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FREE! AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2019

your life on the Crystal Coast

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE

HEATWAVES AFFECT OUR WILDLIFE! HURRICANE SEASON

DISASTER RESPONSE HISTORY IN PLAIN SIGHT

BACK TO SCHOOL

BLACKBEARD:

A STORY WITHOUT AN ENDING

THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR LOCAL AUTHOR EVENT

SECOND SATURDAY AUTHOR EVENT LOOK INSIDE ON PAGE 8 FOR FUN & FREE

THINGS TO DO


—Home of the Crystal Coast Steam Pot—

Enjoy a coastal casual atmosphere comfortable for the whole family. We offer a variety of fresh seafood including all your favorites from sea and shore, from shrimp and clams to Angus beef, plus an extensive gluten-free menu and plenty of desserts.

www.SnapperzSteamBar.com JOIN US IN

NOW WITH 2 LOCATIONS!

3710 ARENDELL STREET

LUNCH, DINNER AND KIDS MENU ALL DAY!

The Boat Bar

MOREHEAD CITY • 252.240.1313

JOIN US IN

The Oyster Bar

8106 EMERALD DRIVE

EMERALD ISLE • 252.354.5722


Discover a different world

GO PRO! LOVE YOUR JOB! TRAVEL! OUR CAREER SCUBA DIVING PROGRAMS ARE ELIGIBLE FOR USE OF YOUR GI BILL® BENEFITS. Our school is nationally accredited by ACCET, which also allows NC National Guard to use Tuition Assistance for these programs.

414 ORANGE STREET » BEAUFORT » 252.SCUBA.OK » discoverydiving.com


Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner All ABC Permits

BREAKFAST NOW SERVED UNTIL 2PM ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY!

8302 Emerald Drive • Emerald Isle • 252.424.8284

ENTERTAINMENT at TRADING POST

AugustEntertainment AUGUST 10

4EverAll AUGUST 17

Big Drink Music Co. AUGUST 22

Naked Knees AUGUST 24

Ryan Cain AUGUST 29

Gene Gregory AUGUST 31

Amani Smith & The Give Thanks Band Find us on Facebook or TheTradingPostEI.com for specials and upcoming events.

TheTradingPostEI.com


MID-AUG U ST TO M I D-SE PT E M B E R 2 0 1 9

Inside This Issue your life on the Crystal Coast

12 It’s The Most Wonderful Time of the Year (Back To School!) Kim Murdoch has a hilarious take on the actual most wonderful time of the year for parents of school-aged kids: back to school!

13 Second Saturday Author Series The library welcomes four distinguished and celebrated authors, one a week, from August through November starting with Helen Aitken.

15

WILDLIFE SHELTER: Heatwaves Affect Wildlife!

are easy to recognize along our shoreline, and their meat is highly prized by diners.

FREE!

AUGUST

/ SEPTEMBER

2019

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14 Ask the Aquarium: Stone Crabs With their elegant black-tipped claws, stone crabs

AN EN

August / September ON THIS MONTH’S COVER

As the summer reaches its peak, many residents and visitors to the Crystal Coast have discovered the delights of taking a kayak paddle around our waters.

15 OWLS: Heatwaves + Wildlife These scorching heatwaves have affected more

than just the people in our area, they’ve affected the animals as well.

17 Disaster Response The best time to respond to a disaster is before it

happens. Hurricane season is here, and now is the time to develop a disaster plan.

18 Blackbeard! Natalie Taylor shares tales of our local famous pirate, Blackbeard in this month’s History in Plain Sight.

LOCAL INTEREST

13 SECOND SATURDAY The library welcomes author Helen Aitken.

18 BLACKBEARD History in Plain Sight shares tales of our famous pirate, Blackbeard.

Things To Do................................................ 8 Rebecca’s Corner: Parasailing........................ 13 A Moment of Reflection. . ............................... 16 Diving Our Coast.. ....................................... 20 Tides. . ........................................................ 21

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2019 CAROLINA SALT 5


PUBLISHER

WILL ASHBY C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

C H E V Y K AY LO R B E C O M E A C O N T R I BU TO R

Submit your letters to the editor, photos, community listings and articles to will@carolinasalt.com. The editorial deadline for the next issue is August 16. The next issue publishes September 7.

B E C O M E A N A DV E RT I S E R

Carolina Salt is a great way to reach out to your local customers, as well as our seasonal visitors.

252-723-7628

Call us to find out how we can help you grow your local business. FROM THE PUBLISHER

Thank you for picking up Carolina Salt magazine, all about our life here on the Crystal Coast. Our articles are written by locals. Every month we look to our readers to keep our magazine fresh. If you have a story to tell, an event to promote or an interesting local photograph, send them our way. Participation is welcomed and appreciated. Reader contributions are the founding principle of the magazine. If you like what you see, tell people about it— especially our advertisers. For questions, concerns or more information, send e-mail to will@carolinasalt.com or call 252-723-7628. For up-to-date info, be sure to look us up on Facebook!

WE DEPEND ON OUR READERS! Call 252-723-7628 if you’re interested in submitting an article or photo. Our local content is what keeps our magazine fresh and relevant. PUBLISHED BY CRYSTAL COAST OUTDOORS PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 572, Morehead City, NC 28557 | 252-723-7628


A casual island eatery with a touch of class.

LIVE MUSIC AT FLIPPERZ! August 23 Music Night with Naked Knees!

SEAFOOD ♥ STEAKS ♥ SANDWICHES 311 Mangrove Drive Across from CVS in Emerald Isle 252.354.7775 • flipperz.net • facebook.com/flipperzemeraldisle


THINGS TO DO

MONDAYS, THURSDAYS

Stand-up Paddleboarding for Kids at the Aquarium [ 9–11AM ] Youths explore Bogue Sound on a

stand-up paddle board with an instructor to guide. During this adventure they will learn about the plants and animals that call the Roosevelt Natural Area home. Ages 6 and up. Pre-registration is required. At the Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. Call 252-247-4003.

✪ ✪ AUGUST 9–11

BEAUFORT PIRATE INVASION

Prepare to be boarded in Beaufort from August 9–11 as the town recreates the pirate invasion of 1747. Reenactors, vendors and locals in regalia abound.

AUGUST 9–11

Beaufort Pirate Invasion

The Beaufort Pirate Invasion is the reenactment of an event that happened in Beaufort in 1747, when the town was caught up in a battle to defend itself from Spanish privateers. Blackbeard is also part of our local history and the wreck of Queen Anne’s Revenge is here to prove it, along with many other tales and legends of the notorious pirate. This annual event was created in 1960 to highlight this unique and historical victory. The story unfolds on the waterfront at Taylor’s Creek, throughout town and around pirate encampments. Professional pirate reenactors, villagers and merchants roam throughout town creating a historical and piratical presence for pirate enthusiasts of all ages to enjoy.

AUGUST 9

Beaufort Picture Show: ‘Woodstock’

[ 5PM, 8PM ] Beaufort Picture Show is a non-profit

✪ AUGUST 9

ASTRONOMY AT THE FORT

Come out to the Beach Access from 9–10 p.m. for a night of astronomy with Ranger Paul Terry. Telescopes will be set up. If you have a telescope, feel free to bring it.

organization formed to showcase a broad range of notable films that enrich lives, engage minds and build community. The early show is at 5 p.m.; the late show is at 8. Location: 1354 Lennoxville Road, Beaufort. For information, text only to 252528-7395.

AUGUST 9

Golden Pirates on the Silver Screen: ‘Treasure Island’ Golden Pirates on the Silver Screen is a new monthly movie series at the Maritime Museum in Beaufort. The museum will show five different movies, all starting at 6 p.m. in the museum’s auditorium. Treasure Island (1950), rated PG, will show on August 9. Admission is free and everyone who attends all five showings will receive a free pirate hat.

AUGUST 9

Astronomy at Fort Macon [ 9–10PM ] Come out to the Beach Access

✪ AUGUST 14

MOVIES IN AB: SMALLFOOT

Free outdoor movie from 8:30–10:30 p.m. at the Atlantic Beach Town Park at 915 West Fort Macon Road. Parking, snacks and restroom available. Bring a chair or blanket. 8

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

(bathhouse) parking lot at Fort Macon and join us for a night of astronomy. Ranger Paul Terry will discuss the night sky and we will have telescopes set up for viewing the heavens. This is a clear weather event. If you have a telescope, feel free to bring it. No pets please. Location: 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. Call 252-726-3775 for more information.

CAROLINA SALT August / September 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

AUGUST 10

Swansboro Hook & Bones Redfish Open

Swansboro Parks and Recreation and Hook and Bones clothing and water lifestyle company are proud to present the 2019 Hook and Bones Redfish Open slated for August 10, 2019. The tournament weigh-ins and awards will take place at the Pugliese Pavilion in Olde Towne Square located on the corner of Front and Church Streets. The event will feature cash payouts for the top anglers, based on boats fishing, including a guaranteed first place payout of $5,000. In addition to main event winnings there is a $300 Hook & Bones early entry cash award for those registered by 5 p.m. on July 31, as well as contingency cash and prizes from sponsors, trophies and plaques. Coastal Conservation Association will be hosting a free youth fishing tournament in conjunction with the Hook and Bones Redfish Open. Kids fishing from land, boat or kayak will compete in multiple age groups for prizes including longest redfish, trout, flounder and many more! Awards will take place in Swansboro, but kids can fish at any inshore location. For more information and registration visit the tournament website at ccancfishingforthefuture. com or Facebook at CCA NC & Hook and Bones Fishing for the Future. The public is encouraged to attend live weigh-ins from 3 to 4 p.m. followed by the Fishing for the Future awards ceremony at 4 p.m. Awards for the Redfish Open will be at 5. There will be fun for the entire family with music, giveaways, vendors, games and a chance to meet teams and anglers. Children activities will be available. TUESDAYS, SATURDAYS

Roosevelt Natural Area Paddle Trip at the Aquarium [ 9–11AM ] Explore tidal flats and quiet backwaters

as you become aware of the intricate web of life thriving in this pristine natural environment. The Aquarium provides the canoe or kayak. Ages 8 and up. $30 At the Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. Call 252-247-4003.

AUGUST 10

Summer Concerts In The Fort: Morehead Brass Consortium

[ 1PM ] All concerts are free although donations are

most welcomed. Doors open early for picnickers and all who want to take in the beautiful setting. Just in case it rains the concerts will be held inside the Visitor Center at the Fort. Morehead Brass Consortium will play pop and classic tunes. Location: 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. Call 252-726-3775 for more information.

AUGUST 10, 17, 24, 31

Jaycee Park Summer Concerts [ 7–8:30PM ] The Morehead City Parks and

Recreation Department sponsors a free summer


✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

concert series from Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day Weekend on the beautiful Morehead City Waterfront at Jaycee Park (807 Shepard Street).

limited; call the park office in advance to register. Location: 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. Call 252-726-3775.

August 10............................ Calico Creek Bluegrass band August 17............................................................Naked Knees August 24.................................................................... Kudubai August 31...................................................................... 4EverAll

Sleep with the Fishes at The Aquarium

AUGUST 11, 18, 25

Swansboro Waterfront Cruise [ 5–6PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation is

partnering with Lady Swan Boat Tours to offer a summer cruise series that will run for the summer! Join us aboard the Lady Swan on Sunday afternoons for a 1-hour relaxing and scenic cruise around historic downtown Swansboro, the intracoastal waterway and nearby Huggins Island, a part of Hammocks Beach State Park. Enjoy the sights and sounds of being on the water and if you’re lucky you may get a glimpse of some local wildlife. For more information call 910-326-2600. Departure Location: Main Street dock, downtown Swansboro. Check in is at 4:45 p.m., departure is at 5 p.m. Tour ends at 6. Cost is $10 per person; children under 2 years old are free. AUGUST 12, 26 | SEPTEMBER 9

Bird Hike at Fort Macon

[ 9–10AM ] Meet at the Fort Macon Visitor Center

and take a leisurely hike to identify birds native to the area. Location: 2303 East Fort Macon Road, Atlantic Beach. Call 252-726-3775 for more information. AUGUST 12, 19, 26

Kids Night Out at the Aquarium [ 6–10PM ] Drop your kids at the aquarium for a

AUGUST 14–15, 21–22, 28–29 | SEPTEMBER 4–5

Roll out your sleeping bag by the Living Shipwreck as sharks, eels and fishes swim just inches away. Snacks, pizza dinner, breakfast, programs and Aquarium tour are included. Cost is $50. At the Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. Call 252-2474003.

Movies in AB: ‘Smallfoot’

[ 9AM–NOON ] Learn about local history while

hits on our giant inflatable movie screen! We have moved our free summer movies from the Circle to the Atlantic Beach Town Park located at 915 West Fort Macon Road. The park offers ample parking, restrooms and snacks available for purchase at our concession stand! Bring a chair or blanket. Rain date is Thursday night.

on the water. Basic instruction and safety lessons are followed by a relaxing paddle through a salt marsh. Participants must know how to swim and some kayak experience is recommended. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult; not suitable for children under 12. Cost is $35 ($20 with own kayak). Pre-registration required; register at 252504-7758. Location: 315 Front Street, Beaufort.

AUGUST 15, 22, 29

[ 8–11AM ] Learn to catch the big ones from the

Alive at Five is held in Jaycee Park on the downtown Morehead City waterfront. Bring your lawn chairs and blankets and join us for music and dancing. Beer, wine and sodas are available for purchase at the event. Jaycee Docks are available for boats to dock for free throughout the concert on most Alive at Five days. Stay tuned to the Downtown Morehead City, Inc. Facebook page as we continue to announce this year’s lineup. Questions? Contact Downtown Morehead City, Inc. at 252-808-0440 or info@ downtownmoreheadcity.com. See y’all downtown!

surf with hands-on instruction. Equipment, bait and licensing requirements are covered. Ages 10 and up. Cost is $25. At the Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. Call 252-247-4003.

AUGUST 15

EmeraldFest: ‘Naked Knees’ [ 6:30–8PM ] The town’s popular EmeraldFest

AUG 15, 22, 29

[ 1–4:30PM ] Sign your kids up to work with a

Park Ranger at Fort Macon to earn their Junior Ranger patch. This event is for children age 6–12 who must be accompanied by an adult. Space is

AUGUST 16

Alive at Five Outdoor Concerts: ‘Bounce’

Fishing Fanatics at The Aquarium

outdoor concert series is back again this summer, with concerts on the oceanfront at the Western Ocean Regional Access (located off Islander Drive). Please bring your friends, lawn chairs or a blanket and enjoy some great music from several different genres!

Junior Ranger Day

AUGUST 16

[ 8:30–10:30PM ] Enjoy your favorite blockbuster

fun night filled with animal interactions while you enjoy a night out on the town. Snacks and pizza dinner are included. Ages 4-12. Cost is $40 At the Aquarium in Pine Knoll Shores. Call 252-2474003. AUGUST 14

and scenic cruise around historic downtown Swansboro, the intra-coastal waterway and nearby Huggins Island, a part of Hammocks Beach State Park. Enjoy the sights and sounds of being on the water and if you’re lucky you may get a glimpse of some local wildlife. The cruise will end watching a beautiful Swansboro sunset. Call 910-3262600 for more info. Be sure to visit our website at swansboro.recdesk.com to register for events. Departure from Main Street dock, downtown Swansboro. Tour ends after sunset. Cost is $10 per person; children under 2 years old are free.

Kayak the Salt Marsh

AUGUST 14

THINGS TO DO

Swansboro Sunset Cruise

[ 7:30–8:30PM ] Swansboro Parks and Recreation

is partnering with Lady Swan Boat Tours to offer Thursday Sunset Cruises. Join us aboard the Lady Swan on Thursday evenings for a 1-hour relaxing

AUGUST 17

Diamond City Homecoming [ 10AM–3PM ] This year’s celebration will be

bringing together the descendants of Shackleford Banks who migrated to Salter Path, Promise Land and Harkers Island to celebrate the 120th Anniversary of the Storm of 1899 that drove their ancestors to higher ground. At 1785 Island Road, Harkers Island.Call 252-728-1500 for information.

Nautical Collection E X C L U S I V E LY D E S I G N E D B Y

VERANDA SQUARE | EMERALD ISLE | CHURCHWELLS.COM 1-800-846-1961 | 252-354-7166

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2019 CAROLINA SALT 9


THINGS TO DO

AUGUST 17

Shark Tooth and Shelling Expedition

[ 8AM–NOON ] Come join us for a relaxing paddle

to surrounding islands to scavenge for beautiful shells, shark teeth and other beached goodies. Call 910-326-2600 for more info. Be sure to visit our website at swansboro.recdesk.com to register for events.

AUGUST 19

Fellowship Night: Paint Night [ 6:30–7:30PM ] This program welcomes adults

AUGUST 17

SHARK TOOTH EXPEDITION

Enjoy a relaxing paddle to surrounding islands to search for shark teeth and shells. Call 910-326-2600 for more information or visit swansboro.recdesk.com.

of all abilities to come together for a fun evening with a rotating theme or activity scheduled every month. This program is geared towards adults with special needs and will be held once a month as an after dinner/evening group. We extend this invitation to anyone who is in their senior year of high school and above. Call 910-3262600 for more info. Be sure to visit our website at swansboro.recdesk.com to register for events. AUGUST 20

PHOTO BY TODD V. WOLFSON

2019 Carteret County Parks & Rec Beach Run Series

JULY 15–16

DELBERT McCLINTON

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FA

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Mark your calendars for the Carteret County Parks and Recreation Beach Run Series. Join in the fun with a run on the sand. Offering 1 Mile, 5K or 10K. Fun for the entire family. No running experience needed. All ages and skill levels welcome!! All runs take place on the beach at the Atlantic Beach Circle. For more details and to register and pay online, visit: ccpr.recdesk.com or call 252-808-3301.

AUGUST 23

Beaufort Picture Show: ‘Amazing Grace’

[ 5PM, 8PM ] Beaufort Picture Show is a non-profit

organization formed to showcase a broad range of notable films that enrich lives, engage minds and build community. Beaufort Picture Show is the premier destination for cinema and cultural events on the Crystal Coast. The early show is at 5 p.m.; the late show is at 8. Location: 1354 Lennoxville Road, Beaufort. For information, text only to 252528-7395.

AUGUST 24–25

Intro to Wooden Boat Building

Explore the art of boatbuilding in this two-day, hands-on course. Students age 16 and up begin with lofting and move on to the setup, steam bending and different methods of creating the backbone of small boats. They also learn planking methods, both carvel and lapstrake and use of appropriate fasteners. After two days, students will have the knowledge, skill and confidence to choose a design and style of boat to build on their own. Cost is $135). Advance registration is required. Register by calling 252-504-7758.

AUGUST 31 – SEPTEMBER 1

Arts & Crafts Fall Show

Juried sale of arts and crafts of coastal artisans held three weekends in a year. Show will be held at Katherine Davis Park on Arendell Street in Morehead City. This is the perfect occasion to browse and buy the work of coastal artists and craftsman. For information call 252-726-9156. AUGUST 31

Delbert McClinton

[ 8–10PM ] The Grammy Award-winning artist is

at the top of his game with his 19th studio album, Prick Of The Litter. The new offering captures the balance of soulful energy and restraint that the legendary performer has been delivering in his live performances for decades. Location: 3505 Arendell Street, Morehead City. For information or tickets call 252-726-1501. SEPTEMBER 7

Newport Community Festival and 5K Run 2019 [ 10AM–2PM ] Face Painting by Independent

Airbrush. Touch A Truck, Mini Food Truck, Rodeo, Hands on Demonstrations, Performing Arts, Crafts and Living History Demonstrations, Bounce Houses, Police Department and Fire Department Displays. Don’t miss out on the all the fun! Free admission! You may start signing up now for the 5K at runtheeast.com. Location: 200 Howard Boulevard, Newport. For more information call 252-223-4749.

august Special LE

O

This Grammy Award-winner performs from 8–10 p.m. at 3500 Arendell Street in Morehead City. For information or tickets call 252-726-1501.

EM

✪ = FREE

MID–AUGUST TO MID–SEPTEMBER

O ADE C

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Stir a little love into everything you do. coffee • local baked goods • gluten-free choices

banana

nut latte

16- $ oz.

3.50

open every day from 7am–3pm •252.354. 2643• Emerald Plantation •8700 Emerald Drive

10 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

FREE


LOL!

KIM MURDOCH

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year

N

o, silly, not Christmastime. I’m referring—as any good parent who has owned a school-aged child over the last ten years would know—to that FABULOUS commercial that starts airing around the beginning of August. You know the one: the dad is riding a shopping cart down the school supply aisle, kicking up his heels, grinning like a fool, tossing pencils and packs of paper into the cart with more glee than a gaggle of tweens at a Justin Bieber concert. Trailing behind him are his two young kiddos walking as if they are marching the Green Mile to their own certain deaths. It’s beyond awesome. As the school year is upon us again—at lightning speed I might add (Summer? I barely knew ya.)—it gets me to thinking about the beginning of the new school year, the excitement of new opportunities, new challenges, the hope of new possibilities. Not for the kids, though. For me. See, I’m not one of those uber-organized moms. I find putting things away … tedious. Not nearly as tedious as climbing through closets to find shoes or upsetting the delicate balance of Mt. Laundrymanjaro on top of the dryer to find a matching pair of socks (which is almost always at the bottom of the pile AND toward the back), but tedious enough to find any reasonable distraction under the sun to keep from doing it. Therefore, I’m a pile-er, a stack-er, a shove-er, a joker, a smoker, a midnight toker. Oh, wait. Not those last two. Anyway, as a result of my OCD (Organizationally Challenged Disorder), school mornings around my house are, to say the least, chaotic. They generally start late, with me screaming for the kids to come downstairs because I got distracted by the morning news. (Okay, it was Facebook. Whatever.) Then begins the mad rush to put together a quick breakfast. By “breakfast” I mean Pop-Tart and by “put together” I mean Frisbee them across the table to each kid’s napkin like a Vegas blackjack dealer. While they are eating, I dash to the laundry room to fish out something that matches—preferably clean, but desperate times call for desperate measures—and work diligently to get the wrinkles out (set my dryer to “fluff”). While the dryer is ironing their clothes, I run back to the kitchen to empty out their lunchboxes from the day before (I know, I know) and scan the refrigerator and cabinets for some reasonable combination of vittles to pack for the girls. It’s easy for The Boy. Nutella sandwich. Every. Single. Day. (It’s funny, he always asks for dessert in his lunchbox. I’m like, “Dude, you took a CHOCOLATE sandwich to school. How am I supposed to “dessert” that?”) Breakfast and an armful of hot clothes later, the kids and I are in a panic to get dressed, hair brushed, teeth brushed, lunches gathered, backpacks snagged up … With mere moments to spare, we run out of the door toward the car and … SHOES! No one has shoes. Well. There went our “moments to spare.” 12 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

Believe it or not, most mornings we actually make it to school on time. Mad, flustered, squealing into the parking lot on two wheels … but on time. This year, though, THIS year is going to be the year I finally get it right! We are going to get up on TIME (Facebook, you will have to wait until 8:30 from now on). The night before, clothes will be laid out. CLEAN, IRONED CLOTHES, with SOCKS … and SHOES. Breakfast will consist of hot scrambled eggs, toast and fresh juice and will be served on PLATES (no more Fart for us, no sirree bob). Lunch optional items will be organized in specific areas of the refrigerator and pantry (right beside the Nutella) and empty lunch boxes will be on the counter waiting to be filled with healthy, delicious meals for those precious little tummies. Hairbrushes will be placed on the bathroom counter along with the detangler and a bow for Baby Girl. Toothbrushes and the kid toothpaste will be beside the sink. My sweet, fresh-faced, children—dressed and ready for school—will gently kiss their Daddy good-bye on his cheek and then gather their lunchboxes and backpacks. On the leisurely ride to school, we’ll talk about our plans for the day, share little bits of wit and wisdom and, as they exit the car to go off to school, they’ll each give me a little smooch and tell me that I am the BEST mother in the world. Oh, did I mention I’d be wearing pearls? Yeah. Right. Like THAT’S gonna happen. Fart, anyone? I personally find that the Frosted Strawberry Pop-Tarts play the best. They taste so yummy AND the frosting gives them a bit of an aerodynamic edge over the unfrosted kind. And I’m TOTALLY going to be on Facebook first thing in the morning. Bingo Blitz is ROCKING at 7 a.m. There’s hardly ANY competition! Come the end of August, I guess I’ll be seeing you at the END of the school drop-off line. I’ll be the one in the tan minivan yelling at her kids and still wearing pajamas … pearls optional. €


Author

Author

ANNIE RAINS

CURT FINCH

Author

Author

BARBARA CLAYPOLE WHITE

HELEN AITKEN

FREE Bagel

with purchase

of Bakers Dozen

Second Saturday Author Series

T

BY HELEN AITKEN

he Friends of the Western Carteret Library (FOL) invites the public to attend the Second Saturday Author Series. Four programs will take place on the second Saturday of each month, August through November, in the Annex, the new library addition. The series includes writer Helen Aitken, local author Curt Finch, award-winning author Barbara Claypole White and USA Today bestselling author, Annie Rains. Authors will sell and sign their books at the event. Having a capacity of 125-150 people, the Annex will be used for workshops, lectures, visiting authors, presentations and next year, as the home to the Storytelling Festival, part of the summertime reading program. The Annex construction was made possible through FOL fundraising and the Carteret County Commissioners’ dedicated funds. The first speaker in the Second Saturday Author Series is Helen Aitken, writer and columnist. Her presentation, “Healthy Humor,” and will briefly discuss humor writing on August 10 at noon, with a barbecue/chicken lunch. Curt Finch will speak on September 14 at 2 p.m. He is the author of The Accusation, The Accident and The Agnostic. A dessert buffet accompanies the event. The third author, Barbara Claypole White, is the award-winning author of The Unfinished Garden, The In-Between Hour, The Perfect Son, Echoes of Family and The Promise Between Us. An English-style Tea precedes the event on October 9 at 2 p.m. The last author to speak is Annie Rains, the USA Today bestselling author of the contemporary romance novels Christmas on Mistletoe Lane, Springtime at Hope Cottage, Snowfall on Cedar Trail and others. A complimentary book will be given to the first 50 series ticket purchasers. A luncheon precedes the speaker at noon on November 9. The Friends of the Western Carteret Library support library programs and their needs with fundraisers such as the Author Series and selling used books at Second Chances in the library. FOL memberships are available at the library or Second Chances. Series tickets are available for $100 each and are transferable or $35 for space available tickets to each event. Tickets may be purchased at the Western Carteret Library or by contacting Diane Schools at dschools1@ gmail.com or by calling 252-354-2916. Western Carteret Library and the Annex is located on 230 Taylor notion Road in Cape Carteret. For more information, contact the library 252-393-6500 or Gina Funk at funkgina@gmail.com. €

Located at Jackie’s American Grille 9106 Coast Guard Rd • Emerald Isle, NC

Tues - Sat, 7:30am - 11:00 am (954) 913-9401

BY REBECCA JONES AUTHOR OF ‘CHANGING TIDES’ AND OTHER BOOKS

P

arasailing from the waterfront in Beaufort lets you experience the best views imaginable as you parasail like a kite in the sky. You are attached to a specially designed canopy wing that resembles a parachute known as a parasail wing. The harness attaches you to the parasail, which is connected to the boat. The boat takes off, carrying you into the air. When you are high above the Crystal Coast you realize how incredible the earth really is. When you land you feel weighed down after experiencing the freedom. That is how life is sometimes. You had dreams, but put them on a back burner. Maybe you were afraid to get near your dream - afraid you would fail. But your wings already exist. All you have to do is fly. For those determined to fly, having no wings is just a little detail. Beyond even the darkest clouds the wide, open, blue sky goes on forever. Trust, let go and allow yourself to take flight. Today is the day to take hold of your dreams. The bad news is that time flies. The good news is you are the pilot. Mark Twain once said, “The air up there in the clouds is very pure and fine, bracing and delicious. And why shouldn’t it be? It is the same air angels breathe.” Release what weighs you down. Let it fly away. Leonardo Da Vinci said, “When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the Earth with your eyes turned skyward.” There is freedom waiting for you on the breezes of the sky. But you say, “What if I fall?” But I say, “Oh, but what if you fly?” €

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2019 CAROLINA SALT 13


ASK THE AQUARIUM

NCAQUARIUMS.COM/PINE-KNOLL-SHORES

We found a crab with black tips on the end of its big claws. What kind of crab could it be?

T

he black pincers on the end of the claws is the giveaway for this crotchety crustacean —it’s a stone crab. These heavy-shelled, thick-bodied crabs are easily recognizable by the dark. brown-black tips on their front claws. In some areas, the dark ends of the pincers give the crab the nickname black fingers. The claw meat is highly regarded by seafood lovers and is much sought after as a food source in some parts of the country. Stone crab claws are particularly popular on Florida menus. These sturdy crabs can grow to measure 5 inches across. The oval shell is a sort of brownish-red with gray spots and tan underneath. The pincers are heavy and unequal and have different functions. The large, blunt-edged claw is used to hold and crush food. The smaller saw-edged claw is used to pinch, rip and tear prey. If handled carelessly, the claws are powerful enough to crush human fingers. The walking legs are heavy and hairy. The stone crab is the largest member of the mud crab family and is slower moving and less aggressive than the blue crab. Unlike the blue crab, it does not swim. Adult stone crabs are commonly found tucked in rock jetties or stony, coral crevices, but they also inhabit deep burrows dug into soft bottom sediments. Young crabs are found in grass and shell bottoms of channels. These hefty crabs prey on barnacles as well as small oysters and clams. The heavy claws can easily crack the shells of smaller mollusks. The claw meat of stone crabs is considered a delicacy and the harvest is regulated in most states. In many states only the larger claw may be taken. The claw is broken off and the live crab is returned to the water, where it will regenerate a new claw in about two months. Some consumers consider the claw meat to be a bit more stringy and not nearly as sweet as the Atlantic blue crab. €

Stone crab claws are favorites on many Southern seafood menus PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK HOOPER FOR THE NC AQUARIUM

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W

ith the onset of scorching heat waves, summertime can become a deadly season for all living things. We are very aware of the negative impact extreme heat has on vulnerable human beings in our communities, but we might be in the dark when it comes to knowing what harm may be going on with the wildlife experiencing near-lethal temperatures that lead to drought and loss of food. June and July topped out with recordhigh temperatures and we never know when they will hit again! The Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport has admitted a few distressed wildlife due to dehydration which symptomized with staggering, loss of balance and confusion. Good Samaritans recognized that something was wrong and that those cottontails, squirrels and birds needed help. The same things that can happen to humans in sweltering heat happens to wildlife as well—dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Hot weather may cause natural water sources to dry up, meaning birds and other wildlife will be left without anything to drink, but we can help them by providing safe, alternative water sources. Turning your outside spaces into temporary homes for nature is doable with actions like freshening and topping off your birdbath daily or creating a makeshift pond from a washtub or putting down a saucer filled with water. These three simple acts could offer a vital lifeline to some of backyard critters. Some people hang a “drip jug” over their bird bath, which is a plastic milk jug filled with water with a tiny hole in the bottom. The birds hear the dripping and the sound attracts them for a cool bath and a drink. Leave shallow dishes, which are safer for smaller animals who could drown in deeper containers, in areas where animals are protected from predators. That means keeping your pets away from this area so the animals can drink undisturbed. A few more tips on providing life-saving water are: clean the receptacles daily to prevent the spread of disease, don’t place the water to close to bushes or trees to minimize predation but do utilize a shaded area to keep the temperature of the water down and keep the water source away from any feeding areas to prevent the water from getting mucky. Along with the clean drinking water you are providing, birds will also be able to bathe which is vital to keeping their feathers in good condition for flight. Regularly watering your plants and gardens will be a lifeline for butterflies and bees. If your plants die, so will the butterflies and their buzzin’ buddies. If your ground area is drying and rules in your community limit grass watering, birds like Robins, Blackbirds and your turtles and frogs will not be able to access earthworms that will tunnel deeper into the ground for safety. A great substitute for earthworms is canned dog

LINDA BERGMAN–ALTHOUSE

OUTER BANKS WILDLIFE SHELTER

HEATWAVES Affect Wildlife!

or cat food provided on a flat plate in your yard. Or if you agree with the birds that worms are best, mealworms from the pet store or bait shop can carry them through the hot times. We usually see birds and squirrels coming to our feeders and water sources during the day, but in the evening and during the night other wildlife such as opossums, raccoons or foxes will visit our makeshift habitat for water and whatever they can find to stay alive. Keep in mind that summer is Baby Season, so wildlife moms and dads will be doing what they need to do to stay alive so they can continue to care for their offspring. They might even bring their youngsters into your safe haven for food and drink. For those of you with pools in your backyard, you might consider covering the pool or providing an island or incline for animals to crawl out if need be. Hot animals trying to beat the heat or quench their thirst can drown in pools so taking away that access or providing an exit can save lives. Please keep an eye out for heat-stressed wildlife. If you spot any critters who look like they’re struggling, call the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport or your own local wildlife organization for help. Be particularly mindful at dusk and at night as many nocturnal animals will be more active during this time. Prepare an emergency kit to keep in your car including water, a blanket/towel and a box. Put a few local wildlife rescue contacts in your phone so you can call for advice if you need it. If you do come across a wild animal who is visibly distressed, wrap them loosely and place them in a cardboard box and place the box in a dark, quiet and cool place. If your distressed wildlife is categorized as a rabies vector species (raccoon, fox or bat), do not touch or pick it

up and call a wildlife rehabilitation shelter immediately. This is for the animal’s safety, as well as your own. Also, DO NOT wrap heat stressed animals in wet towels or submerge in water — this can kill them. Remember, when you sit back and relax with a tall, ice-cold drink, often times enjoying the sunny weather, our backyard birds and other wildlife might not be having such a good time. Most humans have a variety of ways to cope with a heat wave, but animals don’t have those luxuries of running water, airconditioning or places to escape the sweltering environment. So, let’s help our feathered, furred, scaled or shelled friends in any way we can, including offering them a cold one! Water, of course! Cheers! €

ABOUT OWLS TAKE A TOUR of the facility at 100 Wildlife Way in Newport. To volunteer, call 252-240-1200. If your organization would like to learn more about wildlife, our education animals jump at the chance!

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2019 CAROLINA SALT 15


A MOMENT OF REFLECTION

PAUL ORTIZ

WHAT WILL YOU DO WITH WHAT YOU KNOW AN ISLAND CHURCH PERSPECTIVE

T

here are a lot of ideas in the world today of how to get to God. Many have come up with all sorts of thoughts and ideas on the subject. Some of these ideas are just out of the mind crazy. Some are so out there; it is hard to keep a straight face when presented with the interpretation. A sad reality is that many are still searching or woefully have landed on a very wrong understanding. It cannot be said of anyone the answer remains hidden from them. In Acts 17, around the time of 50-52 A.D., the apostle Paul is in Athens. He is troubled to find the city full of idols. The apostle Paul made a point to reason with locals who were God-fearing. At one point, he finds himself to be in dispute with a group of Epicurean and Stoic philosophers. This is what happened: Some of them asked, “What is this babbler trying to say?” Others remarked, “He seems to be advocating foreign gods.” They said this because Paul was preaching the good news about Jesus and the resurrection. Then they took him and brought him to a meeting of the Areopagus, where they said to him, “May we know what this new teaching is that you are presenting? You are bringing some strange ideas to our ears and we want to know what they mean.” Paul stood up in the meeting of the Areopagus and said: “Men of Athens! I see that in every way you are religious. For as I walked around and looked carefully at your objects of worship, I even found an altar with this inscription: TO AN UNKNOWN GOD. Now what you worship as something unknown I am going to proclaim to you. The God who made the world and everything in it is the Lord of the heaven and earth and does not live in temples built by hands. And He is not served by human hands, as if He needed anything, because He himself gives all men life and breath and everything else. From one man He made every nation of men, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and He determined the times set for them and the exact places where they should live. God did this so that men would seek Him and perhaps reach out for Him and find Him, though He is not far from each of one of us. For in Him we live and move and have our being. As some of your own poets have said, “We are His offspring.” Therefore since we are God’s offspring, we should not think that the divine being is like gold or silver or stone—an image made by man’s design and skill (ACTS 17:18-29). Paul proclaims to them what they had not understood or worse, had overlooked. He proclaims the God of the Bible, the One True Living God! He is making known to them what they had not known before. This group of deep thinkers made it their life to sit around every day and discuss the latest ideas while in pursuit of knowledge. The sobering fact was, they really had no real knowledge. In all their discussion, they had not yet discovered the truth. The truth that if believed on, would set them free. But the apostle Paul has now given context to their searching and now because of his proclamation of God and the reality that Jesus had come to live a perfect live, die a sinner’s death and now is raised to life and sitting at the right hand of God; they are without excuse. Their ignorance had come to an end! The next verses clear it up: “In the past God overlooked such ignorance, but now He commands all people everyone to repent. For He has set a day when He will judge the world with justice by the man (Jesus Christ) He has appointed. He has given proof of this to all men by raising Him (Jesus Christ) from the dead” (ACTS 17:30-31). This is the true reality we live in! Every person alive is aware of the God of the Bible. In Romans 1:18-20, this same apostle makes the statement that we are without excuse. We see the evidence of God in creation and it has been made plain to all men. God’s invisible qualities, His power is seen throughout this creation. With this knowledge, your and my time of ignorance is over and now we must choose what to believe. If there were no God, then why like so many atheists would there be argument against Him. Some have woefully chosen. Prior to Jesus, salvation was found in God’s mercy. After Christ’s life, death and resurrection; He is now the necessary object of saving faith. The question for you is, what will you do with what you now know? What will you do with Jesus? € 16 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com

THE ISLAND CHURCH PASTOR PAUL ORTIZ

Paul Ortiz is a follower of Jesus Christ, not religion. A husband and father, he is pastor of The Island Church in Emerald Isle. Reach him at paul@TheIslandChurchEI.org


PUBLIC SERVICE MESSAGE

CRYSTAL COAST CAREFUL!

The Best Time to Respond to a Disaster Is

BEFORE IT HAPPENS

HURRICANE SEASON IS HERE. NOW IS THE TIME TO DEVELOP A DISASTER PLAN. DEVELOPING AN EMERGENCY PLAN CAN HELP YOU TO PROTECT, PREPARE AND RESPOND MORE CALMLY IN THE EVENT OF A DISASTER.

TAKE INVENTORY • Develop an inventory list for your home to document your valuables, complete with pictures or video if possible. This list is key when filing an insurance claim in the event of loss or damage. • Place important documents (social security cards, birth certificates, passports, titles or deeds, wills, insurance documents) into a waterproof container that you can grab quickly in case of an evacuation.If you are computer savvy, make digital copies and place them on a portable drive that can be stored in an offsite location, with a reputable online data storage company or an online backup service. This will ensure that your vital documents available in the event of damage.

THE EMERGENCY PLAN • Review area evacuation routes and determine a primary and alternate route to be used in the event of an evacuation. • Identify meeting places to be used in the event that you are unable to return home. • Make plans for pets. • Put together a list of emergency phone numbers: police, fire and rescue, utility companies, insurance providers, family, friends and co-workers. Program them into your cell phone and make a print copy. • Keep in touch. The American Red Cross has a “Safe and Well” website to help families keep in touch after a disaster.

THE EMERGENCY KIT At a minimum, have the basic supplies listed. Keep supplies in an easy-to-carry kit that you can use at home or take with you in case you must evacuate. Kits should be inspected annually to ensure items are not missing or out

of date. • Water (one gallon per person, per day) • Food (nonperishable) • Flashlight • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio • Extra batteries • First aid kit • Medications (7 day supply) and medical items; ice for medications that need to be kept cool • Multipurpose tool • Sanitation and personal hygiene items • Change of clothes • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information—see “Take Inventory”) • Cell phone with chargers • Family and emergency contact information • Extra cash • Emergency blanket • Map of the area • Baby supplies • Pet supplies (collar, leash, food, carrier, etc.) • Ziplock bags to protect items, medications and documents from moisture damage • If staying home, be sure to have supplies such as tarps, plywood, ropes, fasteners, sandbags, generator with extra fuel and cleaning supplies • Be sure that your vehicle has a full tank of gas and an empty gas container.

TEST YOUR PLAN Planning and doing are two different things. Review and test your plan to be sure that you and your family are ready to respond. Involve all family members, including children. When you develop a team approach everyone understands the plan and helps each person feel more secure. €

eBooks For the first time, our regional library system is offering eBook titles

Visit carteret.cpclib.org & click on OneClickDigital!

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2019 CAROLINA SALT 17


HISTORY IN PLAIN SIGHT NATALIE TAYLOR

BLACKBEARD 

A STORY WITHOUT AN ENDING

18 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com


A

UGUST, 1718. The bottle hit the deck. Its short fuse ignited the gunpowder packed inside and a melee resulted amongst the deckhands. A black cloud of smoke hovered over the ship; deckhands collided with each other in the mass confusion. They all knew what the attack meant, though it was still a shock when first one boot, then another stepped down onto the ship’s gunwales. He climbed aboard the vessel adorned with holstered pistols, his velvet overcoat laden with a sash which clanged and jingled with an allotment of chains, knives and swords. His beard—a source of pride—covered his face near up to his eyes. He had twisted its long length into braids tied with black ribbons. Smoldering cannon fuses extended from beneath his hat, framing his face, the smoke rising from him as if he were created by the explosion itself. Blackbeard. Even the name incited fear, for he was the most ferocious pirate ever to live. Once he fired his pistol under the table, shooting his first mate in the kneecaps—just to let his own pirates know how malicious he could be.

QUEEN ANNE’S REVENGE During Queen Anne’s War in the early 1700s, the man who would call himself Blackbeard was known as Edward Teach. Unable to support a navy during this long period of strife, some countries contracted private vessels and provided their captains with Letters of Marque—what amounted to a license for piracy. Their pay was whatever pillage the privateers could obtain. The man they called Teach began his career raiding ships of the Caribbean as a privateer for Queen Anne, stealing cargo and sometimes whole ships from France and Spain. By the end of Queen Anne’s War, Blackbeard had developed a taste for piracy. He sailed under another pirate until he commandeered the French ship La Concorde for himself—a ship he renamed Queen Anne’s Revenge. What was a Letter of Marque, anyway? To Blackbeard, just a piece of paper. Blackbeard attacked at dusk, often sailing under the same country’s flag as his prey, until the last moment when he hoisted his own Jolly Roger. After disorienting the crew with makeshift grenades, Blackbeard and his brigands ransacked the ship for whatever valuable cargo they could obtain. Over the course of months, Blackbeard built up a flotilla of pirate vessels. Moving away from the Caribbean islands, he blockaded the busy port at Charleston, South Carolina, for days. He held wealthy society members hostage—threatened harm to them all until at the last minute he was able to obtain his ransom: a chest of medicine, along with the personal effects of his hostages. In June of 1718, Blackbeard and his fleet were prowling the waters of what is now called Beaufort Inlet. Blackbeard ran Queen Anne’s Revenge aground on a sandbar; the masthead splintered. The ship’s timbers began to give way. Blackbeard made his escape aboard another ship with all of his treasure as the Queen Anne’s Revenge sank to its watery preserve. Blackbeard then made his way toward Bath, North Carolina, where a Royal Pardon awaited. He left two dozen of his men marooned on an island, taking off on a ship he called Adventure.

HE WAS SUPPOSED TO BE RETIRED August, 1718. As the smoke from the bottle grenade began to clear, the pirate crew boarded the merchant ship. Then Blackbeard made his dramatic, intimidating entrance. His brutal, heavy footsteps traversed the vessel. He and his pirates ravaged the stores, searching for anything valuable.

The merchant ship didn’t have much in coin or jewels aboard, but it did have plenty of cotton and sugar and it was towing an empty vessel. The pirates ordered the merchant crew and passengers to board the empty ship and sent them on their way across the Atlantic. For as evil a reputation as he built for himself, Blackbeard rarely took prisoners or resorted to violence—as long as his victims gave up their loot. Back at his home in Bath, along the Pamlico River, the local townspeople tolerated Blackbeard’s antics because his pirated products were less expensive than true imports. When he brought this merchant ship back full of cargo there was an inquisition. Blackbeard was adamant that he had found the ship abandoned; he was retired, after all. He had accepted the royal pardon. Of course, there were rumors—never proven. There were rumors that Tobias Knight, a local customs officer and Governor Eden had been persuaded to disregard any illegal activities that Blackbeard may have been involved with. There were rumors of a secret passageway between the homes of Blackbeard and Governor Eden. Rumors that, for a few hogsheads of sugar and cotton, officials looked the other way while Blackbeard enjoyed his lavish lifestyle of women, liquor and parties.

NOVEMBER 22, 1718 Lieutenant Robert Maynard waited just inside Ocracoke Inlet. Blackbeard and other pirates were having a raucous bonfire at Teach’s Hole off Ocracoke Island. The party had been going on for days. Word of the pirate bash had made its way all the way to Virginia, where the governor ordered a Royal Naval crew led by Maynard to put an end to Blackbeard’s reign. At high tide, the pirates aboard Blackbeard’s ship Adventure waited for Maynard’s attack. As the Navy ships began to approach, Blackbeard ordered his ship straight ahead—straight toward land! At the last moment the Adventure slipped through a narrow channel between the beach and a sand bar, but Maynard’s ships bored into the underwater obstruction. One of the Navy ships was destroyed. The other was stuck. “Unload everything, lighten the load!” Maynard commanded. His crew threw food and supplies overboard until the sloop was able to pass over the sand bar. Blackbeard attacked them with cannon fire and Maynard ordered his men below deck. They pretended to have succumbed to Blackbeard’s attack. When the pirates boarded the Royal Navy sloop, Maynard’s crew appeared wielding guns and swords. Battles broke out all over the ship. Maynard and Blackbeard met face to face. Amidst grunts and clangs, Blackbeard fought with all of the viciousness he was capable of. Injured, bleeding from sword, knife and gunshot wounds, Blackbeard kept fighting. His crew members dropped around him, but the fight in Blackbeard was as ferocious as his pirate attacks. Blackbeard took another blow and another and kept fighting even with his neck slit, until finally he dropped with a thud to the deck. Maynard attached Blackbeard’s head to the bowsprit of his ship to take back to Virginia—sure proof that he was really dead. Blackbeard’s nefarious reputation still follows him 300 years after his death. It is said that Blackbeard’s Ghost can still be seen near Teach’s Hole, looking for his head. €

CarolinaSalt.com » August / September 2019 CAROLINA SALT 19


DISCOVERY DIVING

LEE MOORE

DIVING OUR COAST

W

W H AT ’ S U N D E RWAT E R I N AU G U S T

JOIN DISCOVERY CONTACT

Discovery Diving at 252-728-2265 or visit them on Facebook to see what classes and events are coming up. You can also visit them online at discoverydiving.com.

JOIN ECARA ECARA

works to continue sinking ships to create artificial reefs here in North Carolina, but their resources are limited. To get involved, visit carolinareef.org.

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arm, blue water was present on the inshore and offshore wrecks in July. In August, the water temperatures should be in upper 70s on the bottom, while the surface temperatures should remain in the low 80s. The wrecks and ledges will continue to see a wide variety of marine life, ranging from game fish to tropical fish commonly seen in the Caribbean. Most wrecks are south of Beaufort Inlet, some are north of Cape Lookout, including the British Splendour. Built by 1931 by Palmers Shipbuilding & Iron, it was owned and operated by the British Tanker. It was powered by a diesel engine that operated a single screw and had a speed of 10 knots. The British Splendour is a 441-foot tanker in 110 feet of water. The highest part rises to about 75 feet. The wreck lies upside down with most of the bow and stern intact. The chain locker is broken open on the starboard side. The stern is broken open at the engine room on the starboard side. There is a large cam shaft on the opposite side of the stern. On March 30, 1942, the British Splendour left Houston with 10,000 gallons of gasoline that needed in England. It was scheduled to meet up with a convoy in Halifax, Nova Scotia. By April 7, the British Splendour was approaching Diamond Shoals off Cape Hatteras. About a half mile off of her starboard bow, the HMS St. Zeno, an armed trawler, was providing an escort. At 10:15 p.m., U-552, under the command of Korvettenkapitän Erich Topp, fired a single torpedo into the port side on the ship, just aft of the engine room. The torpedo destroyed the stern superstructure and the skylight in the engine room was blown off, killing 12 men on duty in the stern of the ship instantly. The stern started to slip below the water almost immediately. The radio operator immediately started sending out distress calls. The remaining 41 crewmen escaped in three lifeboats and a raft. HMS St. Zeno searched for U-552, but was unable to locate it. HMS St. Zeno returned to pick up the surviving crewmen and took them to Norfolk. The British Splendour drifted for several hours before finally sinking. If you would like to learn more about the wrecks and marine life off of the Crystal Coast, contact Discovery Diving at dive@discoverydiving.com, 252-728-2265. €


AUGUST 7 TO SEPTEMBER 7

CAPE HATTERAS TIDE CHART

200

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EMERALD ISLE • 252.354.6592 VILLAGEMARKETOFEI.COM 22 CAROLINA SALT August / September 2019 » CarolinaSalt.com


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Carolina Salt August 2019  

Your Life On the Crystal Coast

Carolina Salt August 2019  

Your Life On the Crystal Coast

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