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W O R G

CAROLINA FOR KIBERA 2015 Annual Report


GROW

OUR MISSION TO

To grow—physically, spiritually, economically, socially—is an exercise in patience and willpower. It takes time and energy, both of which are scarce when daily life in Kibera feels like a constant struggle to survive. Our staff members know this. That’s why they make it their mission to ensure everyone gets a chance to grow. CFK continues to experience growth of its own. We have enhanced the quality of our services and extended them to more people. We discovered new ways to address familiar problems. We redesigned programs to make them more effective. We strive to be a nimble and dynamic organization, one focused on learning, community partnership, and moving forward responsibly and effectively—we strive to grow and flourish. Over the past year, your support has helped Kiberans grow:

27,340 PATIENTS

210 PREGNANT WOMEN

3,040 SOCCER PLAYERS

95% REPAID MICRO-LOANS

2,310 GIRLS

67 SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

seen at the Tabitha Medical Clinic, 1,000 more from last year in the CFK Champions League, an 85.9% increase reached through the Daughters United program, up by 32.8%

registered under new Care Group health model (pg. 19)

to Kiva Zip, 3 percentage points higher than last year reached through new exposure visits (pg. 6)

We are incredibly thankful for your support in helping Kiberans reach opportunities they could not access otherwise. Join us as we continue to grow, listen, and learn in the years to come. Tuko pamoja (We are together),

Jennifer Coffman & David Mshila, Board Chairs

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CAROLINA FOR KIBERA provides opportunity in three areas that are fundamental to personal and community growth:

HEALTH

Ensuring that individuals can face each day with strength is essential for the health of the community.

SOCIAL

Preparing youth for the future requires education both in school and outside of it.

ECONOMIC

Having secure finances creates a solid foundation to explore even more opportunities.

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SOCIAL 4

SPORTS ASSOCIATION EDUCATION PROGRAM DAUGHTERS UNITED


DEPTH& BREADTH

Last year, our social programs underwent impressive growth. The Sports Association registered more teams than ever before. Daughters United began leading discussions in schools, reaching 50% more girls. The programs grew wider, but also more profound. Daughters United added a new photography training program, and began after-school outreach sessions, while the Education Program focused on providing education for the most at-risk youth in Kibera, both inside and outside of the classroom. 5


JEFFREY

“If anything is going to change someone’s life instantly, it’s education because of the opportunities and work ethic it provides.”

ADVOCATING FOR AFFORDABLE EDUCATION When Jeffrey Okoro stepped into the role of CFK’s Education Program Officer last year, he embraced it with vigor. After all, he was a recipient of a CFK scholarship himself. “Since I was one of them, I know how vital it is to provide opportunities to youth.” He also took on the challenge of shaping the program so that it reaches those aspiring students who need access to education the most.

When CFK’s Education Program first began, the program awarded over 400 scholarships per year—back then, the only requirement was appropriate grades. Over time, CFK realized they could make greater impact by shifting the program's focus to target the most at-risk youth in the community. This led to a greater commitment to educate students outside of school as well, providing mentorship, skill trainings, and consequently a new level of depth for each youth. “Often when we say education, people think solely academic. But education is also about daily life.” He continues, “If anything is going to change someone’s life instantly, it’s education

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because of the opportunities and work ethic it provides.”


MENTORING GIRLS ABOUT FINANCE AND LEADERSHIP Before she joined Daughters United, Zuhura was a “big spender,” always spending her spare money instead of saving it. Daughters United changed that. “I like to have possessions, but I learned that it’s important to save instead of eating your money.” Learning about savings with other girls led to Zuhura’s interest in finance, which she is avidly pursuing at St. Paul’s University in Nairobi. “People are surprised that, as a girl, I’m doing finance. So what if I'm a girl?” she retorts, laughing.

much more than just how to save money. “Binti taught me how to take care of myself as a young girl, make friends, and become a leader.” On the weekends, Zuhura teaches other girls about leadership and confidence and helps build their self-esteem. And she’s helping them learn to save as well. She organizes 7 Safe Spaces for girls in her home village of Makina in Kibera. “My Safe Spaces are open centers for girls. They come with problems and leave with solutions.”

“ Daughters United has changed the community. It helps girls know they have the potential to do the same things men can do.”

ZUHURA

Daughters United (Binti Pamoja in Kiswahili) taught Zuhura

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3,040 1,760

8

PLAYERS

in soccer league

MATCHES

held between teams


1,070 1,240

40 121

GIRLS

reached through after school program

GIRLS

in Daughters United Safe Spaces

MEMBERS

of jump rope team

SCHOLARSHIPS

for students

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ECONOMIC 10

NAIROBITS PARTNERSHIP TAKA NI PATO WORK READINESS


EVALUATION& RE-CREATION Growth can be thrilling, but sustained success

requires reflection on the best way forward. CFK’s Economic and Entrepreneurship Department (EED) has been flexible this past year to do just that. We’ve added new programs that focus on formal employment and computer skills, while we’ve designed new methods to ensure sustainability and support systems for small business owners. With new roots, EED is ready to take its impact to the next level. 11


STELLA

“When you meet young people who have taken initiative and gotten a job, it’s a step towards thinking beyond the day-to-day.”

CONNECTING ENTREPRENEURS WITH RESOURCES When it comes to economic issues, Stella has faith in people’s resourcefulness. “People learn how to take advantage of opportunities wherever they are.” As the leader of CFK’s Economic and Entrepreneurship Department, she is brainstorming creative ways to connect Kiberans with those opportunities. She’s behind a new partnership with Nairobits, through which girls learn hard skills in IT, graphic design, and web design. Why girls? “They face so many challenges throughout their lives,” explains Stella. “At the center, they learn skills that set them up for success but they also learn about reproductive health, confidence, and other things as well.”

Stella is also behind the Work Readiness program, which connects Kiberans to job opportunities outside Kibera. These can, with hard work, lead to other possibilities as well. It’s all about preparation and being ready for what life throws at you. “The world we live in is very fluid. Anything can happen at any time.” Stella is helping

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Kiberans—and CFK—to be ready.


Cynthia and Bernice share a lot in common. They’re both the eldest of 3. They both stay in Kibera. They also both believe that the chance for a better life is reliant on having correct information. And they both put this belief into practice. Bernice is passionate about spreading the word about healthy reproductive health methods for women, while Cynthia is interested in starting her own mentorship and career counseling business when the time is right.

When they heard about CFK’s new partnership with Nairobits, they eagerly sought it out. “We are in a digital world,” explains Cynthia. “Having computer skills is important to get a job.” Now they’re in the third month of their classes at the CFK-Nairobits Girls Center. “Right now we’re being taught practical skills about web design,” says Bernice. And they both appreciate that they can learn these vital skills alongside other girls. “Girls are looked down on a lot,” says Cynthia. “That’s why this opportunity is so important.”

“Rather than stay at home doing nothing, why don’t I go to school and benefit myself?”

CYNTHIA & BERNICE

STUDYING WEB DESIGN FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

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60

14

YOUTH

recruited for computer classes


$20k 95%

LOANED

to entrepreneurs

REPAID

Kiva Zip micro-loans

780

EMPLOYED

youth for slum clean-ups

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HEALTH 16

TABITHA MEDICAL CLINIC COMMUNITY HEALTH NUTRITION CENTER SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH


VARIETY& EXPANSION Growth is a central goal of personal, organizational, and community health. With help from partners, CFK began new initiatives last year, including providing ultrasounds and pregnancy counseling for young mothers. We also expanded existing programs—our community health outreach doubled its geographic reach! A community’s growth and strength starts with the health of its members.

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YUNUS

“An outsider can’t convince others like peers can.”

ESTABLISHING COMMUNITY HEALTH NETWORKS Yunus remembers what it was like to have people come into his village of Laini Saba and make false promises. “People would come in, give money, take photos, and say goodbye, never to be heard from again.” He has made it his mission to lead projects by the community for the community, thus providing a thoughtful, engaged structure where organizations can participate as collaborators and make meaningful, long-term investments. “In order to grow, that’s how you have to do it,” he explains. “An outsider can’t convince others like peers.” Instead, committed partners can learn from, grow with, and support community projects, in the process starting to erase the “insider-outsider” dichotomy.

Yunus applies that philosophy to his work managing the Community Outreach Project of CFK. He works with all Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) to extend health access and education to Kiberans. Though the project can be overwhelming at times, Yunus remains optimistic. “You cannot work in the community when you’re gloomy,” he jokes.

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“If you don’t wear your smiles, who will listen to you?”


Bentado lives in Gatwekera, one of the largest villages of Kibera, and she knows every house. “The community knows me as a teacher. It takes time to change their minds, but they do.” Akuku lives nearby and is also a respected figure.

That’s because both women are Community Health Volunteers (CHVs), as well as the leaders of Care Groups (CGs) in Gatwekera. As CHVs, they go door-to-door in their community and provide accurate health information about many topics to their neighbors. And as group leaders, they mentor pregnant women, teaching them about proper nutrition before and after the women give birth. Bentado and Akuku both reach 15-20 women in their groups every week, often meeting in their own houses. But the information doesn’t stop there. “The active members tell their neighbors about what they’ve learned,” says Akuku. “After a while, you become a trusted friend.”

“We must empower them to make sure they can take care of themselves.”

AKUKU & BENTADO

EDUCATING WOMEN ABOUT REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

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3,222 3,178

20

TESTED

and counseled for HIV

CHILDREN SCREENED

for malnutrition


27,340 249

13,509

PATIENTS SEEN

at the Tabitha Medical Clinic

WOMEN SCREENED

for cervical & breast cancer

DE-WORMED

& given Vitamin A supplements

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PLAN!AN ALY ZE! DE SIG N! D

MONITORING & EVALUATION

At the heart of every effective organization is data. In order to grow, we believe it is

crucial to recognize the start of the journey and the endpoint. Over the past year, we’ve expanded our Monitoring and Evaluation efforts in order to stay accountable to ourselves and the Kibera community.

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! PLEMENT MAINTAIN ! IM EST

!T

OP EL EV

M&E Expanding our


HOLDING CFK ACCOUNTABLE Onesmus has a destination for CFK’s Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) structure—and he’s helping us get there. His mandate: collect clear data, analyze it, learn from it, and improve programs and scale impact. While data can’t resolve the complexities of development on its own, it certainly helps. “Good practices easily increase your

With over 5 years’ experience working with M&E systems, Onesmus has put together structures to help CFK learn from its actions and create change in the community. His method: implement program by program because each requires its own framework and ongoing evaluation for improvement and responsiveness. After all, Onesmus recognizes that establishing a solid foundation is the most important aspect of a robust M&E system. “One step is better than no step at all,” he explains. “Even if we start small and then grow big, that’s better than not moving.”

ONESMUS

chances of creating change. One of those practices is M&E.”

“Development is a complex process. You can’t prescribe a road map for someone and guarantee that it will get them there.”

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FINANCIALS 24

Last fiscal year was a landmark year for Carolina for Kibera. Through your generous gifts, we reached an important milestone in the path of any organization: raising over $1,000,000. As always, we work diligently to ensure that your donation fosters growth and opportunity in Kibera. Part of being good stewards of your gift involves fueling new endeavors, such as our new project to bring health information to women of childbearing age. Another part involves strengthening the programs that consistently reach Kiberans every day. Lastly, we strive to hold ourselves accountable to you, our supporter, a sentiment which has led directly to our heightened focus on monitoring and evaluation. By continuing to grow upwards and outwards while also reinforcing our financial foundation, we will provide locally-designed solutions and opportunities for Kiberans for many years.


Our PARTNERS enable big impact at the lowest possible cost.

REVENUE & EXPENSES

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2015* REVENUE Unrestricted Income

769,163

Temporarily Restricted Income

310,588

Permanently Restricted Income

21,784

Realized & Unrealized Investment Gains/Losses

29,066

TOTAL REVENUE

1,130,600

EXPENSES Program Activities

785,618

Fundraising & Administration

152,470 TOTAL EXPENSE

938,088

NET REVENUE

192,512

FINANCIAL POSITION

AS OF JUNE 30, 2015* ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash on Hand

1,276,134

Grants Receivable

205,257

Other Current Assets

17,669

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

1,499,059

FIXED ASSETS Endowment

1,430,970

Furniture & Equipment

15,272 TOTAL FIXED ASSETS

1,446,242

TOTAL ASSETS

2,945,301

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

15,150

LIABILITIES & EQUITY LIABILITIES EQUITY Unrestricted Net Assets

1,133,399

Permanently Restricted Net Assets

641,236

Temporarily Restricted Net Assets

963,004

Prior Period Adjustment Net Income

192,512 TOTAL EQUITY

2,930,151

TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY

2,945,301

* The financial statements presented here are unaudited. For the final audited FY15 financial statement and all past annual reports and financial statements, please visit carolinaforkibera.org/ annual-reports

African Kids in Need AMREF Care Kenya Curamericas Global Family Health Options Kenya General Motors East Africa Ltd Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd Holland & Knight James Madison University Kenya Education Fund Kenya Society for the Blind Kibera Network of Community Health Volunteers Kibera South Health Centre Kiva Zip Langata SubCounty Health Centre Medicine for Essential Supply MSF Kenya Nairobi Braintrust Network Nairobits Trust One World One Rope One World Play Project Population Council Prevention International: No Cervical Cancer Ronald McDonald House Charities Rotary Club of Langata SHOFCO Stara Rescue Centre Street Football World TOMS Toto Health Umande Trust The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention The UNC Center for Global Initiatives UNC Global UNC Women's Soccer University of British Columbia The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Volunteer Service Overseas WomanCare Global

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THANK YOU 26

BREADTH, DEPTH, VARIETY, REEVALUATION—IT ALL BEGINS WITH YOU, OUR SUPPORTERS.

Thank you for your generous

gifts this year, and for helping us and the Kiberans we serve progress, grow, and create change in the Kibera community.

$100,000+

Julian Robertson Ronald McDonald House Charities John & Ginger Sall

$25,000-$99,999

AJG Foundation Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Frontier Services Group Mother Teresa Children’s Foundation Nike Foundation NoVo Foundation Save the Children – Kenya Segal Family Foundation

$10,000-$24,999

Amgen Inc Matching Gifts Program Brett & Diana Bullington Cottier Donzé Foundation Mike & Cathy Fields FIFA Grace Jones Richardson Trust Rolf & Ronda Hoffmann Inveneo Mary Jo Swain TOMS Shoes

$5,000-$9,999

Aid for Africa Kathleen McGinn & Jeff Polzer Chuck & Laura Thompson

$1,000-$4,999

Madeleine Albright Fanny Anguiano Uzma Atif Bank of America Charitable Foundation Rye & Tracy Barcott Bryson Foundation

Mark Chandler & Laurie Wingate Fund Mimi Cross The Fledgling Fund Andrea Guttag Hand Family Foundation Harvard University Alan Johnston & Anne Cross Judy Family Foundation Verlana Laraway Timothy Mott Joseph & Mary Nye James & Florence Peacock The Red Legacy Fund Schwab Charitable Fund T.P. & Donna SchwartzBarcott Greg & Nancy Serrurier Paul Spector & Jane Cross George & Elizabeth Still The Thomas S. Kenan III Foundation, Inc. Michael & Joan Walsh Kenneth & Carol Weast Memuna Williams The Wooster-Barcott Foundation Mark & Stacey Yusko

$500-$999

Linda Bankoski Tim & Sarah Belk Bill and Kennon Jamieson Charitable Fund John Burress David & Jenny Callaway Campbell Foundation Fund Zachary Clayton Stanton Coffin Jennifer Coffman & Fletcher Linder Jerald Coughter Libbie Counselman Charles Crisp James Dean, Jr. Lawrence & Karla Diener

Troy Fitzgerald Geringer Art LTD Sarah Hogan Mark & Susan Irvings Taylor Isenberg Jeffrey Johl Laura Kiefer Roy Kim The Kohn Philanthropic Fund Beth-Ann & Jason Kutchma Richard & Jillian Martin Joseph Morris Sophie Muller Murray Family Charitable Foundation Sujata Narayan Eric & April Nelson North Lake College Presbyterian Church of Mount Kisco Rachel Wong and David A. Schlesinger Fund James & Karen Rodgers Rebekah Shoop Lynda Swann Caroline Philson Taylor Ralph & Ladye Lynne Vickers The Wide Waters Fund

$250-$499

Sara Anderson Richard Andrews Guy Austrian & Jill Jacobs Richard Benedick & Irene Federwisch Meredith Bryson Anthony & Kelly Burton Sandy Canfield & Raj Narayan Dennis Clements & Martha Ann Keels Brooke Cobbs Peter & Sandra Conway Christopher Crosby Caroline Cross Robert Daniels


Mary Anne Dickson DoTopia Lorraine Elliot & Diego Naranjo Equinix Matching Gifts Program Diane Frazier Carole Funderburk Gergen Family Fund Ellon Goertz Robert & Kathleen Gorman Babette Grout Paul Holsinger Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh Denise Johnson LaKeshia Jones Mark & Terri Kerr Haig Khachatoorian Francis Kibet Kitch Family Fund Mark Laichena Daniel Lebold Ming Lu Bradley Mahlum Jeffrey Mason Teresa McGhie James & Susan Moeser George Moose & Judith Kaufmann Tad Oelstrom Winslow Poor Powell Family Fund Carolyn Pumphrey Peter Redfield Vera Rhoades Richard & Sue Richardson Frank & Angie Roediger Brian Ross David & Cornelia Royle Brenda Schoonover Melissa Stegman Niklaus & Lucy Steiner Chris Tomlinson Tripp Tuttle Lynn Wachtel Edward Wall David Wiggins Delwyn Wong

$100-$249

Virginia Aldige Karen Austrian Noel Bailey Byron & Ann Baldwin Leann Bankoski & Hamady Mbaye

Stephen Barefoot Paul & Deborah Barry Amy Bensinger Jeffrey Berman Lisa Bernhard Susan Bernstein Nathan Berolzheimer & Patricia Barron Aaron Biala Sieglinde Bitterfeld Stanley Black Lynn Blanchard Blum Family Fund Jarol Boan Gloria Boone Nancy Boulden William & Linda Bowman Ross Boyce Sally Brewster Earl & Cathleen Briggs Bristol-Myers Squibb Matching Gift Program David Brown Deborah Brown James & Betsy Bryan Jeffrey Cannon Jaime Carrillo Michael Chen Judith Chubb Blanche Clark Andrew Clayburn Kenneth & Virginia Colburn Tom & Mary Congoran Adrienne & Mo Cox Mark & Carol Cramer Arlene Davis Sanford Dawsey Channing Der & Kathleen Yasui-Der Laurie Derse Duke Energy Foundation Matching Gifts Hannah Edwards George & Angela Ellard Raymond Farrow III Alfred Field Jessica Gleason William Graham Ellen Hart Jeffrey Hiday Dorothy Hirvela Dick & Joan Hiskey Gary & Johanna Hodgson Tim Hoefnagel Sue Hovis Chris Howe Nancy Howe

Catherine Inabnit Scotty Jackson Nick Johnson Bernhard Johnson Jeffrey & Shelley Kehl Peter Kempe Betty Kenan Terry Kensler Brian & Moyra Kileff Karla King Robert Kolvoord Winkie LaForce Thomas & Donna Lambeth Paul Leslie Francis Lethem & Brigitte Abrams Judith Lilley Don Lippincott Lesley Litzenberger Walker Long Rocio Lopez Allison Lui Stephen & Karen Lyons Craig & Megan MacDonald H R & Betsy Malpass Richard Manning Edward & Judith Martin Kevin McCadden Mary Kay McGarr Michael McKeever Brendan McKenna Mid-Atlantic Association of IB Schools LaNell Moore Britton Morin Alan & Eloise Neebe Blair Nell New Global Citizens Cindy Ngwalla Elchi Nowrojee Mary Norris Oglesby Jason Page & Kim Chapman Page Rachel Palkovitz Nancy Paricio Alan Patterson

Kate Penrose Rachel Permut Phyllis Pickett Barry Popkin David & Lisa Price Kent Rager Henry Ralston Neil & Maria Riemann Aaron Ruether Toni Ryan Patricia Sawin Rahul Shendure & Erika Schroeder Louise Scott George & Gesele Scully Tejay Sener Leigh Shamblin Gwen Sherwood Lawrence Shirley Gladys Siegel Scott & Charlotte Smith Adam & Jane Stein Dee Stuckey Jamie Temples Jim & Mieko Thomson Thomas Tilson Robert Tinkler David & Ellen Verhaagen Julee & Tony Waldrop Andrew & Carolyn Weir Beth Whitaker Park & Stephanie Willis Jennifer Winston Clark Wright Xi Gamma Pi Beta Sorority of Oregon State University Dr. Brian & Melanie Yen Michael Young Sean Yunt Lisa Zapata Naomi Zeskind Mark Zion Suzanne Zweben

Thank you to all of our supporters from July 2014 - June 2015! To view the full list, visit

CAROLINAFORKIBERA.ORG/HonorRoll15

A gigantic thank you to all the photographers, amateur and professional, who contributed their talents to this report: ARTKIDS Foundation Nick Johnson Ann Kungu

Beth-Ann Kutchma Innocent Nyangori Jerry Riley

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CAROLINAFORKIBERA.ORG

CHAPEL HILL, U.S.A.

+1 919 962 6362 tel | cfk@unc.edu

BOARD OF DIRECTORS RYE BARCOTT, Treasurer

FRANCIS KIBET

BRETT BULLINGTON

BETH-ANN KUTCHMA, Secretary

Co-founder, Carolina for Kibera; Co-founder, Double Time Capital Angel Investor and Advisor to Start-ups; Technology Entrepreneur

DR. DAVID CALLAWAY

Director, Operational & Disaster Medicine, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC

SANDRA CANFIELD

International and Community Development Consultant

DR. JENNIFER COFFMAN, Chair

Associate Executive Director, Office of International Programs, James Madison University

ARLENE DAVIS

Associate Professor, Department of Social Medicine; Director, Clinical Ethics Services, UNC Hospitals

Manager, IT Audit Services, Duke Energy Corporation Senior Program Officer, Center for Global Initiatives, UNC-Chapel Hill; Producer, Without a Fight

DR. KATHLEEN MCGINN

Cahners-Rabb Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School, Harvard University

BEN MSHILA

Human Resources Manager, Divi Carina Bay Casino, U.S. Virgin Islands

DR. JAMES PEACOCK

[Honorary Member] Kenan Professor of Anthropology, UNC-Chapel Hill

DR. NIKLAUS STEINER, Vice Chair Director, Center for Global Initiatives, UNC-Chapel Hill

LORRAINE ELLIOT

Senior Transaction Specialist, Bank of America

NAIROBI, KENYA

+254 (0)20 2350 161 tel | info@carolinaforkibera.org

BOARD OF TRUSTEES DR. KAREN AUSTRIAN

HILLARY OKHIDI OMALA

GEORGE KURIA

DR. SARAH ONYANGO

Associate – Poverty, Gender and Youth Program, Population Council Chief Executive, Gateway Insurance Company Ltd.

DAVID MSHILA, Chair

Freelance Consultant, Human Settlement Services

Managing Director, Enai Group; Executive Director, Kakenya Center for Excellence Africa Regional Director, Planned Parenthood

Carolina for Kibera 2015 Annual Report  

Carolina for Kibera's 2015 was marked by one prevailing theme: GROWTH. Take a look inside to see how we've scaled up our services, explored...

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