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e xcepti o N a l 2013-2014

child

free

A Family’s Guide to Special Needs Resources in the Triangle

a publication of

parent carolina

carolinaparent.com

sponsored by

Tammy Lynn

contents 5 You Have a Friend in Me

Help your child navigate friendships.

9

Legal Protections for Children With Disabilities Understanding your child’s rights in daily life.

12 Local Couple Designs Social Skills App

Triangle parents create a suite of apps to help children with social challenges. Plus: Identify software and apps created for special interests, needs and challenges.

15

What You Need to Know Before Enrolling in a Research Study Find out what to consider before your child participates in a study or trial.

19 Beyond Insurance

Financial help for families of hospitalized kids.

22 Special Needs Resources

Looking for support, information or assistance? Find it in this categorized listing of more than 350 resources.

4 9 Recommended Reading

Books and online resources to help understand and cope with various challenges.

5 0 Terms and Acronyms

A glossary of frequently used descriptive and legal terms.

carolinaparent.com | Exceptional child 2013-14

3

parent CAROLINA

Connecting families with special needs to Triangle resources Cradling my baby son, I peered into his tiny face and was thankful for this gift of life. I was a parent, with an infant to care for and love. But it wasn’t until a year or so later that some of the meaning of this new role sank in. From what to offer for meals and snacks, to whether popping in a kids video for a break encouraged too much screen time, to when and how to reinforce limits, it seemed I was almost constantly making some sort of small decision, a decision that affected someone else. Even as our son got a little older, his father and I were responsible for making the important choices for several years. When selecting child care for our thentoddler, I didn’t choose an ideal match the first time. But my son wasn’t in any real danger. For some kids, a miscalculation in care could be life-threatening. Parents of children with special needs are faced with a multitude of decisions, and the potential consequences and outcomes are magnified. Whenever a diagnosis is established, or a parent suspects something is wrong, the natural next step is to seek information and advice. This annual guide, renamed Exceptional Child, is the go-to source for families in the Triangle with children who have special needs. Our project team diligently collected information about businesses, organiza-

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Exceptional child 2013-14 |

tions, programs and other resources that provide services and/or support for all types of special needs, whether physical, mental or emotional disabilities; sensory impairments; learning differences; developmental delays; or chronic or life-threatening illnesses (starting on page 22). Advancements in research and treatment are possible in part through studies and clinical trials, which also may benefit those who participate. In this guide, three Triangle families share their experiences and tips to help other parents know what to consider before deciding to enroll your child in a research study or trial (page 15). Also find resources to help reduce costs associated with the logistics of accessing treatment (page 19). It’s difficult to see your child in physical pain or discomfort. But it hurts, too, when a child is teased, ignored or outright rejected. Kids with special challenges may be more likely to experience teasing, difficulty, discomfort or even downright cruelty interacting with others. Parents and experts share tips to help you help your child handle negative reactions and form friendships (page 5). One Triangle couple even developed a suite of apps that helps children with social challenges, based on their family experiences (page 12). All parents want to see their kids learn, play, grow and be happy. Our aim with this guide is to help families facing special challenges connect with the resources, people and knowledge in the Triangle that can help.

carolinaparent.com

Publisher Brenda Larson blarson@carolinaparent.com

Editor and

content director

Crickett Gibbons cgibbons@carolinaparent.com

associate Editor Beth Shugg bshugg@carolinaparent.com Project editor Karen Lewis Taylor

Project editorial assistant Karen Keefe Art Director Cheri Vigna cvigna@carolinaparent.com

Advertising designer Mia Prior mprior@carolinaparent.com web editor Odile Fredericks ofredericks@carolinaparent.com digital media specialist Lauren Isaacs lisaacs@carolinaparent.com

sales team leader and

Media consultant

GENERAL Manager and

Media consultant

Candi Griffin cgriffin@carolinaparent.com Gail L. Harris gharris@carolinaparent.com

MEDIA consultantS Regina Alston ralston@carolinaparent.com

Sue Chen schen@carolinaparent.com Business Manager Kara Lynn Mann • 866-932-6459 karalynn@charlotteparent.com

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5716 Fayetteville Rd., Suite 201, Durham, NC 27713 PHONE 919-956-2430 • FAX 919-956-2427 email: info@carolinaparent.com Published by Carolina Parenting Inc. Circulation 25,000. Distribution of this magazine does not constitute an endorsement of information, products or services. Carolina Parent reserves the right to reject any advertisement or listing that is not in keeping with the publication’s standards. Copyright 2013 by Carolina Parent. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

PARENTING MEDIA ASSOCIATION

2013 Gold Award Winner General Excellence

in Me

you have a friend

Help your child navigate new friendships By Kathleen M. Reilly

C

ary mom Teri Smith remembers the incident at the playground like it was yesterday. Her middle son, who has ADD and impulse control disorder, was running past

another boy and unknowingly bumped into him. “I was about to jump up and apologize for him,” Smith says. “But then the other boy’s mom yelled at my son, ‘Jerk!’”

Although today she graciously gives that mom a pass — understanding she was just reacting to the situation — when it happened Smith took her son and left the park, even though they’d come to play with the other kids. Parents of children with special needs

sometimes find themselves in Smith’s shoes, walking the line between helping their children interact with other kids and form meaningful friendships while also handling any negative reactions. After all, kids notice people who look or act differently, and sometimes they aren’t

Reaching out a helping hand Growing up with cerebral palsy, S. Barton Cutter has had firsthand experience with what it’s like to be different from the other kids and the challenges of trying to make friends. “[My speech] can be difficult to understand at times and, growing up, I found other children didn’t always have the patience needed to understand me,” he says. Today, Cutter is a Raleigh-based professional coach, writer and mentor. He offers other people with disabilities what he didn’t have as a child: a role model. “When I was young, I didn’t really have one mentor or role model,” he says. “While there were people I looked up to, like several tutors and such who helped me find my voice in writing, none of them had direct experience of living with a disability.” Because of the lack of guidance, Cutter felt that he had to find his own way through many situations. It wasn’t until he was in college that he met someone, a martial arts teacher, with a disability. “For the first time, I felt as though I could talk to someone who had gone through many of the same experiences I had,” he says. Cutter now draws from his lifetime of experience and encourages others to look beyond their limitations. He shows his clients how to ditch their doubts and perceived restrictions — no matter how big — and to understand they can gain strength and confidently reach for their dreams. Cutter emphasizes the importance of helping kids with disabilities find their confidence and express who they are,

as quick to reach out to their peers with disabilities. How can you help your child develop strong friendships and handle negative interactions, all while giving her the independence to make her own way confidently?

Believe it’s possible The first step is to understand that every kid can make a friend, no matter what, says Aron Hall, director of programs for continued on page 6

embracing their uniqueness and living their lives with confidence and joy. How can you help your child find her way? Cutter suggests helping kids identify their passions and interests. “Have them learn as much as they can about it,” Cutter says. “In learning about something they care about, they also learn about themselves and discover that this area of interest gives them a way to participate.”

What if their interest involves something that makes you

nervous, such as horseback riding? That’s perfectly OK, too, Cutter says. “Sometimes it can be difficult for parents to let their kids try new things, especially if there is a disability involved,” he says. “But allowing kids the opportunity to explore their world gives a sense of personal freedom that’s invaluable.” — Kathleen M. Reilly

carolinaparent.com | Exceptional child 2013-14

5

Friendships continued from page 5

the National Inclusion Project. “Start with that expectation firmly in your mind,” Hall advises. “Doesn’t mean every kid will easily make friends, but when you believe he can, you’ll create intentional scenarios where kids are connecting and moving beyond their differences.” Hall suggests actively giving your child the opportunity to make friends. You can’t expect people to come knocking on your door, seeking out your child for friendship, he explains. That’s not going to happen whether your child has special needs or not. Take the initiative by inviting kids to your house, Hall says. “Sometimes other parents might not feel equipped to have your child visit their home without you at first,” he says. “So plan family outings, or maybe a cookout or bubble party, or whatever you like. Just make that effort to help introduce your child to other kids.” Plan regular outings where your child has the chance to interact with other kids, such as at the park, on play dates or in organized programs.

Put it in context Also keep in mind what friendship means to kids of different ages. For the very young set, “parallel play,” where kids play near each other but don’t necessarily interact with one another, is usually the most you’ll get. For early elementary kids, “best friend” status is often applied to any child who’s there throughout the day — even if that changes from week to week. So don’t worry if your child doesn’t reach “BFF” status with another child immediately. Sometimes it’s more about kids’ developmental milestones than any differences. Hall cautions against pushing too hard, however. If kids just don’t click, don’t keep trying to make it happen. “I’m a big believer that friendship just for the sake

6

Exceptional child 2013-14 |

of friendship rarely works out in a long, sustainable way,” he says. If there’s no connection there, it could just be because the kids aren’t a good fit for each other.

have times when friendships get rocky. And while you can’t fix every single trouble your child faces, you can help navigate the rough waters. It was tough when McCann’s son, for example, told her his awareness of others’ Seek shared interests As with most friendships, shared interests perceptions of him. “He said, ‘I don’t feel like I’m different. bring kids together. “My son loves history The only time I feel different is when I see and presidents and can talk about them it in the face of other people. Then I realfor hours,” Smith says. “Sometimes kids ize they see me as different,’” she says. who had similar interests would be imBut what if it’s more than just a feelpressed and be more friendly with him.” ing? What if there is outright ostracizing When kids are doing something they or bullying? It’s a lesson every kid learns, both like together, it helps friendships Hall says. grow organically. Kids are more likely to “You can just be honest and say, ‘Hey, see the similarities between each other — not everyone we’re going to be around is “We both love chess,” or “We both throw going to be nice. Not everyone is going to left-handed,” for example — if they’re understand who we are or what we like to actively engaged in a favorite activity. Any differences quietly drop to the background. do,’” Hall says. Smith gives her son words to articu“Playing creates a natural opportunity late what he’s feeling. “I’ll say, ‘I can see for kids to shine,” Hall says. “You quickly you’re jealous because your friends are see others’ strengths, you connect, you playing together and not including you,’” laugh, and you find yourself becoming she says. “It gives him validation for friends with that other person.” normal feelings.” Parents can also focus on successes. Prep for success You can help your child plan to meet new “Try pointing out positive experiences kids by giving him a quick coaching ses- as they’re happening,” Hall adds. “Catch sion, says Garner mom Wanda McCann. them having fun, smiling or connecting with the other kid. That will give you refHer son has high-functioning autism, erence points to look back on and say, ‘Yes, and when he was younger she’d gently give him tips before meeting new people. that hurt when they said that to you, but remember when you were coming down “I’d just say, ‘Remember eye contact,’ the slide and laughing?’ That way they can or ‘It’s polite to shake their hands,’” Mcstill pull a positive out of the entire experiCann says. As her son got older, she’d also suggest ence and it’s not a complete bust.” Don’t give up if you have a bad experiwhich topics were appropriate to discuss. ence, either. “If you go out once, have a “With autism, sometimes it was negative exposure, and never go out again, easy for him to get locked into only the you don’t have the possibility of a positive topics that interested him, so I’d remind experience,” Hall says. “Continue to go him which topics were OK to say around family, which were OK with a broader cir- out, and if something negative happens more than once at the same place, go to a cle like coaches and teachers, and which others were fine for an even broader circle different place. You’ll find the right people for you.” like strangers or new friends.”

Smooth the bumps Any child — one with special needs or a more typically developing peer — will

carolinaparent.com

Kathleen M. Reilly is a writer and author living in Raleigh with her husband and sons.

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Exceptional child 2013-14 |

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Leg al Protec tions

for Children With Disabilities Understanding your child’s rights in daily life

A

By Robyn Kinsey Mooring

n 11-year-old child with mild autism is in mainstream classes at his middle school. One day, a substitute — not realizing he doesn’t like to be touched — taps him on

the shoulder to get his attention. The child starts flailing and inadvertently hits the teacher, who later tries to have him suspended. Fortunately for the student, the federal government has established protections to ensure his disability is taken into account in the school disciplinary process. These protec-

tions fall under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of

communicate your concerns to the school administration. If the issue still isn’t resolved, you may consider contacting the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s Exceptional Children’s Division.

n Athletics participation

Outside of school-based sports programs, most athletic opportunities with disabilities in elementary, middle and high school. In addition, the Americans with are provided through municipal parks Disabilities Act (ADA) provides broad anti-discrimination protections in many aspects of and recreation departments or private life outside the school setting. recreational leagues, both of which are If you’re the parent of a child with a disability, these laws are designed to help protect governed by the ADA. your child’s rights in common situations. We explore a few of their implications. Holly Stiles, an attorney for Raleighbased Disability Rights North Carolina, spectrum disorder (ASD). In many cases, says the ADA “protects children from ben School discipline children are repeatedly removed from the ing refused the opportunity to participate School discipline may be a concern if classroom or even suspended for behavior solely because the child has a disability.” your child has a disability that can afIt requires athletic leagues, teams and fect behavior or learning, especially if it’s problems. While IDEA allows such discipline for organizations to “modify rules, practices an externalizing disorder that tends to be and policies as needed for the child with a short period, it can’t be used long-term more disruptive to others. Brenda Berlin, supervising attorney at if the behavior is a result of the disability. a disability” unless it can be proven that making the modifications “would be an “Legal protections kick into place when Duke University’s Children’s Law Clinic undue burden or fundamentally alter the there’s been a removal for more than 10 in Durham, emphasizes that a parent nature” of the program or activity. days,” Berlin says. must “be an active participant and adFor example, the Department of Section 504 also becomes a factor in vocate for your child” to make sure he is Justice has settled cases under the ADA some discipline cases because it applies not penalized or punished because of his requiring leagues to allow a baseball to organizations that receive financial disability. player who is deaf to have an interpreter assistance from any federal department Since most children with such disor agency to cover programs and services. in the dugout and a football player with abilities are in mainstream classes, that’s visual impairments to wear a tinted visor The law specifies that individuals with where many behavior problems — and in his helmet. On the other hand, it may disabilities can’t be excluded from proresulting disciplinary actions — occur, be permissible to refuse to allow a child grams based solely on their disability. Berlin says. who uses a power wheelchair to compete Berlin stresses that parents who sus“IDEA is a law that really says all pect their child may have a disability that in a non-adaptive soccer league. children should be educated together as Triangle municipalities strive to meet affects learning or behavior should ask the much as possible, unless the child won’t or even exceed what is legally required. school to have the child evaluated. Unless be successful or his peers won’t be sucThe Town of Cary’s Parks and Recreation that identification is made and the proteccessful,” she says. Department, for example, works to intions provided by IDEA are in place, the According to Berlin, disabilities that child will be subject to the same disciplin- clude children with disabilities as much can lead to frequent disciplinary action as possible by putting on its sports ary standards as more-typical peers. include attention deficit hyperactivity registration form a box parents can check If problems arise regarding how disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant continued on page 10 discipline is handled, Berlin says to first disorder, Tourette syndrome and autism the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, laws that work in tandem to protect the rights of children

carolinaparent.com | Exceptional child 2013-14

9

Legal protections

private attorney or by filing a complaint with the Department of Justice.

continued from page 9

if a reasonable accommodation is needed. According to Dwayne Jones, the town’s recreation manager, “We’ve really gotten more aggressive in trying to meet [our residents’] special needs. We’re trying to get the word out more that these opportunities are available.” While Jones acknowledges that most requests are for children with conditions affecting learning or behavior, he says the department wants parents to know that reasonable accommodations can be made for children with physical disabilities as well. If parents need help resolving an issue with a town-sponsored athletic organization, they should first go to the child’s coach, then to the head of the department, and finally to the municipality or department ADA coordinator. Problems with private teams or athletic leagues should first be addressed with the coach, then the president of the league and then, if needed, through a

modifications if it would put an undue burden on the facility, its staff or its operating budget. Because every child’s needs are likely n Child care centers to be unique, Stiles recommends parents Child care centers and preschools also of a child with a disability write a “plan of fall under the ADA. Stiles, of Disability Rights North Carolina, says most chron- care” and request a meeting with the child ic or life-threatening illnesses would also care center to discuss how the child’s needs will be met. If the staff refuses to almost certainly fall under the ADA, meet the child’s needs, a more formal which defines disability as a physical or request for a reasonable accommodation mental impairment that substantially under the ADA can be made. If all other limits one or more major life activities. attempts fail, a complaint can be filed Common examples child care centers with the Department of Justice. may encounter are diabetes, cerebral As these scenarios suggest, every palsy, ASD and food allergies, she says. disability brings its own set of challenges, Under the ADA, a child care center would be in violation if it rejected a child’s and concerns must be addressed on a case-by-case basis. The bottom line for application based solely on the needs associated with a condition such as diabetes. parents is to remember that your child According to Stiles, if insulin management has rights and protections under these is required or the child needs to eat a cer- federal laws, and it’s important for you tain type of snack at a particular time, the to know what they are. You can be your child’s best advocate. parents and the child care center should work together to identify how the child’s Robyn Kinsey Mooring is a Durhamdisability-related needs can be met. The center can’t be required, however, based writer and the mother of two boys. to hire a full-time nurse or make other

ARE THERE EXCEPTIONS TO ADA? While the American with Disabilities Act provides broad

do not accept any state or federal money, for example, are not

protections to children and adults with disabilities, there are

bound by the law’s requirements.

exceptions for certain organizations. The law does not apply

Even if a program is not covered by the ADA, Stiles suggests

to religious organizations or private clubs that can prove an

parents still develop a “plan of care” to help ease concerns

exclusive membership. Church-based preschool programs that

about how their child’s disability should be handled. If there is any question about the program’s willingness to accommodate your child, you might want to find a more willing or responsive program while you evaluate your legal options. If your child has been discriminated against because of a disability, you may consult with Disability Rights North Carolina. Your child may be eligible for free legal assistance regardless of your family or household income. Disability Rights North

Carolina can be reached toll-free at 877-235-4210 (voice) and 888-268-5535 (TTY).

10

Exceptional child 2013-14 |

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— Robyn Kinsey Mooring

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| Exceptional child 2013-14

11

Local couple designs

Social skills app for older kids By Karen Lewis Taylor

P

eter and Jennifer Minelli of Durham understand first-hand the social challenges that children diagnosed with autism

spectrum disorder (ASD), ADHD and other conditions face, particularly as they grow and want to be more independent in interactions with peers. Their experiences with their daughter, Ruby, 10, who has high-functioning autism, led them to create storysmart, a

suite of social language apps designed to help children with social challenges develop social communication, social cognition and critical thinking skills.

“The social situations that are the basis for the storysmart stories are all situations that have happened, in some way or another, in our family,” says Jennifer, who is a speech language pathologist. “We wanted the app to target the anxieties and nuanced social scenarios that can be challenging for children like Ruby.” The storysmart scenarios are geared toward children ages

6-12, allowing them to practice different roles and responses in navigating social situations at home, at school, on vacation and during group activities. When the main characters make unexpected or inappropriate choices during social interaction, the user may modify their actions, words or behaviors to bring about the best outcome. Peter, a designer with a background in graphic design and brand development, notes that storysmart has been well received by educators and experts in the ASD community. “We have heard from both special education and mainstream teachers, who really believe that they can use our app as a tool to support inclusion, reading comprehension and social communication,” he says. “We have also received some very positive support from the Duke ADHD program and the Duke Autism program, as well as from Gary Mesibov, the founder of TEACCH [Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication-Handicapped Children, based at UNC-Chapel Hill].” Learn more about storysmart at rubycubeapps.com.

What’s hAPPening? Sites help parents navigate ‘apps’ for special needs

W

ith the tablet revolution well under way and most children regularly enjoying games and learning applications on

mobile devices, parents are faced with the daunting task of evaluating technology that evolves and changes even faster than their cable television programming.

The job may be even tougher for parents of children with

special needs, but — as more and more reports indicate — the potential benefits of apps and adaptive software are considerable. These websites may help families identify and evaluate this technology created with special interests, developmental needs and challenges in mind.

12

Exceptional child 2013-14 |

carolinaparent.com

Jennifer and Peter Minelli, pictured with their children, Ruby, 10, and Buddy, 8, developed a suite of apps for social skills development, based on Ruby’s challenges with high-functioning autism.

Common Sense Media’s Power Up! App Guide commonsensemedia.org/guide/special-needs

Special needs guide created by not-for-profit media review organization, featuring an overview with suggestions for choosing apps that match kids’ needs. Apps are arranged by area of challenge (such as motor skills or math) and difficulty. Friendship Circle App Review friendshipcircle.org/apps

Searchable database compiled by nonprofit that provides programs and support to the families of individuals with special needs. Categories include speech and language, social skills, life skills, behavior, education and scheduling; user can specify Apple or Android. E-Special Needs Software especialneeds.com/special-needs-software.html

Retail website offering software programs designed for students with disabilities such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), language impairments, developmental disabilities, Down

syndrome, aphasia and traumatic brain injury. Also offers adaptive equipment and other assistive technology. Moms With Apps momswithapps.com/apps-for-special-needs

List of apps for children with special needs created by Moms With Apps, a group of developers dedicated to family-friendly apps. Site also hosts online forums for parents to discuss concerns and questions about how technology can best fit into their children’s lives. Autism Speaks autismspeaks.org/autism-apps

Recommendations by parents and other users for apps designed for children and adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Autism Speaks is a national nonprofit autism science and advocacy organization. Karen Lewis Taylor is a writer, editor and mother of two. She and her family live in Apex.

carolinaparent.com | Exceptional child 2013-14

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What You Need to Know

Before Enrolling in a Research Study By Carol McGarrahan

T

he Triangle area’s major hospitals and universities conduct research studies on a global scale, which may be extremely helpful to local families seeking cutting-edge

care for their children. But parents who are thinking about enrolling a child in experimental studies or therapies must do some research of their own. We share the experiences of local families whose children participated in different types of studies as well as advice from experts to help when evaluating a study.

n Aiden’s Story: A developmental study

“We were so lucky to have gone into this because we have learned so much that will help Aiden and help him become Julie Waddle of Raleigh enrolled her son, Aiden, in an autism study through UNC- productive and … have good interpersonal relationships,” Waddell says. Chapel Hill after filling out a questionAs Waddell’s experiences show, naire and being contacted by researchers. parents considering developmental study The Early Development Project at the participation need to be prepared for the UNC Department of Allied Health possibility of an unexpected diagnosis. Science is a developmental study that Christene Tashjian, project coordinator focuses on early identification and intervention in autism by screening 12-month- for the Early Development Project, cauAdam Willits participated in a clinical trial to tions that “some of the information parold children to determine whether they ents might hear about their child could be determine the effectiveness of immunotherapy are at risk for autism or other developon nut allergies. uncomfortable if they are not prepared to mental disabilities. hear it.” A developmental study is designed to One tip Waddell has for parents: You gather information. This study also comThe Duke peanut allergy study pares community services intervention to should always have access to a child durrequired medical appointments every two ing evaluations or procedures, as through weeks as well as regular administration of parent-mediated intervention. a one-way window, for example. Aiden was identified with a speech drops and a daily log. As Adam got older, delay and, beginning at 18 months, parhe was not as vigilant about his doses. ticipated in assessments every six months. n Adam’s Story: A clinical trial Debra Willits, Adam’s mother, notes Aiden did not receive services directly as Adam Willits, 17, of Apex is allergic that small cuts from braces may have part of the study, but the family was proto peanuts and tree nuts. When Adam made dosing more painful. After talking vided a list of services in Wake County. was 11, he joined a clinical trial at Duke with staff, he decided to withdraw from Having developmental assessments al- University Medical Center to determine the trial, especially since he soon would ready completed made it easier for Aiden whether low-dosage exposure to peabe attending college. to receive timely assistance, Waddell says. nuts could reduce sensitivity of allergic Adam’s experience points to a In addition, an occupational therapist individuals. potential downside to participating in working with Aiden helped identify a A clinical trial is a controlled study of clinical trials: some require a significant lactose intolerance. Thanks to these ina drug or a new type of medical device. commitment over a long period of time. terventions, Aiden will be mainstreamed Trials usually have some degree of risk But Willits says the study did reduce her this year in kindergarten. and are subject to a review board. continued on page 17 carolinaparent.com | Exceptional child 2013-14

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Trilogy School Chapel Hill Pediatric Triangle The Learning Chapel Hill Pediatrics “Serving the Triangle Since 1999” and Adolescent Medi- Consultants Adolescents www.trilogyschool.com • Small group instruction for cine

&

students with learning differences • Grades 2-12 Accredited by AdvancED/SACS

Care from birth through college

Directors Laura Wyatt, Ph.D Judy Williams, M.A.T. M.S.A.

Complimentary "meet and greet" sessions International adoption care Convenient parking Same-day appointments Comprehensive sports & camp physicals Behavior consultations (ADHD, obesity, sleep...)

919-781-7804 “Linking Learning to Life”

3810 Merton Dr., Raleigh, NC 27609

Triangle Learning Consultants

Accepting Medicaid and most insurance plans.

“Serving the Triangle since 1989”

Open DAILY, including weekends and holidays

"Walk-in availability" for established patients: Monday – Thursday mornings 7:15 – 7:50am at both office locations TWO locations welcome NEW and established patients

205 Sage Rd., Suite 100, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 • 919-942-4173 249 East NC Hwy 54, Suite 230,Durham, NC 27713

www.trainglelearningconsultants.com • Homework Management Program • Tutoring in all academic areas & SAT

www.chapelhillpeds.com Advocacy

Supported Employment

Autism Society of North Carolina

Training

Respite Care

and

Education Chapters and

Support Groups Family Consultation Direct Care Services

We Can Help

“the leading statewide resource organization serving people across the autism spectrum throughout their lifespan . . .”

At the Autism Society of North Carolina, we understand the challenges of the autism community because we work with individuals on the autism spectrum and their families every day. Our statewide network of resources connects individuals with autism and their families to life-changing programs and supports unavailable anywhere else.

800-442-2762 | www.autismsociety-nc.org

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Research study continued from page 15

son’s sensitivity to peanuts, although the lasting impact remains unknown. Other, secondary benefits have been positive as well: Adam learned how to use an Epipen (an auto-injecting device to prevent anaphylactic shock) and, as he entered his teen years, had frank discussions with staff about the potential dangers of sharing beverages with or kissing someone who has consumed nuts. He also learned more about managing his asthma. Willits believes Adam’s participation was worthwhile, particularly since it has fueled her son’s interest in science and may open the door to a future study.

n Megan’s Story: An elective surgical procedure Karen Hogan’s daughter, Megan, was born with cerebral palsy. She was a candidate for selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR), an elective procedure that involves cutting some of the sensory nerves from the muscles to the spinal cord, with the goal of improving mobility by relieving muscle spasticity. Medical procedures, either experimental or elective, can sometimes be part of a clinical trial and entail inherent risks as well as potential benefits. For parents of children with significant medical challenges, careful consideration of both is essential to make an informed decision. Hogan, who lives in Apex, did her homework regarding the surgery. She researched a surgeon at St. Louis Children’s Hospital who has performed more than 2,000 SDR procedures. She followed some of the surgical patients through Facebook for several years to learn more about outcomes. After years of intense research, the family decided to pursue this option. “We looked into this [surgery] when Megan was 4,” Hogan says. “There is some controversy about this procedure. It took us this long, until the age of 12, to say, ‘We are doing this.’”

It was a difficult decision, especially when people warn that your daughter may never walk again, Hogan says. The biggest help, she adds, was talking with other parents who have been through the process. While it will take more time before the full benefits of the procedure are known, Megan is doing well and says her legs feel lighter.

Questions to Consider About Research Studies Who stands to benefit from the study?

What are the goals of the study?

 Are the consent forms thorough?

Will my child be video-taped or photographed? Who will see that information? How will evaluations and procedures be carried out? What are the potential risks and benefits? Will my child receive information about the risks and benefits? (Children older than 7 are sometimes provided information about a study.)

For a detailed list of questions to ask regarding a study, see nhlbi.nih.gov/ childrenandclinicalstudies (search Good Questions to Ask).

Evaluating a study Parents who are thinking about involving their child in any kind of research study should consider a number of factors when making their decision. A welldesigned study should follow specific guidelines and clearly state objectives. Detailed consent forms should be part of the process. Consider who is supporting the study and what kind of time commitment is involved, as some studies continue for years. Parents should also ask how study results will be communicated. “As a parent whose child joins the study, you want to ask, ‘What kind of access do we have to the research findings, and do we control who receives them?’” says Arlene Davis, a bioethicist and director of the Clinical Ethics Consult Services at UNC Hospitals. Finally, consider your child’s privacy as it pertains to the results of the study. Advancements in genetics have made it crucial to understand not only the type of information you may learn but also whether that information can be used for other purposes. Researchers may collect blood or tissue samples from your child, and there are ethical considerations surrounding the future use of such materials. Privacy can be of particular importance with children because of the length of time this information could be used, Davis says. Also important is whether findings will be part of permanent medical records. Research studies can be of great benefit to children, but it is important to find the right fit for your child’s needs. Gather information, take a deep breath, and follow your gut to determine which study is best for your child. Carol McGarrahan is a Triangle mother and freelance writer who frequently covers health, science and parenting topics.

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Y of the Triangle

The Y partners with A Small Miracle to present Camp G.R.A.C.E. Camp G.R.A.C.E. is a summer day camp for children ages 6 – 13 with Pervasive Developmental Disorders or Autism. LOCATIONS FOR CAMP G.R.A.C.E. A.E. FINLEy yMCA 9216 Baileywick Road, Raleigh 919-848-9622

KRAFT FAMILy yMCA 8921 Holly Springs Road, Apex 919-657-9622

y CAMPS MAKE SUMMER FUN!

Other yMCA locations may have opportunities for your family, as well.

www.yMCATriangle.org

Your Family Connection Every Day

T

urn to Carolina Parent for everything you need to know about life with kids in the Triangle.

 Visit CarolinaParent.com for parenting news, giveaways, resource directories, articles and blogs. Search our online calendar for fun things to do with kids every day.  Sign up for weekly, monthly and specialty e-newsletters.  Join our parenting community on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and discover new ideas on Pinterest.  Pick up our free monthly magazine.  Check out our other annual publications: Baby & Toddler, GPS (Go. Play. See.), Education Guide

CarolinaParent.com 18

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parent

919-956-2430

carolina

Beyond Insurance

Financial help for families of hospitalized kids By Karen Lewis Taylor

F

or many families of children facing hospitalization for chronic conditions or emergency care, concerns about the well-being of their son or daughter far outweigh worries

about paying the bills. But even with many hospital charges covered by medical insurance, families may find that other costs — travel expenses, lodging and meals, and other necessities — add up quickly, creating an additional burden on already-stretched finances.

Fortunately, there are organizations dedicated to supporting families facing financial hardships due to a child’s hospitalization. The list below provides resources for free or reduced-cost transportation, housing and other needs related to a child’s hospitalization. Some resources are locationor condition-specific or may require certain criteria be met. In addition, many hospitals offer assistance to families through reduced-rate meals for parents, hospitality suites with

kitchen and laundry facilities, and gift cards or referrals to local businesses that offer discounts to families of patients. Ask the hospital case worker about what kind of support, financial or otherwise, is available during a child’s stay. Families might also consider an online giving site, such as giveforward.com, as a way to offer friends and relatives — who may want to help but live too far away — an easy way to provide the gift of financial support and peace of mind.

Air Transportation

Lodging

Airlift Hope of N.C. –

airlifthope.org; 800-325-8908

Angel Flight –

angelflightsoars.org; 877-426-2643 Children’s Flight of Hope –

cfoh.org; 919-460-4334 Corporate Angel Network –

Healthcare Hospitality Network – nahhh.org; 800-542-9730 Joe’s House –

Me Fine Foundation –

mefinefoundation.org;

joeshouse.org; 877-563-7468 National Patient Travel Helpline –

Financial support and miscellaneous services

patienttravel.org; 800-296-1217 Ronald McDonald House

919-202-0086 

The MORGAN Project –

themorganproject.org

corpangelnetwork.org;

of Chapel Hill –

patientadvocate.org/resources;

866-328-1313

rmh-chapelhill.org; 919-913-2040

800-532-5274

Mercy Medical Airlift –

(also operates the Ronald McDonald

mercymedical.org; 888-675-1405

Family Room at North Carolina

National Patient Travel Helpline –

Children’s Hospital in Chapel Hill)

patienttravel.org; 800-296-1217

Ground Transportation 

Angel Bus –

angel-bus.org; 800-768-0238

Ronald McDonald House of

Durham – ronaldhousedurham.org;

919-286-9305 (also operates

Ronald McDonald Family Rooms

at Duke Medical Center in Durham

and WakeMed Children’s Hospital

in Raleigh)

Patient Advocate Foundation –

Karen Lewis Taylor is a writer, editor and mother of two. She and her family live in Apex.

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Tammy Lynn Center Tammy Lynn AboUT TAmmy LyNN CENTER

T

ammy Lynn Center for Developmental Disabilities serves nearly 400 children, adults, and families each year with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to offer education, residential and therapeutic family support services to children and adults with special needs.  The Center’s goal is to provide the individuals it serves the opportunity to maximize their abilities in a loving, nurturing environment. Because of the unique nature of the Tammy Lynn Center, families are able to receive a variety of services, often through more than one Tammy Lynn program during the course of a person’s lifetime. Tammy Lynn Center is one of the very few agencies offering such a broad array of services to meet the total need of the individuals we serve.

Programs and Services:

Early Childhood Intervention Services: Tammy Lynn Center was an early pioneer in the state of North Carolina with Early Childhood Intervention Services, serving children from birth to five years old who are at risk for developmental delay or with a specific diagnosis.

Therapists provide educational support to the families of young children with special needs and work directly with the children, in their home, to help them strengthen skills and meet developmental milestones. Day Services: Tammy Lynn Center offers Day Services including a school for children with developmental disabilities ages 3-22 along with before/after school care and summer programs. The Center also offers an inclusive preschool program for children with or without developmental disabilities. This program allows for typically developing 3-5 year olds and their peers with developmental disabilities to participate in activities together that promote teamwork and a greater understanding of diversity. Respite Care Program: Respite care provides temporary relief for families caring for children or adults with developmental disabilities. Caring for a loved one with special needs can be exhausting and caretakers may need a much needed break. Often it isn’t possible to simply ask a neighbor to watch your child because of his or her medically fragile condition. Tammy Lynn provides trained staff members to care for the family’s loved one, giving their caregivers peace of mind without worry or stress. Residential Services: Tammy Lynn Center provides a home, 24-hours-a-day, seven days a week, for thirty children and adults on campus. All residents are provided the love, care, support and training programs to enhance independence and quality of life to the fullest extent possible. We also operate three group homes in our community that serve 4 adults in each home. The adults lead robust, active lives enjoying recreation and leisure activities such as arts & crafts and volunteering in the community with organizations like Meals on Wheels. Our 24/7 staff also provide the necessary supports and transportation so individuals who reside in these homes can access their community and go to a movie, the library, shopping, dining out and attend other community events.

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Tammy Lynn Nursing and Therapy: Tammy Lynn Center has a full team of nurses that offer 24-hour care to the residents on campus and students in the day services program and a full support services in the areas of physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech/language pathology, psychological supports, nutrition, social work, and developmental therapies. Therapies are provided in the school and child care setting, in the residential setting, and in individuals’ private homes. Behavioral consultative and crisis prevention services are also provided.

Ways You Can Help:

Donate: Tammy Lynn Center relies on the support of financial and in-kind donors to achieve our mission. Your generosity to Tammy Lynn Memorial Foundation makes a difference every day in the lives of the individuals we serve. Volunteer: You or your corporate/civic group can spend time volunteering in the direct care of the residents and students or assisting with campus beautification. Events: Tammy Lynn Center is pleased to host special events that help build awareness for the mission and raise money. Save the Date for the Triangle’s best culinary experience at A Toast to the Triangle ™ on March 9th, 2014. Enjoy food and beverage from the area’s finest restaurants, beverage purveyors and bakeries, bid on decadent silent auction packages and support Tammy Lynn Center! Learn more about Tammy Lynn Center and ways to be involved by visiting us online (www.tammylynncenter.org) or calling 919-832-3909.

facing page: Harper learns and practices social development skills

in Tammy Lynn Center’s Building Blocks Developmental Playgroup. this page: Alvin, a Tammy Lynn Center student, enjoys learning outside

under the gazebo A featured cake at the 27th Annual A Toast to the Triangle ™

739 Chappell Dr., Raleigh, NC 27606 919-832-3909 tammylynncenter.org

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SPECIAL NEEDS

Resources Access and Transportation

23 Disability Support and Advocacy

Adaptive Equipment/Assistive Technology 23 Educational Evaluation ADD/ADHD

23 Financial/Legal/Insurance Planning

Autism Spectrum and Related Disorders 27 Giftedness

33 Music/Art/Recreational Therapy

41

33 Neurological, Neuromuscular, and 35

Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders

43

35 Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy 43

Blind/Vision Impaired

27 Government Agencies and Services

35 Recreation and Enrichment

43

Child Care

29 Home Health Care/Respite Care

35 Special Education Eligibility/Support

46

Chronic Health Conditions

29 Independent Living Resources

37 Special Education Programs

47

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

29 Learning Disabilities and Challenges

37 Speech/Language Therapy

48

Developmental Delays and Disabilities

31 Mental Health/Behavioral Counseling

39

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ACCESS and TRANSPORTATION 2U Transit of North Carolina 800 N. Mangum St., Ste. 104, Durham 919-687-4808 www.2utransitnc.com Paratransit service for the Triangle and Triad AA&D Transportation Inc. 1001 Navahoe Dr., Ste. GL-101, Raleigh 919-877-9599 aadtransportation.net Handicapped-accessible transportation. Evans Transportation 5312 Trestlewood Ln., Raleigh 919-427-5635 Handicapped-accessible transportation. GoTriangle 919-485-RIDE (7433) gotriangle.org Partnership of local public transportation agencies; website includes links to services for residents with disabilities. Kingdom Transportation 4701 New Bern Ave., Ste. 102, Raleigh 919-231-0707 kingdomtransportation.com Handicapped-accessible transportation. Leisure Taxi and Transportation 608 W. Johnson St., Ste. 13, Raleigh 919-833-6169 leisuretaxi.com Handicapped-accessible transportation. MET’R Transport 919-544-4111 Paratransit and handicappedaccessible transportation.

Safety Wheelchair Co. 4000 Wake Forest Rd., Ste. 119, Raleigh 919-819-3775 safetywheelchairco.com Handicapped-accessible transportation.

Generations-Tadpole Lending Library 205-G W. E St., Butner 919-575-3093 tadpole.org Program providing free low-tech assistive technology devices and toys.

Stalls Medical/Adaptive Vans Inc. 7980 Chapel Hill Rd., Ste. 101, Cary 919-233-0732 stallsmedical.com Mobility and accessibility equipment, including custom and converted vans.

Learning Ally 800-221-4792 learningally.org Free audio textbook library for eligible students who are visually impaired or have LD.

Tri-Star Medical Transport 207 N. Main St., Ste. 101, Rolesville 919-878-1661 www.tristarmed.com Emergency and non-emergency medical transport. Van Products 2521 Noblin Rd., Raleigh 800-662-7572 vanproducts.com Wheelchair-accessible vehicles and other mobility products.

ADAPTIVE EQUIPMENT/ ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AbleData 800-227-0216 abledata.com Database of assistive technology; website includes consumers’ guide and funding sources. AblePlay ableplay.org Reviews and ratings of play products for children with special needs. eSpecial Needs 877-664-4565 especialneeds.com Adaptive equipment including toys, baby gear and mobility aids.

The M.O.R.G.A.N. Project themorganproject.org/get-help Gently used disability equipment exchange program. All items are free, but donations are welcome. New Motion 1001 American Wy., Apex 800-488-9170 atgrehab.com Pediatric mobility and seating products including wheelchairs, walking aids and car seats. Formerly Carolina Mobility and Seating. North Carolina Assistive Technology Program (NCATP) 4900 Waters Edge Dr., Ste. 250, Raleigh 919-233-7075 ncatp.org State agency providing information, demonstrations and short-term loans of assistive devices, plus used equipment listings and referrals to funding sources. Relay North Carolina www.relaync.com Free service providing telephone accessibility to people who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or speech disabled.

Safety Wheelchair Co. 4000 Wake Forest Rd., Ste. 119, Raleigh 919-819-3775 safetywheelchairco.com Wheelchair and power chair rentals. Stalls Medical/Adaptive Vans Inc. 7980 Chapel Hill Rd., Ste. 101, Cary 919-233-0732 stallsmedical.com Wheelchairs for children. Toys “R” Us Toy Guide for Differently-Abled Kids toysrus.com/differentlyabled Toys for children with special needs. Tubie Whoobies tubiewhoobies.com Kid-friendly G-tube pads and other products.

ADD/ADHD BodyTalk Global Healing 900-A Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-357-8003 BodyTalkChapelHill.com Holistic health care practice using biofeedback and brain training to reduce stress, re-integrate senses and promote well-being naturally. Pediatric applications include sensory integration disorder, autism spectrum, ADHD and learning difficulties. Duke ADHD Program 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 300, Durham 919-681-0015 dukehealth.org/services/attention_ deficit_hyperactivity_disorder Program providing services for children with ADHD or LD, including psychoeducational testing, medication management and consultation, school consultations, and individual, group and family therapy. Part of the Duke Child & Family Study Center. 

Find out about A ssistive Technology The North Carolina Assistive Technology Program (NCATP) blog, The Assistive Technology Daily (attraining.org/ atdaily), includes information about different kinds of assistive technology, dates for upcoming workshops and webinars, and other useful information for families researching products for a child or adult with special needs. “Parents can research and form their own opinions

about how these technologies meet the needs of their children,” says Lynne Deese, who facilitates the blog for NCATP. “Parents of school-age children may want to search such categories as Learning, Cognition and Developmental, and the ever-popular Mobile Devices that includes many of our iPad and Android apps. Their comments on products are also welcomed.”

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Cale Herndon, CFM, CSNA Merrill Lynch

C

YoUR TRUSTED SpEcIAl NEEDS ADVISoR

ale first joined Merrill Lynch and the financial services industry in 2001 just weeks after 9/11. He has a comprehensive approach to wealth management focusing on developing appropriate long term strategies for high-net-worth individuals and their families to grow their business, preserve their wealth and help them meet their long-term financial goals. Cale is particularly interested in assisting families with special needs and holds a Certified Special Needs Advisor (CSNA) designation, for advisors with specific training in helping families with special-needs children and Eldercare training. This gives him the ability to understand and address special needs issues and provide team-approach solutions to each family situation. The Certified Financial Manager and Certified Special Needs Advisor designations, are internal Merrill Lynch self-study curriculum’s based on a variety of wealth management topics and end of course exams. The CSNA training covers a variety of topics, including special needs planning, special needs trusts and trustees, personal and legal concerns facing families of children with disabilities, and building collaborative relationships with special needs attorneys and disability advocates that foster an integrated financial strategy.

Merrill Lynch

You may also benefit from the Merrill Lynch Special Needs Planning Tools and Services for Special Needs Trustees. Merrill Lynch has developed three unique special needs planning tools to assist Financial Advisors and their clients in determining financial security for special needs loved ones: the Special Needs Calculator, the Special Needs Planning Workbook and the Financial Foundation’s Disability Supplemental Questionnaire. Please ask Cale about these resources. Trustees of special needs trusts often require assistance with trust administration and investment services to help them fulfill their fiduciary responsibilities. Cale’s approach to wealth management is consultative, conservative and goal oriented. He utilizes a disciplined process where he takes the time to listen to and review clients’ financial situations, preferences and goals and then, keeping financial security in mind, offers recommendations for diversified asset allocations designed to address their individual expectations and needs. His goal is always to

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meet financial goals with the least risk possible. Lastly, he continues the process with discussions which cover a wide range of opportunities to include liabilities, education planning, investments, insurance, retirement, estate planning services and philanthropy. Cale is a 1994 graduate of North Carolina State University, where he received a B.A. in Multi-Disciplinary Studies with a concentration in Geopolitics. He is currently an officer in the North Carolina National Guard, where he flies AH-64D Apache Longbow Attack Helicopters. He is a recipient of the Air Medal for actions in Iraq in 2009. Cale and his wife, Katie, live in Cary with their two year old daughter and two dogs.

5000 Valleystone Dr., Cary, NC 27513

919-319-7125 http://fa.ml.com/cale.herndon

AN ADVISOR WHO KNOWS YOUR CHILD’S

SPECIAL NEEDS ARE CHALLENGING.

Merrill Lynch

A Merrill Lynch Financial Advisor can help you address the complex issues that confront you and your family while you provide a lifetime of support to your child with special needs. Our team of professionals work together to find appropriate strategies for the financial, social and legal issues facing those who care for a child with a disability. Call today to learn more. Cale Herndon, CFM, CSNA Financial Advisor (919) 319-7125 Merrill Lynch 5000 Valleystone Drive Cary, NC 27513 http://fa.ml.com/cale.herndon

The Bull Symbol, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management and The Power of the Right Advisor are trademarks or registered trademarks of Bank of America Corporation. Neither Merrill Lynch nor its Financial Advisors provide legal advice. Please review any planned financial transactions or arrangements that may have legal implications with your personal attorney. Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, a registered broker-dealer and member SIPC, and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. Trust and fiduciary services are provided by Merrill Lynch Trust Company, a division of Bank of America, N.A., member FDIC, a wholly owned subsidiary of BAC. Investment products:

Are Not FDIC Insured

Are Not Bank Guaranteed

May Lose Value

MLPF&S and Bank of America, N.A., make available investment products sponsored, managed, distributed or provided by companies that are affiliates of BAC or in which BAC has a substantial economic interest including BofA™ Global Capital Management. © 2013 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. AD-07-13-0917 AR330BB2-11-12 445110PM-07/2013

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a d v e r t i s i n g F e at U r e

Abilitations Children’s Therapy

A

providing therapy with a holistic approach

Abilitations

bilitations Children’s Therapy is a therapist-owned practice Raleigh, NC dedicated to providing qual-

ity therapy services to children ages birth to 21. These

services include physical, occupational, speech and music therapy.

Since opening our doors in 2008, our mission has been

to focus on the abilities of all children, not the disabilities.

As Scott Hamilton wonderfully stated, “The only disability in life is a bad attitude!” Our practice strives to be a place

where kids can thrive and achieve their personal goals and parents can turn to for support.

Abilitations has grown from two physical therapists

with a vision to a multidisciplinary staff of 14 in three and a half years. However, even though we have

grown and hope to continue to expand, we will strive

to maintain our “family-centered” approach in all that

we do. We want each child and their family to feel like they have been heard and that someone cares.

children’s ages 5-12 which was created 3 years

ago. We put on a musical production each summer to give our kids the opportunity to dance and sing. The owners of Abilitations Children’s Therapy are

also founding partners in Sassafras All-Children’s Playground, a project to bring an all-accessible playground to Raleigh (sassafrasplay.org).

“We love Abilitations setup and would recommend them to anyone who would listen! My daughter is back to

We feel we accomplish this not only by providing our traditional therapies (physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, feeding therapy) but also

running, jumping, dancing and getting herself into anything she wants.” – Lia, Neave’s mom

offering adjunct therapies and programs including

music therapy, nutritional counseling, fitness training, yoga for the special needs child and social skill

groups. We take a holistic approach to treat the

Please call for a facility tour and consultation to

discuss how we can best meet the needs of your child.

whole child and feel this sets us apart.

In addition to providing therapy services to children, Abilitations Children’s Therapy believes that every child deserves the opportunity to play and have

fun. We have developed programs over the years to give children with special needs access to the same things their peers enjoy. Abilities Indoor Soccer League is a co-ed soccer league for

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11030-101 Raven Ridge Rd.

Raleigh, NC 27614 • 919-844-6611 actwc.com

Move to Grow 3326 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Bldg. D, Durham 919-475-6610 movetogrow.com Developmental therapy program for children with challenges including ASD, ADD/ADHD, LD, anxiety, and developmental delays and disabilities. Therapeutic tools include yoga, functional neurology, developmental movement, social skills and imaginative play. Website includes dates of parent and teacher workshops.  Orenstein Solutions 1100 N.W. Maynard Rd., Ste. 140, Cary 919-428-2766 orensteinsolutions.com Private practice offering assessment and treatment for children with ADHD. Triangle Area CHADD (Children and Adults with AttentionDeficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) 919-229-9233 trianglechadd.com Nonprofit organization serving individuals with ADHD and their families. Triangle Psychoeducational Consultants 3820 Merton Dr., Raleigh 919-789-8989 www.trilogyschool.com/tpc Private practice offering psychoeducational assessment, consultation and therapy for children with ADHD and LD. Wynns Family Psychology 130 Preston Executive Dr., Ste. 202, Cary 919-467-7777 wynnsfamilypsychology.com Private practice of Ph.D.-level psychologists providing evaluation and support for children with ADHD and LD.

AUTISM SPECTRUM AND RELATED DISORDERS The Aspen Center 4328 Bland Rd., Raleigh 919-981-6588 aspencenter.net Center offering therapy, preschool and summer camps for children with autism and developmental delays. Autism Parenting Solutions 919-885-4273 autismparentingsolutions.com Private consultants providing re-

searched-based techniques, practical solutions and advocacy for parents of children with autism. Autism Society of North Carolina 505 Oberlin Rd., Ste. 230, Raleigh 800-442-2762 autismsociety-nc.org Organization providing support and promoting enrichment opportunities for individuals on the autism spectrum and their families; website includes links to local chapters and resources. BodyTalk Global Healing 900-A Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-357-8003 BodyTalkChapelHill.com Holistic health care practice using biofeedback and brain training to reduce stress, re-integrate senses and promote well-being naturally. Pediatric applications include sensory integration disorder, autism spectrum, ADHD and learning difficulties. Carolina Center for ABA and Autism Treatment 111 MacKenan Dr., Cary 919-371-2848 carolinacenterforaba.com Center providing consultation and tutoring for children with autism and related disorders. The Collaborative Autism Treatment Campus (CAT Campus) 3209 Yorktown Ave., Durham 919-213-9840 cat-campus.com A multi-disciplinary group of professionals who work together to provide a range of therapy services to children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families. Duke Children’s Autism Program 402 Trent Dr., Durham 919-668-5559 dukehealth.org/services/ developmental-behavioral-pediatrics/ programs/autism-clinic Major academic center offering assessment, consultation, medication management, genetic evaluation and therapy options for children with autism spectrum disorder and related concerns. Mendel Psychological Associates 3727 Benson Dr., Raleigh 919-876-1313 drmendel.com Private practice offering assessment, individual and family therapy, and support groups for children with

Asperger’s and high-functioning autism. Meredith Autism Program 3800 Hillsborough St., Raleigh 919-760-8080 meredith.edu/autism Specialized early intervention, teaching and behavior modification program for children ages 20 months to 7 years with autism and their families. Move to Grow 3326 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Bldg. D, Durham 919-475-6610 movetogrow.com Developmental therapy program for children with challenges including ASD, ADD/ADHD, LD, anxiety, and developmental delays and disabilities. Therapeutic tools include yoga, functional neurology, developmental movement, social skills and imaginative play. Website includes dates of parent and teacher workshops.  Music Speaks Autism, Division of Community Suzuki Music School 57 Westfield St., Pittsboro 919-842-8145 communitysuzuki.org Program offering music instruction for children and young adults with autism spectrum disorder/PDD. Orenstein Solutions 1100 N.W. Maynard Rd., Ste. 140, Cary 919-428-2766 orensteinsolutions.com Private practice offering assessment and treatment for children with autism/Asperger’s and other concerns. Pathways Treatment Center 103 Salem Towne Ct., Apex 919-387-1818 pathwaystreatmentcenter.org Private program offering families of children with autism education, tools and support for cognitive and emotional development through communication therapy, occupational therapy and Relationship Development Intervention (RDI™). A Small Miracle Inc. 7404 Chapel Hill Rd., Unit K, Raleigh 919-854-4400 asmallmiracleinc.com CAP-MR/DD agency providing services to individuals with disabilities, with an emphasis on autism spectrum disorder.

TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication-Handicapped Children) 100 Renee Lynne Ct., Carrboro 919-966-2174 teacch.com Service, training and research program for all individuals with autism spectrum disorder; website includes links to regional centers across N.C. Wynns Family Psychology 130 Preston Executive Dr., Ste. 202, Cary 919-467-7777 wynnsfamilypsychology.com Private practice of Ph.D.-level psychologists providing evaluation and support for children with Asperger’s and social skills deficits.

BLIND/VISION IMPAIRED Governor Morehead School for the Blind 301 Ashe Ave., Raleigh 919-733-6382 www.governormorehead.net State-run residential school serving residents ages 5-21 who are blind or visually impaired. Preschool provides community-based early intervention and preschool services to children birth-5 years with diagnosed visual impairments. Learning Ally 800-221-4792 learningally.org Free audio textbook library for eligible students who are visually impaired or have LD. N.C. Division of Services for the Blind/DHHS 866-222-1546 ncdhhs.gov/dsb State division offering services such as medical eye care, independent living skills, assistive or adaptive technology, and school-to-work transition programs. N.C. Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped 1841 Capital Blvd., Raleigh 888-388-2460 statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/lbph State agency that circulates books and magazines for eligible persons who cannot use regular printed material because of a disability. North Carolina Council of the Blind 408 Ward St., Graham 800-344-7113 nccounciloftheblind.org

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Bayada Pediatrics ChooSING A homE hEAlTh CARE PRoVIDER FoR YoUR ChIlD

H

ome health care services provide assistance to children with complex medical conditions, as well as offering support to parents. Asking home health care providers these questions will help you learn more about them and the individuals who will be coming into your home.

• • •

• • • • • •

• • •

28

How long has your company been serving the community?

Does your company specialize in pediatric care? Is your company certified by any accrediting body, such as CHAP (Community Health Accreditation Program) or The Joint Commission, and state licensed?

Andrea, RN and Kasey.

How do you ensure that your nurses have the skills to care for my child? What sort of background checks are performed before a nurse is hired? Are your health care professionals fully insured?

As a parent, what sort of participation can I expect in planning my child’s care and routine? Do you consult with my child’s physicians? How will the nurses know what my child needs? How will the nurse interact with my child when not performing medical procedures? How many nurses will be caring for my child? Can I meet the nurses before they start to work? What happens if a nurse isn’t a good fit for our family?

How will I know which nurse is scheduled for the day? How are schedule changes communicated to me? How does the office cover my child’s care if the nurse is unable to work a scheduled shift?

• • •

Do you protect your clients with written standard procedures and policies?

Will the nurses be respectful of our home, belongings, and beliefs? If I have a question or concern, is someone available 24 hours a day, every day?

Contact us To arrange care or learn about pediatric home health care services, call the BAYADA Raleigh office at 919-785-2900 or our Durham office at 919-286-5002.

Who coordinates all of the services your home health care agency will provide to my child and family?

Will your company assist me in obtaining any medical supplies or equipment that my child needs? Will your company help me in getting my home health care services approved, maintained, and paid for?

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Raleigh • 919-785-2900 Durham • 919-286-5002

Advocacy organization for individuals who are blind or visually impaired; website includes local resources. Triangle Radio Reading Service 211 E. Six Forks Rd., Ste. 103, Raleigh 919-832-5138 trianglereadingservice.org Nonprofit agency that connects people who are blind and printimpaired to each other, their communities and families by delivering news, information and entertainment using the latest audio technology.

CHILD CARE Child Care Networks Inc. 117 E. Salisbury St., Pittsboro 919-542-6644 childcarenetworks.org Chatham County organization providing information and referrals for child care and child care subsidies. Child Care Services Association • 1829 E. Franklin St., Bldg. 1000, Chapel Hill, 919-967-3272 • 1201 S. Briggs Ave., Ste. 200, Durham, 919-403-6950 childcareservices.org Triangle-area organization providing information and referrals for child care and child care subsidies. N.C. Division of Child Development/DHHS 319 Chapanoke Rd., Ste. 120, Raleigh 919-662-4499 ncchildcare.net State agency responsible for regulating child care facilities; website includes searchable database of licensed providers and resources for parents. Partnership for Children of Johnston County 1406-A S. Pollock St., Selma 919-202-0002 pfcjc.org Johnston County organization providing information and referrals for child care and early childhood education.

CHRONIC HEALTH CONDITIONS Alliance of AIDS Services – Carolina 919-834-2437 aas-c.org Nonprofit organization offering services and support for people living with HIV/AIDS, their loved ones, caregivers and communities. American Cancer Society 8300 Health Park, Ste. 10, Raleigh 919-334-5218 cancer.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for people affected by cancer. American Diabetes Association 2418 Blue Ridge Rd., Ste. 206, Raleigh 919-743-5400 diabetes.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for people affected by diabetes. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America 800-727-8462 aafa.org Nonprofit organization dedicated to improving quality of life for people with asthma and allergic diseases through education, advocacy and research. Celiac Disease Foundation 818-716-1513 celiac.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for people affected by celiac disease. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation – Carolinas Chapter 2301 Stonehenge Dr., Ste. 200, Raleigh 800-822-9941 cff.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for people affected by cystic fibrosis.

The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) 800-929-4040 foodallergy.org Nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness, providing advocacy and education, and advancing research on behalf of those affected by food allergies and anaphylaxis. Website contains information for managing food allergies. Make-A-Wish Foundation – Eastern N.C. Chapter 2880 Slater Rd., Ste. 105, Morrisville 919-821-7111 eastnc.wish.org Nonprofit organization that grants the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions. National Kidney Foundation Serving the Carolinas, N.C. Region 4701 Hedgemore Dr., Ste. 810, Charlotte 877-858-3808 kidneync.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for people affected by kidney and urinary tract diseases. N.C. FACES (Food Allergic Children Excelling Safely) ncfaces.org Volunteer support group for families dealing with food allergies; website includes calendar of group events. North Carolina Sickle Cell Syndrome Program/DHHS 866-627-2355 www.ncsicklecellprogram.org State-run program offering services and support for people affected by sickle cell disease, as well as education and genetic counseling; website contains links to local resources. Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance of the Carolinas 864-221-9869 tsalliance.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for people affected by Tuberous Sclerosis.

DEAF/HARD OF HEARING Beginnings 302 Jefferson St., Ste. 110, Raleigh 919-715-4092 ncbegin.org Nonprofit agency providing an impartial approach to meeting the needs of families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Carolina Children’s Communicative Disorders Program (CCCDP) 5501 Fortune’s Ridge Dr., Ste. A, Durham 919-419-1449 med.unc.edu/earandhearing/ cccdpgrant Program through UNC-Chapel Hill that provides hearing aids or implant assistance to children ages birth-21. Center for the Acquisition of Spoken Languages through Listening Enrichment (CASTLE) 5501 Fortune’s Ridge Dr., Ste. A, Durham 919-419-1428 med.unc.edu/earandhearing/castle Program through UNC-Chapel Hill for children ages birth-21 who are deaf or hard of hearing. Services include toddler and preschool groups, auditory/verbal therapy and speech/ language therapy. Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Support Program 919-324-3890 ec.ncpublicschools.gov/ disability-resources/ deaf-hard-of-hearing State program serving as a resource to local education agencies and the two state-run schools for the deaf. Consultants are available to assist schools in program planning and development, training, mentoring and technical assistance. Eastern North Carolina School for the Deaf 1311 Hwy. 301 S., Wilson 252-237-2450 www.encsd.net

referral resources help parents find Child Care When Tennille Carter of Durham was looking for a new child care center for her son, who has mild cerebral palsy, she contacted the Triangle-area Child Care Services Association (childcareservices.org) for referrals. “The challenging part for me was that he needs a lot of attention,” she says. “I knew I wanted a 5-star facility with large rooms for him to play in and enough capacity to allow him to move up with his age group. [Child Care

Services] gave me a list of center recommendations, and finding the right place was easy because they had already narrowed the list to those that fit our needs.” Valuable state and local resources, such as Child Care Services, take much of the guesswork out of the process when looking for quality day care and early childhood centers. Find additional child care resources at carolinaparent.com/directories/childcare. carolinaparent.com | Exceptional child 2013-14

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A d v e r t i s i n G F e At u r e

Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities Autism reseArch And eArly development study

T

he Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities at the University of North Carolina at Chapel

Hill is looking for participants for a groundbreaking research study. As part of this study, your child can be

Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities

monitored from infancy for biological and behavioral characteristics associated with autism.

Currently, UNC is searching for participants who

meet the following criteria:

Are between 0-6 months of age (parents who are expecting are also eligible)

• Have an older sibling with autism What is it?

The main purpose of the study is to examine the brains of infants who have an older sibling with

autism since siblings of those with autism have a higher risk of later being diagnosed with an ASD than does the general population. Why should I participate?

The data gathered in this study will provide

important information regarding early brain

development in autism, which may in turn provide

clues that will eventually result in early interventions to improve outcomes for children with autism. Also, participating in the study isn’t the only way to get involved! Please pass this information along to

friends, family, teachers, clinicians, or anyone who may be interested.

natural sleep (no sedation is used). Between

visits to the assessment site, there will be phone

conversations as well as genetic and environmental data collection.

What does all of this cost?

These services are provided at no cost to your family. After each visit, you will receive $50 for

completing assessments as well as an additional $50 for a successful MRI scan. The study also covers all travel related expenses (e.g. flights,

hotels, rental car, gas/mileage for use of personal vehicle, etc.), and you will be reimbursed for food related expenses. Additionally, your family will

receive detailed feedback on the developmental assessment and a review of MRI scans by a neuroradiologist.

What do I have to do?

Once a family is enrolled in this study, they will travel to Chapel Hill, NC for a comprehensive

series of developmental, non-invasive assessments completed at four separate time points between

the ages of 3 and 24 months.  Also, during these visits, the infant will receive an MRI scan during

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UNC Chapel Hill CB#3367 Chapel Hill, NC 27599 • 800-793-5715 ibisnetwork.org • ibisnetwork@gmail.com

State-run residential and day school for children in grades K-12 who are deaf or hard of hearing. Listening and Spoken Language Knowledge Center 202-337-5220 listeningandspokenlanguage.org Nonprofit advocacy and support organization that provides families of children with hearing impairment financial assistance for educational and enrichment opportunities, assistive technology, and therapy. N.C. Division of Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing/DHHS 1100 Navaho Dr., Raleigh 800-851-6099 ncdhhs.gov/dsdhh State division enabling access and communication for residents who are deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind; website includes resources for adaptive technology and sign language interpreters.

Beyond Limits Learning Inc. 919-656-2901 beyondlimitslearninginc.com Private practice providing developmental and speech/language therapy to children with diagnoses including autism, Down syndrome, speech delays and behavioral concerns. Certified bilingual speech therapist on staff. Carolina Behavioral Care Clinic • 4102 Ben Franklin Blvd., Durham, 919-972-7700 • 209 Millstone Dr., Ste. A, Hillsborough, 919-245-5400 carolinabehavioralcare.com Private practice providing assessment and treatment of children with developmental disabilities, LD and ADD/ADHD.

DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS AND DISABILITIES

Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (CIDD) 101 Renee Lynne Ct., Carrboro 919-966-5171 cidd.unc.edu Institute at UNC-Chapel Hill offering services to address the challenges of developmental disabilities.

AHB Psychological Services 3326 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Bldg. D, Durham 919-401-8090 ahbwellness.com Private practice providing assessment of and treatment for children and adults with developmental disabilities, LD and ADD/ADHD.

Community Connections Healthcare Services 282 W. Millbrook Rd., Raleigh 919-665-4673 cchs-nc.com Agency providing mental health and developmental disability services for children and adults.

Alliance Behavioral Healthcare • 414 E. Main St., Durham • 500 Falls of Neuse Rd., Raleigh 800-510-9132 alliancebhc.org Mental health, intellectual/developmental disability and substance abuse services management for Cumberland, Durham, Johnston and Wake counties.

Cornerstone Family Services 415 Lilliput Ln., Wake Forest 919-630-4191 cfskids.com Private practice offering services for children birth-3 years with developmental delays and disabilities to promote cognitive, social, self-help, sensory-based play and early communication activities with an emphasis on increasing positive behaviors.

The Arc of North Carolina 343 E. Six Forks Rd., Ste. 320, Raleigh 800-662-8706 arcnc.org Programs, resources, services and advocacy for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities; website contains links to local chapters.

Dynamic Therapy for Kids 3100 N.C. Hwy. 55, Ste. 102, Cary 919-363-5000 dynamictherapyforkids.com Private practice offering physical, occupational, speech/language and developmental therapies for children.

The Aspen Center 4328 Bland Rd., Raleigh 919-981-6588 aspencenter.net Center offering therapy, preschool and summer camp for children with communication, fine motor and sensory processing issues.

Easter Seals UCP North Carolina and Virginia Charlie Gaddy Children’s Center 314 Chapanoke Rd., Raleigh 919-773-2020 eastersealsucpcenters.com/center/ raleigh Inclusive developmental day center

providing educational activities and child care, plus pediatric speech, occupational, physical and developmental therapies. Operated by Easter Seals United Cerebral Palsy. Exceptional Children Preschool Program/N.C. Office of Early Learning 919-981-5300 www.earlylearning.nc.gov/ PreKindergarten/PreschoolEC/ indexNEW08.asp State-run program serving children ages 3 and 4 and pre-K 5-year-olds with developmental delays, autism, visual or hearing impairments, speech/language impairments and other health concerns. Website includes links to information about pre-K programs. Family Psychiatry & Psychology Associates 1400 Crescent Green, Ste. 120, Cary 919-233-4131 fppa.com Private practice providing assessment of and treatment for children and adults with developmental disabilities, LD and ADD/ADHD. Family Support Network of North Carolina (FSN-NC) Central Directory of Resources 325 Pittsboro St., Chapel Hill 800-852-0042 fsp.unc.edu Statewide network of local programs providing support to families with children who have special needs. The Central Directory of Resources provides information and referrals for service providers and families. Affiliated with the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Johnston County Mental Health Center 521 N. Brightleaf Blvd., Smithfield 919-989-5500 johnstonnc.com/mentalhealth Mental health, developmental disability and substance abuse services management for Johnston County. Learning Together Inc. Community Program 568 E. Lenoir St., Ste. 204, Raleigh 919-856-5200 learningtogether.org/ community-program Nonprofit organization providing developmental therapy for children ages birth-5 years in the home or preschool environment and play groups to encourage social and communication skills.

Move to Grow 3326 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Bldg. D, Durham 919-475-6610 movetogrow.com Developmental therapy program for children with challenges including ASD, ADD/ADHD, LD, anxiety, and developmental delays and disabilities. Therapeutic tools include yoga, functional neurology, developmental movement, social skills and imaginative play. Website includes dates of parent and teacher workshops.  N.C. Infant-Toddler Program/ DHHS 919-707-5520 beearly.nc.gov State program that serves children ages birth-3 years with developmental delays and other special needs through local Children’s Developmental Services Agencies (CDSAs); website has links to local agencies. North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities 3125 Poplarwood Ct., Ste. 200, Raleigh 800-357-6916 nccdd.org Gubernatorial-appointed council working to ensure that people with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to services, support and opportunities; programs include Partners in Policymaking, a training initiative that prepares and motivates people with disabilities and their families to be effective advocates in seeking improved policies and supports.  OPC (Orange, Person, Chatham) Area Program 800-233-6834 cardinalinnovations.org/opc Mental health, developmental disability and substance abuse services management for Orange, Person and Chatham counties. Project Enlightenment 501 S. Boylan Ave., Raleigh 919-856-7774 projectenlightenment.wcpss.net Program providing early intervention screening and educational support for parents and teachers of Wake County children ages birth-5 years. Screening services are available for children 3-5 years of age.

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Davis Family Chiropractic, PLLC OFFERING HELP FOR CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DIFFICULTIES Building Bridges 4 Kids with Neurodevelopmental

Disorders is a unique program to help children with ADD/ADHD, Sensory Processing Disorder, and

Dr. Alisha Davis

Autism Spectrum Disorders. Building Bridges is a natural and safe alternative treatment for children

with Neurodevelopmental disorders focusing on a 3 prong approach:

• Specific, Chiropractic Adjustments • Neural Integration Therapy and Exercises • Biomedical Intervention and Functional Nutrition Chiropractic - The Chiropractic Adjustment is the essential cornerstone of our program,

Nutrition - An examination of your child’s diet is

rodevelopmental Disorders have overstressed,

your child’s gastrointestinal system. Eliminating

Vertebral subluxations caused by birth trauma, falls

your child’s behaviors, their ability to learn, and the

which makes it unique. Many children with Neu-

critical to help determine the best way to repair

disorganized, and immature Nervous Systems.

inflammation and fungal overgrowth can impact

or bumps, can contribute to an immature nervous

health of your child.

body. Removing subluxations can help to “con-

About the Doctor - Dr. Alisha Davis has been prac-

proper communication between the brain and the

a special interest in the treatment of children with

system or a “disconnect” between the brain and the nect the dots” of the nervous system and allow for

ticing since 1999, treating patients of all ages, with

body for proper neurological developmental.

Neurodevelopmental Disorders. She has received

NeuroIntegrative Exercise - A NeuroSensory As-

from the Academy of Chiropractic Family Practice.

sessment will be performed to evaluate posture,

her Diplomate in Pediatrics and Pregnancy Care

balance, coordination, gross and fine motor skills,

and primitive reflexes. Many children with N.D. may

never have reached their developmental milestones or may have been delayed. The persistence of

the Primitive Reflexes beyond the first year of life

can impact fine and gross motor skills, social and academic learning. Dr. Davis will perform specific

exercises in the office to address your child’s weaknesses. The child’s home exercise program will

be tailored to their individual needs to encourage

optimal sensory processing to improve academics, social skills, and behavior.

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Davis Family Chiropractic, PLLC 919-615-2257 davischironc.com

RHA Howell Inc. 4700 Homewood Ct., Ste. 300, Raleigh 919-803-2960 rhahowell.org Company providing services from infancy onward to N.C. residents with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities. Also provides residential care in the community with appropriate supports based on individual needs. Tammy Lynn Center for Developmental Disabilities 739 Chappell Dr., Raleigh 919-832-3909 tammylynncenter.org Nonprofit center offering educational, residential, therapeutic and family support services to people with developmental disabilities. Triangle Down Syndrome Network 600 New Waverly Pl., Ste. 101, Cary 919-803-0515 triangledownsyndrome.org Nonprofit network that supports, educates and connects individuals with Down syndrome and their families; website offers information about community resources and social/support events such as D.A.D.S. (Dads Appreciating Down Syndrome) and GRANDS (Grandparent Support).

DISABILITY SUPPORT AND ADVOCACY Able to Serve 157 Technology Dr., Garner 919-779-5545 abletoserve.org Faith-based nonprofit organization creating opportunities for individuals with special needs to be active and successful in the community. Disability Rights North Carolina 2626 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 550, Raleigh 877-235-4210 disabilityrightsnc.org Nonprofit legal services organization protecting the rights of all N.C.

citizens with disabilities through individual and systems advocacy. Easter Seals United Cerebral Palsy (ES UCP) N.C. & VA 5171 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 400, Raleigh 800-662-7119 nc.eastersealsucp.com Nonprofit organization serving and supporting people with disabilities and mental health challenges; website contains links to resources for families. Exceptional Children’s Assistance Center 4601 Lake Boone Tr., Ste. G, Raleigh 866-740-4135 ecac-parentcenter.org Nonprofit organization offering services designed to meet the needs of all families, educators and other professionals, with an emphasis on children with disabilities and special health care needs. March of Dimes 6504 Falls of Neuse Rd., Ste. 100, Raleigh 919-781-2481 marchofdimes.com/northcarolina Nonprofit organization committed to preventing birth defects through research and education; website includes links to resources for families. National Inclusion Project 104 T.W. Alexander Dr., Bldg. 1, RTP 919-314-5540 inclusionproject.org Foundation working with youth organizations and research centers to promote full inclusion of individuals with special needs in the community. Special Blessings Inc. 919-366-9589 specialblessingsinc.net Faith-based nonprofit organization for individuals with disabilities and their families; programs include support, play and fellowship groups.

EDUCATIONAL EVALUATION 3-C Family Services 1901 N. Harrison Ave., Ste. 100, Cary 919-677-0101 3cfs.com Private practice offering psychoeducational testing and other mental health services. Carolina Care & Counseling Inc. 8520 Six Forks Rd., Ste. 204, Raleigh 919-676-1497 carolinacareinc.com Private practice offering psychoeducational testing and other mental health services. Chapel Hill Pediatric Psychology 205 Sage Rd., Ste. 201, Chapel Hill 919-942-4166 chppnc.com Private practice offering mental health services including neuropsychological testing and psychoeducational evaluation. Create a Healthy Mind 180 Providence Rd., Ste. 9, Chapel Hill 919-918-1014 drsjparks.com Private practice providing psychoeducational evaluation and mental health services/support for families of children with special needs. Educational Therapy Associates 1829 E. Franklin Square, Chapel Hill 919-933-8880 edutherapync.com Private practice offering testing, consultation and advocacy for families of children with specific learning disabilities and/or dyslexia. Family Psychiatry & Psychology Associates, Educational Service Division 1400 Crescent Green, Ste. 120, Cary 919-233-4131 fppa.com Private practice providing individualized educational services for children in pre-K through college, including

educational evaluations and assistance, skills training, school liaison and advocacy services. Greenlee Psychological & Support Services, PLLC 1415 W. N.C. Highway 54 Hamilton Center, Bldg. 200, Ste. 111, Durham 919-824-5743 greenleepsych.com Private practice specializing in evaluations for children that include developmental, autism spectrum, educational, psychiatric, personality, neuropsychological and aptitude domains. Learning Disabilities Assessment 7201 Hasentree Way, Wake Forest 646-996-9217 Private practice offering evaluations for learning disabilities, ADHA, dyslexia and auditory procession disorder. Mendel Psychological Associates 3727 Benson Dr., Raleigh 919-876-1313 drmendel.com Private practice offering educational assessment and mental health services for children. Orenstein Solutions 1100 N.W. Maynard Rd., Ste. 140, Cary 919-428-2766 orensteinsolutions.com Private practice offering psychoeducational assessment and child mental health services. Success In Mind 324 Blackwell St., Ste. 1240, Durham 877-680-8921 success-in-mind.org Nonprofit learning center that provides strengths-based learning plans and follow-up support for students who struggle with learning, as well as information for parents and teachers.

program facilitates inclusion for kids’ programs Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh has taken advantage of the “Let’s ALL Play” program by the National Inclusion Project, based in Raleigh. Marbles team member Sarah Walston says, “The [Let’s ALL Play] training session really helped drive home how Marbles is working to make play accessible for all children. It provided me with tactics for

making successful connections with our guests with special needs and their families.” The National Inclusion Project works with youth organizations, local parks and recreation departments, community centers and privately run programs to encourage and facilitate inclusion of children with special needs through its “Let’s ALL Play” program.

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Developmental Therapy Associates CHANGING LIVES THROUGH EVERYDAY SUCCESSES!

D

evelopmental Therapy Associates was established in 1982 as one of a handful of pediatric

sensory integration therapy clinics across the US

Developmental Therapy

providing occupational and speech therapy services. Who would have thought that nearly 30 years later

sensory integration would become a common term

that is used across many disciplines. Now known as sensory processng disorder in professional litera-

ture, the successes children and their families have

experienced based on this type of therapy withstand the test of time.

a friend at school or express needs clearly – are the

The number of pediatric practices offering therapy services using a sensory integration framework is a testament to the hard work, perseverance and

dedication of our staff, past and present. Developmental Therapy Associates has been instrumental

in this movement by educating the public along with medical residents from Duke University Medical

Center and the UNC Hospital on the importance of early detection and proper evaluation and therapy.

Our staff has presented workshops and conferences to thousands of parents and professionals across

everyday successes that keep us doing what we do! Throughout its nearly 30 years, DTA has remained on the cutting edge, exploring new intervention

methods and providing therapy services not yet available in other places in the community.

Genuine Berard Auditory Integration Training (AIT), Therapeutic Listening, Craniosacral Therapy,

Interactive Metronome (IM), bike riding lessons, handwriting clinics and social skills groups are some of the programs offered at DTA.

North Carolina, the US and internationally.

DTA continues to be a leader in North Carolina and

the southeast region in providing cutting edge / high

quality occupational and speech & language therapy services both in the natural environment and in our

specialized clinics. The successes that we see during therapy sessions are consistent and exciting. The

success stories we hear from our families are what

drive our saying “Changing Lives Through Everyday

Successes”. It is these everyday successes that our kids and their families experience that make this

work so worthwhile. Hearing a parent say that her or

his child is now able to enjoy a family outing or make

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3514 University Dr., Office #8, Durham, NC • 919-493-7002 875 Walnut St., Ste. #100 Cary, NC • 919-465-3966 developmentaltherapy.com

Triangle Psychoeducational Consultants 3820 Merton Dr., Raleigh 919-789-8989 www.trilogyschool.com/tpc Private practice offering psychoeducational assessment, consultation and therapy for children with concerns including LD and ADHD. Wynns Family Psychology 130 Preston Executive Dr., Ste. 202, Cary 919-467-7777 wynnsfamilypsychology.com Private practice of Ph.D.-level psychologists providing psychoeducational evaluation and support for children with concerns such as ADHD, LD, Asperger’s and social skills deficits.

FINANCIAL/LEGAL/ INSURANCE PLANNING American Institute of CPAs (Certified Public Accountants) 220 Leigh Farm Rd., Durham 919-402-4500 aicpa.org National organization of accountants; website includes searchable database of members. Financial Planning Association fpanet.org Organization representing financial planners, attorneys and insurance agents; website includes resources for families and searchable database of members. First In Families of North Carolina 3109 University Dr., Ste. 100, Durham 919-251-8368, x. 102 fifnc.org Nonprofit organization supporting families of individuals with disabilities. Programs include Lifetime Connections, focusing on wills and estate planning, establishing special needs trusts, and developing long-term support networks.   Life Plan Trust 122 Salem Towne Ct., Apex 888-301-0799 lifeplantrustnc.org Nonprofit program developed by the Arc of North Carolina to help develop comprehensive plans for the future care of persons with disabilities. Merrill Lynch Special Needs Planning 919-319-7125 wealthmanagement.ml.com/wm/ pages/Special-Needs-FinancialServices.aspx

fa.ml.com/cale.herndo Voluntary benefits program providing guidance to families of children with special needs, including a special needs calculator that helps families plan for future costs and how much they have to save and/or invest to ensure the quality of life for their child. MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning 877-638-3375 metlife.com/individual/planning/ special-needs Voluntary benefits program helping families who have dependents with special needs plan for the future; website includes links to local offices. National Association of Personal Financial Advisors 847-483-5400 napfa.org Organization of professionals offering comprehensive financial planning; website includes searchable database of service providers. North Carolina Bar Association 800-662-7660 ncfindalawyer.org Voluntary organization of N.C. legal professionals, providing referrals for guidance in estate planning and other needs. North Carolina Guardianship Association Raleigh 919-266-9204 nc-guardian.org Private nonprofit corporation through the Arc of North Carolina offering LIFEguardianship Training, Certification and Technical Assistant Project to educate parents of special needs adult children about guardianship. Special Needs Alliance 877-572-8472 specialneedsalliance.org National, nonprofit organization of attorneys dedicated to the practice of disability and public benefits law. Special Needs Answers specialneedsanswers.com Organization of attorneys providing special needs planning; website includes comprehensive information on special needs planning and a searchable database of service providers.  A community resource provided by the Academy of Special Needs Planners.

GIFTEDNESS Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) 1121 W. Main St., Durham 919-668-9100 tip.duke.edu Program identifying academically gifted students in grades 4 and up and providing them with opportunities that support and enrich their intellectual development. National Society for the Gifted and Talented 800-572-6748 nsgt.org Nonprofit organization connecting gifted and talented children and youth to opportunities, resources and recognition. North Carolina ASIS (Academic Services and Instructional Support) and AIG (Academically or Intellectually Gifted) www.ncpublicschools.org/ academicservices/gifted State agency tasked with identifying academically and/or intellectually gifted children in North Carolina and providing them with services. North Carolina Association for the Gifted and Talented (NCAGT) 910-326-8463 ncagt.org Organization of teachers, parents, other educators and community leaders who foster a better understanding of the needs and capabilities of academically/intellectually gifted children. Website includes information about PAGE (Partners for the Advancement of Gifted Education), local affiliates of the NCAGT run by volunteers.

N.C. Division of Medical Assistance/DHHS ncdhhs.gov/dma/medicaid State office that oversees Medicaid, a health insurance program providing medical coverage for low-income families and people with disabilities, and Health Choice for Children, a free or reduced-price health care program for uninsured families. N.C. Health Info nchealthinfo.org Health and medical information and links to local health services. Administered by the State Library of N.C. and based at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Health Sciences Library. U.S. Social Security Administration – Raleigh Office 4701 Old Wake Forest Rd., Raleigh 877-803-6311 ssa.gov Federal program providing support and benefits to individuals with disabilities through Supplemental Security Income (SSI); website includes online registration.

HOME HEALTH CARE/ RESPITE CARE ARCH National Respite Network and Resource Center 800 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 105, Chapel Hill 919-490-5577 archrespite.org Service of Chapel Hill Training-Outreach Project Inc. (C-TOP) working to promote the development of quality respite and crisis care programs; website includes a Respite Locator that allows families to search for care providers.

SIG (Summer Institute for the Gifted) 866-303-4744 giftedstudy.org/programs.asp Nonprofit organization offering summer and school-year programs for gifted and talented students ages 4-17 across the U.S. Program offered by the National Society for the Gifted and Talented.

Bayada Home Health Care 5505 Creedmoor Rd., Ste. 220, Raleigh 888-995-0788 bayada.com Providers of personal care and skilled services for children faced with complex medical conditions, challenging behavioral issues or other special needs.

GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND SERVICES

CenterPeace Home HealthCare & Companion Services 521 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina 919-567-8200 cpcompanioncare.com Provider of CAP/C services for children with disabilities in Wake and Durham counties.

N.C. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) 800-662-7030 ncdhhs.gov/disabilities Department that oversees services and resources for state residents with disabilities, including child service coordination, assistive technology and home-based services.

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Easter Seals UCP North Carolina & Virginia Is your chIld developIng on tIme? It’s tIme to make the FIrst FIve count!

EEaster Seals

very year, more than one million children with unidentified disabilities enter school with

issues that put them behind their peers. Easter Seals UCP makes it easy to find out if your child is at risk. In the first few years of a child’s life, parents

eagerly await each milestone. But some important

milestones are not so obvious -- and missing them can be warning signs of developmental delays and

Photo courtesy of the Charlotte

other issues that can affect your child’s ability to meet their full potential.

As a leading provider of early intervention services, Easter Seals UCP therapists and families know

what’s possible when kids get the support they need – and also what happens when they don’t.

The good news is that kids with delays, disabilities, and autism can make significant progress if they

Five Things Every Parent Should Know:

Your child is unique and develops at his or

The basics about child development. You’ll be

get support early in life. Easter Seals’ Make the First Five Count® is designed to give children at risk of

developmental delays, disabilities or autism the right

support they need to be school-ready and build a foundation for a lifetime of learning.

Observer. Photo by Todd Sumlin

her own pace.

more aware of the skills your child should achieve. Trust your instincts. You know your child best. If

something just doesn’t feel quite right, share your concerns with your health care provider.

The earlier the better. Early identification

and treatment are key to ensuring your child’s bright future.

Easter Seals UCP services.

Parents and loved ones can access a free online

screening tool called Ages & Stages Questionnaires (ASQ). In less than 20 minutes you can get make

sure your child is reaching his or her developmental milestones.

Learn more at www.MaketheFirstFiveCount.org.

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Find an Easter Seals UCP Children’s Center near you at EasterSealsUCPCenters.com

Maxim Healthcare Services • 2634 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 210, Durham, 919-419-1484 • 5510 Six Forks Rd., Ste. 125, Raleigh, 919-676-7990 maximhomecare.com Provider of home health care and respite services to pediatric patients with a range of needs. National Center for Medical Home Implementation 800-433-9016, x. 7605 medicalhomeinfo.org Resource developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau to ensure that all children, including those with special needs, have access to a medical home; website includes links to state-level partners. PSA Healthcare 121 Edinburgh S., Ste. 203, Cary 800-725-6063 psahealthcare.com Provider of pediatric services including private-duty nursing, pediatric nurse aids, IDD, respite care, skilled nursing visits and therapy. RHA Howell Inc. 4700 Homewood Ct., Ste. 300, Raleigh 919-803-2960 rhahowell.org Company providing services from infancy onward to N.C. residents with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities. Also provides residential care in the community with appropriate supports based on individual needs. Tammy Lynn Center for Developmental Disabilities 739 Chappell Dr., Raleigh 919-832-3909 tammylynncenter.org Center offering respite care services for caregivers of individuals with developmental disabilities, head trauma or those who are at risk for developmental disabilities.

Woody’s Mom 515 Keisler Dr., Ste. 101, Cary 919-228-2844 woodysmom.org CAP/C program providing funding for home-based services for children who have complex medical needs.

INDEPENDENT LIVING RESOURCES Alliance of Disability Advocates 505 Oberlin Rd., Ste. 148, Raleigh 919-833-1117 alliancecil.org Triangle-area Center for Independent Living (CIL) program, assisting people with disabilities in living independently and participating fully in society. Independent Living Services/ DHHS • Durham: 919-560-6815 • Raleigh: 919-715-0543 ncdhhs.gov/dvrs/pwd/ils.htm State agency promoting the integration and inclusion of individuals with significant disabilities in the community, with a focus on individuals who can live independently with appropriate services. North Carolina Statewide Independent Living Council 505 Oberlin Rd., Ste. 206, Raleigh 919-835-3636 ncsilc.org Nonprofit organization working with state’s Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to assist individuals with disabilities in living independently. Website includes list of CILs. RHA Howell Inc. 4700 Homewood Ct., Ste. 300, Raleigh 919-803-2960 rhahowell.org Company providing services from infancy onward to N.C. residents with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities. Also provides residential care with appropriate supports based on individual needs.

Residential Services Inc. 111 Providence Rd., Chapel Hill 919-942-7391 rsi-nc.org Private, nonprofit organization in Chapel Hill/Carrboro area providing supported and independent living options and related services to people with developmental disabilities.

LEARNING DISABILITIES AND CHALLENGES AHB Psychological Services 3326 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Bldg. D, Durham 919-401-8090 ahbwellness.com Private practice providing assessment of and treatment for children and adults with developmental disabilities, LD and ADD/ADHD. Apex Learning Center 120 Salem Towne Ct., Apex 919-389-5410 alceducation.com Center offering educational assessment and tutoring for children of all needs. BodyTalk Global Healing 900-A Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-357-8003 BodyTalkChapelHill.com Holistic health-care practice using biofeedback and brain training to reduce stress, re-integrate senses and promote well-being naturally. Pediatric applications include sensory integration disorder, autism spectrum, ADHD and learning difficulties. Brain Balance Achievement Center • 8204 Tryon Woods Dr., Ste. 114, Cary, 919-851-2333 • 13600 New Falls of Neuse Rd., Ste. 110, Raleigh, 919-554-4622 brainbalancecenters.com Center offering non-medical approach to helping children with behavioral, academic and social difficulties through physical and cognitive exercises and dietary change.

Bridges Tutoring 713 Barksdale Dr., Raleigh 919-836-1228 bridgestutoring.org Center offering instructional guidance by a licensed special-needs educator. Carolina Behavioral Care Clinic • 4102 Ben Franklin Blvd., Durham, 919-972-7700 • 209 Millstone Dr., Ste. A, Hillsborough, 919-245-5400 carolinabehavioralcare.com Private practice providing assessment and treatment of developmental disabilities, LD and ADD/ADHD. Carolina Tutoring carolinatutoring.com Online service connecting parents with tutors providing academic support for children with special needs. Clinical Teaching 1829 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-967-5776 clinicalteachingtutors.com Tutoring for students with LD, ADHD and dyslexia plus academic coaching for gifted students with LD. Club Z In-Home Tutoring 919-622-5694 clubztutoring.com/rtp Service connecting parents with certified, specially trained tutors working with children with LD. Duke ADHD Program 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 300, Durham 919-681-0015 dukehealth.org/services/attention_ deficit_hyperactivity_disorder Program providing assessment, school consultation and counseling for families of children with LD and ADHD. Part of the Duke Child & Family Study Center. Family Psychiatry & Psychology Associates 1400 Crescent Green, Ste. 120, Cary 919-233-4131 fppa.com

Respite C are provides needed break Elnora Temple of Apex, who is raising a nonverbal grandson who has autism and ADHD, says that the respite care provided by the Tammy Lynn Center allows her and her husband, both in their 60s, to “get out into the community as a couple rather than taking turns to do errands and so forth.”

“Without respite care, our lives would be lived in even greater isolation,” she says. “Limited though it is [by the state] to 12 hours per month, it allows us to have a bit of hope that someone cares.” Tammy Lynn Center provides respite care for children and adults with developmental disabilities, head trauma or those at risk for developmental disabilities.

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Law Office of Ann M. Paradis

T

Working TogeTher, hand in hand

he Law Office of Ann M. Paradis helps families with a broad range of education law issues. We exclusively represent students and their parents or guardians. Rather than just “taking your case,” our approach is to partner with our clients – working together, hand in hand – to empower parents with the knowledge, information and support necessary to navigate education issues.

Law Office of Ann Paradis

If you feel you are getting the runaround from school personnel and your words are falling on deaf ears, an attorney can help you understand your rights and how to effectively advocate for yourself or your student. It is our goal to teach you how to be a better advocate so that you won’t need a lawyer anymore. Education Law Legal Services: • special education (evaluation, identification, IEP development and implementation) • 504 Plans • enrollment • accidents and injuries • postsecondary schools - ADA and Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act • discrimination • bullying and harassment • academic dismissal • seclusion and restraint We strive to provide affordable legal assistance by offering fee options based on your circumstances, including the complexity of your matter and your finances. Our cases start with a free intake. Beyond affordability, it is our goal to provide excellent service to clients. We participate in statewide and national education advocacy associations with the goal of staying current with education law issues. We have a dynamic website which provides information to parents, including an education blog and a list of low cost education seminars for the community.

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Examples of Services: • Consultation (1-2 hours) – a chance for you to address education law questions and concerns; course of action developed based on your goals • Advocacy and Support – assist parents and students on hourly basis, sometimes behind the scenes • Letters to school • Attendance at IEP Meetings • Representation at Discipline or Academic Hearings • Special Education Due Process Hearings The Law Office of Ann M. Paradis would like to empower you with the advice, resources and support you need to advocate for the educational needs of your student.

The Law Office of Ann M. Paradis 919-228-2273 annparadislaw.com

Private practice providing assessment of and treatment for children and adults with developmental disabilities, LD and ADD/ADHD. International Dyslexia Association – N.C. Branch 1123 Murphy Ln., Winston-Salem 800-284-1990 Nonprofit organization dedicated to the study, prevention and treatment of the problems of dyslexia. Learn with the Best 501 Keisler Dr., Ste. 101 and 104, Cary 919-303-1255 learnwiththebest.net Center offering tutoring, social skills groups, summer camps and various private education services for children with LD. Learning Disabilities Association of North Carolina ldanc.org Nonprofit organization promoting awareness and supporting equitable opportunities for people with LD through education, support, advocacy and collaboration. LearningRx Brain Training 8305 Six Forks Rd., Ste. 207, Raleigh 919-232-0090 learningrx.com Center offering cognitive skills testing and training for students ages 5 and older, including those with LD, ADHD, autism and developmental disabilities. The Makowsky Visual Learning & Rehabilitation Clinic 4505 Fair Meadow Ln., Ste. 207, Raleigh 919-944-0195 Private optometry practice treating complex visual dysfunction and learning-related visual skills. Sparrow Educational Consulting 724 Saint Mary’s St., Raleigh 919-832-6555 sparroweducation.com Individualized math tutoring for children in grades 8-12, including those with LD and ADD. Student Learning Recovery Tutoring 6917 Cass Holt Rd., Holly Springs 919-557-4727 studentlearningrecovery.com Center offering learning support for children ages 4 and older. Services include programs for dyslexia, LD, ADHD, dysgraphia and visually related learning symptoms.

Success In Mind 324 Blackwell St., Ste. 1240, Durham 877-680-8921 success-in-mind.org Nonprofit learning center that provides strengths-based assessments, learning plans and follow-up support for students who struggle with learning, as well as information for parents and teachers. Success4School 3434 Kildaire Farm Rd., Ste. 122, Cary 919-491-2904 success4school.com Center offering one-on-one tutoring, academic coaching and social skills groups for students needing support, including those with ADHD, sensory or auditory processing issues, LD, Asperger’s and high-functioning autism. Robert Toler, O.D. 821 Perry Rd., Apex 919-362-1962 Private practice in developmental optometry providing assessment and treatment of complex visual problems resulting in reading and learning underachievement. Triangle Learning Consultants 3810 Merton Dr., Raleigh 919-781-7804 www.trilogyschool.com/tlc Center providing individual tutoring and support for students in grades K-12, including those with LD and ADHD. Triangle Psychoeducational Consultants 3820 Merton Dr., Raleigh 919-789-8989 www.trilogyschool.com/tpc Private practice offering psychoeducational assessment, consultation and therapy for children with concerns including LD and ADHD. WHIZard Academy for Mathematics and English 3647 S.W. Cary Pkwy., Cary 919-468-1721 whizardacademy.com Center offering support in math, phonics, reading and writing for students ages 6 and older, including those with ADHD, dyslexia and other learning challenges.

MENTAL HEALTH/ BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING 3-C Family Services 1901 N. Harrison Ave., Ste. 100, Cary 919-677-0101 3cfs.com Private practice providing mental health services for children and

adults, including assessment and treatment of anxiety, mood disorders and substance-related disorders. AHB Psychological Services 3326 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Bldg. D, Durham 919-401-8090 ahbwellness.com Private practice providing mental health services for children and adults, including assessment and treatment of anxiety, mood disorders and substance-related disorders. Alliance Behavioral Healthcare • 414 E. Main St., Durham • 500 Falls of Neuse Rd., Raleigh 800-510-9132 alliancebhc.org Mental health, intellectual/developmental disability and substance abuse services management for Cumberland, Durham, Johnston and Wake counties. The Behavior Exchange Raleigh 919-272-2640 thebehaviorexchange.com Coaching for families to help their children, including those with special needs, with concerns including behavior, organization and routine. Carolina Behavioral Care Clinic • 4102 Ben Franklin Blvd., Durham, 919-972-7700 • 209 Millstone Dr., Ste. A, Hillsborough, 919-245-5400 carolinabehavioralcare.com Private practice providing mental health services for children and adults, including assessment and treatment of anxiety and mood disorders and substance-related disorders. Carolina Partners in Mental Healthcare 919-929-9610 carolinapartners.com Private practice offering individual, group and family therapy for children and adults with mental health needs. Multiple Triangle-area locations listed on website. Cascade Counseling and Consulting 2695 Siler City Glendon Rd., Siler City 919-810-0770 cascadecounselingandconsulting. com Private practice offering individual, group and family therapy for children and adults with mental health needs.

Center for Child & Family Health 411 W. Chapel Hill St., Ste. 908, Durham 919-419-3474 ccfhnc.org Provider of mental health and related services for children and families affected by trauma, abuse and other forms of adversity. A collaborative effort of Duke University, N.C. Central University, UNC-Chapel Hill and the nonprofit Child and Parent Support Services. Chapel Hill Pediatric Psychology 205 Sage Rd., Ste. 201, Chapel Hill 919-942-4166 chppnc.com Private practice offering family and individual mental health services for children. Community Connections Healthcare Services 282 W. Millbrook Rd., Raleigh 919-665-4673 cchs-nc.com Agency providing mental health and developmental disability services for children and adults. Cornerstone Family Services 415 Lilliput Ln., Wake Forest 919-630-4191 cfskids.com Private practice offering services for children birth-10 years with behavioral concerns. Create a Healthy Mind 180 Providence Rd., Ste. 9, Chapel Hill 919-918-1014 drsjparks.com Private practice offering psychological services and support for families of children with special needs. Developing Minds of North Carolina 820 Broad St., Durham 919-794-3919 developingmindsnc.com Private practice offering diagnostic evaluation, therapy and parenting classes for families with children facing various psychological disorders. Duke Child & Family Studies Center 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 300, Durham 919-681-1100 dukechildrens.org/services/ child_psychiatry Programs through Duke’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences providing assessment and treatment for a variety of psychiatric

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The Hill Center HILL TAKES THE STRUGGLE OUT OF LEARNING

T The Hill Center

he Hill Center has been partnering with schools and families for over 35 years to transform students with learning differences into confident, independent learners. Half-Day Model: The Hill Center’s unique half-day model provides individualized instruction in reading, written language, math, and high school-level Spanish for students with learning differences. Our multisensory structured language program is based on the Orton-Gillingham approach and each class boasts a 4:1 student/ teacher ratio. Independent research has confirmed the effectiveness of Hill’s K-12 intervention program. The Hill Center curriculum is linked to the Common Core State Standards to ensure continuity of instruction. Tutoring: Since 1993, Hill Tutoring has helped over 3,500 students achieve academic success. The same methodology teaching techniques utilized in our model school are replicated in tutoring. Hill offers remediation tutoring which focuses on reading, math and written language for students in grades K-8. Content tutoring is offered to students in grades 6-12 in all subject areas including science, math, foreign language, study skills, homework help, and test preparation. Tutoring services are available in our Durham and Raleigh locations. Summer Program: Hill’s five-week summer program is designed for students in rising grades K-9 and provides proactive daily instruction in the areas of reading, written language, and math in a 4:1 student/teacher ratio. The program provides an opportunity for students to improve their skills as well as to help prevent the regression in performance that may occur without daily practice. Our Summer Program now takes place in both our Durham and Raleigh locations.

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Professional Development: The Hill Center is a global resource for educators who seek the appropriate tools to help students struggling with learning differences. General and special education teachers, as well as administrators, learn empirically proven strategies to significantly improve student achievement through onsite and online professional development workshops. The Hill Center proudly offers certification programs in diverse learners and reading, as well as an IMSLEC accredited certification in HillRAP, multi-sensory structured language instructional program.

The Hill Center of Durham 3200 Pickett Rd. Hill Tutoring of Raleigh 6500 Falls of Neuse Rd., Ste 130 919-489-7464 hillcenter.org

disorders. Programs include The Center for Eating Disorders, which specializes in the treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, binge eating and other problems with experiencing the body; the Family Studies Clinic, which provides family therapy and parent management training for children’s behavioral problems; and the Behavioral Interventions Program, which offers therapy for adolescents, particularly those with self-harming behaviors. Durham Child Development and Behavioral Health Clinic 402 Trent Dr., Durham 919-668-5559 dukechildrens.org/services/child_ development_and_ behavioral_health Community-based outpatient practice affiliated with Duke Children’s Hospital, providing psychosocial assessment and care for children with behavioral and emotional disturbances; includes the Duke Adolescent Substance Use Treatment Program. Early Childhood Outreach Program (EChO) of the Exchange Clubs’ Family Center 3708 Lyckan Pkwy., Ste. 103, Durham 919-403-8249, x. 233 exchangefamilycenter.org/ earlychildhoodout.htm Free consultation provided to families and child care providers of children ages birth-5 years when the child’s behavior presents a challenge in a Durham County child care program. Family Psychiatry & Psychology Associates 1400 Crescent Green, Ste. 120, Cary 919-233-4131 fppa.com Private practice providing mental health services for children and adults. Greenlee Psychological & Support Services, PLLC 1415 W. N.C. Highway 54 Hamilton Center, Bldg. 200, Ste. 111, Durham 919-824-5743 greenleepsych.com Private practice offering mental health services for children, teens, young adults and families, utilizing a variety of therapy methods. Coaching for adolescents and adults with disabilities, ASD and ADHD also offered. Group therapy offered for DBT and social skills development.

Johnston County Mental Health Center 521 N. Brightleaf Blvd., Smithfield 919-989-5500 johnstonnc.com/mentalhealth Mental health, developmental disability and substance abuse services management for Johnston County. Learning Together Inc. Child Mental Health Initiative 568 E. Lenoir St., Ste. 204, Raleigh 919-856-5200 learningtogether.org Nonprofit organization offering services to children birth-5 years who have demonstrated serious social, emotional, behavioral and/or mental health concerns. Lucy Daniels Center 9003 Weston Pkwy., Cary 919-677-1400 lucydanielscenter.org Nonprofit organization offering evaluation and services for children with mental health and behavioral challenges. Programs include Family Guidance Service, serving children ages birth-11 years in a clinical setting; SecurePath, a SmartStart partnership program serving lowincome children ages birth-5 years in their home or school setting; and the Lucy Daniels School, serving children in preschool-2nd grade. Angela S. McLean, LMFT 1008-F Big Oak Ct., Knightdale 919-868-6242 resilientfamilies.com Private practice offering family and individual counseling for concerns including child behavior problems and support for parents caring for a child with a developmental disability. Mendel Psychological Associates 3727 Benson Dr., Raleigh 919-876-1313 drmendel.com Private practice offering individual and family therapy and support groups for children with challenges including Asperger’s, high-functioning autism, social anxiety and type 1 diabetes. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) – N.C. 309 W. Millbrook Rd., Ste. 121, Raleigh 919-788-0801 naminc.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for individuals, families and children affected by mental illness; website lists local affiliates.

N.C. Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services/DHHS 919-715-3197 ncdhhs.gov/mhddsas State agency overseeing communitybased developmental disability, mental health and substance abuse services; website includes links to local services. North Carolina Psychoanalytic Foundation 901 Paverstone Dr., Ste. 11, Raleigh 919-847-2323 ncpsychoanalysis.org peacefulschoolsnc.org Support, advocacy, resources and education for individuals, families, children and schools with child development and mental health challenges. Specializing in Peaceful Schools-NC’s bullying prevention workshops and intervention. OPC (Orange, Person, Chatham) Area Program 800-233-6834 cardinalinnovations.org/opc Mental health, developmental disability and substance abuse services management for Orange, Person and Chatham counties. Orenstein Solutions 1100 N.W. Maynard Rd., Ste. 140, Cary 919-428-2766 orensteinsolutions.com Private practice offering mental health services for children and adults. Positive Parenting Solutions 919-845-0409 positiveparentingsolutions.com Online program offering behavioral management and discipline tools for challenging behavioral issues, including those of siblings of children with special needs. SUWS of the Carolinas 363 Graphite Rd., Old Fort 888-828-9770 suwscarolinas.crchealth.com suwsseasons.com phoenixoutdoor.crchealth.com Residential therapeutic wilderness programs for children ages 10-17 who are struggling with behavioral and mental health issues such as depression, low self-esteem, anxiety and defiant behavior. Dog therapy and equine-assisted therapy are also offered.

Smoot Psychological Associates 6512 Six Forks Rd., Ste. 302, Raleigh 919-518-0390 smootpsych.com Private practice offering mental health services for children and adults. Therapeutic Partners 7406 Chapel Hill Rd., Ste. F, Raleigh 919-233-7360 therapeuticpartners.com Private practice offering mental health services for children and adults. UNC Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr., Chapel Hill 919-966-5217 med.unc.edu/psych/patient-care/ child-adolescent Major academic center for assessment, treatment, research and teaching in child and adolescent psychiatry in inpatient and outpatient settings. Programs include Childhood & Adolescent Evaluation Service; Program on Childhood Trauma & Maltreatment; Eating Disorders Program; and TEACCH Autism Service. Wynns Family Psychology 130 Preston Executive Dr., Ste. 202, Cary 919-467-7777 wynnsfamilypsychology.com Private practice of doctorate-level psychologists providing a range of therapies to children and their parents.

MUSIC/ART/ RECREATIONAL THERAPY Abilitations Children’s Therapy & Wellness Center 11030 Raven Ridge Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-844-6611 actwc.com Private practice offering Music Matters, group music therapy for children with special needs. Art Therapy Institute 200 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro 919-381-6068 ncati.org Nonprofit organization offering individual, group and family art therapy for children with special needs, including autism, developmental disabilities, medical concerns, chronic illness and trauma. Nonverbal mental health provider for Chapel Hill/Carrboro City Schools.

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Lucy Daniels Center helping children live emotionally healthy lives Imagine…a place where children who struggle with social and emotional challenges are understood, reassured and supported. Imagine…a place where their parents feel understood, too, and work side by side with clinicians and teachers to help their children achieve their full potential. Imagine…such a place—and then come visit it: the nationally recognized Lucy Daniels Center. Now in its third decade of service to families of the Triangle, the Lucy Daniels Center is the area’s largest and most comprehensive non-profit agency offering mental health services exclusively for children. We provide a variety of supports for children who are struggling emotionally, socially or behaviorally, at the point in their development when these interventions can have the greatest impact. The Center’s highly trained staff offers personalized care for children and their families. Therapeutic programs include:

• • •

Family Guidance Service, serving children birth-11 years through an outpatient clinic

SecurePath, a Wake County SmartStart partnership program serving low-income children birth-5 years in their home

The Lucy Daniels Center is nationally recognized for its approach to serving the mental health needs of children. In 2005, the Center was honored with the Children and Family Community Service Award from the American Psychoanalytic Association. In 2009, the Center received the GlaxoSmithKline Impact Award for providing outstanding mental health services to underserved populations. For more information about our range of child mental health services, contact us today.

“Contacting Lucy Daniels Center was the best decision I ever made for my son.” — Clinic parent “We talk about stuff.” — Client, age 5 “Finding out about the Lucy Daniels Center changed all of our lives.”— School parent

Lucy Daniels School, serving children ages 3-7 (up to age 11 by 2015-16) in an academic environment that is sensitive to their social and emotional needs.

The Center also provides:

• •

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Free resources on child development and mental health on our website (lucydaniels.org)

Lucy’s Book Club (lucysbookclub.org), an outreach initiative that helps parents and caregivers find children’s books that nurture child social and emotional development.

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9003 Weston Parkway, Cary, NC 27513 • 919-677-1400 lucydanielscenter.org

Cascade Counseling and Consulting 2695 Siler City Glendon Rd., Siler City 919-810-0770 cascadecounselingandconsulting.com Private practice offering art therapy for children and adults with special needs. Helping Horse Therapeutic Riding Program 12200 Shooting Club Rd., Raleigh 919-435-4487 helpinghorse.org Nonprofit organization offering therapeutic riding instruction to physically, mentally and/or emotionally disabled individuals. Pediatric Therapy Associates & Sports Medicine • 4201 Lake Boone Tr., Ste. 4, Raleigh, 919-781-4434 • 1120 S.E. Cary Pkwy., Ste. 200, Cary, 919-854-0404 • 800 Benson Rd., Ste. 30, Garner, 919-861-1180 • Wake Forest Business Pk., 835-A, Wake Forest, 919-562-9941 pedtherapy.com Private practice providing music therapy for children with disabilities. Rhythm & Rehab 3514 University Dr., Durham 919-961-2605 rhythmandrehab.org Neurological music therapy programs for children with special needs, including individual and group therapy, adapted piano, musical theater and inclusive developmental music and movement. Voices Together 919-942-2714 voicestogether.net Nonprofit organization serving individuals with developmental disabilities, combining the therapeutic qualities of music with opportunities to increase communication and social skills. Programs serve children ages 7 and older as well as adults.

NEUROLOGICAL, NEUROMUSCULAR, AND SPINAL CORD INJURIES AND DISORDERS Brain Injury Association of North Carolina 2113 Cameron St., Ste. 242, Raleigh 919-833-9634 bianc.net Support, advocacy and resources for people with brain injuries and their families.

Duke Children’s Comprehensive Neuromuscular Program 2301 Erwin Rd., Durham 919-613-6832 dukechildrens.org/services/ comprehensive_ neuromuscular_program Major academic center offering multi-disciplinary pediatric sub-specialty care to children from infancy to young adulthood with major neuromuscular weakness disorders. Epilepsy Foundation of North Carolina 1920 W. First St., Ste. 5541-A, Winston-Salem 800-451-0694 epilepsync.org Support, information, advocacy, and medication and transportation assistance for individuals affected by epilepsy. Muscular Dystrophy Association (Raleigh) 333 E. Six Forks Rd., Ste. 105, Raleigh 919-783-0222 mdausa.org Support, advocacy and resources for people with MD and their families. National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Greater Carolinas 3010 Industrial Dr., Ste. 210, Raleigh 919-834-0678 nationalmssociety.org/nct Support, advocacy and resources for people with MS and their families. North Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Association 7980 Chapel Hill Rd., Ste. 101, Cary 919-234-4171 ncscia.org Support, advocacy and resources for people with spinal cord injury and disease. Raleigh Neurology Associates 1520 Sunday Dr., Ste. 209, Raleigh 919-719-8825 raleighneurology.com Private practice offering child neurology services for conditions such as epilepsy, sleep disorders, neuromuscular disorders and developmental delays. Spina Bifida Association of the Carolinas 800-621-3141, x. 20 sbancsc.org Support, advocacy and information for families living with spina bifida.

Triangle Orthopedic Associates 800-359-3053 triangleortho.com Private practice of orthopedic surgeons providing range of services including physical and occupational therapy, orthotics and prosthetics, and pediatric treatment specialties including limb difference, pediatric rheumatology, skeletal dysplasia and spinal disorders. Multiple locations in the Triangle are listed on website.

PHYSICAL THERAPY (PT)/ OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (OT) Abilitations Children’s Therapy & Wellness Center 11030 Raven Ridge Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-844-6611 actwc.com Private practice providing pediatric speech, occupational and physical therapy. Advantage Therapy 8402 Six Forks Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-847-6773 advantagetherapync.com Private practice providing pediatric speech/language, reading and occupational therapy. Allied Rehab 900 S. Franklin St., Ste. 201, Wake Forest 919-556-1700 alliedrehab.net Private practice providing pediatric speech, occupational and physical therapy. A Child’s Way Therapy LLC 919-324-1881 achildswaytherapy.com Private practice providing pediatric speech, occupational and physical therapy. Developmental Therapy Associates Inc. • 3514 University Dr., #8, Durham, 919-493-7002 • 875 Walnut St., Ste. 100, Cary, 919-465-3966 developmentaltherapy.com Private practice providing occupational and speech/language therapy, with an emphasis on children with sensory processing disorders. Dynamic Therapy for Kids 3100 N.C. Hwy. 55, Ste. 102, Cary 919-363-5000 dynamictherapyforkids.com Private practice offering physical, occupational, speech/language

and developmental therapies for children. Emerge-A Child’s Place 3905 University Dr., Durham 919-489-7333 919-928-0204 emergeachildsplace.com Private practice providing pediatric occupational and speech therapy including special group and summer programs. Pediatric Possibilities 7209 Creedmoor Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-844-1100 pediatricpossibilities.com Private practice offering occupational therapy using a family-oriented sensory integration developmental approach. Pediatric Therapy Associates & Sports Medicine • 4201 Lake Boone Tr., Ste. 4, Raleigh, 919-781-4434 • 1120 S.E. Cary Pkwy., Ste. 200, Cary, 919-854-0404 • 800 Benson Rd., Ste. 30, Garner, 919-861-1180 • Wake Forest Business Pk., 835-A, Wake Forest, 919-562-9941 pedtherapy.com Private practice providing pediatric physical, occupational, speech/language and developmental therapies. Triangle Orthopedic Associates 800-359-3053 triangleortho.com Private practice of orthopedic surgeons providing range of services including physical and occupational therapy, orthotics and prosthetics, and pediatric treatment specialties including limb difference, pediatric rheumatology, skeletal dysplasia and spinal disorders. Multiple locations across the Triangle are listed on website. Triangle Therapy 3602 Trail 23, Durham 919-489-7771 triangletherapy.com Private practice offering physical and occupational therapy for children with sensory integration disorders and other disabilities.

RECREATION AND ENRICHMENT Abilitations Children’s Therapy Summer Musical Program 11030 Raven Ridge Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-844-6611 actwc.com

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Miracle League of the Triangle

F

EVERY CHILD DESERVES A CHANCE TO PLAY BASEBALL

or a child with special needs, playing baseball with other boys and girls is a dream come true. Thanks

to the Miracle League of the Triangle those dreams can

become a reality. The Miracle League of the Triangle is a

The Miracle League

local nonprofit organization operating during the spring and fall seasons as a baseball league for children with special needs. This one-of-a-kind program provides a safe, encouraging environment for children with dis-

abilities to participate in a team sport, many for the first time in their lives.  

Anyone who has seen the program in action knows that the Miracle League of the Triangle is much more than

an ordinary baseball league. It’s an experience of sheer

 

joy, made possible by a community of players, parents,

The Miracle League is always looking for new volunteer

players, and games are noncompetitive, lasting roughly

For more information visit their website or “like” them on

and volunteers. Miracle League teams do not exceed 15

coaches, umpires, game announcers, and “buddies.”

one hour. Volunteer coaches and “buddies” work one-

Facebook. Experience the miracle today!

on-one with the children, emphasizing safety and fun.

Each player experiences the thrill of batting and scoring one run per inning and is announced by a personalized nickname and theme song.  

In the words of a parent, “The Miracle League is one of the few places where every child’s challenges and dif-

ferences are not only understood and accepted but are

celebrated. For many parents it’s the one time and place where they can truly relax and their child can just have fun without any concern.”

The league welcomes all school-age children with any

diagnosed disability — cognitive or physical. Fall season

lasts from September through October, and spring games are played April through May. There are two Triangle-area Miracle League fields: 805 Cary Towne Boulevard in Cary and 3011 Queensland Road in Raleigh.

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P.O. Box 4193, Cary, NC 27519 919-238-0333 MiracleLeagueOfTheTriangle.com

Summer theater program for children ages 5 and older with special needs. Abilitations Children’s Therapy Wellness and Fitness Programs 11030 Raven Ridge Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-844-6611 actwc.com Recreational programs for children with special needs, including inclusive fitness classes designed by a physical therapist, Yogabilities (yoga classes led by a certified specialneeds instructor) and Abilities Indoor Soccer League for children ages 5-12 with all levels of ability. Adventure Amputee Camp Nantahala Outdoor Center, Bryson City 888-662-1662 adventureamputeecamp.org Free residential camp for children ages 8-17 who have lost limbs or were born with limb difference. Aquaventures Swim Academy by Pool Professionals 919-787-7878 poolprofessionals.com/raleigh-nc/ swim-lessons Private and group swim lessons for all ages and abilities, including children with special needs. Bounce U 3419 Apex Peakway, Apex 919-303-3368 bounceu.com After-hours Sensory Bounce for children with special needs and their families, held monthly. Bridge II Sports Durham 866-880-2742 bridge2sports.org Nonprofit organization creating opportunities for individuals who are physically challenged to play sports by providing equipment and developing/coaching teams offered throughout the Triangle. Sports include wheelchair basketball, quad rugby, tennis, hand cycling and ballroom dancing plus GIGE (Girls

Inspired Girls Empowered) to encourage sports participation by girls with disabilities. Bridges 1937 West Cornwallis Rd., Durham 919-489-5335 shalomdch.org/page. aspx?id=187202 An initiative of the Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federation’s Jewish Community Center to provide social, recreational, educational and cultural programs and activities for individuals with special needs and their families in a welcoming Jewish setting. Camp Carefree 275 Carefree Ln., Stokesdale 336-427-0966 campcarefree.org Free camp for children with chronic health problems and disabilities. Camp Carolina Trails Camp Hanes, King 888-342-2383, x. 3217 diabetes.org/adacampcarolinatrails Program of the American Diabetes Association offering residential camp for children in grades 3-11 with diabetes. Camp Celebrate Camp Kanata, Wake Forest 919-966-8539 med.unc.edu/burn/aftercareprograms-temp Residential camp for children ages 7-15 who have survived burn injuries. Sponsored by the N.C. Jaycee Burn Center of UNC-Chapel Hill. Counselors in training ages 16-18. Camp Coast Camp Rockfish, Parkton 252-847-6834 Program offering weekend retreats for children ages 5 and older with asthma and their families, providing educational and fun activities and support. Camp Dogwood 7050 Camp Dogwood Dr., Sherrils Ford 800-662-7401, x. 229 nclionscampdogwood.com

Residential camp for children and adults who are blind or visually impaired. Children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Operated by N.C. Lions Foundation. Camp Ginger Cascades 2090 Scout Rd., Lenoir 828-758-5321 camplikeagirl.org/properties/ ginger_cascades/index.htm Residential Girl Scout camp recognized by Easter Seals for its inclusive programming. Camp GRACE (Growth, Recognition, Achievement, Character, Encouragement) • Kraft Family YMCA, Apex, 919-657-9622 • A.E. Finley YMCA, Raleigh, 919-845-3883 asmallmiracleinc.com/Partnerships/ campGRACE.aspx ymcatriangle.org Day camp for children ages 5-15 with autism and related communication disorders. Sponsored by A Small Miracle Inc. and YMCA of the Triangle. Camp Imagine Camp Hanes, King autismsocietyfc.org/camp-imagine Residential camp for children ages 7-17 with autism spectrum disorder or related communication disorders. Sponsored by the Autism Society of North Carolina/Forsyth County. Camp Kaleidoscope Camp Graham, Kerr Lake 919-681-5349 dukechildrens.org/giving/events/ camp_kaleidoscope Residential camp for children ages 7-16 who are being treated at Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center for chronic illnesses. Camp Lakey Gap Christmount Conference and Retreat Center, Black Mountain 828-669-8977 christmount.org/camplakeygap Residential camp for children and adults with autism.

Camp Royall 250 Bill Ash Rd., Moncure 919-542-1033 camproyall.org Residential camp for state residents with autism spectrum disorder. Operated by Autism Society of N.C. Camp Sertoma of Gaston County Camp Sertoma, Dallas 704-898-4738 Residential and day camp for children with developmental, physical and/or emotional disabilities. Carrboro Recreation and Parks Special Recreation Programs 100 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro 919-918-7372 townofcarrboro.org Programs designed for teens and adults with developmental and/or multiple disabilities, as well as inclusive programs in sports, arts and nature. Challenger Flag Football and Cheer Program 919-306-3822 cff-popwarner.com/Challenger.html Non-competitive Pop Warner football and cheer program for youth ages 5-18 with physical and/or intellectual disabilities who are enrolled in school. Fall season. Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation Adapted Recreation & Inclusion Program 200 Plant Rd., Chapel Hill 919-968-2813 www.ci.chapel-hill.nc.us Specialized and inclusive programs for children and adults with disabilities. Durham Arts Council Summer Arts Camp & Afternoon Adventures 120 Morris St., Durham 919-560-2726 durhamarts.org Full- and half-day inclusive arts programming. Durham Parks & Recreation Special Programs and Inclusion 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham 919-560-4355, x. 27236

wheelchair basketball improves confidence Alyssa L., 11, who plays on the Bridge II Sports Jr. Thunder wheelchair basketball team, says, “Before I joined the team I was not too comfortable around other kids when we played sports. I can’t run as fast as other kids my age. [But] when I am in my wheelchair I am even with all of

the other kids. Playing basketball has taught me to have confidence in myself.” Through Durham’s Bridge II Sports, children with physical or other disabilities enjoy organized sports such as wheelchair basketball, quad rugby, tennis, hand cycling and sitting volleyball. carolinaparent.com | Exceptional child 2013-14

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durhamnc.gov/ich/op/prd/Pages/ Special-Programs-and-Inclusion. aspx Special-needs and inclusive programs including athletics, after-school and day camps and social/support activities. Garner Parks & Recreation Creative Movement Class 205 E. Garner Rd., Garner 919-779-0122 garnerparks.org Program promoting physical and social activity for individuals ages 16 and older with developmental disabilities. A caregiver must attend with the individual. Go Play Outside Now 44 Cornwallis St., Garner 919-796-5601 goplayoutsidenow.com Outdoor play park for all children, including those with autism or physical disabilities/limitations, designed to bring kids back to nature. Power wheel chairs available. Kids Together Playground at Marla Dorrel Park 111 Thurston Dr., Cary 919-469-4061 kidstogethercary.org Public playground accessible to children of all abilities. Kool Kidz Club 11030 Raven Ridge Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-844-6611 actwc.com/kool-kidz-club.html Social outing group for children ages 3 and up with special needs. Sponsored by Abilitations Children’s Therapy. Marbles Kids Museum Family Fun Night 201 E. Hargett St., Raleigh 919-834-4040 marbleskidsmuseum.org Free, after-hours play for children ages 10 and under with special needs and their families, held quarterly. Miracle League of Johnston County 919-934-0626 miracleleaguejc.com Baseball league for school-age children with physical, cognitive and/or emotional disabilties. Miracle League of the Triangle 919-238-0333 miracleleagueofthetriangle.com Baseball league for school-age children with special needs.

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Monkey Joe’s Special Needs Night • 1747 Walnut St., Cary, 919-461-7171 • 6220 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 104, Raleigh, 919-510-6979 monkeyjoes.com Free, after-hours play time for children with special needs and their families, held monthly.

Shepherd Youth Ranch 105 Cedar Creek Rd., Franklinton 704-806-5515 Nonprofit, faith-based organization providing individual equine-assisted phsychotherapy and half-day summer camps for children and adults with various mental health needs and life circumstances.

Orange County Parks and Recreation Special Populations Programs 300 W. Tryon St., Hillsborough 919-245-2660 www.co.orange.nc.us/recparks/ special_events.asp Camps, athletics, arts and social programming for children and adults with special needs.

Signs of Learning Raleigh 919-469-5244 signsoflearning.com Enrichment program in American Sign Language designed to facilitate non-verbal communication by young children, including those with special needs.

Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Boundless Play Facilities • All Children’s Playground at Laurel Hills Park, 3808 Edwards Mill Rd., Raleigh, 919-420-2383 • Marsh Creek Park, 3016 New Hope Rd., Raleigh, 919-996-4920 parks.raleighnc.gov Public playgrounds designed for children of all abilities. Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Specialized Recreation & Inclusion Services 919-831-6835 parks.raleighnc.gov Programs serving children and teens with disabilities, including buddy sports, aquatics, summer camp and social/educational programs, as well as inclusion support services for individuals with disabilities participating in typical programs. The Sensation Nation 866-292-5290 thesensationnation.com Gymnastics and general fitness programs to enhance motor performance, behavior and social skills for children and teens. Website lists programs and locations in the Triangle. Sertoma Deaf Camp Sertoma 4-H Education Center, Westfield 301-620-2254 campsertomaclub.org Residential camp for youth ages 8-16 who are deaf, hard of hearing or signing CODAs. Sponsored by the Sertoma Club of N.C., VA and MD.

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SOAR (Success-Oriented Achievement Realized) 226 Soar Ln., Balsam 828-456-3435 soarnc.org Wilderness adventure and experiential learning programs for adolescents with LD and ADHD. Special Olympics North Carolina 2200 Gateway Center Blvd., Ste. 201, Morrisville 919-719-7662 sonc.net Athletic training and competition for children ages 8 and older with intellectual disabilities. Young Athletes program provides non-competitive experiences for children ages 2-7. Spectrum Family Camp Camp Greenville, Cedar Mountain 864-836-3291, x. 106 campgreenville.org/spectrumfamily-camp.php Weekend retreat for families with children with autism spectrum disorder and a family camp for families who have children with Down syndrome.

Together on Center Stage 300 W. Ballentine St., Holly Springs 609-472-1260 togetheroncenterstage.org Inclusive theater initiative for individuals age 7 through adult, providing a performing arts vehicle for people of all levels of experience and abilities. Participants create their own show and characters in an eight-week period. Programs are in the spring and fall at the Holly Springs Cultural Arts Center. Sponsored by the Civitan Club of Holly Springs. Victory Junction 4500 Adam’s Wy., Randleman 336-498-9055 victoryjunction.org Year-round camping facility for children ages 6-16 with chronic medical conditions or serious illnesses. Wake Forest Parks & Recreation Dream League Baseball 301 S. Brooks St., Wake Forest 919-435-9562 wakeforestnc.gov/residentsparksrecreation_youthathletics_ dreamleague.aspx Baseball league for children ages 5-18 with special needs. WakeMed’s PlayWELL Park at Poe Center for Health Education 224 Sunnybrook Rd., Raleigh 919-231-4006, x. 399 poehealth.org Playground accessible to children of all abilities, free and open to the public by reservation only. YMCA of the Triangle ymcatriangle.org Programs at select locations for children with special needs, including camps, athletics and social opportunities; also offers inclusive programs at other locations.

Spring Camp Cheerio 1430 Camp Cheerio Rd., Glade Valley springcampcheerio.org Weekend retreat for individuals with hearing loss and their families who are interested in learning strategies for spoken languages.

Note: Many Triangle organizations offer accommodations for residents with disabilities. For a comprehensive list of local facilities, see our GPS (Go. Play. See.) resource guide for Triangle families, available in print and at carolinaparent.com.

Talisman Programs 64 Gap Creek Rd., Zirconia 855-588-8254 talismancamps.crchealth.com Residential camps in Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests for children with LD, ADHD, Asperger’s and high-functioning autism.

SPECIAL EDUCATION ELIGIBILITY/SUPPORT Children’s Law Clinic Duke University Law School, Durham 888-600-7274 childedlaw.org Program of Duke Law School providing free services to low-income

parents in matters relating to the rights of children in school, including special education and school discipline. Exceptional Children’s Assistance Center 4601 Lake Boone Tr., Ste. G, Raleigh 866-740-4135 ecac-parentcenter.org Statewide nonprofit offering Parent Training and Information (PTI) services that include the IEP Partners parent support/advocacy program. Law Office of Ann M. Paradis 1135 Kildaire Farm Rd., Ste. 200, Cary 919-228-2273 annparadislaw.com Consultation, advocacy and legal representation for families with education concerns including special education and school discipline. Triangle Parent Navigator 919-608-1241 triangleparentnavigator.com Consultation and support for parents with children entering Trianglearea special education programs, including collaboration with schools, therapists and other professionals. Wrightslaw wrightslaw.com Education and training for parents, educators and others involved in special education and advocacy for children with disabilities; website includes resources for parents and information about consultation services.

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS All Saint’s Academy 4154 Shearon Farms Ave., Ste. 100, Wake Forest 919-236-3370 allsaintsacademy.net Private school serving students in grades K-8, including those with special needs. The Aspen Center Building Blocks Preschool 4328 Bland Rd., Raleigh 919-981-6588 aspencenter.net Inclusive developmental preschool for children ages 18 months-6 years. Assistive Technology for Infants and Preschoolers Project (ATIPP) N.C. Central University, Durham 919-530-7299 web.nccu.edu/soe/atipp

Inclusive therapeutic preschool promoting communication, social, learning and motor skill development while targeting speech/language skills in children birth-5 years. Bridges and Beyond Inclusive Preschool 1340 Wall Rd., Ste. 100, Wake Forest 919-453-6433 bridgesandbeyond.com Inclusive preschool for children ages 2-5, offering individual and group developmental therapies; reserved classroom openings for children referred through the CDSAs (Children’s Developmental Services Agencies). Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools 750 S. Merritt Mill Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-8211 chccs.k12.nc.us Chatham County Schools 369 West St., Pittsboro 919-542-3626 chatham.k12.nc.us Chesterbrook Academy 130 Towne Villages Dr., Cary 877-638-8131 cary.chesterbrookacademy.com Private school offering Paladin program in rising grades 1-8, specializing in dyslexia, dysgraphia and mild attention deficit disorders. Cresset Christian Academy WINGS Program 3707 Garrett Rd., Durham 919-489-2655 cressetchristian.org Program offering educational support for students at Cresset Christian Academy with LD. Durham Public Schools 511 Cleveland St., Durham 919-560-2000 dpsnc.net Easter Seals UCP North Carolina and Virginia Charlie Gaddy Children’s Center 314 Chapanoke Rd., Raleigh 919-773-2020 eastersealsucpcenters.com/ center/raleigh Inclusive developmental day center providing pediatric speech, occupational, physical and developmental therapies. Operated by Easter Seals United Cerebral Palsy.

Eastern North Carolina School for the Deaf 1311 Hwy. 301 S., Wilson 252-237-2450 www.encsd.net State-run residential and day school for children in grades K-12 who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Jordan Lake School of the Arts 1434 Farrington Rd., Apex 919-387-9440 jordanlakesa.com Private school specializing in children in grades K-12 who are gifted, have Asperger’s or are on the autism spectrum.

Exceptional Children Preschool Program/ N.C. Office of Early Learning 919-981-5300 www.earlylearning.nc.gov/ PreKindergarten/PreschoolEC/ indexNEW08.asp State-run program serving children ages 3 and 4 and pre-K 5-year olds with developmental delays, autism, visual or hearing impairments, speech/ language impairments and other health concerns. Website includes links to information about pre-K programs.

Just Right Academy Inc. 3717 Murphy School Rd., Durham 919-932-0360 justrightacademy.org Nonprofit private elementary and secondary learning center for grades K-10, geared to children who need structure, consistency, positive reinforcement, more movement, reduced stress, both remediation and challenge along with a multisensory way of learning.

The Fletcher Academy 400 Cedarview Ct., Raleigh 919-782-5082 thefletcheracademy.com Private school serving students in grades 1-12 with LD and ADHD. Frankie Lemmon School and Developmental Center 1800 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh 919-821-7436 frankielemmonschool.org Nonprofit, tuition-free preschool offering individualized educational experiences for eligible Wake County children ages 3-6 with developmental disabilities. Governor Morehead School for the Blind 301 Ashe Ave., Raleigh 919-733-6382 governormorehead.net State-run residential school serving residents ages 5-21 who are blind or visually impaired. Preschool provides community-based early intervention and preschool services to children birth-5 years with diagnosed visual impairments. The Hill Center 3200 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-7464 hillcenter.org Private, part-day school for students in grades K-12 with LD and ADHD, plus tutoring, summer school and enrichment programs. Johnston County Schools 2320 Business U.S. 70 E., Smithfield 919-934-6031 johnston.k12.nc.us

Learn with the Best 501 Keisler Dr., Ste. 101 and 104, Cary 919-303-1255 learnwiththebest.net Center offering transitional kindergarten and private elementary for children with challenges such as autism, LD and ADHD. Learning Together Inc. Developmental Day Center 568 E. Lenoir St., Ste. 204, Raleigh 919-856-5200 learningtogether.org/ developmental-day-center Nonprofit organization offering an inclusive, developmental program for children ages 18 months-6 years with, or at risk for, developmental disabilities. Lucy Daniels School 9003 Weston Pkwy., Cary 919-677-1400 lucydanielscenter.org Part-day preschool and kindergarten and full-day elementary school program for children ages 3-8 years who will benefit from an academic environment sensitive to their social and emotional health. M.A.G.I.C. Preschool (Movement and Gestures Improve Communication) 141 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina 919-577-6807 capitolcityspeechtherapy.com/ magic.html Inclusive preschool for children ages 3-5 years using a multidisciplinary teaching program designed to enhance social, emotional and intellectual growth; 1:4 teacher-to-student ratio. Push-In speech therapy services

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are available. A program of Capitol City Speech Therapy, LLC. The Mariposa School for Children with Autism 203 Gregson Dr., Cary 919-461-0600 mariposaschool.org Private, nonprofit organization offering year-round, intensive instruction to children ages 18 months-12 years with autism and other developmental disabilities. North Carolina ASIS (Academic Services and Instructional Support) and AIG (Academically or Intellectually Gifted) www.ncpublicschools.org/ academicservices/gifted/ State agency tasked with identifying academically and/or intellectually gifted children in North Carolina and providing them with services. N.C. Department of Public Instruction (DPI) Exceptional Children Division 301 N. Wilmington St., Raleigh 919-807-3969 ec.ncpublicschools.gov State program serving as a resource to local education agencies (LEAs) and the two state-run schools for the deaf. Consultants are available to assist schools in program planning and development, training, mentoring and technical assistance leading to a quality education for students who are deaf or hard of hearing across all communication modes and settings.

3-22 with developmental disabilities and delays, cerebral palsy and those who are medically fragile.

Advantage Therapy 8402 Six Forks Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-847-6773 advantagetherapync.com Private practice providing pediatric speech/language, occupational and reading therapy.

Trilogy School 3810 Merton Dr., Raleigh 919-781-7804 www.trilogyschool.com Private school specializing in students Allied Rehab in grades 1-8 with LD and ADHD; high 900 S. Franklin St., school courses available upon request. Ste. 201, Wake Forest 919-556-1700 alliedrehab.net Wake County Private practice providing pediatric Public School System speech, occupational and physical 5625 Dillard Dr., Cary therapy. 919-431-7400 wcpss.net Assistive Technology for Infants and Preschoolers Project (ATIPP) White Plains Children’s Center N.C. Central University, Durham 313 S.E. Maynard Rd., Cary 919-530-7299 919-469-3522 web.nccu.edu/soe/atipp whiteplainschildrenscenter.org Inclusive therapeutic preschool Nonprofit inclusive child care center promoting communication, social, and preschool serving children ages 12 months-5 years with special needs. learning and motor skill development while targeting speech/language skills in children birth-5 years.

SPEECH/LANGUAGE THERAPY

Abilitations Children’s Therapy & Wellness Center 11030 Raven Ridge Rd., Ste. 101, Raleigh 919-844-6611 actwc.com Private practice providing pediatric speech, occupational and physical therapy.

Beyond Limits Learning Inc. 919-656-2901 beyondlimitslearninginc.com Private practice providing developmental and speech/language therapy to children with diagnoses including autism, Down syndrome, speech delays and behavioral concerns. Certified bilingual speech therapist on staff.

Capitol City Speech Therapy, LLC Absolute Speech & • 3700 National Dr., Ste. 219, Language Therapy Raleigh 186-104 Wind Chime Ct., Raleigh • 141 N. Main St., Fuquay-Varina 919-870-1280 919-577-6807 absolutespeech.com capitolcityspeechtherapy.com Private practice providing free Orange County Schools Private, therapist-owned company speech/language screenings plus 200 E. King St., Hillsborough that provides unique and innovative therapy in the day care/preschool set- speech, language and swallow919-732-8126 orange.k12.nc.us ing therapy and community-based ting, client home and/or clinic. rehabilitative services that include the Stevens Prep Academy client and caregiver. Access Speech Therapy 901 Oak Creek Rd., Raleigh 109 Professional Ct., 919-846-0118 Ste. 109, Garner Cary Speech Services stevensprepacademy.com 919-618-2982 875 Walnut St., Ste. 252, Cary Private school offering individualized accessspeachtherapy.com 919-460-0113 education for students in grades 3-12 Private practice offering free speech/ caryspeech.com with learning difficulties (includlanguage screening plus treatment for Private practice offering speech/ a variety of speech/language delays language assessment and therapy for ing ADHD, Asperger’s and auditory and disorders for pediatric population children. processing disorders) or behavioral in Wake and Johnston counties in the challenges. home, day care or clinic setting. Also Center for Speech, provides reading therapy and social Language & Learning Tammy Lynn Center skills groups. 1703 Legion Rd., Ste. 201, Chapel Hill for Developmental Disabilities 919-932-7160 739 Chappell Dr., Raleigh nc-csll.com 919-832-3909 Center offering speech/language tammylynncenter.org therapy and tutoring. Program providing specialized classroom education for children ages

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A Child’s Way Therapy LLC 919-324-1881 achildswaytherapy.com Private practice providing pediatric speech, occupational and physical therapy. Developmental Therapy Associates Inc. • 3514 University Dr., #8, Durham, 919-493-7002 • 875 Walnut St., Ste. 100, Cary, 919-465-3966 developmentaltherapy.com Private practice providing occupational and speech/language therapy, with an emphasis on children with sensory processing disorders. Dynamic Therapy for Kids 3100 N.C. Hwy. 55, Ste. 102, Cary 919-363-5000 dynamictherapyforkids.com Private practice offering physical, occupational, speech/language and developmental therapies for children. Emerge-A Child’s Place 3905 University Dr., Durham 919-489-7333 919-928-0204 emergeachildsplace.com Private practice providing pediatric occupational and speech therapy including special group and summer programs. Innovative Therapy 2180 N. Salem St., Ste. 103, Apex 919-303-1755 innovativetherapyapex.com Private practice offering speech/ language therapy in a play environment, plus social skills groups for children ages 4-14. Pediatric Therapy Associates & Sports Medicine • 4201 Lake Boone Tr., Ste. 4, Raleigh, 919-781-4434 • 1120 S.E. Cary Pkwy., Ste. 200, Cary, 919-854-0404 • 800 Benson Rd., Ste. 30, Garner, 919-861-1180 • Wake Forest Business Pk., 835-A, Wake Forest, 919-562-9941 pedtherapy.com Private practice providing pediatric physical, occupational, speech/ language and developmental therapies.

Recommended Reading

O

Compiled by Cheryl K. Teal

ur list of recommended reading includes recently published titles on autism, developmental disabilities,

physical or mobility impairments, giftedness and more.

The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum by Temple Grandin (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013). A cutting-edge account of the latest science of autism from best-selling author Temple Grandin, who introduces readers to the scientists and self-advocates who are developing innovative theories of what causes autism, how it is diagnosed and how to best treat it. Easy to Love but Hard to Raise: Real Parents, Challenging Kids, True Stories by Kay Marner and Adrienne Ehlert Bashista (DRT Press, 2012). An anthology of personal essays written by parents of children with ADD, ADHD, OCD, ASDs and other “alphabet soup” diagnoses that take the already difficult job of parenting and add to the challenge. Topics include dealing with problem behaviors in various contexts and settings, experiences with and feelings about treatment, school (and other advocacy) experiences, children’s social interactions and friends, and the effect of parenting a difficult child on a parent’s emotional and physical health, marriage and other relationships. The Everything Parent’s Guide to Raising a Gifted Child: All You Need to Know to Meet Your Child’s Emotional, Social, and Academic Needs by Sarah Herbert Robbins (Adams Media, 2012). Gifted and exceptional children can seem self-sufficient, but it takes more than intelligence to lead a happy and fulfilling life. This book, part of the Everything Guides, examines how parents can nurture a gifted child from birth to adolescence through support and advocacy in school, in social situations and at home. Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity by Andrew Solomon (Scribner, 2012). Solomon writes about families coping with their children’s differences: deafness, dwarfism, Down syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, multiple severe disabilities and more. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the author suggests that the experience of difference within families is universal, as are the triumphs of love documented in every chapter.

The Girl’s Guide to Growing Up: Choices & Changes in the Tween Years by Terri Couwenhoven (Woodbine House, 2011). This guide is intended for girls with intellectual disabilities who may need extra help as they encounter the physical and emotional changes of puberty, including safety and privacy issues. It is written on a third-grade reading level for girls to read by themselves or with a parent’s help. The Spark: Raising a Genius by Kristine Barnett (Random House Publishing Group, 2013). In this memoir, the author shares the story of how she nurtured her autistic son, who was ultimately recognized as a genius. She believes that all parents can use these strategies to help their child find his or her “spark.” Cheryl K. Teal has a master’s degree in Library Science from North Carolina Central University. After her earlier careers as a teacher and a homeschooling mom, Cheryl now works as a Children’s Collection Development Librarian at Wake County Public Libraries in Raleigh.

Online reading The Pacer Center, pacer.org/newsletters – Parentrun advocacy organization for children with special needs. Newsletters and e-news are produced multiple times per year on issues including special education, early childhood development, technology, health care and advocacy. Parenting Special Needs, parentingspecialneeds. org – Free, bimonthly online magazine devoted to providing information and inspiration to parents of children of all ages with special needs.

Friendship Circle Blog, friendshipcircle.org/blog – Hundreds of searchable articles on topics including parenting, special education, products, therapy tips, videos and more. Contributors include parents, special educators, therapists, advocates and those with special needs.

Pinterest page, pinterest.com/swiesenbaugh/ special-needs-blogs – A collection of parenting blogs that address the challenges and joys of raising children with special needs.

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Special Needs

Terms Acronyms Need a primer on special needs terms and acronyms? This glossary of descriptive and legal terms can help. Compiled by Karen Lewis Taylor

Adaptive Development: Refers to the development of age-appropriate self-care or daily living skills. Adjusted Age: The age of a child, less the number of weeks the child was born premature; often compared/contrasted to chronological age. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): Wide-ranging civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity; also seen as ADAAA or Americans with Disabilities Act, As Amended. Assistive Technology (AT): Assistive, adaptive and rehabilitative devices that promote greater independence for people with disabilities by providing enhancements to, or changing methods of interacting with, the technology needed to accomplish tasks. Birth Defect: A structural, functional or metabolic abnormality present at birth that results in physical or mental disability or is fatal. Brain Injury: Damage or trauma to the brain that may affect memory, muscle control or other neurological functions. Cognitive Development: Development of the functions of the brain including perception, memory, imagination and language use. Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior that violates the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules. Congenital: Any trait or condition that exists from birth. Developmental Delay: Describes the development of children who have not reached various milestones in one or more areas in the time frame that is typical for his or her chronological age.

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Developmental Disability (DD): A mental or physical condition beginning in childhood where the child acquires skills at a slower rate than his or her peers, the condition is expected to go on indefinitely, and the condition restricts the child’s ability to function in society. Early Intervention: Specific services provided to infants and toddlers showing signs of, or at risk of, having a developmental delay. Emotional Disturbance (ED): Refers to an individual who exhibits chronic difficulties in the emotional and behavioral areas. Also referred to as behavioral disturbance (BD) or emotional-behavioral disturbance (EBD). Established Risk: When a child has already been identified with a condition related to developmental delay or disability or other medical conditions impacting development. Failure to Thrive: A condition in some children below the third percentile in weight and height (compared to other children of the same age) caused by problems with feeding and/or caregiving. Genetic Disorder: Disease transmitted from one generation to the next through genes. Inclusion: Full participation of special needs children in programs designed for typically developing children; also referred to as mainstreaming. Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA): Federal law that governs how states and public agencies provide early intervention, special education and related services to children with disabilities. Individualized Education Plan (IEP): A legal document that defines the individual educational goals for a child with special needs and the accommodations and services the school agrees to provide.

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Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP): Documents the delivery of community-based, interagency services for families with young children who have disabilities. Intervention: Treatment or assistance given to improve a deficit or a lag in mental or physical functioning. Learning Disability (LD): A disorder that impacts a person’s ability to interpret what is seen and heard and/or link information from different parts of the brain that is not caused by mental retardation or known physical problems. Least Restrictive Environment (LRE): A legal term pursuant to the U.S. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which requires schools to provide a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) with non-disabled peers to the greatest extent appropriate. Neurological Disorder: Various disorders or significant problems of the central nervous system. Occupational Therapy (OT): A type of health care treatment to improve self-help skills and adaptive behavior for people with development delays, illnesses or injuries that impede their ability to function independently. Orthopedic Impairment: A condition of the skeletal system that may result in restricted movement and developmental delays, illnesses or injuries. Sensory Integration Disorder: The inability of the brain to organize information coming through the senses; also called Sensory Processing Disorder. Service Eligibility: Conditions that must be met to qualify for particular resources and help. Sources: Center for the Improvement of Child Caring (ciccparenting.org) and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (ncdhhs.gov).

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Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department

Specialized Recreation Services

Our programs are designed to emphasize the strengths and abilities of individuals with a developmental and/or physical disability. • • • •

Special Olympics sports and competition Aquatic and Swimming programs Social and Education programs Inclusion Support for participation in typical programs

(919) 996-6835 | parks.raleighnc.gov

At North Carolina Children’s Hospital, we know that caring for your children’s health is your first priority as a parent. That’s why we’re proud to bring the Kohl’s Online Health Resource Center to our website. Now, no matter where in North Carolina you live— from Murphy to Manteo and all points in between— you can turn to www.ncchildrenshospital.org/kohls for a wealth of health information for kids. You’ll find health tips, healthy recipes, health quizzes, articles, health risk calculators and even videos. There are more than 12,000 topics in all. The Kohl’s Online Health Resource Center: just another way UNC Health Care and North Carolina Children’s Hospital are leading, teaching—and most of all—caring.

www.ncchildrenshospital.org/kohls


2013 Carolina Parent Exceptional Child