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FREE! JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2017

your life on the Crystal Coast

Sweet, Adorable

NIGHT

GLIDERS Laugh While You ROLL WITH THE

CHOCOLATE•FESTIVAL Celebrating Charity & Chocolate

PUNCHES

Erosion Prevention

LIVING

SHORELINE LOOK INSIDE FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO ON THE CRYSTAL COAST MID–JANUARY THROUGH MID–FEBRUARY PG. 8


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MID-JAN UA RY TO M ID-F E B RUA RY 2 0 1 7

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

12 Asking About Octopuses Looking at octopuses it isn’t immediately clear

how they manage to make more octopuses! Reproduction by this eight-armed creature is as unique as the animal itself.

13 Night Gliders The Southern Flying Squirrel is the most common

13

mammal never seen by humans in North Carolina! This itty-bitty squirrel is nocturnal, becoming active and feeding only at night while foraging on the ground.

NIGHT GLIDERS: Our Cutest Squirrels

16 Roll With The Punches When your beach wedding is looking like it’s going

FREE!

JANUARY

ARY 2017 / FEBRU

t stal Coas on the Cry your life

t All Abou

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OCTOPU

tion Reproduc orable Sweet, Ad

HT NIG DERS GLI

OLgATChaE•rityFE& ChoSTcolatIVAe L CHCeleOCbratin

hile You Laugh W ITH THE ROLL W ES

PUNCH

E LOOK INSID & FREE FOR FUN

THINGS TO DO COAST CRYSTAL ON THE THROUGH Y MID–JANUARY MID–FEBRUAR PG. 8

January / February ON THIS MONTH’S COVER

It’s one of our favorite events of the year here on the Crystal Coast: the Carolina Chocolate Festival. Turn ahead to page 11 for a schedule of events, and buy your tickets today!

to have to default to Plan B due to rain...but then suddenly you catch a break, be prepared for more bumps in the road, and remember to always roll with the punches.

19 Old Kitties, Diabetes There are multiple forms of diabetes. Some

are curable, some are manageable and some are neither. Find out what the types are, how to diagnose them, and what your treatment options look like.

20 Preventing Erosion Some waterfront property owners along our coast

might be thinking about finding a more effective way to control erosion and protect their properties. Time to talk about living shorelines, which use natural materials to absorb wave energy!

12 ASK THE AQUARIUM This month we look at octopus reproduction.

16 ROLL WITH IT Beach weddings with rainy skies and an intruder.

LOCAL INTEREST

Things To Do................................................ 8 Free Events at Fort Macon. . .......................... 22 At the BHA in January. . ................................ 22 Hooked Up Fishing..................................... 23 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 24 Tides. . ....................................................... 25 19 OLD KITTIES? Find out about one of the threats to the health of your older kitty.

20 PREVENTING EROSION In your waterfront home with a living coastline.

NCCF Community Events............................. 26

CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2017 CAROLINA SALT 5


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WILL ASHBY

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Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant. PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


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THINGS TO DO

JANUARY

Harrika’s Live Music Series

Come see what’s happening in the Biergarten! Thursday trivia and beer releases 6–10 p.m. and live music on the weekends 7:30–10:30 p.m. For more information visit drinkcoastal.com or call 252-354-7911. At 911 Cedar Point Boulevard, Highway 24, Cedar Point. 1/7.................................................................................... 4EverAll 1/12...............................................................60s Decade Trivia 1/14..................................................................... Barefoot Wade 1/21..............................................................pure t mommicked 1/26............................................................. 70s Decade Trivia 1/28...............................................Werewolves of Morehead JANUARY–FEBRUARY

JANUARY–FEBRUARY

WALK TO RUN SERIES

of classes for beginning runners Mondays and Saturdays starting January 23. The 8-week course is $75 (16 classes). For more information call 252-354-6350.

‘Walk To Run’ for Beginning Runners

Mondays 5:30–6:30 p.m. and Saturdays 9–10 a.m. starting January 23. This 8-week program helps you develop a safe and efficient running style. Certified PTA Linda Carlsen will begin by analyzing your running gait and use the run/walk method to teach you. Through this program, you will gain confidence, understanding of proper technique, build endurance and strength and have fun in the process. Running locations will vary. It is time to get out and learn the joys of running! Cost is $75 for 16 classes. Space is limited to 15 beginner runners. Contact Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation at slowe@emeraldisle-nc.org or 252354-6350 to register.

JANUARY 11

Merry Time for Tots: Pirate Hooks and Peg Legs

[ 10–11 AM ] Preschoolers and their caregivers are

✪ JANUARY 13

ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE

at Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation, 7500 Emerald Drive in Emerald Isle. Free! Popcorn and drink for $1. Bring chairs and blankets. Movie is Ice Age: Collision Course.

invited to the Maritime Museum in Beaufort to explore the world of pirates! Following a story about a boy who joined a pirate crew, everyone will get to make their own pirate hats and explore inside a pirate treasure chest (it isn’t just gold and jewels!). Along with learning about pirates students will review senses, parts of the body and colors. Ages 2–5. Free. Space is limited, pre-registration is required. 252-728-7317. At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Stop by, call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com for more information or to register.

Nautical Collection E X C L U S I V E LY D E S I G N E D B Y

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MID–JANUARY TO MID–FEBRUARY

CAROLINA SALT January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

JANUARY 13

FRIDAY FREE FLICK

‘Ice Age: Collision Course’

Free and open to the public. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Popcorn and drink for $1. Please bring chairs and or blankets, but no outside beverages or snacks. At Emerald Isle Parks and Rec, 7500 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle.

JANUARY 14–MARCH 10

AUSTIN VETERINARY HOSPITAL

‘Rescue Me’ Art Opening Helps Animals In Need [ 5–7 PM ] Carolina Artist Group shows

unconditional love for those who help animals in need in Eastern North Carolina with a benefit art show. Rescue Me features original art in many mediums to help bring happy endings to animals. A portion of sales goes to Austin Veterinary Outreach and Rescue (AVOR). The public is invited to an opening reception on January 14 from 5–7 p.m. Prizes are awarded to artists in various categories. Anyone interested in animal rescue, veterinary medicine or their own cute pets can enjoy the diverse and heart-warming art. AVOR is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to helping animals who are down on their luck to turn their lives around by providing affordable veterinary care, including spay and neuter services and by helping to find forever homes for the unattached. Their newly outfitted mobile vet clinic operates through Dr. Sara Austin and Dr. Sam Schmitt of Austin Veterinary Hospital in Beaufort. For more information call 252-726-7550. JANUARY 14 DOWN EAST FOLKARTS SOCIETY

Moors and McCumber in Concert at the College

[ 6:30 PM ] James Moors and Kort McCumber

are an acoustic duo that crafts beautiful story songs walking the line between rootsy folk and melodic pop. Based in Superior, Wisconsin, James is an award-winning songwriter, guitarist and vocalist. Colorado artist Kort is a talented multiinstrumentalist who plays guitar, banjo, fiddle, cello, mandolin, piano, Irish bouzouki and lap slide guitar, just to name a few. He also has won multiple songwriting competitions. Hear them on


✪ = FREE stage up close and personal as they create a bigger sound than most duos, with catchy melodies that are big, bright and electrifying. General admission tickets are $16 (active duty military and Down East FolkArts Society Members $13, full-time students $10). To reserve tickets, please call or text 252-6464657 or email folkartsenc@gmail.com. For more information on performers visit downeastfolkarts. org/Concerts.html. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; show starts at 7:30. At Joslyn Hall, Carteret Community College, 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City.

JANUARY 16

Free Admission Day and Food Drive at the Aquarium

All visitors will be admitted free of charge to the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The aquarium will also offer a chance to return the favor with a contribution of non-perishable food items to Martha’s Mission Cupboard. For details call 252247-4003 or visit ncaquariums.com/pine-knollshores.

JANUARY 17

What Is Core Strength?

What does that really mean? Why is it so important? How does this relate to exercise or function in daily living? Doesn’t my abdominal exercise work the core? You may be very surprised to hear the answers to these questions! If you want to know more, consider coming to a free presentation by Lisa McIntosh. Lisa is a physical therapist with Encore Physical Therapy. Her focus is in the field of orthopedics and pelvic health. She is passionate regarding exercise and overall fitness, with an intense focus on core recruitment and development as it relates to functional movement in your daily life. For more information call Emerald Isle Parks and Rec at 252-354-6350 or stop by the center at 7500 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle.

JANUARY 17

POLICE EDUCATING THE PUBLIC (PEP) PROGRAM

Target Hardening: Protecting Your Property

[ 10–11 AM ] The Police Educating the Public

(PEP) Program will be a series of one-hour classes presented on the third Tuesday of every month in the Town Board Meeting Room. January’s

MID–JANUARY TO MID–FEBRUARY

topic will be Target Hardening/Protecting your Property, with instructor Officer Bailey. or more information call Emerald Isle Parks and Rec at 252-354-6350 or stop by the center at 7500 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle. JANUARY 20

Clam Chowder Cook-Off On the Waterfront In Beaufort [ 6–8 PM ] Four volunteer clam chowder cooks

will compete at the sixth annual Clam Chowder Cook-Off. Participants enjoy a tasting-sized portion of each of the four chowders and then vote for their favorite. In addition to clam chowder, the event will host a cornbread tasteoff. Tickets are available at the museum store or at museumfriends.org. Tickets are $35 for non-members ($30 for Friends of the Museum). Proceeds help support the operations of the Friends of the North Carolina Maritime Museum. At the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center on Front Street in Beaufort. Stop by, call 252-7287317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com for more information.

JANUARY 20

CLAM CHOWDER COOK-OFF

on the waterfront in Beaufort. Four volunteer cooks compete at the sixth annual cook-off. Tickets are available at the museum store, and start at $30. Call 252-728-7317.

JANUARY 20

Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives In Concert [ 8 PM ] One of country’s most historically minded

new traditionalists, Marty Stuart is also one of the most eclectic, moving between honky-tonk, rockabilly, country rock, traditional country and Bluegrass. He has also been one of the more flamboyant showmen, supporting his “party hearty” image with a wardrobe of rhinestoneladen Nudie suits. At Carteret Community Theatre,1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information call 252-497-8919. JANUARY 21

Red Clay Ramblers In Concert at Joslyn Hall

JANUARY 20

[ 7:30–9:30 PM ] Core Sound Waterfowl Museum

and Heritage Center presents the Red Clay Ramblers at Carteret Community College’s Joslyn Hall, 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information call 252-728-1500.

MARTY STUART IN CONCERT

at Carteret Community Theatre, 1311 Arendell Street, Morehead City. A flamboyant showman new traditionalist, Marty Stuart is sure to please.

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THINGS TO DO

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CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2017 CAROLINA SALT 9


THINGS TO DO

✪ = FREE

MID–JANUARY TO MID–FEBRUARY

JANUARY 28

JANUARY 26

Coffee with a Cop at The Trading Post

[ 9–10 AM ] Join your neighbors and police

officers for coffee and conversation! No agendas or speeches, just a chance to ask questions, voice concerns and get to know the officers in your neighborhood. Coffee with a Cop sessions take place on the fourth Thursday of each month at different locations in town. For more information call Emerald Isle Parks and Rec at 252-354-6350.

JANUARY 28–29

INTRO TO WOODEN BOAT BUILDING

at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center on Front Street in Beaufort. Learn the skills you need to choose a design to build on your own. Call 252-728-7317 for information.

Brown Bag Gam: Dolphins

Clean out your closets! Consign your boutique, brand name and upscale clothes. Earn money and score some new finds! Consignors receive 60 percent of the sale value, with 5 percent of proceeds donated to a local charity. Accepting toddler to ladies sizes clothing, shoes and accessories. All clothes must be stain-free, in excellent condition and hung on hangers. Items must be tagged, priced and have an ID number. Call Bryson McLean at 704-576-4572 or jbmclean@ec.rr.com for an ID. Dropoff for consigned items will be Thursday, January 26, from noon to 6 p.m. Sales will be open to the public on Friday from 11a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at Star Hill Golf Club Champion Room, 202 Club House Drive, Cape Carteret. All consignors must provide a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Proceeds from your sales will be mailed to you by January 31. Come join the fun and find some great deals!

[ 9 AM–4:30 PM ] In this two-day hands-on course,

AMIT PELED IN CONCERT

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the most exciting performers on the international stage, brings to life a nostalgic program with gems from Bach, Faure and Beethoven—plus a few Hungarian Rhapsodies. At The History Museum, 1008 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For more information call 252-247-7533.

Upscale and Designer Consignment Sale

Intro To Wooden Boat Building

at The History Museum of Carteret County (formerly The History Place), 1008 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For information or tickets, call 252-247-7533.

[ 8 PM ] Israeli cellist Amit Peled, praised as one of

JANUARY 27–28

JANUARY 28–29

JANUARY 28

Cellist Amit Peled In Concert at The History Museum

students will explore the art of boat building from start to finish. By the end of the course, students will have the knowledge and skill to choose a design and style of boat to build on their own and the confidence to take on the job. Course fee is $135. Minimum age is 16. All courses are limited in size. Advance registration is required. At 315 Front Street, Beaufort. For more information call 252-728-7317.

Stir a little love into everything you do. coffee local baked goods gluten-free choices •

JANUARY 30

[ 12–1 PM ] Pack a lunch and join museum natural

science curator Keith Rittmaster for an informal discussion about the biology, behavior and conservation issues affecting the North Carolina bottlenose dolphins. Free admission. Walk-ins welcome. At the NC Maritime Museum, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Stop by, call 252-728-7317 or visit ncmaritimemuseums.com for more information. FEBRUARY 4

Tea with Wonka: An Afternoon of Tea-Time Wonder Step into a world of pure imagination, “for we are the music-makers and we are the dreamers of dreams…” The Infusion Café presents a whimsical formal tea event hosted by none other than Willie Wonka, so you can expect this to be a most amazing, most fantastic and most extraordinary afternoon! Enjoy three courses of whimsically wonderful tea fare created by our kitchen artists to celebrate Roald Dahl’s book, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and the wondrous treats of his creation. The tea fare will include an appetizer, our formal two-tiered server with a layer of savories and a layer of sweets and our grand finale dessert, accompanied by two services of tea all served by our friendly, costumed staff while you enjoy the tale-telling and music-making of our very special host. Seating is limited. Tickets required. Call 252240-2800 for more information and to guarantee your seats. €

JANUARY Special

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10 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

FREE


CAROLINA CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL

THINGS TO DO

CHOCOLATE•FESTIVAL Celebrating Charity & Chocolate

Chocolate Festival Events 2017 FEBRUARY 3

Pro/Am Chocolate Fantasy Challenge

Do you think you make the best chocolate dessert in North Carolina? The categories this year are cakes and cupcakes. Professionals and amateur divisions will be judged separately. Entry form required prior to event. Winners will be announced following day at festival. FEBRUARY 3

Chocolate Uncorked

[ 7–10 PM ] Wine tasting dinner charity auction with live music provided

by Blue Moon Jazz. This event will be held at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center, 315 Front Street, Beaufort. Tickets available online at carolinachocolatefestival.com or can be purchased at Cru Wine Bar in Beaufort, Dee Gee’s on the Morehead City waterfront and Emerald Isle Wine Market in Emerald Isle. FEBRUARY 4

Cocoa 5K/Fun Run

[ 7 AM CHECK-IN | 8 AM RACE ] At the Crystal Coast Civic Center.

Cost is $25 per person or $45 for a family of four. FEBRUARY 4

Chocolate Spa

At Carteret Community College in Morehead City. Enjoy 90 minutes of massage, feflexology and aromatherapy! Cost is $79 per person, and includes a ticket to the Chocolate Festival.

FEBRUARY 4

Chocolate Festival

[ 9 AM–6 PM ] Chocolate vendors galore! Wall-to-wall chocolate cakes and tortes, chocolate bars, ice cream and more … this event offers more than a sampling of everything chocolate. Join in the fun of the hourly pudding eating contest! Chocolate door prizes given away. Tickets are $9 for adults and $2 for kids ages 5 to 12. Children under age 5 are admitted free. FEBRUARY 4

Live Auction of Pro/Am Competition Cakes and Cupcakes [ 10:30 AM | 12:30 PM | 2:30 PM ] All the entries from the

Pro/Am Chocolate Fantasy Challenge bake off will be auctioned off for the benefit of local charities! Be sure to bid on your favorite luscious chocolate dessert! FEBRUARY 5

Another Great Day of Chocolate! Free Admission for Active Duty Military [ 10 AM– 3 PM ] Pudding eating contest and more! Tickets are $9 for adults and $2 for kids ages 5 to 12. Children under age 5 are admitted free. Active duty military personnel will be given free admission on Sunday with military I.D. €

your life on the Crystal Coast WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! CALL 252-723-7628 IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING AN ARTICLE OR PHOTO.

CarolinaSalt.com » December / January 2017 CAROLINA SALT 11


ASK THE AQUARIUM

Q

NCAQUARIUMS.COM/PINE-KNOLL-SHORES |

How does an octopus reproduce?

Eggs laid by an octopus hang in strings from the top of a flower pot in an aquarium holding area. The female rests on the bottom of the pot, her arms curled inside. PHOTO COURTESY OF NC AQUARIUMS

SHERRY WHITE

A

Reproduction by this amazing eight-armed creature is as unique as the animal itself. To reproduce, the male deposits a packet of spermatozoa into the mantle of the female– the part of an octopus that contains the vital organs and makes up the majority of the body. Females can produce up to 200,000 eggs. Once the eggs are fertilized, the female produces long egg strings and attaches them to the underside of ledges, rocks, etc., or beneath submerged objects like shipwrecks. She stops eating and broods her eggs for four to six weeks by blowing oxygenated water over them with her siphon. She dies shortly before or soon after eggs hatch. Newborns are tiny replicas of their parents. They measure about half the size of a grain of rice and rest on the sea bed or in grass flats where they mature quickly, lest they become part of the marine food web. Many never reach maturity. Some 200 species of octopus are known. The species found in North Carolina waters is the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, a small variety weighing only a few pounds and having a short life span of 12 to18 months. Larger species are most often found in colder, northern waters. Octopuses are loners and make their homes in shallow-water dens or small caves on or near the ocean floor. If no such nooks are available, they easily adapt to living inside wrecks, old car tires, pots, jars or other debris. They frequently block the entrance to their homes with rocks or other found objects to keep out intruders. These interesting animals have highly developed central nervous systems, well developed eyesight and are excellent at camouflage. They exhibit complex behaviors, are masters at coordinating their eight independently working arms, and quickly learn to navigate mazes and distinguish colors and shapes. Such characteristics indicate an unusual degree of intelligence. They are truly awesome animals. €

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1075 Cedar Point Boulevard 252.393.7200 12 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com


LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

Night Gliders

I

t’s a bird! No…it’s a bat!” It could very well be that both guesses are wrong. The diminutive night flyer, gliding from tree to tree on folds of outstretched skin is the most common mammal never seen by humans in North Carolina, so it is easily misidentified. The Southern Flying Squirrel is a small rodent with big saucer-like eyes that occupies habitat similar to his larger cousins, the gray squirrel and the fox squirrel. However this itty-bitty squirrel is nocturnal, becoming active and feeding only at night while foraging on the ground. It weighs no more than 2 to 3 ounces and measures from 8½ to 97⁄8 inches, including a 3 to 4-inch tail. The Southern Flying Squirrel is one of two flying squirrels found in North America—the other one is the Northern Flying Squirrel. While both are found in North Carolina, the Northern Flying Squirrel is rare and found only at higher elevations in the western part of our state. The Southern Flying Squirrel is the smallest of North Carolina’s five tree squirrel species. Its fur is a ravishing reddish brown or gray, and its belly is a creamy white. The most distinctive feature it sports is the cape of loose skin that stretches from its wrists to its ankles and forms a membrane, called the patagium, with which it is capable of gliding. The membrane is bordered in black. When the squirrel stretches its legs to their fullest extent, the membrane opens and supports the animal on glides of considerable distance. Although it is called a “flying” squirrel, it actually jumps and parachutes rather than flies! It’s amazing to catch a visual of them in flight. The gliding membrane billows up and by varying the tension on the patagium and using its tail as a rudder (like the tail on a kite), the squirrel can direct its glide around branches and other obstacles with remarkable agility, although it cannot gain altitude during a glide. However, it can make a sudden 90-degree angle turn in the direction of its glide. That fluffy little multi-purpose tail is also used for communication and thermal regulation. Although the distance they glide is usually short, the longest flight on record was measured at around 200 feet. The flying squirrel lands hind feet first, head up and scampers to the side of the tree to avoid detection. Although a fairly quiet animal, flying squirrels can produce birdlike chirping sounds and some vocalizations not audible to the human ear. Preferred habitats for Southern Flying Squirrels include hardwood and mixed pine and hardwood forests. They require older trees with cavities that provide 1½ to 2 inch

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER ABOUT OWLS

TAKE A TOUR of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport.

To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, the OWLS non-releasable education animals jump at the chance!

diameter entrances for roosting and nesting in. In winter these adorable squirrels readily gather in surprisingly large numbers. Tree cavities have been found with as many as 50 roosting squirrels inside! Because of their need for tree cavity habitats, they are a natural competitor for woodpeckers’ homes and even though they are quite cute, they’ve been known to bully an endangered Red-Cockaded Woodpecker from its nesting cavity and take over the residence. Bluebird boxes are also quite attractive to flying squirrels. Wildlife rehabilitators at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport get involved in the rescue and rehabilitation of this delightful, tiny squirrel when the little one chooses a cavity precariously close to a residence or even manages to enter a house. It’s not uncommon for Southern Flying Squirrels to find a cavity somewhere on a residential structure and make their way into an attic or a wall to find the perfect, safe dwelling to nest and raise babies, which some folks object to. Sometimes a tree is cut down before realizing it is home to nesting or roosting flyers. Tree cutters bring the homeless little gliders to the shelter to ensure they are cared for and raised properly for eventual release back into the wild, giving them that second chance we at the shelter are known for. When they are admitted, usually due to displacement rather than injury, we attempt to replicate their omnivorous natural diet as best we can. If very young, shelter staff will provide syringe formula until they are ready for solid foods such as mealworms, fruits, berries, flower blossoms, vegetables, seeds and nuts. Nesting and breeding usually occurs twice a year: January/February and June/July. A typical nest will be lined with finely chewed bark, especially cedar bark, and grasses. Lichen, moss and even feathers will provide a soft bed. More than one nest is constructed as a necessary Plan B in the wild, because Mom will need to move her infants if the nest is disturbed by natural elements such as damaging weather or predator presence such as owls, hawks, snakes, bobcats, coyotes, raccoons, weasels, foxes and the common house or feral cat (which is the most prevalent and lethal danger posed to them). The average litter produces one to three young that weigh in at less than a quarter ounce each. The youngsters will open their eyes at four weeks and stay with Mom until she births her next litter. Although these flying squirrels are mammals and babies will nurse for about a month, they will be gliding and eating on their own by eight weeks. Unfortunately, Mom is on her own during this time, as males do not assist with the rearing of babies. It will take about a year for the young’ns to mature before reproducing. Life expectancy for these cute little rodents is up to 13 years in captivity, but not more than 4 or 5 years in the wild. Flying squirrels are the oldest living line of modern squirrels and fossil records date back over 30 million years. They are a non-game species and although not listed as endangered, we should still be mindful that their presence gives humans a better quality of life. Those cutie-patooties glide through the night feeding on a variety of insects and big ol’ bugs that would surely be annoying to us during the day! So, if you find Southern Flying Squirrels have moved into your home or they are now homeless due to a downed tree, please contact your nearest wildlife rehabilitation center or wildlife control officer for assistance, not just because they are cute, but because we need to protect and relocate our environmental partners! € CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2017 CAROLINA SALT 13


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CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2017 CAROLINA SALT 15


Roll With the Punches

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fter a beautiful, warm, early fall week at our beach rental, it rained all day—on both Friday and Saturday. We had made so many preparations for our daughter’s on-the-beach wedding, it seemed quite the shame that we would have to fall back on Plan B: relocating to the tiny sanctuary in the church where the reception would be held. By the time Saturday rolled around, however, and our daughter Tamara was peacefully making her final preparations for joining together with her beloved Graham, it no longer mattered. In several hours, their joy would be complete, and they would be celebrating with beloved family and friends, a wonderful send-off full of smiles, hugs, wellwishes … and chocolate from the delightful candy bar set-up at the reception. With last-minute music rehearsals, sermon preparations, decorations and outfitting, we made sure that we knew where our umbrellas were so that all of this beauty would not get drenched. Not even Mother Nature would ruin our daughter’s dream wedding at her much-loved Emerald Isle, where our family had camped and vacationed for most of her life. After having pastored churches for 30 years, I have come to realize that weddings often take on a life of their own regardless of how well you plan. It only takes one wrinkly aisle cloth, one clumsy groomsman, one dropped (or forgotten) ring, or (shudder) a local fisherman barreling through the wedding area on a company truck and all of a sudden those “best-laid plans” fall prey to the unexpected. Fortunately, this usually ends up providing some comic relief during one of the most stressful times of one’s life. Accordingly, I have saved myself from much of the damaging effects of said stress by learning to roll with the punches. This day would certainly challenge the

“roll” mechanism in us all. We made the call to relocate at the absolute last minute since there was no way to inform guests ahead of time. They would all be waiting at the Park Street public access to the beach for instructions on where to go and what to do. Treasured friends and family from over the years had driven and flown in to share in the event, and I knew they would be waiting, eager to see how we would pull this off. Regardless, we were determined that the word “disappointing” would not be a part of any of our conversations. On the way to Mile Marker 15, I answered my cell phone to hear my wife’s hopefulbeyond-belief assessment of the situation: “It looks like it’s cleared off some to the north.” I had not even noticed that my windshield wipers were now only encountering mist. As I pulled into the lot and greeted all our friends ages 18 months to 92 years, even the misting had stopped. With threatening clouds everywhere— but a strip of bright sky far off on the horizon—everyone seemed to vote by telepathy (or at the very least, gutsy grins) to go for it! As risky as anything we had ever done, we pulled out the rental chairs, dragged out sound equipment and guitars, invited everyone to lend a hand, and set up at the water’s edge. Within 40 minutes of our expected start time, the wedding party began its barefoot trek to the most perfect of altars I had ever seen—a small hemp table in front of God’s beautiful creation. Shades of light orange, turquoise, and khaki graced the beach as the groomsmen, bridesmaids, bridesmen and groomsmaids (yes, you read correctly) calmly stepped to their appointed places. Finally, both parents of the groom and both parents of the bride brought in their beloved children. After seating the mothers, the two fathers found their places as pastors and officiants, and with incredible expectation in every way, the ceremony for

16 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

these two young people to start the rest of their lives together—through promise and faith— began. The portable sound equipment worked flawlessly! Volunteers shared their video and audio skills with perfection! The waves lapped at the feet of the bride’s attendants but came no further! With vows, sermon, rings and even seashell necklaces created by the couple to exchange (in lieu of the unity candle), the event was almost like a fairy-tale. During the song “Longer Than” (I kid you not), schools of fish were incredibly visible in the huge backdrop waves just as the line was sung, “Longer than there’ve been fishes in the ocean…” During this song, they took the first steps of their journey together with a brief, symbolic walk to the water’s edge. “We’ll fly through the falls and summers…with love on our wings…” That’s when the truck came barreling through. As my young son would say, “What th’ schmuggett!” Logic would dictate that it’s not very nice to crash a wedding, especially with a truck, but apparently after a day of fishing, logic does not apply. Graham and Tamara paused to stay out of the truck’s path, then came on back to their place, were blessed, pronounced husband and wife, kissed, and left the beach as a mess of seagulls took flight and the congregation was led in singing “All You Need Is Love” by the Beatles. Frankly, I think quick reflexes aren’t so bad to have, as well! With the last photos snapped by our gracious and respectful photographer, the rental chairs stacked back on the pallet, and the equipment safely loaded in the van, the mist returned. By the time we were on the road to the church, it was again pouring down rain. Apparently, God’s deal with Mother Nature had reached its limit. That was OK with us, though—nothing else mattered at this point.


BY REV. LEVI STROUD

Not even Mother Nature would ruin our daughter’s dream wedding. The love birds were on their way, but more importantly: Tamara had her dream wedding … and everyone and everything seemed to bow in deference to that dream. Let the rain come! We’ll take it—with gratitude! A lot of prayers were answered that day. As thankful as we were to our church people for lifting up those prayers, we didn’t really expect

BOWs

the Almighty to intervene with respect to the weather, but we are very sure that He did! The beach has been good to our family, and I know we will continue to enjoy its offerings for many years to come. Who knows? Maybe we’ll retire down here. In the meantime, we’ll just keep rolling with the punches and packing away the memories—

the kind that only cherished family and dear friends can make. And as for the renegade wedding-crashing fisherman? I suppose we’ll file him away in the “truth is stranger than fiction” department … or perhaps, “That which does not destroy you will make you stronger.” Or better yet, “Did anyone get the number of that truck?” €

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Interested in being a vendor? E-mail Tracy@macdaddys.com for more information. CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2017 CAROLINA SALT 17


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COADY HAGA, DVM

HEALTHY PETS

Old kitties, diabetes?

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his month, let’s focus on a malady afflicting older kitties: diabetes. There are multiple forms of diabetes. Some are curable, some are manageable and some are neither. The two main types are Type I diabetes, in which the pancreas fails to make adequate insulin; and Type II, in which the body fails to respond to the insulin it is making. This is an important distinction to make, as Type II diabetics are frequently obese and in need of nothing more than weight loss to improve their body’s response to insulin. Type I Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, as it is properly known, is a failure of the pancreas to produce insulin. There are many reasons why the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas may cease production, ranging from auto-immune disease or infection to trauma, surgery or other metabolic diseases. In a normal individual, when carbohydrates such as starches and sugars are eaten, the pancreas recognizes an elevation in blood sugar and makes insulin to process that sugar (glucose) into usable or storable energy. Insulin has some other effects on blood pH and certain electrolyte concentrations as well. Insulin is the primary hormone responsible for storing excess energy as body fat, so kitties with no insulin production are typically thin or losing weight, whereas those with excessive body fat are insulin resistant because the body becomes reluctant to store fat once there is already plenty available. This is an important point when it comes to weight control also, as keeping blood sugar levels low has a direct effect on the amount of body fat an individual makes. This is the power of the Glycemic Index. Now we know what it is. What do we look for? As in cats with kidney disease, undiagnosed or uncontrolled diabetics will frequently show a huge increase in thirst and urination, while at the same time losing weight, frequently despite a good appetite. The weight loss is due to the lack of insulin present to promote fat storage and the increased thirst is due to the high concentrations of sugar in the blood, making it syrupy and thick and making patients feel dehydrated. It is further complicated by the amount of urine being produced in order to ferry all the excess blood sugar out of the body via the urethra. Some cats are relatively normal clinically even though they are walking around with sky-high blood sugar. These kitties are a diabetic crisis waiting to happen and as soon as their ability to compensate for being out of balance runs out, they will have a system crash. Some of these cats will start urinating outside the litter box and a urinalysis will show some sugar in the urine. A simple blood panel for senior patients is a good idea once or twice a year after about age seven and can significantly improve your chances of managing this and many other diseases. So now that we’ve found it, what do we do about it? Assuming this is Type I, which is not curable by weight loss, controlling the blood glucose level is the order of the day. Typically, a diabetic has trouble keeping levels down in the normal range, but a kitty that hasn’t eaten for a couple of days may have the opposite problem, their sugar crashes dangerously low. A simple way to understand this is that eating makes blood sugar go up, insulin makes it go down. When a patient is having a diabetic crisis, it is critical to get an accurate reading of the glucose level so therapy can be focused on getting the

What do we look for? As in cats with kidney disease, undiagnosed or uncontrolled diabetics will frequently show a huge increase in thirst and urination, while at the same time losing weight, despite a good appetite. blood sugar moving in the right direction. Frequently these patients are also dehydrated and have built up toxins in their blood that alter pH among other things, so administration of balanced electrolyte solutions through IV fluids is essential. Once the crisis has passed, the management phase begins. This usually consists of a low-glycemic diet and daily insulin injections. The injections are easy to do at home and most patients do fine with them after a time. Ideally, we would check glucose levels frequently throughout the day and tailor food intake and insulin doses accordingly. This is generally not practical for several reasons—lack of a good testing unit for at-home use and the reluctance of many cats to be pricked several times a day—so alternatives must be used. Typically, a patient will be prescribed a dose of insulin, its owner will be given a list of signs to look for and an appointment will be scheduled for bloodwork to check effectiveness. In the early stages, getting the balance right can be a little frustrating. Some cats never find a happy dose, but usually once you figure out your individual pet’s needs you can remain fairly stable with your dosing. An all-day testing procedure called a glucose curve can be done in the pet hospital, during which a dose of insulin is given and the blood sugar is monitored frequently throughout the day to get an idea of when the peaks and valleys occur and how wide an area they will cover. Fructosamine is another valuable test, as its level is indicative of average glucose levels over time, so checking this can give a picture of how well a cat’s diabetes is being controlled. Once in the management phase, checking glucose curves and fructosamine levels every few months will ensure that your kitty is being well managed and can help you avoid some of the nasty complications of uncontrolled disease. As with many diseases of both humans and animals, early detection and intervention are the keys to a positive outcome. If you have an older kitty, talk with your vet about senior labwork panels, recent behavior and what to look out for. It might just save your cat’s life. €

CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2017 CAROLINA SALT 19


LIVING SHORELINE ACADEMY

TRACY SKRABAL

Living shorelines help control erosion on property

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ith 2017 upon us, it’s that time of year to reflect on New Year’s resolutions —and some waterfront property owners along the North Carolina coast might be thinking about finding the most effective way to control shoreline erosion and protect their properties. Many waterfront property owners have already taken steps to find a stronger, costeffective and environmentally friendly way to protect their properties from erosion. By choosing living shorelines, residents aren’t just using a method that only grows stronger with time, they’re choosing one that protects shoreline habitats. Living shorelines use natural materials such as marsh grasses and sometimes oysters or rock, to absorb wave energy. Bulkheads, their hardened counterparts, reflect wave energy back along the shoreline—a process that can lead to worsened erosion over time, especially during storms. Hurricane Matthew destroyed many bulkheads and caused unsightly damages that will now require very costly repairs. Sarah Williams is a homeowner who lives on Hawkins Creek in Swansboro. She isn’t sure how exactly the property was previously protected but said she thinks it was protected with pilings and low sea walls that had deteriorated over time. When faced with erosion issues, Williams instantly knew which method she wanted for erosion control. “When I noticed some erosion in my yard and needed to take some

20 CAROLINA SALT

preventative measures, I knew without a doubt that I wanted to use the living shoreline model and not install some kind of bulkhead or hardened structure,” Williams said. The North Carolina Coastal Federation began a marsh toe revetment, the process of placing oyster reef bags along the eroding marsh, in fall 2016. The construction has only recently begun, so there are no long-term results at this point, but she said the oysters held up very well to Hurricane Matthew flooding. “The oyster shells did beautifully through Hurricane Matthew,” she said. “I have never seen the water come up that high into my backyard.” The decision to build a living shoreline is an economical one, as they become stronger over time. Once marsh grasses become firmly rooted, they grow and spread while the oyster reefs strengthen from new oyster growth. An adult oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of water a day – so not only do these living shorelines protect your property, they also clean the water. In addition to their filtration benefits, living shorelines protect and create salt marsh habitats that are vital to the health of estuaries. Estuaries serve as nurseries for juvenile marine species, so by maintaining and creating new habitat and keeping the water healthy, living shorelines support fisheries and local economies. A new free online resource developed by the federation and Restore America’s Estuaries helps waterfront property owners and design

January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

professionals learn about living shorelines. Living Shorelines Academy features training modules that serve as introductory courses for those interested in learning more about living shorelines. The modules for property owners provide information about options for controlling shoreline erosion. The modules for consultants, contractors and other professionals offer basic instruction on design and construction. The website also includes a map of highlighted projects from around the country, a comprehensive list of existing living shorelines databases, a nationwide directory of professionals and an interactive forum for the living shorelines community, including property owners, to share information and learn from others. Visitors can also check out the latest shoreline stabilization research. If you want to start controlling shoreline erosion in 2017 or are ready to switch from hardened shoreline stabilization techniques, learning how to effectively do so while protecting habitats at the same time has never been easier. “I encourage everyone to use the living shoreline model as opposed to other erosion control methods,” Williams said. “I believe that if they do some research and see how they work that they will feel like I do—it’s really the only option for a healthy coastline.” Visit livingshorelinesacademy.org to learn more. For more information about this new resource, please contact Tracy Skrabal at 910509-2838. €


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Sessions range from 3 days to 2 weeks. In addition to the residential and day programs, Camp Albemarle offers specialty camps such as the Magical Mystery Tour, Leadership Camps, Service Camps, Sailing Camps, Adventure Adventure Camps, If you want your child’sTrek, summer to be meaningful ANDHome fun, Camp Free Camp and Preschool Day Camps. These camps Albemarle is the place for them to be! For over 60 years, Camp offer opportunities to get off site and explore the Crystal Albemarle has been providing exciting faith-based Residential Coast community. Adventure Trek provides that and and Day camping programs for children of all faiths. Campers the opportunity to explore all the exciting activities the swim, sail on Bogue Sound, take on the Tree Climbing Challenge mountains offer. or our Alpine Tower, and participate in sports, arts and Mark your calendars and plan on joiningofusspecially for one or environmental activitiesnow all under the supervision all of these events Camp Albemarle! selected andfree trained staffatmembers. Children learn to live, work and play together in afun caring, safe community, where These events offer for all ages and a taste of their what summer camp is like. Come and try as your hand at tree spiritual well-being is just as important their physical wellclimbing being. (March & May only), take the drop on the Giant Swing (April thedays. property, roast s’more over Sessions rangeonly), from hike 3 to 10 In addition to aour regular aresidential campfireand or play in Bogue special SoundAdventure on a sailboat, or day programs, Campskayak provide stand up paddle board (May only). opportunities to backpack, climb, and raft in the mountains and then head back to the coast for other great activities.

CALL TODAY FOR INFORMATION!

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CAMPALBEMARLE.ORG Camp Albemarle is a non-profit corporation. Scholarships (camperships) are 2017 available. CarolinaSalt.com » January / February CAROLINA SALT

21


Upcoming Free Events & Programs at Fort Macon

BHA’s Annual Membership Meeting

ort Macon State Park at 2303 East Fort Macon Road in Atlantic Beach is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The bookstore and museum are open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort tours take place Monday through Friday at 11 a.m. For further information call 252-726-3775 or visit ncparks.gov/ fort-macon-state-park.

o you recognize this photo? Do you know what it is or the history behind it? Join the Beaufort Historical Association’s annual membership meeting to see a presentation of old Beaufort images and learn the stories they carry with them. Members and prospective members are invited to join the Beaufort Historical Association for the Annual Membership Meeting and potluck dinner Tuesday, January 24, at 6 p.m. in the Ann Street Methodist Church Eure Building at 500 Ann Street in Beaufort. After a brief meeting, the 2016 Volunteer Awards will be presented. Following the potluck dinner, a brief business meeting and presentation of volunteer of the year awards, there will be a special presentation from Bobbie Young and Chris Sabiston who will share a collection of old Beaufort photographs during an interactive presentation, getting you to guess where the photo was taken. For more information on the upcoming Membership Meeting or to nominate volunteers, stop by the Visitors Center at 130 Turner Street, call 252-728-5225 or visit beauforthistoricsite.org. €

F JANUARY 9

Bird Hike

[ 9 AM ] Meet at the Visitor Center and take a leisurely hike to identify

birds native to the area.

JANUARY 11, 18, 25 | FEBRUARY 1, 8

Musket Firing Demonstration

[ 10 AM ] Learn about a Civil War era musket’s history, loading

procedures and firing. Meet in the fort. JANUARY 13

Astronomy

[ 5:30 PM ] Meet at the bathhouse to view space through a telescope and

D

learn more about our universe. JANUARY 19

Natural Side of Fort Macon

[ 10 AM ] Meet in the Visitor Center lobby for a leisurely hike exploring

the natural side of Fort Macon. Hike will cover both trail and beach. FEBRUARY 1

Friends of Fort Macon Monthly Meeting

[ NOON ] Meet at the Golden Corral (Dutch treat) in Morehead City

for the Friends of Fort Macon’s monthly meeting. News and upcoming events and projects will be discussed, and a guest speaker will have a 30-45 minute presentation. FEBRUARY 6

Flags of Fort Macon & the Confederacy

of flags used by the confederacy during the War Between the States. € [ 10 AM ] Meet at the Fort Visitor Center to learn about the wide range

22 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

your life on the Crystal Coast B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

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CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

HOOKED UP FISHING REPORT

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION A H O O K E D U P L O O K A T W H A T ’ S B I T I N G I N J A N U A RY

J

anuary can be a tough month for fishermen due to the weather, but it typically offers some mild days that make for a great time on the water! We have a few species that remain here along the Crystal Coast regardless of how cold it gets and they must eat! So make it one of your New Year’s resolutions to explore our beautiful backwaters and enjoy some fishing this January.

SPECKLED TROUT

To be consistently successful landing speckled trout during the winter months it’s important to pay close attention to the location and fish the right baits. By January, the water temps are usually fluctuating between 40 and 50 degrees, depending on the weather patterns, time of day and proximity to the ocean. These cold water temps push our wintering populations of trout into the ocean or into deeper channels and creeks in the backwaters. Anglers can find plenty of small trout (10–15") in the deeper holes around the inlets. But, the majority of our speckled trout, including many larger fish, can be found hunkered down along rock jetties or in mainland creeks, whether immediately off the ICW and sounds or up our rivers. Since location is key to finding winter populations of speckled trout, before your next trip this January study a map of creeks in your target area and make a plan to carefully dissect one creek each trip. Regardless of which area you’re fishing, you’ll need the right baits. If you’re fishing deep water around the inlets and jetties you’ll want to use a 3/16 to ¼-oz. jig head when tipped with a soft bait. A few of my go-to soft baits for targeting specked trout include Berkley Gulp’s 3" smelt minnow, 4" shrimp and the 5" jerk shad. Bett’s ¼-oz. Halo Shad and Halo Shrimp are also excellent baits for Speckled Trout. If fishing shallower creeks or areas with little to no current, I switch to a 1/16 to ⅛-oz. jig head to allow them a moment to suspend after each twitch. In these locations Mirrolure’s MR17 will produce some incredible strikes. Although large wintering trout can be very finicky, they love a slow sinking or suspending bait.

REDFISH

ichael caught their Frank Jones and his friend M ile fishing the limit of 2 to 3-pound trout wh Jeff Cronk Swansboro area with Captain late this December.

When looking for redfish this January, anglers should focus on the surf zone when we have sunny days with northerly, northwesterly or westerly breezes. The surf will lay down flat, allowing anglers to approach the surf zone, while sunny skies will allow anglers to see through the water and spot schools of redfish moving along the surf. Once located, these fish will usually strike any soft bait that’s been cast into the school. I like a ½-oz. jig head tipped with a Berkley Gulp 4" Shrimp. When we have multiple warm days some of these schools of redfish will move through the inlets and scour the shallow flats and bays behind our beaches in search of food. So, anglers can also spend time on the trolling motor quietly moving through these shallow bays looking for reds. Once located, it’s usually no problem to hook up with plenty of reds ranging from 3 to 7 pounds. It’s important to use little to no weight with your baits because most of the shallow flats will have a thick, green algae covering the bottom during winter months. I like to rig a 4" Smelt Gulp Minnow on a 1/16-oz. jig head or a 5" Smelt Gulp Jerkshad on a weightless hook (weedless). Whether you’re looking for trout or reds this January one thing is true. The weather may slow many anglers down but, these fish must eat! If you put the time in you can have a successful fishing trip this January!

PRODUCT NEWS

FISH’N 4 LIFE CAPTAIN JEFF CRONK

leads fishing and nature charters on the Crystal Coast. To get out on the water with him, call 910-325-8194. You can also visit him online at nccharterfishing.com.

SpiderWire braided lines outcast and outlast other brands! Many fishermen, like myself, have switched over to braided and super lines over the past decade. These lines have definite advantages—such as abrasion resistance and strength—that far exceed mono lines. As a diehard tournament fisherman and professional fishing guide, I’ve used many types of braided line in attempt to hook and land more fish. With over 150 days a year on the water an currently over 80 top five tournament wins, I’ve come to depend on several braided lines offered by SpiderWire. Whether I choose from SpiderWire’s EZ Braids, Stealth Braids or Ultra-Cast Braids, I know that only the best technology and most advanced high molecular weight PE fibers qualify for their braided lines. This ensures SpiderWire designs the ultimate fishing lines, for ultimate performance! Based on over 30 years of professional experience I can honestly say that these braids outcast and outlast any other braid I’ve ever used! You can check out SpiderWire braided lines at spiderwire.com. € CarolinaSalt.com » January / February 2017 CAROLINA SALT 23


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST W H A T ’ S U N D E R W A T E R I N J A N U A RY

B

ecause most of December had above normal air temperatures, with many days in the 70s, the water didn’t cool off as it would have normally. The offshore water temperatures ranged from 64 to 70 degrees, depending on the offshoots of the Gulf Stream. The inshore water temperatures ranged from 59 to 64 degrees. In January, we can expect the water temperatures to be in the low 60s offshore and in the mid to upper 50s offshore. December did not have typical diving conditions. Even though the ocean had many calm days and the dive charter boats were able to get out, the visibility was below the normal for the Crystal Coast. Because most of December had above normal air temperatures, with many days in the 70s, the water didn’t cool off as it would have normally. The offshore water temperatures ranged from 64 to 70 degrees, depending on the offshoots of the Gulf Stream. The inshore water temperatures ranged from 59 to 64 degrees. The offshore water temperatures are typically in the low 60s; inshore temperatures are usually in the mid to upper 50s in January. Some divers will be wearing drysuits, but it is still warm enough for most to wear 7mm wetsuits.

EQUIPMENT BASICS: THE DIVE COMPUTER When divers took their Open Water (Beginner) class, they learned how to use dive tables to determine how long they could stay down during a dive and to determine how long they could stay down on their second and third dives. The dive tables provide a numeric and alphabetical representation of the amount of nitrogen the diver has accumulated in their tissues. A diver needs to know how long the dive lasted and how deep they were to use the dive tables. The diver gets this information by using a dive watch and a depth gauge. As divers begin their diving adventures, they begin to accumulate dive gear. One of the first pieces of gear that divers usually get is a dive computer. Dive computers can be worn on the wrist or they can be mounted in the gauge console. Divers choose their first dive computer by looking at the selection at their local dive shop and by asking other divers which ones they use. Most look at the display to make sure that the information is easy to read. The information usually displayed is depth, actual dive time and remaining dive time. Added features could include the water temperature, ascent rates or a countdown for the safety stop. Most computers today can be set for air or enriched air (nitrox). As divers get more experience, they might upgrade because they need a computer with more features.

WHEN IS IT TIME TO UPGRADE? Features that experienced divers might look for are the ability to use multiple gases or to put in deep stops to aid in the off-gassing of nitrogen. Some computers allow the user to put transmitters on up to 10 other divers to monitor their air supply. Instead of asking other divers to see their pressure gauge, the diver with the computer can look at their display to keep track of their buddy’s air supply. Most dive computers displays have a gray background with black numbers. Some of the newer computers have color displays that make reading the information easier in low light. In addition to the color displays, some new dive computers have touch screens that allow the diver to switch displays using touch instead of having to push buttons that might be difficult while wearing gloves. New computers provide the diver with more information during the dive and even more information about the dive when the dive profile has been downloaded. Dive computers use algorithms to determine how long the diver can stay at depth and depending on the conservative factor, the amount of time varies. When choosing a dive computer, divers should research what type of algorithm is used to determine the bottom times. The two types of algorithms are Empirical and Theoretical. Empirical algorithms are determined by using numbers from actual dives or results determined by testing in recompression chambers. Theoretical algorithms are determined by using mathematical models based on theory on how the tissues will react with nitrogen under pressure. Both algorithms have been proven safe to use. Choosing a dive computer with a particular algorithm is personal preference on whether a diver prefers to be a hands-on type of person with actual testing or the type of person that has a mathematical background that likes theories. If you are considering a new dive computer and would like more information on features, or if you’d just like to take some of the new equipment you got for Christmas for a test drive, contact Discovery Diving at dive@discoverydiving.com or 252-728-2265. Like us on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up in the near future. € 24 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org.


JANUARY 7 TO FEBRUARY 7

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NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL FEDERATION

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JANUARY EVENTS

NCCF COMMUNITY-WIDE EVENTS H O W YO U C A N H E L P I N J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7

JANUARY 14

Coastal Cleanup Kickoff at Hoop Pole Creek

[ 10 AM–NOON ] Join the North Carolina Coastal Federation at the Hoop Pole Creek Nature

Trail in Atlantic Beach. Volunteers will help to pick up assorted trash and debris items along the trail and adjacent shoreline. Hoop Pole Creek is a coastal creek, salt marsh and maritime forest preserve rich with oysters, fish and other wildlife. This event is part of a statewide kickoff for the federation’s Lost Fishing Gear Recovery Project. Since 2014, the federation has received funding from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Debris Program to hire commercial fishermen to recover lost crab pots from North Carolina’s internal coastal waters. In 2016, the North Carolina General Assembly appropriated additional money to this project, to facilitate a statewide expansion and hire greater numbers of commercial fishermen starting in January 2017. This entire event will take place outdoors, so dress accordingly. Sturdy shoes for walking in wet areas are also recommended especially boots and/or waders if available. Trash bags, gloves and other clean up materials will be provided. This event may not be the best working conditions for young children. Anyone under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. Pizza and refreshments will be provided for all volunteers after the cleanup! For more information on the cleanup, visit nccoast.org/event/2017-kickoff-clean-coast-hoop-pole-creek/.

Join the North Carolina Coastal Federation at the Hoop Pole Creek Nature Trail in Atlantic Beach. Volunteers will help to pick up assorted trash and debris items along the trail and adjacent shoreline.

JANUARY 21

The Red Clay Ramblers In Concert

[ 7:30 PM ] Join us for a special concert from the Tony Award-winning The Red Clay Ramblers!

The band, which is in its 45th year, is holding the concert in Joslyn Hall at Carteret Community College. Concert proceeds will benefit the North Carolina Coastal Federation and the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum & Heritage Center. The federation is celebrating its 35th anniversary in 2017 and the museum is celebrating its 25th. The Red Clay Ramblers have made several earlier highly acclaimed appearances in Carteret County, including a performance at Croatan High School in March 2012; at the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum & Heritage Center in May 2009; and for the Coastal Folklife Project in Beaufort in November 1991. Ramblers’ pianist Bland Simpson has also made numerous appearances in Carteret County with his, Don Dixon’s and Jim Wann’s musical King Mackerel & The Blues Are Running. Personnel for the January Ramblers’ shows will be: Clay Buckner (fiddle, harmonica); Chris Frank (guitar, accordion, tuba, trombone); Jack Herrick (bass, bouzouki, trumpet, pennywhistle); Rob Ladd (drums); and Bland Simpson (piano). The Red Clay Ramblers shows are noted for great humor, high energy and wide-ranging repertoire, as The New York Times observes: “The Red Clay Ramblers are a musical group whose eclectic repertory is that of a fantasy roadhouse band from a vanished rural America. Bluegrass, New Orleans, classical folk and gospel sounds emerge in nutty profusion from these talented instrumentalists and singers.” There are no online ticket sales for this event. Tickets can be purchased at the federation office at 3609 N.C. 24 in Ocean or the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum at 1785 Island Road on Harkers Island. Prices are $23 for federation members, $28 for non-members. Student tickets can be purchased for $12. They can also be purchased over the phone by calling the federation at 252-393-8185. Don’t miss the chance to bring family and friends for a fun performance from this exceptional North Carolina group. Learn more about The Red Clay Ramblers at redclayramblers.com.

Join us for a special concert from the Tony Award-winning The Red Clay Ramblers! The band, which is in its 45th year, is holding the concert in Joslyn Hall at Carteret Community College.

JANUARY 24

Oyster Bagging Volunteer Workday

[ 10 AM–NOON ] At the North Carolina Coastal Federation Office (Ocean). The NCCF invites

community members and volunteers to help bag oyster shells at our headquarters office in Ocean. During the event, volunteers will be filling mesh bags with oyster shells that will be used to build oyster reefs in the spring and summer. The bags will be placed along shorelines to protect them from erosion and create valuable habitat. Volunteers are needed to cut, tie, lift and stack the shell bags. These events are suitable for adults and supervised children over the age of 12. Snacks are provided. Volunteers should dress in layers for the weather and in clothes that are comfortable but that can also get dirty. Volunteers should also wear closed-toe shoes or boots that fully cover their feet. These oyster shell bagging events are part of a living shoreline project. For more information on living shorelines, check out the Living Shorelines Academy. The Living Shorelines Academy is an online exchange of information that encourages the use of environmentally friendly living shoreline erosion control practices to protect valuable waterfront property. For more information visit nccoast.org/event/oyster-bagging-volunteer-workday-5/. € 26 CAROLINA SALT January / February 2017 » CarolinaSalt.com

The NCCF invites community members and volunteers to help bag oyster shells at our headquarters office in Ocean.


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Carolina Salt January 2017  
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