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Volume 4, Issue 4 Volume 4, Issue 4 FEB 2014

C A R O L

M OR G A N

S C H O O L

ALUMNI NEWSLETTER CMS ALUMNI REUNION 2014 IS HEADED FOR BOSTON A couple of years ago the Alumni Association decided to host several reunions in the United Sates as part of their plan to connect our alumni community around the world. We chose the US as many members of our community live there and we thought it would be easier for them to travel within the country to join their classmates and spend some time remembering good old times. Our first international gathering was in Miami and we were delighted to meet with alumni and former teachers who flew from different cities nearby, including Santo Domingo!

The next reunion is scheduled for Saturday, May 3rd, 2014 at GEM NIGHTCLUB & LOUNGE. This would be our second reunion outside the Dominican Republic and we hope that many of our sharks are able to attend and share with other classmates. Those living in the Dominican Republic have the convenience that Monday, May 5th is a holiday!

their ticket. GO TO OUR WEBPAGE: WWW.CMS.EDU.DO AND UPDATE YOUR ADDRESS… NEXT TIME, THE PARTY MAY GO YOU YOUR CITY! CMS ALUMNI REUNION 2014 Date: Saturday May 3rd, 2014 Place: GEM 42 Province St., Boston, MA Time: 6:30 P.M. to 9:30 P.M. Ticket price: US$50 p/p

You may purchase your tickets by contacting the Alumni Relations Office at 809-947-1021 or by email: alumni@cms.edu.do. There is a special giveaway for the first 25 people who buy

Our sharks promote the creation of the Dominican Schools Soccer League By Gabriela Jiménez ‘07

YOU ARE INVITED 

GIN Conference at CMS March 13-16, 2014

CAREER DAY at CMS March 20, 2014

Spring Fest & Family Fun Day/ Int’l Food Fair at CMS * April 5, 2014

CMS GOLF TOURNAMENT May 10, 2014 at Punta Cana

Carol Morgan School’s Athletic Department joined efforts with other local schools in the Dominican Republic to create the first national girls soccer league in the country. They called it Dominican Schools Soccer League (DSSL) and it is divided into two geographic groups. The North Group is formed by the International School of Sosua, the Santiago Christian School, Colegio De La Salle Santiago, and Centro Educacional Bonao; the South-East Group is composed by Punta Cana International School, the Abraham Lincoln School of La Romana, Colegio De La Salle Santo Domingo and the Carol Morgan School.

For the regular series each team played two games against every school of their group, one as home club and another one as visitor. After obtaining the standings of each group, on the second week of February, they moved to the playoffs, where the participating schools played against the teams from the opposite group to make it to semifinals. Our sharks won the final games 3-0 against Colegio De La Salle Santiago.

regular and scheduled games is to create a healthy rivalry amongst the teams, setting a high value on interscholastic sports.

The importance of having an organized league with

FOR DIGITAL / COLOR VERSION GO TO WWW.CMS.EDU.DO/ALUMNI * SENT BY EMAIL ON FEB0 28, 2014 let us know if you did not get it!


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Eating out and having surgery in Dominican Republic; how and where By Dr. Luis Alcántara Abreu ‘80, Orthopedist Surgeon fruits and vegetables are chlorinated, if the crockery is properly steamed washed, etc. We assume when we see the finished product, gourmet or otherwise, everything was done by the book. Bon appétit!

We eat to survive which is the reason as to “why” isn’t included in the title. We go out to restaurants to relate with each other as part of basic social behavior, which is why we do it very pleasantly. I don’t know anyone that is not interested at the very least in assuming that the restaurant has an impeccably clean kitchen and the management and care in the preparation of the food is nothing less than the best. In fact general culture and even “Ratatouille” teaches us that in every kitchen there is trained staff assigned to every area, from the chef to the cleaning staff. Certainly none of us know how produce arrives from the market, who receives them and how and where they are stored, if the “cold chain” is followed, if the

Now who does not have a history of indigestion or even food poisoning after a splendid lunch, an exquisite dinner or a simple "brunch"!? From Helicobacter Pylori to Clostridium Botulinum, anything can sneak into our digestive or even neurologic system sometimes putting us in lifethreatening situations. Let’s consider the counterpart, why do we have surgery? To save a life, spare a limb, restore the quality of life or even regain self-esteem! All vital reasons and, in most cases, have nothing to do with social behavior. How we go into an operating room is generally a question easy to answer… very afraid! So little fun and completely devoid of the glamour of the social convention, we are clothed so that modesty becomes something virtual, we get pricked with needles and are treated with phrases reminiscent of the early days of elementary school or a visit to grandma. Let’s not mention the foley catheter to avoid being branded as cruel.

In any case we have reached this point, after the consensus, diagnosis and discussions of alternate treatment or the victim of an incident or accident that left room for nothing else but an emergency intervention. Regardless of how, we got to where. Here we must seriously start to worry. Let’s do the exercise of how much we really know (or assume!?) about operating rooms. Is the operating room environment appropriate in relation to the rest of the clinic? In large clinics that have sprouted out from what originally was a small medical practice or those "expanded" from a family home (!) it occasionally happens that “unsterile” or contaminated equipment moves around ORs as it would from the table to the kitchen. Is it not valid to inquire if the appropriate international standards are followed for aseptic and antiseptic measures in treating surgical instruments and equipment both by doctors, nurses and technical staff? These measures include use and disposal of surgical clothes, personnel access and dressing room location, caps and masks coverage, entrance and exit of chairs and stretchers, disposal of biological material and solid and liquid residue, serial clean-

ing of the operating room and all its equipment (this includes anesthesia equipment, surgical table, etc). It is not uncommon in developing countries to even have ORs using regular homestyle air conditioners. You should also know that meeting the standards of cleanliness is not the only important measure to eliminate microorganisms in the operating rooms. To prevent them from spreading it is very important to maintain the ORs at an ambient temperature, in general, between 22 and 25 degrees Celsius and humidity from 45% to 60%. The number of people that walk around in the OR during surgery should be the least possible. Standards that regulate all these issues are readily available to healthcare personnel. Despite all the precautions, the major pathogens causing severe hospital infections can be found in all the different parts of the hospital, including the OR. For this reason an infection is, along with other surgical complications, one of the risks inherent in any surgery. Assumptions in a restaurant can lead us to indigestion or even a cramp that drives us to the hospital. Will we assume as much of an operating room!?

Last Christmas at CMS for REMINISCIA ‘14 For the second year in a row, the Alumni Association decided to treat our seniors with doughnuts during their morning break to wish them happy holidays wherever they were heading. We wanted this day to be a special one for REMINISCIA ’14 as it was their last Christmas at CMS.


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How does CMS reflect on my college experience? States might have hindered me academically, but I must admit that those doubts were long gone by the end of the first few weeks of school. For those students who, like I tried to be, absorbed as much as they could from CMS, the academic part of college isn’t that difficult.

Going into college made me doubt about how coming from a school outside of the United

I believe that the biggest example can be found in reading and writing. Even though most graduates from CMS who go off to college in the US are not native English speakers, I’ve observed that writing comes as easy to us as it does for many American students. Experiences such as the semester-long Senior Extended Essay or even reading The

Raven with Ms. Carrera back in 8th grade build a strong foundation for CMS students in English. In Math and Science, the areas in which I struggle the most in, I still manage to maintain an academic level I’m proud of because CMS has emphasized these areas so much as shown by the beginning and rapid growth of clubs and organizations in the STEM fields like Team Drift and GIN along with the Sea Savers. Finally, if it weren’t for the teachers I encountered along the way in my field of choice, the Social Sciences (I am currently double majoring in International Studies with a concentration in Political Science and Economics), I would probably be studying

By José M. Munné ‘13 something completely different. Ranging from World to American to Dominican history, and branching out into Economics and Government, I can honestly say that every teacher inspired me to open up my mind and try to dig a little deeper and learn a little more in order to either not repeat the problems of the past or fix those we are facing now and will face in the future. All in all, when the Carol Morgan School says that it’s a college-preparatory school, they couldn’t be more right.

CMS Alumni “Juntadera” In Its Fourth Year Every Year the Alumni Association Executive Committee hosts a get together for our young alumni from the last ten graduating classes. This year, thanks to the support of Fernando Queipo ‘94 and Mario Lovaton, we had our traditional open bar at Mix The Bar for classes 2003 to 2013 This is a networking activity to give our sharks the opportunity to catch up right before starting their holiday break in December.

Smile for the camera...

CLASS OF 2011

Members of Class of 2012

CLASS OF 2013

Congratulations Chantal Paiewonsky ‘’03!


ANNOUNCEMENTS NEW BRICKS We want to thank all of you for the support you are giving us through our different fund raising programs. Here are the new supporters that are leaving a mark… De La Torre Ramírez Family THANK YOU!!!

We are very happy to announce that ARS PALIC accepted our proposal to support our Naming Project by sponsoring our Health Office! The entire CMS Community is welcome to name one of the many rooms available on our campus in honor of or in memory of an individual, under the names of a group of classmates, or a company

BUY YOUR TICKET FOR THE TUITION RAFFLE AND GIVE YOURSELF THE OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE TUITION COST FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2014-2015! 1st Prize: One full tuition * 2nd Prize: 50% discount on tuition * 3rd Prize 25% discount on tuition Ticket Price: US$100 * For more information contact the Development Office at 809-947-1021/20

Carol Morgan School sadly reports the loss of the following member of our community: Our condolences to the family and friends of… Leoncio Crespo ‘83 February 2014

Ways to support Carol Morgan School There are several ways to give to the Carol Morgan School. CMS depends upon the generosity of our community to sustain and advance the mission of the School:

Alumni Giving Annual Fund

Leave a Mark...buy a Brick

Naming Project, sponsor a room under your name or a group of classmates

Make a Pledge

For more information about these programs and other ways to make a gift, please contact Vielka Morales at 809-947-1020 / 809-947-1021 or by email: vmorales@cms.edu.do Carol Morgan School is a 501 C3 organization, donations are tax deductible in the United States.

CMS Alumni Association Av. Sarasota esq. Nuñez de Caceres Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

CMS Alumni Newsletter Vielka Morales Development Officer T: 809-947-1020 vmorales@cms.edu.do Ana Venta Alumni Relations Assistant T: 809-947-1021 alumni@cms.edu.do If you want to submit an article for our next issue, please send an email to: vmorales@cms.edu.do

FOLLOW US ON….

U.S. Mail: Carol Morgan School 8400 NW 25th Street, Suite 110, BM# 1-09221 Doral, FL 33122

Phone: 809-947-1021 / Fax: 809-533-9222 E-mail: alumni@cms.edu.do / www.cms.edu.do

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Alumni Newsletter Feb 2014  
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