her career in education as a teacher of English, Spanish and journalism. Her interest turned to library media while she was a teacher at Glenn High School when she met Betty Norton, the school librarian. Gloria was impressed with the way Betty sought out the teachers to share with them additional resources and services to help with teaching and learning. Betty kept students coming to the library to read, do research, and participate in the AV Club. Inspired, Gloria began to investi-

34

gate a change in career to library media. Gloria completed her Master’s degree in school librarianship at UAB and went on to get two other post-graduate degrees in Educational Leadership. She served as librarian at West End High School in Birmingham City Schools and as system-wide librarian at Lane Teacher Center. When urged to apply for Director of Library Media Services in Jefferson County Schools, she took on yet another challenge, which to this day she has enjoyed. Because Jefferson County schools were so spread out and located in so many different municipalities and staffed with library aides instead of professional, certified librarians, Gloria’s first task as Director of Library Media Services was to facilitate

the hiring of qualified librarians. She sought to unify the librarians and foster collaboration among them through a new Library Advisory Committee with two representatives from elementary, middle and high school levels. New professional development opportunities were organized through a variety of conferences including the Summer Professional Development Conference (“Back-to-School Conference); Library Opening of School Meeting; Computer Literacy Month (which included a program called BYTE--Building Youth with Technology in Education and the Fall grade level meetings); Family Reading Program (which included the Parents’ Reading Initiative where parents read to or with their children at least 15 minutes a day); and Young Authors’ Showcase (where students had to write

The Alabama School Librarian


Meg Brooke is a former president of AIMA (ASLA).

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Library Media Services, Retires an original revision of the end of a book). Reading program awards were provided by Jefferson County PTA Council and presented at the January meeting of Jefferson County Board of Education and the Christmas Books Share-A-Bration Workshop, where books and reading were promoted as “gifts of life.” Authors, illustrators, and storytellers were invited presenters at the workshop and the young authors were invited to the workshop to meet and interview them and community reading role models were utilized to motivate students to read more for information and for pleasure. “Read Across America and Read Across Jefferson County followed the Christmas Share-A-Bration, which was followed by LLSP, the Library Links for Success Program, which recognized the most exemplary

Winter 2012

library program in support of the total school curriculum and named the Library Media Specialist of the Year, the Library Aide of the Year, the Most Exemplary Principal in support of Libraries, the John and Ella McCain Leadership Award and the Director’s Award for Outstanding Support to the Library Media Services Department; Spring grade-level meeting; Library Closing of School Meeting and the Librarians’ Appreciation Luncheon. Library monthly and annual reports were required to provide documentation of the success and needs of the school library media program. Librarians’ selfassessments were requested to assist the librarians in determining the strengths and weaknesses of their programs and devising a plan for improvement.

Some of Gloria’s professional involvements have included: President of Alabama Instructional Media Association (AIMA), Chair of the Children and School Division of the Alabama Library Association, Regional Director of the Southeastern Regional Media Leadership Council, which included the states of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Florida, Puerto Rico and Tennessee; President of Alabama Library Forum (ALF), and Board member of the National Association for Educational Communication and Technology. Some of her honors have included: Alabama Library Hall of Fame (1990), First recipient of the Alabama Library Media Professional of the Year Award (presented by AECT and 3M); Award of Exceptional Service from the Alabama Instructional Media Association (1989 & 1992); Librarian of the

35


Meg Brooke, NBCT Librarian, Shades Valley High School and Jefferson County International Baccalaureate High School

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Gloria Dennard, Director of Jefferson County’s Year 2001, presented by Beta Phi Mu, the International Library Science Honor Society; Distinguished Service Award, 1992, presented by AIMA; AIMA’s Outstanding Service as Legislative Chair 1989-91; 20 Years of Outstanding Service as Director of Library Media Services, Jefferson County Schools, presented by JefCo Librarians, 2008; Leadership Birmingham, 1991 and Leadership Alabama, 2000; Founding Board Member of Birmingham Civil Rights Institute; Top Twenty Most Influential Women in Birmingham (Birmingham News Poll); Who’s Who in Birmingham; Who’s Who in Alabama; Girl Scouts Woman of Distinction, 2008; NAACP Woman of Distinction 2011; NCCJ Outstanding Educator; Stillman College Educators’ Hall of Fame, 2011

36

From Gloria When I first began my work as Director of Library Media Services with Jefferson County School System, I had to get acclimated to working with K-8 children. My backgound had been on the high school level. One day, as I was visiting an elementary school, I was asked by the librarian to read to her kindergarten class. "No problem", I said, and I proceeded to read to the children the book she gave me, while seated in a rocking chair in front of the kids. The more I read, the closer the kids inched to me until finally, they were up on my lap, tugging at my arms, and hugging me. This surprised me, because I was used to high school students who would sometimes listen to your reading, but did not respond with hugs. This experience gave me a warm fondness for reading in the elementary grades. On another note, I was invited by Gertrude Dick, the librarian at West Jefferson High School, to come to read to what I thought was a class. It

The Alabama School Librarian


Meg Brooke is a former president of AIMA (ASLA).

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Library Media Services, Retires ended up being the whole student body at West Jefferson. I had taken various books with me to read, but I chose the book, Tikki Tikki Tembo to share with the high schoolers because of its fun play with words, and I could challenge their recall ability and see if they were paying attention. To my surprise, the students applauded me after I finished the story, and many of them eagerly participated in my test of their recall ability. We all had so much fun that day. The principal said he had never seen them so animated about reading. Of course, I was flattered. Once on a reading trip to Pinson Valley Elementary School just prior to the Christmas holidays, I discovered that many of the students in the class were Spanish-speakers, so I switched my reading plans and decided instead to teach all the kids Christmas songs in Spanish. We had so much fun singing in Spanish, and I did, also, manage to read a book about Christmas. My concern for school libraries has been continuous throughout my tenure as library director. When I first began my job, there were only a few certified librarians in Jefferson County. Most of the library managers were library aides. We appreciated what the aides did, but we needed well-trained, professional librarians. To my delight, we accomplished this mission in a few years, and, also, were able to cease having one librarian to have to divide her time and talents between two schools. Through my work with AIMA, we were successful in getting the library unit included in the Minimum Program to cease librarians being among the first to be let go whenever there was a funding shortage in the education budget When fax machines came on the scene, I was determined to find funds to purchase fax machines for our schools, and when this mission was accomplished, to my dismay, some of the principals took the fax machines from the libraries and placed them in their offices. Librarians, being the resourceful and tenacious people they are, found other ways to increase their inventory of needed equipment for their libraries through grants, appeal to parents, and other library supporters. My current concern for libraries include the lack of proper funding to keep the school libraries updated in resources and services and the lack of real understanding among administrators of the value and needs of school libraries.

Winter 2012

37


Instructions for Authors Carolyn J. Starkey, NBCT Editor, The Alabama School Librarian

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

The Alabama School Librarian ABOUT THE ALABAMA SCHOOL LIBRARIAN The Alabama School Librarian is a combined association newsletter and peer-reviewed (refereed) journal published by the Alabama School Library Association (ASLA). It is devoted solely to the field of school libraries and technology as related to school libraries. Although all submissions are welcome, those that clearly focus on issues and topics related to Alabama school libraries have publication priority. The Alabama School Librarian is published digitally four times per academic year and is sent electronically to all members of the Alabama School Library Association and supporters of Alabama school libraries. AUDIENCE Readers of The Alabama School Librarian are primarily school li-

38

brarians and/or technology specialists. Other readers include university faculty members, vendors, and supporters of Alabama school library programs. CONTENTS OF THE ALABAMA SCHOOL LIBRARIAN The contents of The Alabama School Librarian falls into three categories: (1) Association News Includes articles, newsbriefs, program descriptions, activity suggestions, and reviews of ASLA events and Alabama school library program activities. Articles for this section will undergo General Editorial Staff review only. (2) Libraries and Librarianship Articles Includes general articles on library and technology topics. Articles for this section will undergo General Editorial Staff review on-

ly. (3) Scholarly Referred Articles Includes research studies, learned essays, professional papers, literature reviews, literature/book critiques, and other professional topics. Submissions for this section will undergo a blind review by at least two members of the Academic Editorial Board. MANUSCRIPT FORMAT Manuscripts for General Editorial Staff Review [(1) and (2) above] have no length limitations but should be submitted in 12point Constanstia font with a .doc or .docx file extension. A title page with author’s name, affiliation, address, and a short professional biographical sketch should be included. An author photo should be submitted as a .jpeg attachment. Pages should be numbered. Authors are responsible for ob-

The Alabama School Librarian


Authors Wanted! The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

Instructions for Authors taining releases from all persons appearing in submitted photos. Authors are also responsible for obtaining releases for all copyrighted material included within submissions. Manuscripts for Academic Editorial Review should follow the format guidelines as in (1). Additionally, the author should meet these elements: Author name should not appear on manuscript pages other than the title page; original tables and figures should be placed on a separate sheet at the end of the manuscript and notations for proper placement of tables and figures should appear in the text; and manuscripts should reflect APA, 5th edition styling. SUBMITTING THE MANUSCRIPT Articles and accompanying ma-

Winter 2012

terials should be submitted electronically in a .doc or .docx format to Carolyn Starkey at admin@jojostarkey.com. If the author would like a blind review for a scholarly submission, this should be noted in the submission email. Manuscripts submitted to The Alabama School Librarian should not be under review at another publication.

ly in any other journals and/or books. Manuscripts accepted for publication may be edited for clarity, accuracy, readability, and publication style. Publication usually occurs within 6 months of acceptance. DEADLINES FALL BACK TO SCHOOL ISSUE Deadline: July 31. Release date of mid-to-late August.

REVIEW PROCESS Each manuscript will receive appropriate review for the type of submission. Usually, authors should expect to hear the results within two to eight weeks, depending on the type of submission. PUBLICATION OF ARTICLES The Alabama School Librarian assumes that accepted manuscripts have not been published previous-

WINTER ISSUE Deadline: November 30. Release date of late December or early January. SPRING ISSUE Deadline: February 15. Release date of mid-to-late March. SUMMER PRE-CONVENTION ISSUE: May 15. Release date of late May.

Carolyn 39


Membership 2011-2012

The Alabama School Librarian Journal and Newsletter of the Alabama School Library Association

The Alabama School Library Association of School Librarians (ASLA) is our state professional membership organization focused on the needs of school librarians and the school library community. School librarians/media specialists in Alabama are encouraged to support the efforts of ASLA as we continue to advocate for libraries, librarians, and funding during the 2011-2012 school year. You may join by mail or online.

First Friday Sessions

Save These Dates March 29-30, 2012 National Latino Children’s Literature Conference, SLIS, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL. April 24-27, 2012 Alabama Library Association (ALLA) Annual Conference, The Wynfrey Hotel, Hoover, AL. June 12, 2012 Alabama School Library Association (ASLA) Summer Conference, Mtn. Brook High ASLA Twitter Chats are the School, Mountain Brook, AL. first Tuesday in every month. Up-

#aslachat

coming Twitter chats will be

June 13-15, 2012 Alabama EducaFebruary 7, March 6, April 3, and tion Technology Conference May 1 at 7 p.m. (AETC) Conference, HewittTrussville High School, Trussville, AL. 40

The Alabama School Librarian


_______New Member

________Cash

ALABAMA SCHOOL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

ASLA MEMBERSHIP FORM

_______Renewal

________Check Number

2011-2012 *PLEASE FILL OUT ALL INFORMATION COMPLETELY

Last Name

First Name

Initial

Mailing Address

City

State

Zip Code

School

System

Home Phone

Work Phone

Fax#

E-mail Address

ASLA District #

District I: Colbert, Cullman, Franklin, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Morgan, and Winston District II: Blount, Jackson, Madison, Marshall District III: Fayette, Greene, Hale, Lamar, Marion, Pickens, Sumter, Tuscaloosa, Walker District IV: Jefferson and Shelby District V: Calhoun, Cherokee, Cleburne, DeKalb, Etowah, St. Clair, Talladega District VI: Autauga, Bibb, Butler, Chilton, Choctaw, Dallas, Lowndes, Marengo, Perry, Wilcox District VII: Bullock, Chambers, Clay, Coosa, Elmore, Lee, Macon, Montgomery, Randolph, Russell, Tallapoosa District VIII: Baldwin, Clark, Conecuh, Escambia, Mobile, Monroe, Washington District IX: Barbour, Coffee, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Geneva, Henry, Houston, Pike Membership Category $25 Active Membership $50 Corporate Membership $5 Student Membership $5 Retired Membership Other organizations to which you belong: Alabama Education Association (AEA) American Library Association (ALA) American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) To apply and pay online using Paypal, go to www.alasla.org and click on Membership Resources. To apply through mail, please return completed form with check made payable to ASLA to: Susan Cordell ASLA P.O. Box 2211 Hamilton, AL 35570 Membership in ASLA is from October 1st to September 30th each year. If you join ASLA during the year, your membership will still be up for renewal September 30th.

Winter 2012

41


Alabama School Library Association http://www.alasla.org

42

The Alabama School Librarian


The Alabama School Librarian