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FREE! JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

your life on the Crystal Coast

HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM EVERYONE AT CAROLINA SALT

LOOK INSIDE ON PAGE 8 FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO MID–JANUARY THROUGH MID–FEBRUARY


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8106 EMERALD DRIVE

EMERALD ISLE • 252.354.5722


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MID-JAN UA RY TO M ID-F E B RUA RY 2 0 1 9

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

10 Roll With The Punches (Or... The Wedding Crasher) Not even Mother Nature would ruin the Reverend

Levi Stroud’s daughter’s dream wedding on the beach—even through at had been raining for days. But life has a way of taking unexpected turns.

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11 The Underappreciated White-Throated Sparrow One of the most abundant birds found in the WILDLIFE SHELTER:

The Underappreciated Sparrow

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R HAPPY NEW YEAE AT FROM EVERYON LT CAROLINA SA

THINGS

LOOK INS

FOR FUN

FEBRUARY

UGH MID–

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TO DO

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January / February ON THIS MONTH’S COVER

February brings a sweet holiday, Valentine’s Day. Consider taking your sweetheart to this year’s Chocolate Festival in Morehead City for a fun day of all things chocolate.

forests of North America, their winter range covers most of the eastern U.S, and it’s one of the most numerous birds to winter in our state.

12 Ask the Aquarium: Dolphin Or Porpoise? A visitor asks, if they’ve seen porpoises swimming

off the beach at Ocean Isle. Is that something that can happen here on the Crystal Coast? Do you think you know the answer to the question?

14 A Moment Of Reflection: My Best Year Starts Here Pastor Paul Ortiz of the Island Church on

Emerald Isle has words of wisdom to guide us on our way into 2019, and to help renew our thinking and clarify our vision for the future.

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 10 ROLL WITH PUNCHES Or... The Wedding Crasher! Grace under pressure time.

12 DOLPHIN OR PORPOISE? Ask the Aquarium about these very different animals.

Hooked Up Fishing...................................... 15 Diving Our Coast.. ........................................ 16 Tides. . ........................................................ 17

CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2019 CAROLINA SALT 5


PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is January 16. The next issue publishes February 7.

B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

252-723-7628

Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

“I'll only give you the paper if you promise not to let the news upset you.” News you don’t have to worry about.

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant. PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


Happy Valentine’s Day F ROM F L I PPE R Z FA M I LY BA R & G R I L L

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THINGS TO DO

JANUARY 9, 16, 23, 30 | FEBRUARY 6

Bird Hike at Fort Macon

Civil War Era musket’s history, loading procedures and firing. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252726-3775.

and take a leisurely hike to identify birds native to the area. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

JANUARY 10 | FEBRUARY 8

Natural Side of Fort Macon

Astronomy at Fort Macon

[ 6–7PM ] Meet at the bathhouse to view space

through a telescope and learn more about our uUniverse. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252726-3775. JANUARY 12

Shoreline Cleanup at Hoop Pole Creek ✪ JANUARY 10 | FEBRUARY 8

ASTRONOMY AT THE FORT

Meet at the bathhouse at Fort Macon State Park to view space through a telescope and learn more about our universe. From 6 to 7 p.m. at 2303 East Fort Macon Road on Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

JANUARY 12

CRYSTAL COAST BRIDAL FAIR

Enjoy a day of fun while talking with many different vendors about services for your wedding day. Speak with vendors and view sample items. Enter contests and wind door prizes all day long and at the After Party. At 3505 Arendell Street in Morehead City. For more information call 252-240-3256.

JANUARY 14

Musket Firing Demonstration

[ 10–11AM ] Meet in Fort Macon to learn about a

8

✪ = FREE

MID–JANUARY TO MID–FEBRUARY

[ 10–NOON ] Help us protect coastal wildlife

and habitats at Hope Pole Creek Nature Trail during our 2019 Coastal Cleanup Kickoff! One of the federation’s primary initiatives is to reduce the amount of marine debris littering coastal shorelines and waterways. Since 2014, the federation has led the Lost Fishing Gear Recovery Project in an effort to remove lost crab pots from North Carolina sounds. The North Carolina General Assembly appropriated funding to this project to facilitate and continue this statewide project. The cleanup continues in January 2019 with both commercial fishers and community volunteers—we need your help! Hoop Pole Creek is a coastal creek, salt marsh and maritime forest preserve that continues to be rich with oysters, fish and other wildlife. Volunteers will help to pick up assorted trash and debris items, as well as trim trees and bushes along the trail and clean off the boardwalk. This entire event will take place outdoors, so dress accordingly. Closed-toed shoes are required and sturdy shoes for walking in wet areas are also recommended. Boots are appropriate if you choose to walk along the water’s edge. Trash bags, gloves and other cleanup materials will be provided. Anyone under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. Lunch and refreshments will be provided for all volunteers after the cleanup. For more information on the progress of this project over the past four years visit www.nccoast.org/crabpotproject. For more information call 252-393-8185. JANUARY 12

Crystal Coast Bridal Fair

[ 10AM–3PM ] Come join us for a day of fun while

you talk with many different vendors to see what they have to offer you for your special wedding day. Speak with vendors and view sample items. Enter contests and win door prizes all day long and at the After Party. At 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information call 252240-3256.

CAROLINA SALT January / February 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

[ 9–10AM ] Meet at the Fort Macon Visitor Center

JANUARY 17

[ 10–11AM ] Meet in the Visitor Center lobby for

a leisurely hike exploring the natural side of Fort Macon. Hike will cover both trail and beach. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-240-3256. JANUARY 17, 18

Down East Folk Arts Society Presents Tom Kimmel

[ 7–8:30PM ] The Down East Folk Arts Society will

once again bring world class singer/songwriters to the Crystal Coast with a winter concert series beginning in January and running through March. Singer, songwriter, entertainer, poet and teacher Tom Kimmel is all of these things and more. Since 1980, dozens of Tom’s compositions have been recorded by a host of major artists, including Linda Ronstadt, Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Randy Travis. They’ve been featured in films from Twins to Serendipity and Runaway Bride and in television shows from Miami Vice to Touched By An Angel. An eclectic artist in his own right, he has released seven solo albums, published a book of poems and led songwriting workshops and classes across the US and in Europe. At 513 Evans Street, Morehead City. JANUARY 26

Jack Ketner Art Show

[ 7–9PM ] You’ve enjoyed his fiddle for years, now

come out to see his original, complex depictions of coastal life and music. Peruse the art while tasting the latest offerings at Bogue Sound Distillery. Complementary appetizers. Music by Robert Gasperson. At 108 Bogue Commercial Drive, Newport. JANUARY 29–FEBRUARY 26

Fit and Fun Youth Program

[ 4–5PM ] Morehead City Parks and Recreation

Department is now offering a youth fitness and health program called Fit & Fun Youth for ages 10–14. The program will be offered on Tuesdays and will focus on educating kids about healthy eating, making healthy choices and becoming more active in order to improve overall health and body confidence. Each week participants will engage in a short educational lecture and activity, such as learning to cook a healthy recipe, followed by a physical activity such as a fitness obstacle course or active game. This program is a fun way for kids to socially interact with others their age, learn healthy alternatives and become more active in the process. The cost of the program is $50. Registration will close January 25. The


✪ = FREE

MID–JANUARY TO MID–FEBRUARY

program will be instructed by Victoria Ward who is a Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness Instructor, Barre Fitness Instructor and Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist. For more information, please contact Victoria at victoria.ward@ moreheadcitync.org or call 252-726-5083, ext. 1. JANUARY 29

Escoffier Chef Dinner Series

The popular dinner series is back! Enjoy a fourcourse meal prepared by culinary students and top local chefs. Get a ticket for an individual dinner or the whole series but act fast because they always sell out! Doors open at 5:30 p.m., hors d’oeuvres until 6:30 p.m. This amazingly unique event supports the CCC culinary program. The culinary program is vibrantly training tomorrow’s chefs. Carteret Community College is very proud that we send up to four students annually to France for a month internship. During this month-long trip the students train under the best French escoffier chefs in the world! At 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information or tickets call 252-2226262. FEBRUARY 2

Hatteras Island Oyster Roast

[ 1–4PM ] Come enjoy fresh oysters, live music, a

warm fire and lively spirits. An oyster roast for the coast—join us around the fire at Oden’s Dock for an old-fashioned oyster roast that will also help give back to our coastal environment! We’ll have fresh oysters on hand, seafood chowder, corn bread and other refreshments. Be sure to save room for homemade dessert from the bake sale. Proceeds from this event will benefit the North Carolina Coastal Federation’s oyster education and restoration programs. Hear live music from Blurky’s Quirky Friends and enjoy good company among federation staff, board members and volunteers. This laid-back community event will celebrate local seafood and a healthy coast for a good cause. Special thanks to the Outer Banks Visitors Bureau for sponsoring this event. Register to attend in advance online now. The cost is $25 in advance and $30 at the door and includes allyou-can-eat oysters, one serving of chowder, corn bread and a non-alcoholic beverage. Members of the federation will receive a $5 discount. Tickets can also be purchased in advance at the

THINGS TO DO

federation’s northeast office in Wanchese or at Oden’s Dock in Hatteras. Purchases are nonrefundable. This event will take place rain or shine. This event is planned to take place outdoors, so please dress accordingly. In the case of extremely bad weather, the event will take place at the Hatteras Village Civic Center. FEBRUARY 4

Flags of Fort Macon and the Confederacy

[ 10–11AM ] Meet at the Fort Macon Visitor Center

to learn about the wide range of flags used by the confederacy during the War Between the States. At 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information call 252-726-3775.

FEBRUARY 2

FEBRUARY 9

Third Annual Fur Ball

[ 6–10PM ] Love is in the hair! The third annual

Fur Ball of the Crystal Coast in support of Austin Veterinary Outreach and Rescue is a great opportunity to celebrate Valentine’s Day! Please join us for great music, food and a silent auction for items to support the Austin Veterinary Outreach and Rescue. With your support we can help save more dogs and cats in 2019. We look forward to seeing your paws on the dance floor! At the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Atlantic Beach Oceanfront, West Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. For more information or tickets call 252499-2292.

HATTERAS ISLAND OYSTER ROAST

From 1–4 p.m., enjoy fresh oysters, live music, a warm fire and lively spirits around the fire at Oden’s Dock. Cost is $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Event benefits NCCF.

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt! Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way! WILL@CAROLINASALT.COM 252-723-7628

FEBRUARY 9

THIRD ANNUAL FUR BALL

The Fur Ball in support of Austin Veterinary Outreach and Rescue is a great way to celebrate Valentine’s Day and save more cats and dogs in 2019. Call 252-499-2292.

Nautical Collection E X C L U S I V E LY D E S I G N E D B Y

VERANDA SQUARE | EMERALD ISLE | CHURCHWELLS.COM 1-800-846-1961 | 252-354-7166

CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2019 CAROLINA SALT 9


LOCAL COLOR

REV. LEVI STROUD

Roll With The Punches …not even Mother Nature would ruin our daughter’s dream wedding.

A

fter a beautiful, warm, early fall week at our beach rental, it rained all day—on both Friday and Saturday. We had made so many preparations for our daughter’s on-the-beach wedding, it seemed quite the shame that we would have to fall back on ‘Plan B’… relocating to the tiny sanctuary in the church where the reception would be held. By the time Saturday rolled around, however, and our daughter Tamara was peacefully making her final preparations for joining together with her beloved Graham, it no longer mattered. In several hours, their joy would be complete, and they would be celebrating with beloved family and friends, a wonderful send-off full of smiles, hugs, wellwishes … and chocolate from the delightful “candy bar” set-up at the reception. With last-minute music rehearsals, sermon preparations, decorations and outfitting, we made sure that we knew where our umbrellas were so that all of this beauty would not get drenched. Not even Mother Nature would ruin our daughter’s dream wedding at her much-loved Emerald Isle, where our family had camped and vacationed for most of her life. After having pastored churches for 30 years, I have come to realize that weddings often take on a life of their own regardless of how well you plan. It only takes one wrinkly aisle cloth, one clumsy groomsman, one dropped (or forgotten) ring, or (shudder) a local fisherman barreling through the wedding area on a company truck and all of a sudden those “best-laid plans” fall prey to the unexpected. Fortunately, this usually ends up providing some comic relief during one of the most stressful times of one’s life. Accordingly, I have saved myself from much of the damaging effects of said stress by learning to roll with the punches. This day would certainly challenge the “roll” mechanism in us all … as the afternoon unfolded. We made the call to relocate at the absolute last minute since there was no way to inform guests ahead of time. They would all be waiting at the Park Street public access to the beach for instructions on where to go and what to do. Treasured friends and family from over the years had driven and flown in to share in the event, and I knew they would be waiting,

eager to see how we would pull this off. Regardless, we were determined that the word “disappointing” would not be a part of any of our conversations. On the way to Mile Marker 15, I answered my cell phone to hear my wife’s hopefulbeyond-belief assessment of the situation: “It looks like it’s cleared off some to the north.” I had not even noticed that my windshield wipers were only encountering mist (after two days of drenching rain). As I pulled into the lot and greeted all our friends—from ages 18 months to 92 years, even the misting had stopped. With threatening clouds everywhere—but a strip of bright sky far off on the horizon—everyone seemed to vote by telepathy (or at the very least, goofy, gutsy grins) to go for it! As risky as anything we had ever done, we pulled out the rental chairs, dragged out sound equipment and guitars, invited everyone to lend a hand, and set up at the water’s edge. Within 40 minutes of our expected start time, the wedding party began its barefoot trek to the most perfect of altars I had ever seen—a small hemp table in front of God’s beautiful creation. Shades of light orange, turquoise, and khaki graced the beach as the groomsmen, bridesmaids, bridesmen and groomsmaids (yes, you read correctly) calmly stepped to their appointed places. Finally, both parents of the groom and both parents of the bride brought in their beloved children. After seating the mothers, the two fathers found their places as pastors and officiants, and with incredible expectation in every way, the ceremony for these two young people to start the rest of their lives together—through promise and faith— began. The portable sound equipment worked flawlessly! Volunteers shared their video and audio skills with perfection! The waves lapped at the feet of the bride’s attendants but came no further! With vows, sermon, rings and even seashell necklaces created by the couple to exchange (in lieu of the unity candle), the event was almost like a fairy-tale. During the song “Longer Than” (I kid you not), schools of fish were incredibly visible in the huge backdrop waves just as the line was sung, “Longer than there’ve been fishes in the ocean…” During this song, they took the first steps of their journey together with a brief, symbolic walk to the water’s edge. “We’ll fly through the falls and

10 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

summers…with love on our wings…” That’s when the truck came barreling through. As my young son would say, “What th’ schmuggett!” Logic would dictate that it’s not very nice to crash a wedding, especially with a truck, but apparently after a day of fishing, logic does not apply. Graham and Tamara paused to stay out of the truck’s path, then came on back to their place, were blessed, pronounced husband and wife, kissed, and left the beach as a mess of seagulls took flight and the congregation was led in singing “All You Need Is Love” by the Beatles. Frankly, I think quick reflexes aren’t so bad to have, as well! With the last photos snapped by our gracious and respectful photographer, the rental chairs stacked back on the pallet, and the equipment safely loaded in the van, the mist returned. By the time we were on the road to the church, it was again pouring down rain. Apparently, God’s deal with Mother Nature had reached its limit. That was OK with us, though—nothing else mattered at this point. The love birds were on their way, but more importantly: Tamara had her dream wedding … and everyone and everything seemed to bow in deference to that dream. Let the rain come! We’ll take it—with gratitude! A lot of prayers were answered that day. As thankful as we were to our church people for lifting up those prayers, we didn’t really expect the Almighty to intervene with respect to the weather, but we are very sure that He did! The beach has been good to our family, and I know we will continue to enjoy its offerings for many years to come. Who knows? Maybe we’ll retire down here. In the meantime, we’ll just keep rolling with the punches and packing away the memories— the kind that only cherished family and dear friends can make. And as for the renegade wedding-crashing fisherman? I suppose we’ll file him away in the “Truth is stranger than fiction” department … or perhaps “That which does not destroy you will make you stronger.” Or better yet, “Did anyone get the number of that truck?” €


LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

The Under-Appreciated Sparrow The sparrow hops when they’re on the ground, rather than walking, and then pounce on anything they’ve uncovered.

C

olor catches our eye, as we avid bird watchers will probably agree. Take for example the bright red cardinal or the royal rluebird or the brilliant, rusty breast of the American robin. We can’t miss those birds because they announce their presence in living color! What we tend to miss are the little guys who blend in and are only here in the coastal region of North Carolina during the grayness of winter—such as our fast, unobtrusive, flitting sparrows. There are 43 species of sparrows worldwide. The ones we see most on the coast are the house, chipping, song and white-throated sparrows. Most breed as far north as Canada and only migrate to or through North Carolina during October before the harsh cold season hits up north. They will stay through late April, early May and then head back north for breeding. Recently, a white-throated sparrow smacked the patio glass door of this author’s home and Frizbee, an “indoor only” feline, alerted me to his still and lifeless presence on the deck. The limp sparrow was placed in a comfy, towel-lined container and placed in the wildlife triage to monitor his injuries and to see if he had only been stunned. Happy to report that within a half hour, he was on his feet and making his desire to be released known. Thankfully, he pulled through and there was no reason to transport him to the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport. White-throated sparrows, from the family of New World sparrows, are diminuitive brown and gray birds that weigh only an ounce on the average. They one thing that might stand out in their appearance is a striking head pattern that includes a yellow or tan stripe, as well as a patch of white on their throat. Sparrows are small but plump with short tails and stubby but powerful beaks similar to the beaks of other seed-eating birds such as the house finch. To help them hold and break seeds, the sparrow has an extra bone in their tongue called the preglossale, which stiffens the tongue. White-throated sparrows eat the seeds of grasses and weeds, including ragweed and buckwheat, as well as fruits of sumac, grape, cranberry, mountain ash, rose, blueberry, blackberry and dogwood. In summer they also eat large numbers of insects caught on the forest floor or during quick flights out from low vegetation. Their insect diet includes dragonflies, wasps, stinkbugs, beetles, flies, caterpillars, spiders, millipedes, centipedes and snails. Parents feed their nestlings almost exclusively insects. During winter, which is when they hang out with us on the coast, white-throated sparrows readily visit our bird feeders for millet and black oil sunflower seeds. In spring they eat the tender buds, blossoms and young seeds of oak, apple, maple, beech and elm to ready themselves for their return migration north. Hierarchies or pecking orders, exist in these winter flocks where males are typically dominant. Because of the sparrows abundance, accessibility of both breeding and wintering grounds and the relative ease with which they can be maintained in captivity, they have been used in many types of bird monitoring and studies. Although sparrows have these unique benefits and values—ecological importance, beautiful earth-toned color schemes and that they are quite often mentioned in song lyrics, as well as a frequent topic in folklore—they may very well be the least appreciated of all birds, even though the white-throated sparrow is one of the most abundant birds found in the forests of North America. Their winter range covers most of the eastern United States, including all of North Carolina, and it is one of the most numerous birds to winter in our state, along with the dark-eyed junco and the song sparrow. You’ll find white-throated sparrows on the ground, often in flocks, while they scratch through leaves with both feet in search of seeds, fruits and insects. These winter visitors love leafy urban

spaces with brushy edges or hedgerows and active bird feeders. To encourage them to visit your feeder, add a brush pile of plentiful groundcover. Use a ground feeder with millet and sunflower hearts and scatter millet under the brush from now until April for cold weather energy and to ensure safe refuge. Also, keep your birdbaths thawed and full. White-throated sparrows are a joy to listen to and are adored for their clear whistle of “Sweet, sweet Canada, Canada, Canada,” which is the song of their homeland. In their breeding region, the female will build an open cup nest on the ground, hidden by low shrubs or high grass, made of grasses, twigs, weeds, pine needles, fine roots and animal hair. While the female is building the nest, the male will sing to defend their territory and aggressively chase any intruders away. Momma will lay 4 to 5 pale blue or greenish-blue eggs marked with reddish brown and lavender that she incubates for about two weeks. After hatching, both parents will feed the nestlings. In about 10 days, the young leave the nest but will still be cared for by their parents for another two weeks. The parents stay together for the summer, but they often choose new partners the next year. The white-throated sparrow is still widespread, and tallies taken during the annual national bird count suggests only a slight decline in the last few decades. Historically, the sparrow has legendary status and is mentioned in many literary works. Aphrodite, Goddess of Love, considered the sparrow a sacred bird, a symbol of true love (although they do get a bad rap for not being monogamous!) and capable of a spiritual connection. In some European countries, the belief is if a sparrow flies into your home you will have good luck, and even better luck if the sparrow builds a nest! Or it could mean that a wedding will happen soon. Egyptians believe sparrows catch the souls of the recently deceased and carry them to heaven, and that’s why so many sailors get sparrow tattoos (just in case they die at sea). The call of the sparrow will bring rain! Wow. All these beliefs seem like very heavy burdens to place on a tiny sparrow! Still, considering all that, it might be wise to keep our eyes on the sparrow. €

ABOUT OWLS

TAKE A TOUR of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the OWLS non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2019 CAROLINA SALT 11


ASK THE AQUARIUM

NCAQUARIUMS.COM/PINE-KNOLL-SHORES

ASK the AQUARIUM

Q

We thought we were seeing porpoise swimming off the beach at Ocean Isle, but someone said they were dolphins. Are dolphins and porpoises the same thing?

Bottlenose dolphins are common sightings in North Carolina waters. All marine mammals are protected by federal law. PHOTO COURTESY OF N.C. AQUARIUMS

12 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

P

eople often use the terms dolphin and porpoise interchangeably. Although these marine mammals look much alike, they are different animals. Dolphins (family Delphinidae) have a rostrum, or beak, and a curved dorsal fin. Porpoise (family Phocoenidae) have a blunt head and a triangular dorsal fin. In North Carolina waters, it is common to see groups of dolphins feeding close to shore. Porpoise tend to inhabit offshore waters in colder climates. The nearest porpoise species, the harbor porpoise, ranges between Canada and Virginia; however, in winter they’re known to enter North Carolina waters as far south as Cape Hatteras. Porpoise are considered relatively non-social animals, usually seen in groups of two to five. Dolphins, on the other hand, travel in larger groups and display frolicking, acrobatic behaviors. In nearshore North Carolina waters, you’re most likely to see bottlenose dolphins. Other species, such as spotted dolphins, travel our offshore waters. Like all marine mammals, porpoise and dolphin are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. It’s against federal law to approach, feed, or harass them, and violations are punishable by fines or imprisonment. Both dolphin and porpoise populations continue to be threatened by human activities. Unintentional entanglement in commercial and recreational fishing gear, ingestion of litter, contamination of food sources and boat injuries remain problems. As wild marine mammals, these animals are best appreciated from a distance. People often make the mistake of using food to entice them close to boats. This has resulted in some animals becoming accustomed to approaching boats for handouts. Not only is this bad for the animal’s diet, it can endanger both the animal and people. Dolphin wounds from boat propellers are not uncommon, and animals have been known to become aggressive and bite. Litter and cruel jokes are also a problem. Lens caps, fishing hooks, lures, disposable lighters and other such items have been found inside dead dolphin stomachs. Scientists continue to study marine mammal biology and behavior; however, more data on reproduction rates, residency, migration patterns and habitat needs is critical to assist in their conservation. National, regional and state organizations work together to gather such information. €


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A MOMENT OF REFLECTION

PAUL ORTIZ

MY BEST YEAR STARTS HERE AN ISLAND CHURCH PERSPECTIVE

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t’s 2019! Another New Year is here! With it, new starts for many. The focus of my New Year’s message was from a passage in the Bible filled with a very real and powerful fact so many people have overlooked. In 2 Peter Chapter 1, Verse 3–4, the writer reveals a truth from God to us that has very serious implications for anyone listening or reading. “His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him who called us to His own glory and excellence, by which He has granted to us His precious and very great promises, so that through them you may become partakers of the divine nature, having escaped from the corruption that is in the world because of sinful desire.” God has granted to us, through His divine power, all things pertaining to life and godliness. The Contemporary English Version of the Bible puts it this way: “God has given us everything we need in order to live a life that pleases Him now.” That is a wonderfully powerful statement from God Himself to all of us. We all look at the beginning of the New Year as a fresh start. A time to start new again. This is why so many people begin the year with new ideas or resolutions for change. Truth is, 2019 can be your best year ever, but it won’t be if God is not at the center of your world. You see, 1 Peter 3:1–4 makes it clear that when we live where God is and we allow Him to lead our lives, He will grant to us through His divine power all things pertaining to life and holiness. Bottom line, God has given us everything we need in life for every circumstance and situation. Therefore, we are without excuse. When we fall short, it is because we have chosen to ignore what God has provided to us. In fact, that passage continues by stating, “He has granted to us His precious and very great promises, so that through them you may become partakers of the divine nature.” God has made a promise to those who would accept and receive it, to share in His divine nature. It is that divine nature that He generously shares with us that provides the power we need to live a godly life that pleases Him. God provides what we need. We cannot do it! We can try, but we will fail. God is the source of strength we need for living a holy life. Better still, when life is hard and it will be from time to time, God has provided for that too. “And God is able to make all grace abound to you, that always having all sufficiency in everything, you may have an abundance for every good deed.” [2 CORINTHIAN 9:8] If you let God, He will make all grace available to you so that you have sufficiency in everything. Another amazing statement of God’s goodness toward us. He wants to pour over anyone who would participate, super abounding grace for every matter of life. Who wouldn’t want that? And yet, so many go it alone in this life trying to do in their own strength what cannot be accomplished without God’s divine power. Which, by the way, He wants to willingly share with us. Here’s the problem. We are so comfortable with thinking like the rest of the world, we can’t grasp the trap we are in. We are stuck and we need to renew our thinking. “See to it that no one takes you captive through philosophy and empty deception, according to the tradition of men, according to the elementary principles of the world, rather than according to Christ.” [COLOSSIANS 2:8] 2019 can be a very different year. It can be the best year of your life to date. It is all dependent on who sits on the throne of your heart. Make this year different because God has provided for you and given you everything you need in order to live a life that pleases Him now. Apply Romans 12:1–2 to your 2019 and let God change it all. “Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.” €

14 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

THE ISLAND CHURCH PASTOR PAUL ORTIZ

Paul Ortiz is a follower of Jesus Christ, not religion. A husband and father, he is pastor of The Island Church in Emerald Isle. Reach him at paul@TheIslandChurchEI.org


CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

HOOKED UP FISHING REPORT

REELING IN THE NEW YEAR A H O O K E D U P L O O K A T W H A T ’ S B I T I N G I N J A N U A RY

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anuary can be a tough month for fishermen due to the weather, but it typically offers some mild days that make for a great time on the water! We have a few species that remain here along the Crystal Coast regardless of how cold it gets and they must eat! Due to the cold temperatures, fish will definitely be schooled up and anglers will want to focus their efforts in the right areas during the right conditions.

SPECKLED TROUT

Many of our larger speckled trout will move into up river situations during the winter months. They will migrate through the main channels up our rivers, into the deeper protected creeks off our rivers and into smaller creeks or canals along the mainland sounds and Intracoastal Waterway. There will still be many smaller trout with some keeper-sized fish mixed in along the deep channels and creeks near our inlets as well as the surf zone. There are certain baits that work well in areas with current and certain baits work better in areas with little to no current. A general rule of thumb while trout fishing is to go light. Trout seem to respond more aggressively to baits that have long suspension times. I like to use Mirrolure’s sinking twitch baits or ¼-oz. to ³⁄₁₆-oz. jig heads with my Gulp baits or soft plastics while fishing the channels and creeks closer to our inlets that have currents. These heavier baits sink quickly while the current sweeps them along the bottom. When I move into upper creeks or canals I often scale down to ¹⁄₁₆-oz. jig heads. Some of my favorite soft baits to put on my jig heads include Berkley Gulp 3" and 4" Pearl White Shrimp, 4" Smelt Minnow, 5" Jerkshad in Pink or White and Berkley Powerbait’s 3" Pro Grub or Pro Twitch Bait Minnow in Chartreuse Ice or Pink Ice. My favorite pre-weighted soft bait is Bett’s Perfect Sinker Shrimp. These baits have a slow decent and I’ll usually allow a one-second pause between twitches for every 2 feet of depth I’m fishing. All of these baits will produce vicious strikes from speckled trout.

REDFISH

The winter months will offer the chance for slot-sized redfish like this pair that David Knox and his colleague from ECU caught with Capt. Jeff Cronk.

When looking for redfish this January, anglers should focus on the surf zone when we have sunny days with northerly, northwesterly or westerly breezes. The surf will lay down flat, allowing anglers to approach the surf zone by boat, while sunny skies will allow anglers to see through the water and spot schools of redfish moving along the surf. Once located, these fish will usually strike any soft bait cast into the school. I like a ½-oz. jig head tipped with a Berkley Gulp 4" Shrimp or a 4" Minnow. When we have multiple warm days, some of these schools of redfish will move through the inlets and scour the shallow flats and bays behind our beaches in search of food. So anglers can also spend time on the trolling motor quietly moving through these shallow bays looking for reds. Once located, it’s usually no problem to hook up with plenty of reds ranging from 16 to 28 inches. It’s important to use little to no weight with your baits because most of the shallow flats will have a thick, green algae covering the bottom during winter months. I like to rig a 4" Pearl Gulp Shrimp on a ¹⁄₁₆-oz. jig head or a 5" Smelt Gulp Jerkshad on a weightless hook (weedless). Whether you’re looking for trout or reds this January, one thing is true: the weather may slow many anglers down, but these fish must eat! If you put the time in, you can have a successful fishing trip this January!

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: PENN CONFLICT II SPINNING REELS

FISH’N 4 LIFE CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

leads fishing and nature charters on the Crystal Coast. To get out on the water with him, call 910-325-8194. You can also visit him online at nccharterfishing.com. youtube.com/user/carolinafishingtv

I’ve been putting Penn’s Conflict spinning reels to the test for several years and have been extremely impressed with their durability and performance. But, one thing I love about Penn is that the company is always striving to create and utilize new technology to make their products even better! The new Penn Conflict II spinning reels feature everything one would expect from a legendary fishing tackle manufacturer such as Penn. The gear train runs off Penn’s CNC Gear technology, which provides serious cranking power and offers a more durable and long lasting gear train. This reel also utilizes Penn’s HT100 carbon drag system which provides an incredibly strong and smooth drag, even under heavy loads. The Conflict II is a great looking, light and durable design with a super smooth yet strong drag, making it an excellent reel for all fishermen. Check out the Conflict II spinning reel online at www.pennfishing.com. €

CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2019 CAROLINA SALT 15


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST

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anuary is when divers bring their new equipment they received at Christmas out into the water. Some divers will be wearing drysuits, but it is still warm enough for divers to wear 7mm wetsuits. Because most of December was a very windy month, the dive boats didn’t leave the dock much. The offshore water temperatures were in the mid to low 60s. The inshore water temperatures ranged from the upper 50s to low 60s. The offshore water temperatures should be in the low 60s and the inshore water temperatures should be in the mid to upper 50s in January. Now that Christmas is over, most people are carrying their live tree to the sand dunes to help build up the dunes or they are putting their artificial tree into storage for next Christmas. When people decorate their Christmas trees, they hang as many ornaments as possible to cover the tree. When you go diving, you don’t want to look like a Christmas tree, but some divers do because of all of the pieces of gear they have hanging off of them. Divers want to be streamlined so they can move through the water easier. One way is to have gear that does more than just one function. A new product that was introduced at DEMA, the Diving Equipment and Marketing Association’s annual convention, is the TovaTec Mera flashlight and camera. It looks like an ordinary, handheld flashlight but also has the ability to record video or take still pictures. A micro SD card stores the video and pictures. The light has an intensity of 1,000 lumens. Another way to reduce your resistance in the water is to reduce the number of hoses you have. Divers carry a secondary regulator, an octopus, in the event their buddy or another diver runs low on air and needs to share air to return to the surface. The octopus is usually attached to the diver’s buoyancy compensator, usually called a BC, inside the triangle formed by the bottom of the ribs and the chin. A way to reduce the number of hoses and still have an octopus is to get an octopus that is integrated into the diver’s inflator hose on their buoyance compensator. Using this type of secondary regulator, the diver will pass his primary to the other diver and then use the one on the inflator hose. A standard low pressure hose cannot be used with the octopus that is integrated into the inflator hose. One with a bigger end has to be used to connect to the larger fitting. Instead of having the standard four hoses, the diver will now have three hoses. Another way to reduce the number of hoses is to use a wrist dive computer that uses a transmitter to show the diver the amount of air that is in their tank. This will eliminate the need for a hose to a pressure gauge that is in a console with the computer. Some dive computers with a transmitter also allow you to read the tank pressure of other divers, sometimes up to ten divers. The transmitter screws into a high pressure port on the regulator’s first stage. The transmitter and the dive computer each have a battery so it is important to check both batteries before each dive. Using the wrist dive computer with a transmitter and the octopus integrated in the inflator hose, the diver reduced the number of hoses from four to two hoses. The diver will just have the primary regulator hose and the low pressure hose for the inflator hose. These are some of the ways a diver can be more streamlined while moving through the water. The Equipment Specialist class familiarizes a diver with different types of gear and ways to configure the gear. If you have any questions about gear, gear configurations, classes or sharters, contact Discovery Diving at dive@discoverydiving.com, at 252-728-2265 or follow them on Facebook. €

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Hemp Extract or CBD Oil? What’s The Difference?

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T BY REBECCA JONES

anuary 1 is when people begin to make their New Year’s Resolutions. A resolution means a firm decision to do or not to do something. I interviewed several folks and this is what their New Year’s Resolution are for 2019: LOSE WEIGHT EXERCISE MORE GET OUT OF DEBT QUIT SMOKING OR DRINKING GET A BETTER JOB

When I asked them what their resolutions were for 2018 they had the same answers. They said they did not accomplish their goals last year and were doubtful that they would do it this year, but they wanted to try. I did not make a 2018 resolution as I have not been successful in the past either. But something was stirring inside me to do a self examination. As I looked back on 2018 I found that when I reflected back on the year (especially the last part of the year since Hurricane Florence) that I found more kindness in others and within myself. I found strength that I did not know I had—or maybe that I had forgotten. As I gazed at Kandice’s photo of the boats at the Turner Street Bridge in Beaufort, iIt reminded me of the story in the Bible about Peter walking on water. With faith in Jesus Christ, Peter started walking on the water toward his Master. But then the strong wind took his focus off of Christ. Soon doubt started forming in his mind. With his faith in Christ shaken due to the howling wind, he started to sink into the sea. As he was sinking, Peter called for Jesus’ help. Jesus immediately stretched out His hand and caught him. As He did so, Jesus asked Peter, “O you of little faith, why did you doubt?” After they got into the boat, the wind that had been so boisterous suddenly stopped. What I learned from this is don’t stay in the boat when God is calling you to step out on the water. No, we cannot actually physically walk on water, but we can allegorically step out in faith to the next thing God is calling us to do. In Beaufort each evening I watch as the boats come in from their day on the water. Any wise sailor knows docking is as important as sailing. An old Zen proverb says, “We cannot see our reflection in running water. It is only in still water that we can see.” Maybe in 2019 you will make time for a reflection instead of a resolution. Then you can have something to hold on to and to grow in this new year. €

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Rebecca Jones is a writer from Beaufort, North Carolina. She is the author of “Changing Tides,” and other books. 18 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

BY JESSICA SEYMOUR

he hemp industry in North Carolina is nothing short of exploding with new growers and new cannabinoidcontaining dietary supplements that can help with multiple health conditions and symptoms. In 2017 North Carolina initiated its pilot program to allow farmers to grow hemp, the low-THC variety of cannabis. Legally, hemp must be less than 0.3 percent THC and is bred to be high in cannabinoids, the most popular being CBD, or cannabidiol. Hemp is different than marijuana because it contains all the medicinal properties of the plant but without the “high.”

WHOLE PLANT MEDICINE The hemp plant offers not only cannabinoids, but flavonoids and terpenes, providing the entourage effect that gives hemp its tremendous role in healing. These parts of the cannabis work together to interact with our body’s endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is signaling system of receptors found on the surface of certain cells that are critical for control of many bodily functions-including pain, digestion, mood, nervous control, immune health and overall balance in our body.

FULL SPECTRUM HEMP EXTRACT There are a variety of ways to extract the oil from the plant. Each extraction method provides a slightly different end-product. A fullspectrum extraction method allows us to get everything the plant has to offer, not just CBD. Our private test results reveal that our extracts contain CBD as well as CBN, CBG, CBC, THCA, CBDA to give your body a “multivitamin” of cannabinoids and various terpenes. These compounds work synergistically to produce a more potent and longerlasting effect than a single compound can achieve on its own. Full-spectrum hemp extract is different from a CBD isolate, which means that the end product only contains CBD. The rest of the cannabinoids/terpenes/flavonoids are wasted when CBD is the only cannabinoid extracted. Lazy Gator’s Hemp Farm (Kinston, NC) grows, processes, extracts and bottles various ingestible, smokable and topical full-spectrum hemp extract products. People use the term CBD oil loosely to speak generally about the products on the market that contain CBD. Our full-spectrum hemp extract is CBD oil and much more! There is much to learn about the uses of this very intriguing plant that has been prohibited for so long. The best news yet: the 2018 Farm Bill legislation removed hemp from the Schedule 1 drug list, opening this industry to thrive. Visit the Market at Cedar Point and ask to try some of our locally grown, processed and hand-bottled hemp extract products. €

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jessica Seymour is a registered dietitian and part of the Lazy Gator’s Hemp Farm team. Lazy Gator’s Hemp Farm is located at 3376 Highway 55 West in Kinston. You can contact them via email at lazygatorshempfarm@gmail.com or visit them online at lazygatorshempfarm.com.


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Profile for Will Ashby

Carolina Salt January 2019  

Your Life on the Crystal Coast

Carolina Salt January 2019  

Your Life on the Crystal Coast

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