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CAROL MORGAN SCHOOL

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM OF STUDIES 2013-2014 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C a r o l Ave. Sarasota esq. Nunez de Caceres Apartado Postal No. 1169 Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

M o r g a n

Tel: (809) 947-1000 Fax: (809) 533-9222 www.cms.edu.do headmaster@cms.edu.do

S c h o o l

Carol Morgan School CPS #2246 PO Box 149020 Coral Gables, FL 33114-9020

ADMISSIONS: Ruth Sรกnchez, Registrar Tel: (809) 947-1100 Fax: (809) 701-6899


CMS

HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

CONTENTS

TOPIC

PAGE_

Carol Morgan School Mission Statement ………………………………………. School Philosophy and Objectives ……………………………………………..... Statement of Accreditation ………..…………………………………………….. School Mission...…………………………….…………………………………….. Purpose of booklet ……………………………………………………………….. Planning for the future ………………………………………………………….. Credits….………………………………………………………………...... Grade Level Placement …………………………………………………… Higher Education Requirements………………………………………....... Graduation Requirements………………………………………………………. Course Selection ………………………………….…............................................ Course Load Requirements………………………………………………... Course Scheduling Process ……………………………………………….. Guidance Department……………………………………………………… Four Year Plan…………………………………………………………………….. Cross Disciplinary Programs……………………………………………………. Advanced Placement Program……………………………………………. Optimal Learning Center …………………………………………………. Independent Research ……...…………………………………………….. Virtual High School………………………………………………………. Application for an Advanced Placement Course…………………...…………. English ……………………………………………………………………….…... Social Studies …………………………………………………………...……….. Mathematics……..……………………………………………………………….. Science…………………………………………………………………………….. World Languages ………………..………………………………………………. Physical and Health Education…………………………………………………. Fine and Performing Arts………………………………………………………. Applied Technology ……………………………………………………………... Course Offerings, 2012-13………………………………………………….…....

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

THE CAROL MORGAN SCHOOL OF SANTO DOMINGO Mrs. Carol Morgan started to teach her daughter and five other children in an old abandoned chapel in the garden of the Episcopal Church in 1933. When Mrs. Morgan’s husband’s missionary work took his family back to the United States, the school continued. In 1949, it was officially named The Carol Morgan School in honor of her efforts. It moved locations many times. In 1964, Mr. Donald Reid, on behalf of the Dominican Republic Government, donated the present site of 15 acres to the school. Construction began immediately and the school moved to its present campus in 1968. The gymnasium was built in 1974 and other improvements to the facilities and grounds have been continued, now directed by a long-range plan.

Mission Statement The Carol Morgan School is a private, secular, nonprofit, college-preparatory school that instills a passion for learning, builds character and inspires civic and social responsibility. Incorporating a rigorous U.S. curriculum and advanced technology, CMS prepares students to become leaders of a multicultural, global society. The Carol Morgan School will maintain its lead as a world-class, comprehensive school. Revised March 2010

Philosophy Statement for The Carol Morgan School of Santo Domingo Committed to continuous improvement, the Carol Morgan School provides an excellent standards-based academic program within the framework of the best in research-based educational practices. The varied international student body receives an immersion English language program. The philosophy and objectives of the not for profit community school, maintains a U.S. curriculum in the rich cultural setting of the Dominican Republic. The multi-national CMS welcomes students from all countries knowing that this association of students of different backgrounds and religions will help students have a clear understanding of the global world in which we live. Our students come from varied family, geographic and educational backgrounds and the school recognizes the individual differences of its children. CMS Programs are designed to meet a wide range of individual needs. Our programs also stress the worth and dignity of each student and strives to give him/her the opportunities to progress intellectually, emotionally, socially, and physically to his/her greatest potential.

Approved March 7, 1994; Amended June12th, 2006

Statement of Accreditation Carol Morgan School receives accreditation from the SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION of COLLEGES and SCHOOLS (SACS). This Association is a non-governmental, internationally recognized, organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering post-graduate instruction. Accreditation of an institution by SACS indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a peer group review process. An accredited school is one which has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation. Accreditation by SACS is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of the quality of every course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. It does, however, provide reasonable assurance about the quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution. Inquiries regarding the status of an institution’s accreditation by SACS should be directed to the administrative staff of the school. Individuals may also contact SACS: 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 Tel: 404-679-4500 Fax: 404-679-4541.

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

WELCOME to CAROL MORGAN HIGH SCHOOL

School Vision “Founded in Integrity, Focused on Learning” Approved May 2009 To this end we will: Expect the very best from every student. Request and encourage family support and involvement. Pledge our professional expertise and personal commitment.

Student Outcomes Upon graduating from Carol Morgan School students will: •

Demonstrate analytical thinking.

Demonstrate ability to problem solve.

Possess a global perspective.

Demonstrate citizenship and social responsibility.

Be life long learners.

Demonstrate ethical behavior and sound judgment.

Be aware and reflective of their varied intelligences/intellectual strengths.

Be inquisitive and information seeking.

Apply scientific and mathematical principles of investigation and research to future life settings.

Be able to apply technological skills in new and future settings.

Demonstrate outstanding practical and academic skills for personal and professional success.

Demonstrate skillful written and oral communication and reading ability.

Possess bilingual skills within the English and Spanish languages.

Demonstrate self-reliance

Demonstrate confidence

Demonstrate multicultural sensitivity and respect for differences.

Demonstrate self motivation and self discipline.

Possess leadership ability and team work skills.

Demonstrate ability to make healthy life choices for future well-being.

Be well mannered, courteous, and cultured and able to conduct themselves as ladies and gentlemen within social and professional settings.

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

The purpose of this booklet is to provide parents and students with the tools to develop a course of study toward high school graduation and beyond.

The booklet is divided into sections that will allow you to: • Discuss and develop plans for the future, • Review graduation requirements for Carol Morgan High School, • Understand individual courses based upon course descriptions, • Select and request courses for the next school year, • Learn of specialized services and offerings.

Department information will be found in the following order: • English, p. 13 • Social Studies, p. 16 • Mathematics, p. 20 • Science, p. 23 • World Languages, p. 26 • Physical and Health Education, p. 29 • Fine and Performing Arts, p. 31 • Applied Technology, p. 36

Course descriptions are listed beginning with those required for graduation, and then those that are elective classes.

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Planning for the Future CREDITS A student receives • One (1) credit for the successful completion of each Full Year (two semester) class, • One half (1/2) credit for the successful completion of each Semester class, No credit is received for a class if a student’s final grade is below 60%. In a full year course, the final grade is the average of both semesters.

GRADE LEVEL PLACEMENT Students are placed at grade level according to the following criteria: Grade 10 Six (6) credits earned Grade 11 Twelve (12) credits earned If you have questions regarding your credits, contact the Guidance Office.

Grade 12

Eighteen (18) credits earned

HIGHER EDUCATION Many students continue education beyond high school. Since admission requirements vary widely between higher education institutions, applicants must consult the bulletin or catalog of the institutions of choice. During the school year, admissions officers from many schools and colleges visit with CMS students. It is important to realize that admission to college is generally competitive and that a maximum rather than a minimum course of study is recommended. It is further recommended that students consult with their guidance counselor frequently in making plans for the future. This will help to ensure that course selections are appropriate to personal goals. While accumulation of credits is important, students must also consider course rigor, grades, S.A.T. scores, school recommendations, leadership experiences, community service hours and involvement in co-curricular and extracurricular activities. Students should take the most challenging courses that they are capable of completing successfully. This will put them in a position to be accepted at a college or university where the academic challenge will be appropriate for their talents and preparation. U.S. College / University Entrance SUBJECT # Years RECOMMENDED English 4 Social Studies 4 U.S History + Modern Language Math

4 4

Science Physical Education Fine Arts

4 1 ½

Through Pre-Calculus

Dominican University Entrance SUBJECT # Years RECOMMENDED * English 4 Social Studies 4 Dominican History + Economics + Sociology Spanish 4 Spanish 12 Math 4 Pre-Calculus including Statistics

EXAMINATION

Science Physical Education Fine Arts SAT I and SAT II ACT & T.O.E.F.L

EXAMINATION **

4

Biology, Chemistry, Physics National Exams required 8th and 12th grade

* These courses are STRONGLY RECOMMENDED for ALL students to prepare for the Dominican “Pruebas Nacionales” (National Exams) even if university study in the United States is under consideration. ** ALL Dominican students, as well as students who wish to attend Dominican universities, should prepare for the “Pruebas Nacionales” (National Exams). Futhermore, ALL Dominican graduates are stongly advised to take the “Pruebas Nacionales” (National Exams) IMMEDIATELY after graduating from CMS in case these exams results are needed at a later date.

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Graduation Requirements

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS To be eligible for graduation from the Carol Morgan School, a minimum of 25 credits must be earned in Grades 9 – 12 in accordance with the table below. Eight semesters of successful full-time attendance in high school are required. Students must maintain an academic G.P.A. of 2.0 (70%). Each semester’s performance achievement will be reviewed to ensure all students will eventually meet graduation requirements. The following subjects must be successfully completed with passing (60% or higher) grades. Add something here about Algebra 1 at 70%? SUBJECT REQUIRED COURSES Graduates of 2010+ English 9, English 10, English 11, English English 12 (or AP Literature or AP Language) 4 credits Global History and Geography I, Global History and Social Studies Geography II (or AP World History), 4 credits US History (or AP US History) * Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II & Trigonometry 3 credits Mathematics ** Physical Science, Biology 3 credits Science Three consecutive Spanish courses World Language 3 credits (Mandarin is offered as an elective language) Physical and Health Education 1 & 2 Physical and 2 credits (Integrated Health and PE) Health Education 2 credits Fine Arts 0.5 credits Computer Technology ****Including the SAT Prep and Writing the College Additional Courses 4 credits Research Paper Courses TOTAL CREDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 25.5 CREDITS ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Every student must write an SAT I exam SAT-reading, writing, math Passing The Senior Extended Essay is a CMS graduation requirement SEE-paper +oral defense 10 Hours of Community Service each school year in Grades 9 – 12 40 hours * Algebra I may be taken in 8th grade, but no HS credit will be received. Alegbra must be passed with a 70%. A student taking Geometry in 9th grade must complete the three year math requirement, e.g. Algebra II/ Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, Calculus. ** An exception exists for students with outstanding achievement who are committed to the Sciences. Physics and Chemistry (or the AP versions) must be completed, as a graduation requirement, if permission to waive Physical Science is granted. **** The SAT and Writing the College Research Paper Courses are required. Early graduation, which is defined as prior to June of a student's senior year and/or with less than four (4) full years of high school attendance, is not an accepted practice at The Carol Morgan School. Although they may take credit-granting courses, eighth grade students will not receive credits toward graduation. The graduation requirements for students registered in a High School Level 2 Resource class (OLC) will be reduced by one credit for each year s/he received OLC Level 2 assistance since no credit is granted for OLC. Core course requirements must still be met for graduation.

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

Course selection COURSE LOAD REQUIREMENTS Each student must • Select, in the spring, their full program for the entire next year. • Enroll in a full schedule of seven courses, each semester. Students in Grades 11 and 12 who carry two (2) or more Advanced Placement courses may be given the option, with parent permission, to choose one study hall for a semester or year. • Students must take a minimum of five core courses (social studies, English, Spanish, math and science) each semester. • Students with a study hall cannot register for a teacher’s assistant or office aid position.

COURSE SCHEDULING PROCESS 1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

This booklet is prepared to assist students and parents with planning, for a full, comprehensive program each year. Students should review their current transcript and fill out a four year plan to ensure they are on track to meet graduation requirements. See Four-Year Plan on page 9. Students should review the Program of Studies • Consider what you want to study in college. Are you taking appropriate courses to prepare you for your next step? • What courses do you need to study in the US versus the DR? • The point is to challenge yourself. • You may not sign up for classes you have already taken unless you did not pass that course. Students complete the Course Selection Form for their grade, obtain their parents’ signatures, and submit them to their advisor by the date indicated on the course selection form. Students register electronically. The electronic registration must exactly match the student’s Course Selection Form. The Guidance Office reviews the course selections. The Principal, with assistance from the Guidance Counselor and Subject Chairpersons, organizes classes to accommodate the requests in a way that minimizes the conflicts for students and teachers. Draft schedules are printed and the Guidance Counselor will work with the student to resolve schedule conflicts. Students new to the school will be scheduled as early as possible.

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT The Counselors in the Guidance Department help students select and schedule courses. The course selection process, however, is but one part of the department’s involvement in the total educational experience. The Guidance Department is committed to helping all students make the best possible use of their educational opportunities. For each student, this involves an ongoing examination of the self in a changing world. It means carefully selecting courses and then answering the question, "How does it all fit together for me and where do I want to go with it?” Most students need some help with self-understanding, decision making and relating to others, as well as with obtaining information about course selection, careers, and further education. This help is offered by guidance counselors through individual conferences, group discussions and informational programs. It is also an aim of the Guidance Department to work closely with parents, teachers, administrators and others in the school and community. The greater the communication, the more opportunity there is for solving problems that may interfere with the learning process and for expanding resources available to students. This, in turn, should enable young people to contribute more fully to the community.

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Four–Year Plan Name: Grade 9 English 9

Social Studies Global History and Geography I

Grade 10 English 10

Social Studies

Mathematics

Mathematics

Science

Science

Science

Spanish 10

Spanish 11

Spanish 12

PHE 1

PHE 2

SAT Prep

WCRP (SEE)

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Science Physical Science /Biology Spanish 9

Technology

Community Service Hours (10) Credits Year: Cum:

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Grade 12 English 12/ AP English/ (Language or Literature)

Social Studies U.S. History / AP U.S. History

Mathematics Algebra I/Geometry

Social Studies Global History and Geography I / AP World History Mathematics

Class of: Grade 11 English 11/ AP Eng. Language

Community Service Hours (10)

Community Service Hours (10)

Credits Year:

Credits Year:

Cum:

Cum:

Community Service Hours (10) Total: 40 Credits Year: Cum:

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

Cross Disciplinary Programs ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PROGRAM WE INVITE YOU TO CHALLENGE YOURSELF! CMS offers the Advanced Placement (AP) Program, a globally recognized program of college-level courses and examinations that give committed, motivated students the opportunity to: earn college advanced placement broaden horizons

improve performance in college earn college credits

become eligible for a Scholar Award or International Diploma experience the process of a college class

2013-2014 CMS plans to offer 10-15 AP courses and examinations. While we encourage all students to challenge themselves, please remember that AP courses require extraordinary personal commitment at an accelerated academic level. The college-level content of AP courses, as well as the May examinations timetable, requires rapid coverage of material, a great deal of independent study, extraordinary work ethic, consistent attendance and a high record of achievement in previous courses. AP Courses also require a greater commitment outside of school as the level of homework is greater than regular courses. Please note, that it is a CMS Policy that all students enrolled in AP classes must take the AP exam in that course. Exam fees are the responsibility of the student’s family. AP prerequisites and appropriate grade levels are available in each of the course descriptions. If required, AP applications are available in this booklet and also from the Guidance Office.

Dominican Republic Universities recognize Advanced Placement scores. The following institutions will recognize grades of 3, 4 and 5 on up to three AP exams as students register with the universities. Santo Domingo: San Pedro de Macoris: Santiago: APEC PUCMM UNIBE UCE PUCMM UNPHU INTEC So, if you are planning to attend university locally, AP may give you significant advantages!!!

SEE AP APPLICATION FORM ON PAGE 12

OPTIMAL LEARNING CENTER (OLC) Resource Level 2 services are provided for students who have been identified and evaluated as having a learning difference and who require additional assistance for success. The Resource teacher develops an Individualized Education Plan with the student, teachers and parents to address the student’s needs. Accommodations to match the ways in which the student best learns are encouraged within each classroom. Within the OLC room at least three times per week, the Resource teacher ensures students are aware of their strengths as well as their weakness and helps them use their strengths to greater advantage. Students learn about their particular learning styles and practice techniques to enhance their style. Ongoing attention to study and organizational skills helps students to use their learning time more effectively. This service has an additional cost; details can be obtained from the OLC Office.

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROJECT Independent Research Project is designed to provide an opportunity for students to go beyond the classroom experience to pursue a particular interest if subject area course offerings have been exhausted. The administration and staff recognize the value of self-discovery and selfteaching and support the responsibility and growth which is involved in this process. To apply, a student must: • be a Junior or Senior •

have exhausted the present curriculum

• •

have at least a B average in the subject area in which s/he wishes to study independently be involved in only one independent Reasearch Project per semester.

Exceptions to these qualifications will be handled via your guidance counselor. The counselor will bring viable exceptions to the attention of the subject Department Chairperson’s approval. In cases of doubt, the guidance counselor will bring individual cases to the principal.

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VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL VHS is an online education program that gives students access to high quality, innovative on-line curriculum offered from high schools around the world. In addition, students have the opportunity to interact, collaborate, and team with students of different ethnicities, cultural backgrounds and geographical locations. The VHS program offers over 130 different course selections with curriculum that is extremely diverse and a creative alternative to traditional courses. Although VHS exists only in cyberspace, its policies, procedures and guidelines are real. Students and teachers are expected to attend their VHS NetCourse on a daily basis (or, for students on block schedules, at least 3 times per week). Courses must undergo rigorous evaluation before they are accepted, and are regularly monitored to ensure that they comply with VHS delivery standards. A complete catalogue and description of the VHS program are avaible at www.govhs.org Who Can Enroll in VHS? Students can enroll in VHS classes if they meet the following criteria: 1. The student must be a sophomore, junior or senior. 2. Student must have a solid academic career (not necessarily outstanding, but solid). 3. The student and his or her guardian(s) must pay an additional fee for taking a VHS course. VHS Course Clarifications 1. All VHS are equal to CMS elective courses. 2. VHS courses are categorized by grade (10, 11, 12) and difficulty level (standard, honors, AP, etc). Credit will be granted as an elective course at the appropriate grade and difficulty level. 3. One VHS course can be taken in addition to six CMS campus courses. Students cannot register for seven CMS courses plus a VHS course. 4. Students can only participate in one VHS course per semester. 5. A VHS course can be scheduled in any block throughout the day. 6. There is an additional cost associated with a VHS course. 7. Parents and teachers should be aware that due to scheduling complications it may not be possible for VHS students to receive constant supervision. Students are expected to comply with the expectations outlined in the CMS Internet Use Contract and also in the VHS Internet use contract. 8. VHS seats are limited. Students interested in taking a VHS class are encouraged to contact Mr. Rodrigo as soon as possible. 9. Course registration is not guaranteed until payment is received. For additional information regarding the selection process and for the necessary forms, students and parents may contact Armando Rodrigo, the VHS Site Coordinator, through the high school office or at arodrigo@cms.edu.do.

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Application for an ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSE Complete an application for each course you are applying for Advanced Placement courses are rigorous, fast-paced classes for students seeking an academic challenge. “All students who are prepared and willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum should be considered for admission to AP courses.” – The College Board

High school course work completed is the best indicator of whether a student is “prepared and willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum.” Students who demonstrate that preparation and willingness typically have: • 90% or higher average in preparatory courses in that department; • 85% average or higher in core courses (English, Spanish, math, science, social studies) Please note the following: • Students with a core academic average <85% are welcome to apply for an AP course, but a maximum of two AP courses is recommended. • Students with a core academic average <80% must complete and attach a “Request for an exception to the AP acceptance criteria” to this form. If accepted, only one AP course is recommended. • Students with a core academic average =<75% or who are on Academic Probation will not be considered for AP course enrollment. If you truly desire to take an AP course, demonstrate that you are prepared and willing to do rigorous work by raising your core GPA above 75%. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Name ___________________________________ Current grade level _______________ Core GPA (=>85%) ________________ Parent phone number _________________ Circle the ONE ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSE you are applying for on this form. English Spanish Math Science Social Studies Fine Arts English Lang & Spanish Language Calculus AB Composition (11) English Lit & Spanish Literature Statistics Composition (12)

Environmental Science Chemistry Physics B

Grades in this department

Course

European History

Studio Art

Government: US-Comparative World History US History Psychology Economics

VHS Computer Science Calculus BC

Grade

Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 (if applicable)

Other AP courses you are applying for _______________________________________________ Student signature _______________________________________ Date _____________ Parents’ signatures ________________________/___________________________ Date _____________ Current Subject Teacher signature-“I am in agreement this student is a good match for this AP course.” Signature________________________Date______________

Submit this completed form to the Guidance Center by 2:30 p.m. Friday, February 8th. Meeting deadlines is an AP expectation; therefore, late applications will NOT be accepted. Decisions posted Feb. 15. Approved ________________ Tentatively approved _____________ Not approved _____________ Reason for denial:

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ENGLISH

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ENGLISH English offerings by grade: Grade 9 English 9

Grade 10 English 10

Grade 11 English 11 AP Language and Composition SAT Prep

Grade 12 English 12, or AP Language & Composition, or AP Literature & Composition Writing the College Research Paper

(Courses listed are not always offered every year) ENGLISH 9 Prerequisite: English 8

Grade 9 Full Year Textbooks: Elements of Literature 3, Holt, Rinehart, Winston Elements of Writing 3, Holt, Rinehart, Winston

1 Credit (Required)

This course focuses on the study of fundamental concepts of literature from around the world including Africa, the Americas, Europe, and England and on improving students’ writing skills. Students will understand and analyze various genres of literature – poetry, short story, drama, epic, and the novel. Students will also develop critical reading and analytical skills, build their vocabularies, and enhance their understanding of grammar through methodologies including individual study, class discussions, literature circles, Socratic seminars, written and oral expression, and visual media. Writing assignments that evolve from the reading selections will incorporate the Six Traits of Writing. This course carries a heavy emphasis on grammar usage in order to improve students’ understanding of the English language and improve their writing ability. In addition to class participation, note-taking, quizzes, tests, and multi-media projects, students will be required to prepare a multi-genre research paper and create an oral presentation. ENGLISH 10 Prerequisite: English 9

Grade 10 Full Year Textbooks: Elements of Literature 4, Holt, Rinehart, Winston Elements of Writing 4, Holt, Rinehart, Winston

1 Credit (Required)

This course will focus on classical world literature and communication skills. Class assignments will require students to read, write, and think critically and creatively. The use this literature to observe record and examine the world, thereby defining and understanding their individual views. Students learn to record their own views and the views of others through various models of writing, with an emphasis on expository pros which students will develop using specific grammatical/rhetorical structures. Students will also complete a full length research project. ENGLISH 11/ American Literature Prerequisite: English 10

Grade 11 Full Year Textbooks: Elements of Literature 5, Holt, Rinehart, Winston Elements of Writing 5, Holt, Rinehart, Winston

1 Credit (Required)

The course focuses on the thematic study of American Literature and Rhetoric. Through the various genres of literature and multi-media, students will understand the major themes and ideas embodied in America. Students will examine the many cultural influences contributing to the American identity and dream. Students will improve their critical reading, writing, thinking, speaking, and researching skills though independent study, cooperative activities, project-based learning, and the use of techonology in the classroom. ENGLISH 12 / English Literature Prerequisite: English 11

Grade 12 Full Year Textbooks: Elements of Literature 6, Holt, Rinehart, Winston Elements of Writing 6, Holt, Rinehart, Winston

1 Credit (Required)

The focus of this course is English literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the present day. Through the various genres of literature, students will come to understand fundamental concepts of literature within the wider framework of British society and culture. Students will be required to participate in cooperative activates and class discussions, take notes during class presentations, read assigned literature outside of class, produce oral and written work on a daily basis, and takes quizzes, tests and exams. Course objectives include the study of the literature of Great Britain, extensive preparation for university-level writing, and the development of an expanded world view to help students become lifelong learners as well as well as agents for change.

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014 Grade 11

Semester

½ Credit (Required)

This course is required for ALL JUNIORS in order to prepare them for the SAT Test. The course will be one semester long with students splitting their time between the math portion of the test and the English portion of the test. The course will be taught collaboratively by two teachers, one from English and one from Math. Students receive instruction in the areas of: test format, strategies to attack each type of question, tips on pacing and guessing, practice with real SAT questions and whole test sections plus guidance on the college selection/application process. In the English section they will focus on vocabulary building, critical reading, thinking strategies and writing. In the math section the focus will be on algebra, geometry and statistics. WRITING THE COLLEGE RESEARCH PAPER

Grade 12

Semester

½ Credit (Required)

This one semester course is required for ALL SENIORS in order to prepare their Senior Extended Essay and Oral Defense. Students will choose and research a narrow topic in considerable detail, generate an original thesis, and compose a succinct 2500-3000 word essay that they must defend in an oral presentation at the conclusion of the course. The purpose of the course is to ensure that every CMS student experiences the process of envisioning, creating, revising, submitting and defending a major research paper. Specifically, students will apply the Big 6 research cycle at the college level, locate and evaluate reliable sources in the library, web, or databases; cull, organize, and synthesize task-appropriate information, responsibly track and cite sources, and use 21st century web tools to effectively manage web-based information as well as applying effective presentation skills and technological fluency. OPTIONAL COURSES AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

Grades 11, 12

Full Year

1 Credit

AP Language and Composition is structured as a first year college composition course and involves close reading and analysis. The effect of writing on the intended audience, the rhetorical devices used to achieve that effect, and judgments about the writer’s attitude and motivation are the concerns of this course. Students examine a range of writing models, learn to write detailed analyses and practice certain techniques in their own writing. Besides the largely nonfiction works provided as composition examples, AP Language includes a mixed genre selection of notable pieces from world literature. Students will be required to participate in cooperative group learning and class discussions, to take notes during class presentations, to read a great deal of assigned literature outside of class, to produce oral and written work on a daily basis, and to take quizzes, tests and exams. Advanced Placement Language and Composition is offered to students in grades 11 and 12 who sufficiently demonstrate their abilities, motivation and interest through the quality of past work, grades, PSAT scores, teacher recommendation, and a sample AP essay and objective passage. AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

Grade 12

Full Year

1 Credit

The AP Literature and Composition student reads analytically to recognize and describe both orally and in writing, how language and form contribute to the meaning of a work. This includes literal and figurative meaning, recognition of themes, and stylistic techniques and devices. Students use writing as a means of discovery and clarification in personal writing and literary analysis. Class discussions are student-directed; students orally demonstrate text based position statements with effective supporting evidence. Students exhibit responsive, active listening. Students will be required to participate in cooperative group learning and class discussions, to take notes during class presentations, to read a great deal of assigned literature outside of class, to produce oral and written work on a daily basis, and to take quizzes, tests and exams. Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is offered to students in grade 12 who sufficiently demonstrate their abilities, motivation and interest through the quality of past work, grades, PSAT scores, teacher recommendation, sample AP essay and objective passage.

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SOCIAL STUDIES

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SOCIAL STUDIES ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Social Studies offerings by grade: Grade 9 Global History and Geography 1 Current Events: D.R. and the World

Grade 10 Global History and Geography 2 or AP World History Psychology Economics Current Events: D.R. and the World

Grade 11 US History and Government or AP United States History AP US Government and Politics AP World History AP European History AP Psychology AP Economics Economics Psychology Sociology Current Events: D.R. and the World

Grade 12 AP US Government & Politics or AP United States History AP World History AP European History AP Psychology AP Economics Economics Psychology Sociology Current Events: D.R. and the World Dominican History/Geography

(Courses listed are not always offered every year) GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 1

Grade 9 Full Year Texbook: World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall.

1 Credit (Required)

This course gives students a holistic view of World History by focusing on the development and changes of the SPRITE+1 (Social, Political, Religious, Intellectual, Technological, Economic, and Geography) themes across every major region of the world. Special focus will be given to the role of geography in “setting the stage” for history and the result of interaction between different regions and cultures. Writing will be a focus as well, as students will learn to use primary and secondary source documents to critically assess historical events. Course starts from “Pre-History” and concludes with the Age of Exploration GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 2 Grade 10 Full Year Prerequisite: Global History and Geography 9 Texbook: World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall.

1 Credit (Required)

This course gives students a holistic view of World History by focusing on the development and changes of the SPRITE+1 (Social, Political, Religious, Intellectual, Technological, Economic, and Geography) themes across every major region of the world. Special focus will be given to the role of geography in “setting the stage” for history and the result of interaction between different regions and cultures. Writing will be a focus as well, as students will learn to use primary and secondary source documents to critically assess historical events. Course starts from the Age of Exploration and continues until present day. US HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT Grade 11 Full Year 1 Credit (Required) Prerequisite: Global History and Geography 10 Texbook: American History: The Modern Era Since 1865, Glencoe Company. A foundation is laid through a review of the American Revolution and the Constitution. Our studies then move to the Civil War Era and its after-effects. The expansion of industry, Manifest Destiny, the rise of the United States as a world power, World War I, prosperity and depression, and World War II are also covered. Group projects and oral/visual presentations are used to enhance student learning and to make the course a rich and rewarding experience. DOMINICAN HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY Grade 12 Full Year 1 Credit (Required for Dominican Universities) Prerequisite: None Textbook: La República Dominicana, Dos Siglos de Historia, Geografia y Sociedad, Curso 1ro., 2do. Ciclo, Santillana. The purpose of this course is to encourage our students to understand the impact and relevance of historical occurrences. This course is intended to assist students in gaining a perspective of their cultural and social environment. The goals of the course are directed to ensure that the students acquire the basic knowledge and attitudes they need to face a changing world. The students will develop the skills, strategies and habits of mind required for effective inquiry and communication, as well as understanding the basic concepts of our history. Essential course for students intending to study at any Dominican University.

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OPTIONAL COURSES AP WORLD HISTORY Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: World Cultures, AP Application Process Textbook: Traditions and Encounters, 3rd Edition, McGrawHill AP World History is designed to develop a greater understanding of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This course offers balanced global coverage with Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe. This course will cover the time frame of 8000 B.C.E. up until the present day. All of the information will be brought together using 6 central themes of study: change and continuity, patterns and effects of interaction among societies, the effects of technology and economics on their environment, systems of social structures and gender structures, cultural, intellectual and religious developments, and changes in the structure of states’ political identification over time. This course fulfills the requirement for World History. AP MICROECONOMICS Prerequisite: AP Application Proces

Grades 11, 12

Full Year

1 Credit

Why do cartoons only have four fingers? Why does Japan have twice as many vending machines as the United States? Why might sweatshops be a (gasp!) good thing? You have been reading and hearing about economic issues for years—recessions, inflation, poverty, tuition, airfares, stock prices, eBay auctions, gas prices. You might think explanations of these issues would sound as exciting as watching grass grow. But what people fail to recognize is that economics is full of life! Economics is about making choices. You make them everyday: whether to go out or stay home; whether to buy the fajitas or the calzone; whether to take AP Econ or an elective. You already know more about economics than you realize. Now it’s time to further your education. Covering an array of concepts including scarce resources, market power, market failure, efficiency, competition, and game theory experiments, we will shed light on how these forces shape our day-to-day lives, often without our knowing it. AP EUROPEAN HISTORY Prerequisite: AP Application Process

Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: The Western Heritage, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall

The goals of the Advanced Placement Program in European History are to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, an ability to analyze historical evidence and an ability to express that understanding and analysis in writing. The focus of the course is on intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history and social and economic history. AP UNITED STATES HISTORY Prerequisite: AP Application Process

Grades 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Texbook: The American Pageant, Houghton-Mifflin

Advanced Placement United States History covers Colonial America to the Present. Students develop the factual knowledege and analytical skills necessary to deal with the issues and problems of United States History. They do in-depth analysis of major developments, use primary sources, assess historical materials, and write several research papers. The course is equal to a full-year college survey course. Completion of the course fulfills the requirement for United States History. AP GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: US Prerequisite: US History, AP Application Process

Grade 11, 12 Full Year Textbook: Government in America, Longman

1 Credit

AP Government and Politics: United States Government and Politics focuses upon the general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Areas to be studied are: Constitutional underpinnings of United States government, political beliefs and behavior, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of national government, and civil liberties and rights. Students will gain a greater understanding of the contemporary issues facing the US government as well as a deeper exploration into their own personal values and opinions. This course is particularly recommended for students who wish to apply their knowledge and insights of US history to current events. AP PSYCHOLOGY Prerequisite: AP Application Process

Grades 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: Psychology (7th Edition) Worth Publishers

Advanced Placement Psychology is an introductory course in psychology intending to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that offered in most college introductory psychology courses. Students will be introduced to the study of human and animal behavior as a natural science. A broad spectrum of information about the field of psychology will be presented and students will be exposed to the psychology principles associated with the many branches of pyschology. Finally, students will be exposed to the methods psychologists use in their scientific endeavors. Major topics of study include: methods and approaches, history of psychology, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology and individual differences, abnormal psychology and treatment of psychological disorders, social psychology as well as applied psychology. Attention will be devoted to preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination.

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CMS ECONOMICS Texbook: Economics Principals in Action, Practices, Prentice Hall

HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014 Grades 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Economics is a course dealing with the American economics system, examining how it functions and meets the needs of the people. Behavior of business, government, labor, and other institutions that impact on economy are studied. Students will analyze the techniques used to try to achieve economic stability, growth and full employment, while avoiding inflation. The world economy is discussed, noting the problems presented by scarcity, poverty, and population growth. Students should leave this course with an understanding of how the American free enterprise system works to satisfy the needs of its people.

PSYCHOLOGY Textbook: Understanding Psychology, Glencoe

Grades 10, 11, 12

Semesters

½ Credit

This course deals with the development, expression, and nature of human behavior. Animal and human behavior is examined to gain understanding of learning theories, personality development and interpersonal relationships. Students will learn basic psychological terminology, study theories and become acquainted with some of the ways knowledge of psychology is used in our world. Students should leave this course with a greater awareness of how personal behavior arises and how it relates to the behavior of others. SOCIOLOGY Textbook: Understanding Sociology, Glencoe

Grades 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Sociology is the scientific study of human society. Sociologists are interested in learning about all aspects of human societies. Since most of us have spent all our lives living in and observing the ¨goings on¨ of society, much of the subject matter in Sociology will seem familiar. Topics such as family, education, race, religion, socialization, race, ethnicity, sex and gender, population, and social movements are examples of some of the terms studied in this course. This class will enable you to discover and understand why and how things happen in the social world. The five key concepts of Social Structure, Social Action, Functional Integration, Power and Culture are used to understand our complex, ever-changing social world. CURRENT EVENTS: DOMINICAN REPUBLIC AND THE WORLD. Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12. Prerequitie –None

Semester

½ Credit

Taught in Spanish. This course will focus on Chronological thinking, historical comprenhension and historical analysis and interpretation. Economics, social and political issues of the Dominican Republic past and present, with a vision of the future will be addressed by the course content, e.g. current events involving the Dominican Republic, political and economics issues, civic engagement and moral skills. Students will become aware of the reality of the Dominican Republic by examining domestic issues and the country’s relations with the rest of the world.

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

MATHEMATICS

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

MATHEMATICS ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mathematics offerings by grade: Grade 9 Algebra I Geometry

Grade 10 Geometry Algebra II and Trigonometry

Grade 11 Algebra II and Trigonometry Geometry Precalculus AP Statistics AP Calculus AB

Grade 12 Algebra II and Trigonometry Precalculus Calculus College Preparatory Mathematics AP Calculus AB & BC AP Statistics

(Courses listed are not always offered every year) ALGEBRA I Prerequisite: Pre- Algebra (Grade “C” or better) 01/18/07

Grades 9, 10 Full Year Textbook: Algebra, VCSMP

1 Credit (Required)

Algebra 1 is a beginning high school math course which covers the traditional topics of algebra including: operations with real numbers, variable terms, polynomials, and radical expressions; solving equations; factoring; graphing linear systems; solving systems of equations in two variables; and, solving quadratic equations. Upon completion of Algebra I, the student should have a solid background in algebra and be ready to move on to higher math. Special Requirements: TI-83 or TI-84 Graphing Calculator (Texas Instruments) GEOMETRY Prerequisite: Algebra I (Grade “C” or better)

Grades 9, 10, 11 Full Year Tetxbook: Geometry, McDougal Littell

1 Credit (Required)

Geometry is a basic course, which begins with a review of Algebra I followed by an introduction to symmetry and constructions. The course emphasizes structure, reasoning and deductive proof, the logic of which is revealed through postulates, definitions and theorems. Methods of justification include two-column proofs. A gradual development of formal proofs is encouraged throughout the course. The students will learn to use reasoning skills to analyze and explain properties of triangles, congruent triangles, similarity, polygons, three dimensional solids, circles and coordinate geometry. Right triangles and an introduction to trigonometry are also covered in this course. Special Requirements: Only need a Scientific calculator, but we want them to have one of these early TI-83 or TI-84 Graphing Calculator (Texas Instruments), protractor, compass. ALGEBRA II and TRIGONOMETRY Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry

Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit (Required) Textbook: Álgebra 2 Prentice Hall Mathematics 2009

This second level course builds on skills and concepts developed in both Algebra I and Geometry and move on to an introduction to trigonometry. Linear and quadratic equations and inequalities are reviewed and expanded. New topics such as functions, conic sections, complex numbers, and exponential and logarithmic equations are introduced and practiced. Trigonometry is then introduced and practiced during the last quarter of the course. Algebra II and Trigonometry provides the foundation for students to continue studies in mathematics in the Pre-Calculus course. Special Requirements: TI-83 or TI-84 Graphing Calculator (Texas Instruments). PRECALCULUS Prerequisite: Algebra II and Trigonometry

Grades 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: Graphical, Numerical, Algebra 7th Edition 2007, Pearson Addison Wesley

Precalculus is an advanced course which begins with a review of real numbers, exponents, and radicals, polynominals, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions systems and graphs. Exponential and logarithmic function are reviewed and expanded upon. Trigonometric functions, their inverses and triangular trigonometry are studied in depth. Other topics included in the course are complex numbers, sequences and summation notation, matrices and determinants, and conic sections. Upon completion of this course, the student should have the mathematical background for the study of Calculus. Special requirements: TI-83 or TI-84 Graphing Calculator (Texas Instruments). CALCULUS Grades 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Precalculus or summer equivalent Textbook: Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic 3rd edition 2007 Pearson, Prentice Hall Wesley

1 Credit

Calculus is an advanced course which begins with a review of polynomials and trigonometric functions, functions and graphs. Topics included in the course are: limits, continuity, and differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions. Velocity, acceleration, related rates, application of derivative, integration and its application is studied in depth. The purpose of the course is to prepare the student for college calculus. ( i.e. student will major in business, engineering, science, etc ). Special Requirements: TI-83 or TI-84 Graphing Calculator (Texas Instruments).

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AP CALCULUS (AB) Grades 11, 12 Prerequisite: Precalculus, Recommendation of Instructor and AP Application Process Textbook: Calculus, Graphical, Numerical, Alebraic 3rd edition, Prentice Hall Wesley

Full Year

1 Credit

The AP-Calculus (AB curriculum) course offered is a full-year course in elementary functions and introductory calculus. The course is intended for students who have already studied college-preparatory mathematics: algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and precalculus. The philosophy of the course is one that emphasizes the developing of students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Major topics of study include: Limits and Continuity, Derivatives, Applications of Derivatives, Transcendental Functions, Integration, Applications of Integration. Special Requirements: TI-83 or TI-84 Graphing Calculator (Texas Instruments). AP STATISTICS Grades 11, 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Algebra II and Trigonometry, Recommendation of Instructor and AP Application Process Textbook: The Practice of Statistics, Yates.

1 Credit

The AP statistics course is a full year course to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course is intended for students who already have a firm grasp on algebraic concepts. Students may take this course after or in conjunction with a precalculus course. For the strong math student this course may be taken along side the AP Calculus course. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns; Planning a Study: Deciding what and how to measure; Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation; and Statistical Inference: Confirming models. Special Requirements: TI-83 or TI-84 Graphing calculators (Texas Instruments)

COLLEGE PREPARATORY MATHEMATICS Grade 12 Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II/Trigonometry, Recommendation of Instructor Textbook: College Algebra by Larson, Hostetler and Hodgkins

Full Year

1 Credit

The College Prep course mainly focuses on developing students´conceptual understanding of algebra while offering opportunities for improving problem solving skills. The course will cover basic algebra skills, inequalities, graphing, and functions: polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic. Students exiting this course will be ready for first year mathematics at any competent college or university. They will have overcome misconceptions and feel confident about their algebra and critical thinking skills. Students will need to score a 60% in the CBA´s in order to pass this course.

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

SCIENCE

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HS Course Descriptions 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2014

SCIENCE ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Science course offerings by grade Grade 9 Physical Science Biology * Astronomy

Grade 10 Biology Physics Chemistry AP Environmental Astronomy Marine Biology AP Biology

Grade 11 Chemistry Physics AP Chemistry AP Physics AP Environmental Forensic Science I, II Astronomy Marine Biology AP Biology

Grade 12 Chemistry Physics AP Chemistry AP Physics AP Environmental Forensic Science I, II Astronomy Marine Biology AP Biology

(Courses listed are not always offered every year) PHYSICAL SCIENCE Prerequisite: Grade 8 Science

Grade 9 Full Year 1 Credit (Required) Textbook: Physical science, McLaughlin, Thompson, Zike.

Physical Science is a freshman science course which introduces students to the fundamentals of Physics and Chemistry. Topics covered include: structure and properties of atoms and matter, chemical reactions, motion and forces, energy and its interaction with matter, and the history and nature of science. Emphasis is placed on the skills of critical thinking, scientific inquiry, laboratory technique, and mathematical applications. *An exception exists for students with outstanding achievement who are committed to the Sciences to waive Physical Science and take Biology during ninth grade. The criteria for waiving Physical Science as a Grade 9 requirement and entering Biology in grade 9: The student must 1) earn a grade of 85% or above in Algebra I, 2) earn a grade of 90% or above in Science 8, 3) have no grade below 80% in the core academic subjects (Math, Science, Social Studies, English, Spanish), 4) be recommended by his/her Mathematics and Science Teachers, and 5) complete Physics and Chemistry (or the AP versions) as a graduation requirement in place of having Physical Science in 9th grade. Note: Semester grades from both semesters will be used to determine eligibility for Biology. Please see the Counselor for more information. BIOLOGY Prerequisite: Physical Science (or equivalent)

Grades 9*, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit (Required) Textbook: Biology, Miller and Levine

Biology, the study of life, is an introductory high school course designed to develop a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s respect, understanding and appreciation of the living world. Unit topics follow a traditional sequence: cells, biochemistry, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Laboratories and other practical activities will be used to develop and give meaning to concepts via the scientific method and laboratory skills; qualitative and quantitative skills will be emphasized. * Special Permission required.

OTHER COURSES AP BIOLOGY Grades 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Biology required, or permission of instructor and AP Application Process

Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: Biology, Starr and Taggart

The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and an appreciation of science as a process. The course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course taken by biology majors. It is demanding of a student and requires dedication and disciplined study skills. Next offered 2012-2013. AP CHEMISTRY Grades 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisites: Chemistry and Algebra I required, or permission of instructor and AP Application Process Textbook: Chemistry, Brown Advanced Placement Chemistry is the equivalent of a college freshman chemistry course. The course offers many of the topics in more depth than Chemistry and adds new topics: Atomic theory and structure; chemical bonding; nuclear chemistry; states of matter; reactions; stoichiometry; equilibrium; kinetics; thermodynamics. Laboratory experiments require the use of more complicated apparatus and more skill. Mathematics is used extensively throughout the course.

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AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Prerequisite: Biology required

Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet, Botkin and Keller

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. AP PHYSICS Prerequisites: Physics, Algebra II Textbook: Physics, Cutnell and Johnson

+

Trig

are

Grades 11, 12 required, or permission

of

Full Year instructor and

1 Credit APApplication

Process

Advanced Placement Physics is the equivalent of a college freshman Physics course. The course emphasizes mathematical and conceptual problem-solving strategies to prepare students for the College Board’s AP Physics exam in May. Laboratory experience requires the use of more complicated apparatus and greater skill than the basic Physics course. Topics covered include: classical mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, waves, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern Physics. CHEMISTRY Prerequisite: Physical Science or equivalent

Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: Online Modern Chemistry from Holt Rinehart & Winston

This course of study is presented using the most current theoretical viewpoints of Chemistry in correlation with proper scientific method and techniques. The first semester reviews basic atomic structures and introduces concepts involved in bringing about chemical changes. The study of analytical fundamental, atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends, and quantitative chemistry are investigated while students reinforce scientific methodologies. The second semester builds on these concepts while introducing chemical bonding and structure, the kinetics of phases of matter, colligative properties of solution , electrolytes, oxidation-reduction, and relationships. Mathematics is involved in most of the topics covered and laboratories account for many hands-on opportunities to reinforce discussed classroom materials. Qualitative and quatitative analysis will be an essential part of the course’s design. The final sections of this curriculum described as Journal Work will be used throughout the year to promote critical thinking based on scientific process. PHYSICS Prerequisite: Physical Science or equivalent

Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: Physics, Principles and Problems, Zitzewitz, Elliott, Haase.

This course introduces students to the major topics in Physics with an emphasis on critical thinking, laboratory techniques, and scientific inquiry. Topics covered include: kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and modern Physics. The course requires a familiarity with laboratory techniques and basic numerical analysis. FORENSIC SCIENCE I Grades 11, 12 Prerequisites: completion of Biology with a C or better grade. Textbook: Forensic Science for High School, Ball-Deslich and Funkhouser

Semester 1

½ Credit

The purpose of this course is to apply science to law. As our society grows more complex, it becomes more dependent on rules of law to regulate the activities of its members. The course is lab-based and the units of study include: types of evidence, processing a crime scene, fingerprints and drugs/poisons. Students will complete labs and performance-based assessments to solidify their knowledge about how to collect and apply the evidence to crimes. Students who are successful in Forensic Science I may continue their studies in Forensic Science II. FORENSIC SCIENCE II Grades 11, 12 Prerequisites: completion of Forensic Science I with a C or better grade or teacher approval. Textbook: Forensic Science for High School, Ball-Deslich and Funkhouser

Semester 2

½ Credit

The purpose of this course is to further expand the students understanding of forensic science and provide opportunity to apply the skills and understanding of Forensic I to past and current case analysis, to correctly collect and process biological evidence (hair, blood, skeletal and DNA). The level of investigative analysis and sophistication of critical thinking is expected to be higher and more mature than that demonstrated in Forensic Science I. ASTRONOMY

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Astronomy is one of the oldest subjects taught. The study of the celestial objects has occupied mankind’s interest for a long time. In this course we will study the history of astronomy. Look at its effects on life here on earth. We will develop skills that facilitate our observations of the sky. We will learn about stellar evolution, galaxies and the current theories of the universe. We will learn how to read star maps and use them to locate stars and celestial bodies. No course in astronomy would be complete without a thorough analysis of our own solar system, as well as our own moon and the earth. From here we will finish out the course on comets, meteors and life on other worlds. Textbook: Astronomy 3rd. Ed., Wiley

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CMS MARINE BIOLOGY

HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014 Grades 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

This course is for students who are interested in developing an understanding of the basic concepts of Marine Biology. It is intended for students at all levels who are motivated to learn more about the oceans of the world and organisms that live in them. The course is designed to include the study of the marine organisms of our own coastal area. Field trips and laboratory activities will be an integral part of the course. The major areas of study will include the following topics: world’s cceans, chemical and physical factors, marine plants, invertebrates, marine vertebrates (fish, reptile, bird, and mammal), marine ecology, and sand beaches, dunes, rocky shores, coral reefs, and marine biomes.

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WORLD LANGUAGES

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WORLD LANGUAGES World Languages offerings by level: Grade 9 SSL I, II, II, IV Spanish 9

Grade 10 SSL I, II, II, IV Spanish 10

Grade 11 SSL I, II, II, IV Spanish 11 (Spanish Literature) AP Spanish Language

Grade 12 SSL I, II, II, IV Spanish 12 (Latin American Literature) AP Spanish Literature / Language

Mandarin I, II

Mandarin I, II

Mandarin I, II

Mandarin I, II

(Courses listed are not always offered every year) SPANISH 9 Prerequisite: Spanish 8 or SSL 4

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook:. A) Lengua y Literatura 1-Santillana B) Taller de Redacción I- María Ascunción del Río – Mc Graw Hill This is a basic course, primarily for native Spanish-speakers, which expands the fundamental skills acquired in Middle School and continues to build strength in the areas of grammar, vocabulary, reading, comprehension and writing. It introduces discussion of literacy forms and the use of figurative language. SPANISH 10 Prerequisite: Spanish 9

Grades 10, 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: A) Lengua y Literatura 2 – Santillana B) Taller de Redacción II – María Asunción del Río – Mc Graw Hill This course has been designed in a way that the student may reach an adequate mastery of oral and written language in order to establish an effective relation with the community and have access to cultural values, in particular those literary ones. The topics selected in this course aids the students in research, organizing their thoughts and expressing themselves effectively, in oral as well as in written form. It is an intermediate course, which shifts from the fundamental emphasis placed on grammar, reading comprehension, spelling rules and usage to the introduction of literature awareness. Upon the completion of the course, the student should have a solid foundation for more advanced studies of Spanish.

SPANISH 11 (SPANISH LITERATURE) Grades 11 Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Spanish 10 Textbook:A) Literaturas Españolas, Carmen Rodríguez de Mora y Jorge A. Santana Tomos I y II B) Panoramas Literarios – España/ Teresa Méndez This is a course in Spanish Literature covering the major literary movements from the 12th century to the 20th century. It requires comprehension, interpretation and analysis skills to evaluate major pieces of Spanish literature in both oral and written presentations. It emphasizes the historical development of the Spanish language, the interpretation and discussion of literary works and their mechanical and critical analysis. SPANISH 12 ( LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE ) Recommended for Dominican Universities Prerequisite: Spanish 11 Grade 12 Full Year 1 Credit Textbook: Introducción a la literature Hispano-Americana: de la Conquista al siglo XX – National Textbook Company. An advanced course in Spanish American literature covering a survey of the main literary movements from the pre-Columbian period to the present. It requires ability to comprehend, interpret and analyze the writing of many Latin-American authors in both oral and written presentation. Upon completion of the course the student should be able to meet the requirement of Dominican and other Latin-American universities. SPANISH as a SECOND LANGUAGE I Prerequiste: Level exam

Grades 9-12 Full Year Textbook: En Español I, McDougall, Littell

1 Credit

This is a beginning course for those who are at the comprehension stage of learning. Listening skills are emphasized. Speaking, reading and writing skills are developed according to the correct grammar usage.

SPANISH as A SECOND LANGUAGE II Prerequisite: SSL I or level exam

Grades 9-12

Full Year

1Credit

Textbook: En Español I, McDougall, Littell

This is an advanced beginner’s course for those who are at the speech-emergence stage, and already understand basic everyday practical language. The emphasis will be on speaking and following the correct rules of grammar. Listening, reading and writing skills will continue to be developed.

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CMS SPANISH as a SECOND LANGUAGE III Prerequisite: SSL II or level exam

HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014 Grades 9 – 12 Full Year Textbook: En Español II, McDougall, Littell

1 Credit

This is an intermediate course, which has been designed for students who have a basic understanding of the Spanish language and are able to speak in a grammatically correct fashion. The course focuses on the development of flexibility in the oral use of the language through vocabulary building and monologues. The development of reading and writing skills are emphasized. The students are also exposed to Spanish and Latin American culture as reflected in a real life situational context. SPANISH as a SECOND LANGUAGE IV Prerequiste: SSL III or Level Exam

Grades 9-12 Textbook: EnEspañol III

Full Year

1 Credit

SSL IV is an advanced course for those who are able to carry on everyday life conversations with native speakers, but who need to develop their reading and writing skills. Grammar and orthography skills are stressed, but equal emphasis is given to conversation. This level has an extensive cultural component. SPANISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE V Prerequisite: SSL IV or Level Exam

Textbook: Conversaciones Creadoras, Joan L. Borwn, Carmen Martin Gaite Houghton Mifflin Company Is designed for students to develop and stress fluency in oral and writing skills, through action learning. This level touches areas of communication such as interpersonal, presentational, and interpretative, using cultural information, making connections to today’s world and establishing comparisons with communities. MANDARIN I and II (Chinese)

Grades 9, 10, 11 -12

Full Year

1 Credit

In these courses students will be introduced to Chinese language and culture. The objectives are for students to acquire basic proficiency in the skills of speaking and listening comprehension in the context of contemporary Chinese culture. Chinese characters will be introduced systematically as they relate to the oral/aural skills being acquired during the course. The course will be proficiency-based, and evaluation will include traditional testing methods as well as performance assessments that allow the student to demonstrate basic communicative proficiency. Topics will include greetings, descriptions of people, family members, clothing, colors, numbers, time calendar, school, leisure activities, weather, places and transportation, shopping, and food. AP SPANISH LITERATURE Grade 12 Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: Spanish 11 AP Application Process Texbookt: Abriendo Puertas – Tomos I y II- Mc. Dougal Littell, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica – Mc Graw Hill, Momentos Cumbres de las Literarias Hispánicas, Pearson. Study classic and contemporary Spanish and Latin American authors and poets, learn characteristics of literature, and compare cultures of age and country, at a first year college level. DOMINICAN HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY Grade 12 Full Year 1 Credit (Required for Dominican Universities) Prerequisite: None Social Studies Credit Textbook: Sociedad, Historia y Geografia de la Republica Dominicana –Atlas Folklorico, Atlas Historico, Atlas Biodiversidad, Editorial Santillana. The purpose of this course is to encourage our students to understand the impact and relevante of historical occurrences. This course is a chronological study of the Dominican Republic from the Pre-Columbian period to the present. Students study historic events, geographic settings, cultural perspectives, and economic implications, role of government and citizenship rights and responsibilities. Dominican History is an analytical look at the Constitution, political beliefs, behaviors, political parties and interest groups. Students focus on the different political views people share in the political process. Finally, our students use research methods and technology to study cultural and physical sociological perspectives, theories and concepts to understand current events and evaluate problems in our society. This is an essential course for students intending to study at any Dominican University; however, it does not fulfill the three year Spanish requirement.

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PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION 30 of 39

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PHYSICAL and HEALTH EDUCATION ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Health and Physical Education offerings by grade: Grade 9 PHE I

Grade 10 PHE II Team Sports/Lifetime Fitness Weight Training

Grade 11 Team Sports/Lifetime Fitness Weight Training

Grade 12 Team Sports/Lifetime Fitness Weight Training

(Courses listed are not always offered every year) PHYSICAL and HEALTH EDUCATION I & II

Grades 9, 10

Full Year

1 Credit per year (2 years required)

The Physical Education component of this course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Students will learn movement skills and principles, ways to improve personal fitness and physical competence, and safety and injury prevention –The physical goal is to improve coordination, strength, and flexibility. By the end of the course, students will: • Demonstrate personal competence in applying movement skills and principles • Demonstrate improvement in their skills • Demonstrate understanding of specific rules and guidelines for participation in recreation and sports including team, group, dual, and individual activities and relating these rules to the laws of society. The Health program component is integrated into the schedule for each year so that students will explore a topic for periods of time between units of physical education. Topics include: mental health, social health, nutritional health and hygiene, and understanding human development.A wellness portfolio will be maintained for each student and will include health screening, fitness test results, body mass index, activity log, and nutrition reflection sheet. TEAM SPORTS/LIFETIME FITNESS

Grades 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

A semester long course in which students will learn and practice the skills needed to play team sports as well as learn and practice skills for life fitness. Students will explore units involving sport and fitness leadership such as: training, coaching/psychology, injuries and officiating. Possible class units include, but are not limited to volleyball, basketball, soccer, ultimate frisbee, softball, doubles badminton, yoga, aerobics, weight training, swimming, dance and tennis. This course is open to students grades 10-12. Written work will also be part of the course requirement. WEIGHT TRAINING/CONDITIONING

Grades 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

This course will expose the student to different strategies in weight training. They will gain knowledge of different training techniques and understanding of basic fitness principles. In addition to physical activity there will be a written component to the course. Each day the student will actively participate in a combination of weight training, plyometrics, and cardiovascular training, and flexability excersises. By the end of the course, students will: Demonstrate competence in weight training, improvement in overall fitness, demonstrate and understanding of specific techniques for the use of weight training equipment, review articles related to their fitness goal, and complete a personal journal of their activity and improvement.

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CMS

HS Course Descriptions 2013 – 2014

FINE & PERFORMING ARTS Visual

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Music

Theater

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High School

Carol Morgan School Course Offerings 2012 – 2013

VISUAL ARTS Visual Art course offerings by grade: Grade 9 Art I, II Ceramics I, II Sculpture 1 Digital Imaging and Design Yearbook I

Grade 10 Art I, II, III Ceramics I, II Sculpture 1 Creativity & Innovation Digital Imaging and Design Yearbook I, II

Grade 11 Art I, II, III AP Studio Art Ceramics I, II Sculpture 1 Digital Imaging and Design Yearbook I, II, III Creativity & Innovation

Grade 12 Art I, II, III AP Studio Art Ceramics I, II Sculpture 1 Digital Imaging and Design Yearbook I, II, III Creativity & Innovation

(Courses listed are not always offered every year) ART I

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Art 1 is an introductory class designed to help students become familiar with, and to apply, the language of the visual arts for self expression and aesthetic awareness. This will include basic principals of design, composition and color theory, drawing and painting skills. Art and design history are incorporated into course activities through research of visual artists and by applying art history movements into their personal artwork. ART II Prerequisite: Art I

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Students will develop their skills in drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking and applied design, while exploring a variety of art materials and techniques. Students will learn to self evaluate critique artwork and will be able to assess and increase their own artistic development. By the end of this course, students will have a better understanding of aesthetics and the visual arts. ART III Prerequisite: Art II

Grades 10, 11, 12

Full Year

1 Credit

Art III is a course in which more individual study and project initiation is encouraged, with supervision. This course is not AP Art, although there are similarities. Students are encouraged to find areas of interest and research, plan projects and evaluate their own progress and success. Sketchbooks are required as a mean to record ideas and as a self-evaluation tool to keep track of projects and growth. AP STUDIO ART Prerequisite: Art II and permission of instructor, AP Application Process

Grades 11, 12

Full Year

1 Credit

This College Board program provides the only USA standard for performance in the visual arts that allows students to earn college credit and/or advanced placement while still in high school. Each student is required to submit a portfolio (including his/her goals for each project and self-reflection upon completion) for evaluation at the end of the year. The portfolio is divided into three areas: Drawing, Portfolio, 2-D Design Portfolio, 3-D Design Portfolio. These, in turn, each have a section for: Quality, Concentration, and Breadth - with slides required in two of three sections. And five (5) actual works in drawing or 2-D design. CERAMICS I

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Ceramics I is an introductory course. Basic skills in hand-building (pinch, coil, slab) will be emphazised, with additional opportunities to work on the potter’s wheel. Textural designs and decoration will be incorporated into various methods of production and glazing processes. The course is based on the different techniques (slab, coil, and wheel) to build pots, tiles, and other objects. We begin with a review of the elements and principles of design and the history of ceramics. Students Students will be directed to incorporate Taino, Egyptian, and pre historic art designs. Research and sketches for every project are mandatory in the development of each piece. CERAMICS II

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Basic skills in handbuilding (pinch, coil, slab will be required) will continue, but emphasis will be on work produced on the potter’s wheel. Work will include centering the clay, multiply numbers of specific items from one large piece of clay, wedging, lidded post and assembled pots made from wheel thrown pieces. Students will be exposed to traditions in ceramics and to contemporary work.

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High School

SCULPTURE I

Carol Morgan School Course Offerings 2012 – 2013

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

A wide range of skills and materials will be taught, working with casting plaster, clay, metal, fiber materials, papers, assorted naturals, and plastics. Basic sculpting skills in clay busts of animate and inanimate objects will be aspects of the beginning section of the program. This will be followed by emphasis on working with conceptual ideas in three-dimensions. Creative and innovative insights into sculptural solutions will be promoted. This is an introductory course aimed towards the achievement of harmonious compositions with form combinations, movement, and the use of different materials such as gypsum, wire, plastic, and wood. Interesting topics will be discussed while molding the clay into forms of expression. We will also engage in recycling when students use disposable objects in the creation of their pieces. As students learn from their own creations, they will also explore the work of some masters of these techniques. DIGITAL IMAGING AND DESIGN

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

This course consists of two components: Digital Imaging and Layout Design. Students will learn digital camera and software use, image processing and restoration using photo shop, 3 D imaging software, and integrating text and images in a publishable format. Both components will address and integrate the elements and principals of design. Students will apply the elements and principals of design to digital images and design layouts based on a sound understanding of digital cameras, Photo Shop, PageMaker, and 3D imaging software.

CREATIVITY & INNOVATION Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester ½ Credit This course will invite participants to think in different ways, to learn to solve problems in an innovative and creative way, taking into consideration not only the visual arts, but also mathematics, science and social studies. Everybody has good ideas, but not everybody make ideas happen and we’ll take a look into the process from the moment you generate an idea through implementation. By the end of this course, students will be able to generate, improve and expand on ideas; and define situations and needs for new ideas, develop processes that manage the generation, adaptation and change of ideas, and concepts and their implementation.

YEARBOOK I Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation/Digital Imaging and Design preferred

Full Year

1 Credit

In this course students produce the school yearbook. Students will be able to prepare pages for submission to Taylor Studio Works.Students will be introduced to the elements and principals of design behind good photos and layouts.Taking, editing, manipulating and organzing photos gives students source material for their layout design work.Students are also involved in the journalistic process of collecting information to use in the text portion of their designs.Students will use the online layout software provided by Taylor Publishing to integrate photos,text,clip art and backgrounds to design creative,informative layouts that will be viewed by the entire school. YEARBOOK II Grades 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation/Digital Imaging and Design preferred

Full Year

1 Credit

This course will result in continued mastery of the skills, learned in Yearbook I. Students will also utilize more of the tools available in Photoshop, after shooting in more challenging situations with more advanced photo equipment.Editing components of the year book will place students in leaderships roles as, they work with novice students.Students will continue to be exposed to relevant graphic design software at the end of the course, time permitting. YEARBOOK III Grades 11, 12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation/Digital Imaging and Design preferred

Full Year

1 Credit

This course will result in continued mastery of the skills learned in Yearbook I and II.Students will have the opportunity to take on the role of year book editors, developing the overall design concept and theme behind the book.As well as more advanced photography techniques, students will be able to creatively manipulate images.The full potential of the online publishing software as well as other graphic design software will be explored.

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High School

Carol Morgan School Course Offerings 2012 – 2013

PERFORMING ARTS Course Descriptions

INSTRUMENTAL Grade 9 Concert Band Symphonic Band I Music Technology

Grade 10 Concert Band Symphonic Band I,II Music Technology

CONCERT BAND I, II, III, IV

Grade 11 Concert Band Symphonic Band I,II,III Music Technology Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade 12 Concert Band Symphonic Band I,II,III,IV Music Technology Full Year

1 Credit

Concert band is an introductory music course designed to develop musical skills through the playing of a woodwind or brass instruments in a band setting. Music is performed at a Grade I to II level of dificulty. On-going study of proper technique, theory and maintenance will be emphasized. Attendance and participation at all rehearsals, performances and activities is expected. The school will provide instruments. SYMPHONIC BAND I, II, III, IV Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Three years of experience in a band setting (Beg., Adv., and Con. Band) required audtion; Symphonic Band II requires Sym. Band I, II, etc…

1 Credit

A higher-level, advanced, performance-based course demonstrating accomplished musical skills in a band setting. Music is performed at a Grade III to V level of difficulty, and will meet the needs of advanced and exceptionally advanced students. On-going advanced study of proper technique, theory and maintenance will continue as needed. Students will have the opportunity to serve as section leaders and officers. Attendance and participation at all rehearsals, performances and activities is expected. Instruments must be provided by the student, with the exception of percussion and large or specialty instruments. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

Grades 9,10,11,12

Semester

½ Credit

Music Tech is a course that explores the different methods of digital music creation. By studying various popular music styles of the 20th century, such as rock, funk, jazz, swing, R & B, and blues, students will learn how to create original music. Using the software Garage Band students will work with real audio, MIDI, loops and Quick Time movies. No pre-requisite or musical knowledge is required.

VOCAL Grade 9 Mixed Choir Advanced Mixed Choir

MIXED CHOIR

Grade 10 Mixed Choir Advanced Mixed Choir

Grade 11 Mixed Choir Advanced Mixed Choir Advanced Singing I, II Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade 12 Mixed Choir Advanced Mixed Choir Advanced Singing I, II Full Year

1 Credit

Available to all high school students and requires no audition. All students are eligible for the Mixed Choir, as long as they have a keen interest in singing. In this class students will gain the skills to be able to audition successfully for the advanced choir. Students will learn proper singing and performing techniques, as well as theory and music reading skills. There are two concerts a year, which all choral students are required to attend. ADVANCED MIXED CHOIR Prerequisite: Audition Required

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Full Year

1 Credit

Students who wish to enter the Advanced Mixed Choir must audition with the choral director during the spring semester prior to the year they wish to enter the class. Priority will be given to those who have had previous choir experience. This ensemble builds on previous singing knowledge and theory. This choir has many performances a year, including school assemblies, community service events, festivals, concerts, and competitions. They perform 4 and 5 part music of diverse styles and at a high level of difficulty. ADVANCED SINGING I, II Prerequisite: Audition Required

Grades 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Advanced Singing is a course designed for those students who want to develop their voice and learn more advanced singing techniques. The repertoire will consist of solos, duets, and chamber music, with each student having some input on the music selection. 35 of 39

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High School

Carol Morgan School Course Offerings 2012 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2013

THEATER ARTS Theater Arts course offerings by grade: Grade 9 Theater Arts I Introduction to Film

THEATER ARTS I

Grade 10 Theater Arts I, II Introduction to Film

Grade 11 Theater Arts I, II, III Introduction to Film I & II

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade 12 Theater Arts I, II, III Introduction to Film I & II

Full Year

1 Credit

Theatre Arts I will develop an understanding and appreciation of theatre concepts. Students will study how theatre arts connect to other areas of life and the relevance, implications, and consequences of the theatre in its social, cultural, and historical context. The course will include a basic study of movement, voice, acting, characterization, improvisation, theatrical conventions, theatrical production, dramatic and literary genres, and careers in theatre. The student will have the opportunity to respond and interpret diverse theatrical experiences including reading plays, viewing recordings of productions, and attending live performances. Students will be assessed through assignments based on research topics, a self-reflection journal, participation and attitude, group projects, quizzes and tests, performance of assigned scenes or materials oral and written reports on plays and books assigned for reading. THEATER ARTS II Prerequisite: Theater Arts I

Grades 10, 11, 12

Full Year

1 Credit

Theatre Arts II will further expand the depth and variety of theatrical study for students. Students will delve into theatre history, acting techniques, and the technical elements of theatrical production. Theatre II students will have an opportunity to experience the process of playwriting and development, design (scenic, costume, properties, and lighting), theatrical realization (the building of costumes, scenery, props, etc. from scratch) and directing. As with Theatre Arts I, students will be assessed through assignments based on research topics, a self-reflection journal, live performance critiques, participation and attitude, group projects, quizzes and tests, performance of assigned scenes or materials, oral and written reports on plays and books assigned for reading. THEATER ARTS III/ IV Grades 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I and II, or comparable courses from another school.

Full Year

1 Credit

Theatre Arts III is a course for students interested in furthering their creative development through the theatre arts. It is a course that emphasizes theatrical production. Students will be responsible for maintaining large roles (technical or performance) in the major school productions and in scenes and performance pieces selected for class. As a class, students will produce at least two substantial theatrical works and with the assistance of the instructor, will be responsible for all of the elements that go into production (acting, directing, costumes, scenery, properties, and lighting). Theatre Arts III students will be assessed through a self-reflection journal, participation, attitude, and dependability, individual and group projects related to production and performance based assessments regarding their contributions to productions (based on rubrics given to students in advance of major projects).

INTRODUCTION TO FILM I & II

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

This course is made of two major components; the study of film including the history of film, film theory and appreciation, and film analysis. We will be studying master directors, camera shots and film genres The second major component being video production, in which students will learn all aspects of writing, directing, producing and editing short films, commercials, and documentaries. Students will work together on short film projects which will be shown to the public.

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High School

Carol Morgan School Course Offerings 2012 – 2013

APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

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High School

Carol Morgan School Course Offerings 2012 – 2013

APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Applied Technology offerings by grade: Grade 9 21st Century Skills Web Design

Grade 10 21st Century Skills Web Design Business Technology Intro to Computer Programming Pre-Engineering

Grade 11 21st Century Skills Web Design Business Technology Intro to Computer Programming Pre-Engineering AP Computer Science A

21ST CENTURY SKILLS

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade 12 21st Century Skills Web Design Business Technology Intro to Computer Programming Pre-Engineering AP Computer Science A

Semester

½ Credit

A project based learning course in which students will have learning opportunities that use computers and related technologies to develop 21st century skills. This class is designed for students who need to show competency in technology skills for graduation. This course is required unless a technology proficiency assessment has been passed.

WEB DESIGN Prerequisite: C grade, or better, in 21st Century Skills or equivalent

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Learn to create and publish web pages for personal and professional use, e.g. Note Pad, Adobe DreamWeaver.

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY Prerequisite: C grade, or better, in 21st Century Skills or equivalent

Grades 10, 11, 12

Semester

½ Credit

Semester

½ Credit

Semester

½ Credit

Learn different aspects of technology that are used in business settings, e.g. MS Project.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING Grades 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: B grade, or better in 21st Century Skills or equivalent, knowledge of Algebra/Geometry Learn Java and C++ programming that will prepare a student for AP Computer Science

PRE-ENGINEERING Prerequisite: B grade, or better, in 21st Century Skills or equivalent

Grades 10, 11, 12

Students will learn skills for Computer Aided Drafting/Design and Robotics

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (VHS) Grades 11, 12 Full Year 1 Credit Prerequisite: B grade, or better in 21st Century Skills or equivalent, knowledge of Algebra/Geometry, Technology Teacher recommendation Students will take the AP Computer Science A exam in the spring Preparing for a career in Computer Programming

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COURSE OFFERINGS 2012-2013 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT English 9 1 9 English 10 1 10 English 11 1 11 AP Literature & Comp. 1 12 AP Language & Comp. 1 11 – 12 English 12 1 12 * SAT Preparation Course .5 11 * Writing the College .5 12 Research Paper MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Algebra 1 1 9 Geometry 1 9 – 10 Algebra 2 & Trigonometry 1 10 – 12 Pre Calculus 1 11 – 12 Calculus 1 11 – 12 AP Calculus 1 11 – 12 AP Statistics 1 11 - 12 SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Physical Science 1 9 Biology 1 9 - 12 AP Environmental 1 10 – 12 AP Biology 1 10-12 Marine Biology 1 9-12 Chemistry 1 10 – 12 AP Chemistry 1 11 – 12 Physics 1 10 – 12 AP Physics B 1 11 - 12 * Forensic Science I,II .5 11 -12 *Astronomy .5 10-12 .5 10-12 VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL By arrangement. Includes an additional fee.

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT Global History and Geography 1 1 9 Global History and Geography 2 1 10 US History 1 11 – 12 AP World History 1 10 – 12 AP US History 1 11 – 12 AP Government & Politics: US 1 11 – 12 AP European History 1 11 – 12 AP Psychology 1 11 – 12 AP Economics 1 11-12 *Economics 5 10 - 12 * Psychology .5 11 – 12 *Sociology .5 11 - 12 *Current Events: D.R. and The World (SS credit) .5 9-12 WORLD LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT Spanish 9 1 9 - 12 Spanish 10 1 10 – 12 Spanish 11 1 11 – 12 Spanish Literature 12 1 11 - 12 AP Spanish Literature 1 12 SSL 1 1 9 – 12 SSL 2 1 9 – 12 SSL 3 1 9 – 12 SSL 4 1 9 – 12 SSL 5 1 9 - 12 AP Spanish Language (SSL) 1 11-12 Mandarin I 1 9-12 9-12 Mandarin II 1 Dominican History and Geography (SS credit) 1 9-12 OLC DEPARTMENT OLC/Referral Process Req’d

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT * Art 1 .5 * Art 2 .5 Art 3 1 AP Studio Art 1 * Ceramics 1 .5 * Ceramics 2 .5 * Sculpture .5 *Digital Imaging & Design .5 *Creativity & Innovation .5 Yearbook 1,2,3 1 *Music Technology .5 Symphonic Band 1 Concert Band 1 Mixed Choir 1 Advanced Mixed Choir 1 *Advanced Singing I, II .5 Theater Arts 1 1 Theater Arts 2 1 Theater Arts 3 1 Theater Arts 4 1 *Film 1 & 2 .5 *Music Tech .5 TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT * 21st Century skills .5 * Web Design .5 * Business Technology .5 *Introduction to Computer .5 Programming *Pre-Engineering .5 AP Computer Science A (VHS) 1 PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION Physical & Health Education 1 1 Physical & Health Education 2 1 * Weight Training .5 *Team Sports/Lifetime Fitness .5

9 – 12 9 – 12 10 – 12 11 - 12 9 – 12 9 - 12 9 - 12 9-12 9-12 9-12 9 – 12 9-12 9-12 9 - 12 9-12 11-12 9 - 12 10 - 12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12

9 – 12 9 – 12 10 - 12 10 - 12 10 - 12 11-12

9 10 10 - 12 10-12

HS Programs of Study  

2013-2014

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