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p. Q+E 32

p. Q+E 36

Center of Attention by Deborah Harmanson-Pulos

p. Q+E 10 Nesting Bracelet by Marcie Abney

Quick + Easy

Sea Breeze by Jenika Perry

p. Q+E 14 Crystal Key Earrings by Kristal Wick

p. Q+E 16 Chance for Romance by Melissa Grakowsky

OC TOBER/NOVEMBER 2011 SUBSCRIBER BONUS PROJEC T DOWNLOADS

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CONTRIBUTORS

Q+E 4

REFINED RUFFLES Nora Farnsworth Enhance wire ribbon ruffles with embroidered crystals and seed beads

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LIVELY LACE Julie Glasser A centerline of crystal bicones complements interlocked triangle-weave motifs

Q+E 10 NESTING BRACELET Marcie Abney Use seed beads and gemstones to shape easily linked components Q+E 14 CRYSTAL KEY EARRINGS Kristal Wick Create glitzy netted earrings whose glamour belies their simplicity Q+E 16 CHANCE FOR ROMANCE Melissa Grakowsky Simple stitching grants this bracelet a lacy nineteenthcentury look

Q+E 28 FIGURE-EIGHT BRACELET Julie D’Amico-Beres This versatile piece is worked using a variation of twoneedle right-angle weave Q+E 32 CENTER OF ATTENTION Deborah Hermanson-Pulos Herringbone-stitch strands pay homage to an eye-catching centerpiece Q+E 36 SEA BREEZE Jenika Perry Enrich a basic strand of beads with short fringe and whimsical starfish Q+E 40 THIS & THAT Melinda Barta Connect peyote-stitch strips in a flash with simple netting Q+E 44 PRINCESS PEARLS C. J. Bauschka Capture a regal sense of elegance in this bracelet of crystals and pearls Q+E 48 MORE TECHNIQUES

©2011 Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved.

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FEATURED ARTISTS

contributors

Q

When creating a piece of beadwork, do you design in advance or create as you go?

Usually my ideas start with a shape or a particular stitch, but they evolve as I work. Most of my designs have individual segments that connect, and that’s when true creativity comes into play. My goal is to use all the pieces in an interesting design while maintaining the right length and constructing the perfect closure. —JULIE GLASSER

I keep paper and pencil at hand so that I can sketch out ideas when and where they hit me, but most of my work is created as I go. I really like that little bit of magic that happens when my imagination and the practical application of beadweaving techniques meet and then diverge into something completely unexpected.

I almost always create as I go. I’ll start with a general idea of a design, but getting to that final piece is a journey of trial and error. The fun part of designing this way is that you never know what ideas will sprout and grow as you work, and the end result is always a surprise. —MARCIE ABNEY

—DEBORAH HERMANSON-PULOS

My jewelry is a work in progress from the moment I spot the inspirational bead or pendant that I want to work with. I leave it in a teacup on the corner of my workbench and add bits of this and that to complement it. When my cup is full, I know that I have a good mélange with which to begin my design.

I’m a create-as-you-go kind of girl. I start with one thing in mind and end up with something totally different, which is not always helpful when I have to go back and write up my instructions. That’s why the majority of my designs are truly one of a kind. —C. J. BAUSCHKA

—JENIKA PERRY If it’s a strung piece, I create as I go. I may have colors or a style in mind, but I work better when I try things I’ve never tried before. If it’s needle-andthread work, I design in advance or I get frustrated. Bead size and shape are so important for certain stitches that I wouldn’t know where to begin without proper planning.

With seed beads, I’m totally a design-first type of beader. I sketch my design, then translate it into components and give it a try. I usually make another one in different colors and incorporate the things I learned making the first. Both pieces rarely turn out the same, and it’s good to make the second while the first is fresh in my mind.

—JULIE D’AMICO-BERES

—KRISTAL WICK

Often, a design just pops into my head. I’ll rework the design in my mind, adding and subtracting elements before I sit down to translate what I have envisioned to the physical piece. This process takes time, but it gives me a definite direction to follow as I work on perfecting the design. —NORA FARNSWORTH

Both! I often have some concept beforehand and sketch it out to have a place to start. Regardless of how thorough the idea is, I always end up modifying and changing it as I work because it’s impossible to know exactly how the piece is going to look until I put the beads in place.

Want to become a BEADWORK CONTRIBUTOR? See our submissions guidelines and deadlines at beadworkmagazine.com.

CORRECTION:

On page Q+E 24 of the August/September 2011 issue, the beads pictured at bottom left are not TOHO beads. We regret the error.

—MELISSA GRAKOWSKY

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refined ruffles N O R A FAR NSWO R T H

TECHNIQUES bead embroidery whipstitch wirework See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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USE A FEW TWISTS OF wire ribbon to create a ruffle ready to

embellish with a border of crystals. Complete the necklace with silk cord and a sprinkling of embroidered seed beads.

MATERIALS 2 g light-aqua bronze-lined size 15° seed beads (A) 180 Indian sapphire AB 3mm crystal bicones (B) 2 borosilicate 6mm end caps 1 sterling silver 1½" hook-and-eye clasp 2 sterling silver 6mm oval jump rings 6" of sterling silver 20-gauge wire 24" of taupe 3⁄8" silk cord piping 3' of dark brown 12mm tubular wire mesh ribbon Smoke 4 lb braided beading thread

TOOLS 1) NECKLACE BAND. Stitch crystals and

seed beads to a wire mesh ribbon that encases a silk cord: Embellish: Secure 3' of thread about ½" from one end of the ribbon. Using whipstitch, stitch 1B and 3A close to the edge, spacing the beads about 1⁄16" apart (Fig. 1). Repeat along both edges, leaving ½" at each end of the ribbon free of beads. Secure the thread and trim. Twist: Cut the silk cord, if desired, to adjust the finished length. (The clasp will add about 2" to the length.) Slide the ribbon over the cord, keeping the cord centered inside the ribbon. Note: Use the dowel (or knitting needle), if necessary, to help open the ribbon before sliding it over the cord. Twist and gather the ribbon around the cord so it forms a 10" length of swirls and ruffles. Gently pull the ribbon’s edges outward to expand it and add volume. Attach: Center the gathered ribbon on the cord so equal lengths of cord extend on each end. Stitch the ribbon’s ends to the cord to hold the ribbon in place. Embellish these stitches with crystals and seed beads (Fig. 2).

Artist’s Tip After stitching beads onto the ribbon, pull the wire mesh back into shape if the stitching has distorted it.

Size 10 beading needle Scissors Smooth round 3⁄8" dowel such as a knitting needle (optional) Round-nose pliers Chain- or flat-nose pliers Wire cutters

FINISHED SIZE: 22"

Fig. 1: Stitching the edge beads

Fig. 2: Sewing the ribbon to the cord

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Fig. 3: Attaching a wire to the cord

Fig. 4: Finishing the cord end

2) FINISHING. Use wire and end caps to

finish the cord ends and attach the clasp: End caps: Use 3" of sterling silver wire to

form a wrapped loop that attaches to the cord about ¼" from the cord’s end (Fig. 3). String 1 end cap (wide end first) and 1B; form a wrapped loop. Repeat using the remaining end cap at the other end of the cord. Embellish: Start 3' of new thread near the ribbon on one end of the necklace. Working with 1 bead in each stitch, sew A randomly along the exposed sections of cord, adding slightly more beads to the cord where it’s closer to the ribbon and fewer toward the end caps (Fig. 4). Repeat on the other end of the necklace. Clasp: Use 1 jump ring to attach one half of the clasp to 1 wrapped loop. Repeat at the other end of the necklace using the other half of the clasp. ✦

Option Enjoy making this necklace in many different colors of wire mesh ribbon.

NORA FARNSWORTH has been designing jewelry for several years. She’s always on the lookout for new and interesting materials to add to her work and loves creating with fibers, wire mesh, and beads. To see more of her work, visit www.sonoranbeads .com and contact her at orders@sonoranbeads.com. RESOURCES Check your local bead shop or contact: WireLace wire mesh ribbon, FireLine braided beading thread, Swarovski bicones, and all other materials: Sonoran Beads, (480) 664-7093, www.sonoranbeads.com.

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WHEEL-SHAPED MOTIFS IN TRIANGLE WEAVE are

lively lace

enhanced with a centerline of crystal bicones in this easy, casual bracelet.

JULIE GLASSER

1) FIRST WHEEL. Use triangle weave

and charlottes to form the initial wheel: Unit 1: Use 6' of conditioned thread to

string 9B, leaving a 6" tail. Pass through the beads again to form a ring and exit the first 3B (Fig. 1—blue thread). Unit 2: String 6B; pass through the last 3B exited and the first 3B just added (Fig. 1—red thread). Unit 3: String 6B; pass through the last 3B exited and the first 6B just added (Fig. 2—green thread). Unit 4: Repeat Unit 2 (Fig. 2—blue thread). Unit 5: Repeat Unit 3 (Fig. 2—red thread). Unit 6: Pass through the nearest 3B of Unit 1. String 3B; pass through the nearest 3B of Unit 5, 3B of Unit 1, and the 3B just added (Fig. 3). Note: Don’t pull the thread too tight or the wheel will warp.

Option TECHNIQUES triangle weave peyote stitch See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

If you substitute size 11° cylinder beads on the toggle, as shown on the blue bracelet, make the strip 12 beads wide.

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2) SUBSEQUENT WHEELS. Continue working partial wheels in triangle weave: Unit 7: String 6B; pass through the last 3B exited and the first 3B just added (Fig. 4—purple thread). Unit 8: String 6B; pass through the 3B just exited and the 6B just added (Fig. 4—green thread). Unit 9: Repeat Unit 7 (Fig. 4—blue thread). Unit 10: String 3B; pass through the nearest 3B of Unit 5 and the last 3B exited in Unit 9. Weave through beads to exit the top of Unit 8 (Fig. 4—red thread). Repeat Units 7–10 fourteen times or until you reach the desired length, minus 1⁄2" for the clasp.

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MATERIALS

Fig. 1: Forming the first two units

Fig. 2: Adding Units 3–5

1 g bronze size 11° charlottes (A) 9 g light bronze iris size 8° charlottes (B) 16 light topaz AB 4mm crystal bicones Brown size D nylon beading thread Thread conditioner

3) CRYSTALS. Pass through the 3B shared

TOOLS

by Units 8 and 9 to exit toward the beadwork. String 1 bicone; pass through 3B to exit the center of the next wheel (Fig. 5). Repeat along the centerline of the bracelet to add 16 bicones. Repeat the thread path to reinforce. Secure the thread and trim.

Scissors Size 10 beading needles

FINISHED SIZE: 7"

4) TOGGLE AND LOOP. Leaving a 6" tail,

use 3' of conditioned thread and evencount flat peyote stitch to make a strip 10A wide and 8 rows long. Zip the ends to form a tube. Exit the third A of Row 1 and string 2B. Pass through the sets of 3B and bicones in the centerline of the bracelet to exit the other end (Fig. 6—blue thread). String 1B and 19A; pass back through the last B added, the centerline of the bracelet, and the 2B before the toggle. Pass through the third A of Row 2 (Fig. 6—red thread). Repeat the entire thread path to reinforce. Secure the thread and trim. Note: Don’t pull too tight or the bracelet will pucker. ✦ JULIE GLASSER has been beading since 1980, when she inherited her grandmother’s wire and seed beads. She focuses mostly on beadweaving techniques and teaches various beading classes at an art school in Atlanta. She is an accomplished metalsmith, combining sterling silver and seed beads in her work. Visit www.julieglasser.com.

Fig. 3: Completing the first wheel

Fig. 4: Weaving Units 7–10

RESOURCES Check your local bead shop or contact: Similar charlottes: Applegate Lapidary, (209) 296-0929, www.applegatelapidary.com. Swarovski bicones, Nymo nylon beading thread, Thread Heaven thread conditioner, and all other materials: Fire Mountain Gems and Beads: (800) 355-2137, www.firemountaingems.com.

Fig. 5: Embellishing with bicones

Fig. 6: Creating the toggle bar and loop

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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nesting bracelet MARCIE ABNEY

TECHNIQUE circular peyote stitch See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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INSPIRED BY THE LITTLE WIRE-WRAPPED nests that are so

popular for wireworkers, Marcie created a similar version with seed beads for beaders. Artist’s Tip

MATERIALS

Be sure to condition your thread since you are passing through gemstones.

4 g matte metallic brown size 11° seed beads (A) 30 semimatte Picasso jasper 4mm rounds (B) 10 copper 6mm closed (soldered) jump rings 2 copper 6mm open (unsoldered) jump rings 5 copper 12mm open (unsoldered) jump rings 1 copper 13mm round toggle clasp Size D nylon beading thread Beading wax

TOOLS The back view of a bracelet.

Scissors Size 12 beading needles 2 pairs of chain- or flat-nose pliers

FINISHED SIZE: 71⁄4"

1) NEST. Use circular peyote stitch to form

beaded “nests” using jasper rounds and seed beads: Round 1: Use 3' of waxed thread to string {1A and 1B} six times, leaving a 6" tail. Tie an overhand knot to form a circle. Pass through all the beads again, exiting from 1B (Fig. 1—purple thread). Round 2: String 2A and pass through the next 1B; repeat five times. Step up through the first A added in this round (Fig. 1—green thread). Round 3: String 1A and pass through the next A of Round 2, then string 3A, skip 1B of Round 2, and pass through the next A of Round 2; repeat five times. Step up through the first A added in this round (Fig. 1—blue thread). Round 4: String 1A and pass through the next 3A of Round 3, then string 1A and

pass through the next A of Round 3; repeat five times. Weave through beads to exit 1A of Round 1 (Fig. 1— red thread). Round 5: String 3A, skip 1B, and pass through the next A of Round 1. Pass back through the third A just added (Fig. 2—green thread). *String 2A, skip 1B, and pass through the next A in Round 1. Pass back through the second A just added. Repeat from * three times (Fig. 2—purple thread). String 1A; pass back through the first A added in this round and the nearest A of Round 1. Pass through the first A added in this round (Fig. 2—blue thread). Pass through the 6A in the inner circle formed by this round twice (Fig. 2—red thread). Weave through beads to exit the first A of a

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Fig. 1: Stitching Rounds 1–4

Fig. 2: Adding Round 5

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Artist’s Tips • You don’t have to use the same color of stones—use different colors to create a different effect. • The creative options for these little components are endless. Use them to create earrings, bracelet charms, or even a fun pendant.

3A set added in this round, toward the back of the nest. Back arms: *String 2A; pass through the nearest A of Round 3. Pass back through the 2A just added, the last A exited in Round 5, and the next 2A of Round 5 (Fig. 3). Repeat from * five times. Exit from the second A added for the first arm, toward the outer edge of the nest. Loops: *String 5A and one closed 6mm jump ring; pass down through the next arm of beads. Weave through beads of the inner circle to exit the arm directly across from the loop just made (Fig. 4). Repeat from *. Secure the threads and trim. Repeat this entire step four times for a total of 5 nests.

2) ASSEMBLY. Attach one open 6mm jump ring to one half of the clasp. Use one 12mm jump ring to attach the open 6mm jump ring just added to the closed 6mm jump ring on one end of 1 nest. Use one 12mm jump ring to attach the closed 6mm jump ring on the other side of the nest just added to the closed 6mm jump ring on another nest; repeat three times. Note: Make sure all of the components face the same direction, with the jump rings facedown. Attach the remaining open 6mm jump ring to the other half of the clasp. Use the remaining 12mm jump ring to attach the open 6mm jump ring just added to the closed 6mm jump ring on the final nest. ✦

MARCIE ABNEY is a self-taught beader living in Wilmington, North Carolina. She loves to find inspiration in architecture and architectural shapes and spends her spare time playing with beads. You can see more of her work at www.labellajoya .blogspot.com. RESOURCES Check your local bead shop or contact: Seed beads, jump rings, and clasp: Michaels, (800) 642-4235, www.michaels.com. Jasper rounds: Jane’s Fiber and Beads, (423) 639-7919, www.janesfiberandbeads.com.

Option

Fig. 3: Forming the arm on the back of a nest

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Fig. 4: Creating a loop

For an adjustable bracelet, use a lobster clasp at one end and a chain of jump rings at the other.

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crystal key earrings K R I S TA L W I C K

WHIP UP these easy-to-

make netted earrings in the morning and flash your sparkling new accessories that night. 1) BODY. Stitch a netted disc to form the

body of the earring: Inner ring: Use 6' of thread to string {1A and 1B} six times, leaving a 6" tail. Pass through all the beads again and tie a square knot with the working and tail threads to form a tight circle. Weave through beads to exit from the second A (Fig. 1—blue thread). Net loops: String 4A, 1B, and 4A: pass through the last A exited and the next B and A of the inner ring; repeat to add a total of 6 loops. Weave through beads to exit through the fifth A added in this section (Fig. 1—red thread). Outer ring: String 1B and pass through the middle A/B/A added in the next loop; repeat to add a total of 6B. Exit from 1B (Fig. 2). Connector loops: String {1A and 1B} twice. String 1A; pass through the last B exited on the outer ring and the first A/B/A just added (Fig. 3—green thread). String 6A and pass through the last A exited. Repeat the thread path to reinforce, then weave through the outer ring beads to exit from the B opposite the one where the connector loop was just stitched (Fig. 3—blue thread). Repeat from the beginning of this section to add a second connector loop. Weave through the outer ring beads on each side of the body to reinforce (Fig. 3—red thread).

TECHNIQUE netting See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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MATERIALS 3 g rose-lined clear size 11° seed beads (A) 44 fuchsia AB2X 4mm crystal bicones (B) 2 dark pewter 12×32mm metal key charms 2 dark pewter 5mm jump rings 2 sterling silver 7⁄8" ear wires with 3mm rhinestone embellishment Smoke 6 lb braided beading thread

Fig. 1: Stitching the inner ring and net loops

TOOLS Size 10 beading needle Scissors Flat- or chain-nose pliers

FINISHED SIZE: 31⁄4”

Fig. 2: Completing the outer ring

2) ASSEMBLY. Use 1 jump ring to connect

a charm to one of the connector loops. Connect the ear wire to the other connector loop. 3) Repeat Steps 1 and 2 to form the second earring. ✦ KRISTAL WICK , Swarovski ambassador and previous editor of Beading Daily, has written two books, Sassy Silky Savvy and Fabulous Fabric Beads. She has also created two DVDs, Mixed Media: Beaded Bracelets with Fiber Beads, Crystals, Resin, and Wire and Mixed Media: Jewelry Making with Handmade Beads, Crystals, Resin, and More! See more of her work at www.kristalwick.com.

Artist’s Tip Fig. 3: Adding the connector loops

Reinforce the beadwork several times to make the earring sturdy, but don’t pull so tightly that the beadwork buckles.

RESOURCES Check your local bead store or contact: FireLine braided beading thread, Swarovski bicones, and all other materials: FusionBeads.com, (888) 781-3559.

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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chance for romance MELISSA GRAKOWSK Y

TECHNIQUES picot peyote stitch See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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THIS ROMANTIC BRACELET, inspired by Victorian-era trims

and jewelry, is a cinch to stitch. Don’t be fooled by its delicate good looks; the lacy beading is worked off a sturdy base. MATERIALS 2 g transparent smoke topaz gold iris size 15° seed beads (A) 2 g metallic bronze size 11° seed beads (B) 2 g matte rose gold iris size 8° seed beads (C) 100 transparent ruby frosted rainbow 3.4mm Japanese drop beads (D) 12 gold 6mm crystal pearls 1 glass 17mm shank button Crystal 6 lb braided beading thread

TOOLS Scissors Size 12 beading needles

FINISHED SIZE: 7"

1) BASE. Add a tension bead to 3' of

thread. String 1C. String {1 pearl and 3C} twelve times. String 48A to create the button loop; pass back through the C just exited. String 1C and pass through 1C, 1 pearl, and 1C (Fig. 1); repeat eleven times to continue peyote-stitching along the initial strand. Remove the tension bead. String 1B, 9A, the button shank, and 9A; pass back through the 1B, 1C, 1 pearl, and 2C (Fig. 2—blue thread).

2) EMBELLISHMENTS. Use seed beads

Artist’s Tip

and drop beads to add loops and picots:

Braided beading thread is an excellent choice for making this design a strong, long-lasting bracelet. You won’t have to work with doubled thread or make additional passes through any sections to reinforce them.

Small picots and loops: *String 1B, 1D,

and 1B; pass through the C just exited. String 1B, 3A, 3B, 3A, and 1B; skip 1C/ 1 pearl/1C and pass through the next C (Fig. 2—red thread). Repeat from * ten times. String 1B, 1D, and 1B; pass through the C just exited, the next C, and 8A of the button loop (Fig. 3— blue thread).

Fig. 1: Peyote-stitching along the base

Fig. 2: Attaching the button and working small picots and loops

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Artist’s Tips • Work with tight thread tension since you won’t repeat many of the thread paths, and you’ll only go through some beads once. • Try using glass or acrylic 6mm rounds in place of the pearls to change the look of the bracelet. • If you can’t find 4mm drop beads, you can substitute size 8° beads to get a very similar look. Fig. 3: Stitching the button-loop picots

Button-loop picots: String 1B, 3D, and

1B, then skip 2A and pass through 13A; repeat twice, passing through only 8A the second time. Pass through 2C (Fig. 3—red thread). Repeat the small picot-and-loop embellishment along the bottom edge of the bracelet, passing through 1C, 1 pearl, 1C, 1B, and 18A at the end of the bracelet. Pass back through the end B and C. Large picots: String 7A; pass through the D of the nearest small picot. *String 3A; pass through the first 2B of the nearest loop. String 1B, 3D, and 1B; pass through the B just exited and the next B of the loop. String 3A; pass through the D of the next small picot (Fig. 4). Repeat from * ten times. String 7A; pass through the 3D, 1B, 28A, 1B, and 3D on the button loop (Fig. 5). Repeat the large picots to embellish the bottom edge of the bracelet. Pass through the nearest C and B of the button loop. Secure the thread and trim. ✦

Fig. 4: Adding a large picot

MELISSA GRAKOWSKY is a self-taught beadweaver from Connecticut. She has a background in physics and painting and is intrigued by the three-dimensional possibilities of working with seed beads, a needle, and thread. You can view Melissa’s beadwork online at www.grakowsky.net or find her on Facebook. RESOURCES Check your local bead shop or contact: Toho seed beads: Bobby Bead, (888) 900-2323, www.bobbybead.com. Miyuki drops, Swarovski pearls, and FireLine braided beading thread: Fire Mountain Gems and Beads, (800) 355-2137, www.firemountaingems.com. Lampwork button by Greg Hanson: Hanson Stone Handmade, www.hansonstonehandmade.etsy.com.

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Fig. 5: Linking the small picot to the button loop

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A DV ER TOR I A L

presents

the Inspired

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A DV ER TOR I A L

30 New Colors of TILA Beads Offer More Design Options

5 NATURE-INSPIRED Pendant Ideas for Fall A stunning fall necklace design begins with a fabulous pendant. Try one of these inspiring ideas: • Gemstone Donuts: Create a dramatic focal by adding a beadwoven or metal bail to a 40mm red aventurine, carnelian, or tigereye donut. • Gemstone Teardrops: String a flat teardrop onto a head pin and form a wrapped loop to create a simple but striking pendant with cappuccino jasper or red creek jasper.

If you’re one of the many fans of the popular 2-holed flat square TILA beads, you’ll be excited to learn about the thirty new color options coming this fall. This brings the total number of available colors to sixty-one. While the original beads featured mainly neutrals such as white and black, along with various metallics, the new shades include a mix of brights such as cobalt blue, cherry red, and sunny yellow and soft pastels such as rose, mint green, and peach. As with the original beads, the new colors come in a range of finishes including opaque, transparent, matte, and AB. Visit WWW.MIYUKI-BEADS.CO.JP/ENGLISH/TILA/ for a full-color palette. You’ll also find design ideas for using TILA beads with herringbone stitch, loomwork, and other beadweaving stitches, along with simpler projects using stringing. Can’t wait for the new TILA beads to arrive? You can play with them online by clicking on “Play Mode.” Use your mouse to move the beads around the screen to see what colors look best together. It’s lots of fun!

• Faceted Gemstones: Try stitching several of these brilliant small (12mm) gemstones together for an eye-catching focal. Choose an unusual shape such as axe and star for extra attention. • Shell Pendants: If you find gemstones too heavy, consider a lightweight iridescent shell pendant in black tab or brown lip. Available in large sizes (45mm), they make the perfect background for layering charms or beaded dangles. • Handmade Scrabble® Pendants by HomeStudio: Use chain to string these cute pendants featuring fawns, rabbits, squirrels, and other woodland creatures. Visit FUSIONBEADS.COM for a wide selection of fall pendants and more design ideas.

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A DV ER TOR I A L

SUPER STICKY BEAD MAT CURES A MESSY PROBLEM Does this sound familiar? Just when you finish arranging your beautiful design on your table, you accidentally bump the table leg, scattering your beads across the table and onto the floor. Before it happens again (and you know it will), think about buying the new reversible Sticky Bead Mat XL by BeadSmith. This mat measures slightly larger than a sheet of paper. One side contains U-channels, just like a traditional stringing bead board, while the other side is flat. Both sides are marked with measurements in both inches and centimeters, making it easy to design jewelry the right size. Best of all, the Sticky Bead Mat XL keeps small beads and findings in place without adhesive or sticky residue. For traveling, check out the original Sticky Bead Mat. Measuring just over 3 x 5 inches and flat on both sides, it easily tucks into a carry-on bag or purse. If the mats start to gather dust, simply rinse them with water and let them dry. They will become sticky again.

Double Your Beading Fun WITH TWO TYPES OF BEADING THREAD By matching the color of nylon thread to your beads, you can make the thread disappear into the background and allow your beadwork to shine. But as both new and long-time beaders can attest, ordinary nylon thread can be frustrating to use because it easily breaks and frays. Luckily, Toho Beads makes One-G, a strong nylon thread that’s less likely to fray and tangle. A special coating on the thread makes messy waxing unnecessary. It also makes it easier to rethread your needle. Choose one of twelve colors or get the assortment that includes all the colors in a handy plastic storage case. If you hate threading beading needles, you’re in luck! Amiet is a 100% polyester thread with a thin but sturdy texture that doesn’t require a needle. It works with lace and leather, in addition to beads. Amiet is available in eighteen colors, including rich fall shades such as mahogany, auburn, and carmine. Visit www.tohobeads. net/amiet/amiet.pdf for a full-color palette, plus more than a dozen ideas for knotted, strung, and crocheted jewelry.

Find a shop near you at WWW.BEADSMITH.COM.

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A DV ER TOR I A L

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A DV ER TOR I A L

Create Gorgeous, Lasting Jewelry with Flawless Crystal Pearls

Add a New Twist to Jewelry with Artistic Wire Mesh If the cold days of fall have sapped your creativity, get inspired by Artistic Wire Mesh from Beadalon. This flat, hollow mesh tube can be stretched, twisted, wrapped, folded, knotted, or glued. Use it instead of beading wire to string beads, knotting in between each bead for an extra burst of color and texture. Or jazz up a plain strand of beads or chain by placing them completely inside the mesh tube. Use Artistic Wire Mesh as an embellishment, wrapping it like a ribbon around a large gemstone cabochon or bail and tying a simple knot. You can even create your own necklace focals by stretching this permanently colored copper wire into freeform, 3-D shapes such as flower petals and leaves. Finish your necklace or bracelet by knotting, wirewrapping, or crimping. Use C-Crimp findings (the kind used for ribbons) or string beading wire through the mesh and then crimp closed with a crimp tube, crimp bead, Scrimp, or EZ-Crimp. Available in two widths and six colors, Artistic Wire Mesh will wake up your creativity in no time.

Freshwater pearls can be challenging to use in jewelry designs, since their shapes and hole sizes are not uniform. Sometimes the holes require a bead reamer before stringing. Pearls also require special care when worn, since they can be easily damaged. Crystal Pearls from Swarovski Elements eliminate these problems, while retaining the classic look and weight of fresh water pearls. The crystal core makes it possible to have uniform holes for stringing, while the innovative silky smooth pearl coating resists damage from rubbing, scratching, perfume, perspiration, and UV light. Crystal pearls are available in a variety of shapes, including baroque, twist, and drops. Ranging in size from 3mm to 14mm, crystal pearls also come in a variety of colors, including popular metallics such as copper, bright gold, and bronze. A new large-hole version is perfect for beadweaving, since it accommodates multiple thread passes. Crystal pearls perfectly complement the beads and pendants from Swarovski Elements, making it easy to finding matching and contrasting colors, shapes, and sizes. Get inspired by free jewelry and home decor ideas at WWW.CREATE-YOUR-STYLE.

To find stores near you, visit WWW.ARTISTICWIRE.COM.

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A DV ER TOR I A L

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DISCOVER THE SECRETS of

Peyote andHerringbone

Stitch N

OW YOU CAN MASTER bead

stitches from the basics + beyond with expert Melinda Barta. With thread-path diagrams, expert tips and tricks, and up-close shots and images, you’ll easily learn two of the most popular seed-bead stitches.

Order your copy of these dynamic DVDs to:

‡

Get Started Today with this must-have, easy-to-follow jewelry resource you’ll use again and again!

‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

Create pieces even faster with twodrop techniques for quick stitching. Have even more fun with seed beads making easy embellishments. Discover the formula for creating your own one-of-a-kind patterns. And more!

‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

Watch a preview at

Get started the right way with a comprehensive tools and materials overview.

InterweaveStore.com/BartaDVDs

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TUBULAR, S P I R A L , F L AT, AND MORE!

Fall in love with seed-bead stitching

Do you remember the first time bea

ds called your

name? I do. I was about seven year

s old, killing time in a gift shop in the old Denver Stap leton Airport, when the sweetest white-and-yellow daisy-chain bracelet caught my eye. Sure, I’d seen beaded bracelets befo I truly saw beads. I studied and stud connected those tiny beads until I

re. But this was the first time

ied the thread paths that was able to make my own. That

daisy-chain bracelet was just the tip

of the iceberg.

Now is your time to fall in love with

bead stitching, just as I did.

Watch along as I show you step by

step how to create fabulous jewelry with peyote and herringbone stitch. We start with the basics and then step it up a notch with adva nced variations. So you can begin creating right away!

Melinda Barta artist, designer, and senior editor of Bea

dwork magazine

WORKSHOP

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figure-eight bracelet J U L I E D ’A M I C O - B E R E S

TECHNIQUE two-needle right-angle weave variation See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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WHEN TIME IS SHORT and you’re looking for a satisfying

project to finish without fuss, stitch this pearl and crystal bracelet in two-needle right-angle weave. MATERIALS 8 g clear AB size 11° seed beads (A) 62 clear AB 4mm crystal bicones (B) 11 clear AB 6mm crystal bicones (C) 22 cream rose 4mm crystal pearls (D) 24 cream rose 8mm crystal pearls (E) 1 sterling silver 11mm lobster clasp 1 sterling silver 4mm clasp ring with connector loop Crystal 8 lb braided beading thread

TOOLS 2 size 10 or 12 beading needles Scissors Chain-nose pliers

FINISHED SIZE: 7½"

Fig. 1: Stitching Row 1, Units 1 and 2

Fig. 2: Adding the clasp and forming Row 2, Unit 1

1) BASE. Use two needles to stitch the base of the bracelet: Row 1, Unit 1: Place one needle on each end of 10' of thread. String 1B and slide it to the center of the thread. Use the right needle to string 4A, 1B, and 4A, then use the left needle to string 4A, 1B, 4A, and 1B; cross the right needle through the last B strung to form a circle (Fig. 1—blue thread). Row 1, Unit 2: Use the right needle to string 4A, 1B, and 4A, then use the left needle to string 4A, 1B, 4A, and 1B; cross the right needle through the last B strung (Fig. 1—red thread). Row 1, Units 3–12: Repeat Unit 2 ten times to form a total of 12 units. Turn the work 180 degrees. Clasp: Pair the needles together and string 6A, the clasp, and 6A.

Row 2, Unit 1: String 1B on the right

needle and pass the left needle back through the same B (Fig. 2—blue thread). Use the right needle to string 4A, pass through the nearest B of Row 1, Unit 12, and string 4A. Use the left needle to string 4A, 1B, 4A, and 1B. Cross the right needle through the last B strung (Fig. 2—red thread). Row 2, Unit 2: Repeat Row 2, Unit 1, eleven times to add a total of 12 units. Ring: Pair the needles together and string 6A, the clasp ring through the connector loop, and 6A. Separate the needles and cross through the first B added in Row 1, Unit 1. Weave the right needle through the nearest 1A and set aside. Weave the left needle through the nearest 4A and 1B (Fig. 3).

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Fig. 3: Adding the clasp ring

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Artist’s Tips • To make it easier to get braided beading thread through your needle, grasp the end with chain-nose pliers and pull. This straightens out and stiffens the thread. • To get the cleanest cut, always use very sharp scissors when cutting braided beading thread.

Fig. 4: Embellishing the center and adding the pearls

Fig. 5: Adding the side embellishments

2) EMBELLISH. Decorate the base with

bicones and pearls: Center: Use the left needle to string 1A, 1C, and 1A, then pass through the next B between rows (Fig. 4—blue thread); repeat ten times to add a total of 11C. Weave through beads to exit from the top B of Row 2, Unit 1. Set the left needle aside. Pearls: Use the right needle to string 1A, 1E, and 1A, then lay the strand diagonally across the unit and pass through the A next to the B on the opposite side of the unit, toward the B, and the nearest A of the next unit, away from the B; repeat to embellish each unit in Row 1 (Fig. 4—red thread). On the final stitch, pass through the second A of the final unit away from the B and continue through beads to exit the nearest edge B of Row 1, Unit 12. Set the right needle aside. Use the left

Q+E 30

• You can give this bracelet a more petite look by using 12 seed beads in each figure-eight circle instead of 16.

needle to embellish Row 2 the same way. Set the left needle aside. Sides: Use the right needle to string 2A, 1D, and 2A, then pass through the next edge B of Row 1 (Fig. 5); repeat ten times to add a total of 11D. Secure the right thread and trim. Use the left needle to embellish Row 2 the same way, passing through the top B. Secure the left thread and trim. ✦ JULIE D’AMICO-BERES teaches math in grades six through eight. She lives in Wisconsin with her husband of eighteen years and their two dogs. She travels extensively and enjoys looking for beads in exotic locales. Experienced in many forms of crafting, she found her passion in beading about eight years ago. Contact her at jewelsbyjules@wi.rr.com. RESOURCES Check your local bead store or contact: Swarovski bicones and pearls, FireLine braided beading thread, and all other materials: Fire Mountain Gems and Beads, (800) 355-2137, www.firemountaingems. com.

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make it easy for you great jewelry

We to make

This design was made by Katie Hacker using Beadalon 19 Strand Silver Color Wire, Remembrance™ Memory Wire, Chain, and Findings. You can learn how to make this design at: htttpp:///w hhttp://www.beadalon.com/fairytalecollection.asp /www ww.bbea eada ada daloon..co com/ m//faairiryt ryt ytal alec ecol col o leect c ioon. n.as aspp as

Making your own jewelry is fun, easy, and very gratifying. Save money and express your style by creating your own earrings, bracelets and necklaces. Visit our website for hundreds of design ideas, step-by-step instructions, product videos, and inspirational ideas to discover how easy it is for you to Create Something Great™.

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center of attention DEBORAH HERMANSON-PULOS

TECHNIQUES ladder stitch tubular herringbone stitch fringe See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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CHOOSE A STUNNING FOCAL BEAD

and let its color scheme inspire your seed bead and crystal selections. MATERIALS

Artist’s Tip As you stitch the strands, keep the beads close to each other with tight tension so the weight of the focal bead doesn’t create segments of stretched thread.

1) STRA NDS. Work 3 tubular herringbone

strands: Round 1: Use 6' of waxed purple thread

to form a ladder-stitch strip 1 bead high and 4 beads long, using B for the first 2 stitches, C for the third and fourth stitches, and leaving a 14" tail (Fig. 1—blue thread). Stitch the first and last beads together to form a circle, exiting up through the first 1B (Fig. 1— red thread). Round 2: String 2B; pass down through the next 1B and up through the following 1C (Fig. 2—blue thread). String 2C; pass down through the next 1C and step up through the following 2B (Fig. 2— red thread). Rounds 3–5: Repeat Round 2 three times. Round 6 (embellishment): String 1A; pass down through the next 1B and up through the following 1C of the previous round (Fig. 3—blue thread). String 1A; pass down through 1C and up through

the next 1B of the previous round (Fig. 3—red thread). Round 7 to end: Repeat Round 2 twice, then Round 6; repeat this sequence until the strand is 181⁄4" long or the desired length (total necklace length minus 4" for the final rounds and clasp). Note: Push the A to the outside of the strand as you work. Final rounds: Repeat Round 2 five times. Weave through the final round, following a ladder-stitch thread path. Secure the thread but don’t trim it. Set the rope aside.

Fig. 1: Joining the ladder-stitch strip

3 g silver-lined crystal size 15° seed beads (A) 4 g matte silver-lined purple size 11° cylinder beads (B) 5 g silver-lined purple size 11° cylinder beads (C) 4 g matte silver-lined orange size 11° cylinder beads (D) 5 g silver-lined dark orange size 11° cylinder beads (E) 4 g transparent fuchsia size 11° cylinder beads (F) 5 g silver-lined dark rose size 11° cylinder beads (G) 1 g silver-lined crystal size 11° seed beads (H) 9 padparadscha 4mm crystal bicones 9 fuchsia 4mm crystal bicones 9 light-purple 4mm crystal bicones 2 padparadscha 8mm crystal bicones 1 salmon/fuchsia/ shimmer white/violet swirled 40mm polymer clay coin 20 silver-plated 4mm daisy spacers 2 Bali silver 11×17mm 3-to-1 triangle connectors 1 sterling silver 15mm round toggle clasp Dark pink, orange, and purple size D nylon beading thread Microcrystalline wax

TOOLS Scissors Size 10 or 12 beading needles

FINISHED SIZE: 22½" (necklace); 4" (focal)

Fig. 2: Starting the herringbone rope

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Fig. 3: Embellishing the herringbone strand

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3) FOCAL. Create a bail and fringe for the

clay coin: Purple bail and fringe: Add a tension

Fig. 4: Attaching the toggle bar

Fig. 5: Forming the fringe and bail

Repeat this entire step with orange thread, using D and E for B and C, and again with dark pink thread, using F and G for B and C (continue to use A for all embellishments) for a total of 3 strands. 2) NECKLACE ASSEMBLY. Using the tail thread on the B/C strand, string {1 spacer and 1 light purple 4mm bicone} three times; pass through the first hole on the wide end of 1 connector. String 7C, 3H, the toggle bar, and 2H; pass back through the first H added. Weave back through all of the following beads and connector just added to exit the last 1B exited on the necklace strand. Pass up through the next 1B on the end of the rope (Fig. 4). Repeat the entire thread path, secure the thread, and trim.

Q+E 34

Repeat this entire step using the tail thread on the D/E strand, padparadscha 4mm bicones for the light purple bicones, E for C, and passing through the center hole of the connector and the 5H already added. Repeat again using the F/G strand, fuchsia 4mm bicones for the light purple bicones, G for C, and passing through the last hole of the connector and the 5H already added. Repeat this entire step again using the other ends of the ropes, making sure they aren’t twisted, and the toggle ring.

bead to 3' of waxed purple thread, leaving a 12" tail. String 30C, 1 spacer, 1 padparadscha 8mm bicone, the coin, 1 padparadscha 8mm bicone, 1 spacer, 15C, 1 light purple 4mm bicone, and 1A; skip the 1A and weave back through beads to exit the first spacer (Fig. 5— blue thread). Wrap the first 30C around the 3 strands of the necklace. Remove the tension bead and pass through the 30C of the loop. Pass through the spacer/8mm bicone/coin/8mm bicone/ spacer and string 15C, 1 light purple 4mm bicone, and 1A; skip the 1A and weave back through beads to exit the first spacer (Fig. 5—red thread). Orange bail and fringe: String 30E; circle the 3 necklace strands. *Pass through the spacer/8mm bicone/coin/8mm bicone/spacer. String 15E, 1 padparadscha 4mm bicone, and 1A; skip the 1A and weave back through beads to exit the first spacer. Pass through the 30E. Repeat from * twice for a total of 3 fringes, omitting the last pass through the 30E. Fuchsia bail and fringe: Repeat as for the orange bail and fringe, using G for E and fuchsia 4mm bicones for the padparadscha 4mm bicones. Secure the working thread and trim; don’t trim the tail. Final fringe: Add a needle to the tail thread and pass through the spacer/ 8mm bicone/coin/8mm bicone/spacer. String 15C, 1 light purple 4mm bicone, and 1A; skip the 1A and weave back through beads to exit the first spacer. Secure the thread and trim. ✦ DEBORAH HERMANSON-PULOS has been an unrepentant seed bead addict for ten years. She teaches at Bead Quest in Grand Rapids, Michigan. RESOURCES Check your local bead shop or contact: C-Lon nylon beading thread, Delica cylinder beads, and size 15° seed beads: Caravan Beads, (800) 230-8941, www.caravanbeads.net. Swarovski bicones: Fire Mountain Gems and Beads, (800) 355-2137, www.firemountaingems.com. Connectors, spacers, and clasp: Bead Quest, (616) 726-5908, www.beadquest.com. Polymer coin: Deborah Pulos Designs, www.deborahpulosdesigns.com.

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sea breeze JENIKA PERRY

TECHNIQUE fringe See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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SHORT FRINGE topped off with teardrops—plus a

few seaworthy starfish beads—bestow rich texture on a simple seed bead strand.

MATERIALS 3 g matte metallic mauve iris size 15° seed beads (A) 26 g total mix of matte metallic size 6° seed beads in silver, copper, and gold (B) 222 bronze metallic 3.4mm teardrops (C) 1 dark-orange 13mm hollow cloisonné starfish bead 1 dark-orange 18mm hollow cloisonné starfish bead 1 copper 15mm round toggle clasp Crystal 6 lb braided beading thread

TOOLS Tools Scissors Size 12 beading needles

FINISHED SIZE: 7½"

1) BASE. Use 8' of thread to string 7A, the

toggle bar, and 5A, leaving a 6" tail. Tie a knot to form a circle and pass through the first A strung. String 75B, 6A, the toggle ring, and 6A; pass through the last B strung (Fig. 1).

2) EMBELLISHMENT. Use fringe to

embellish the base and add starfish beads: Row 1: String 1B, 1A, 1C, and 1A; pass

back through the B just strung and through the next 1B on the base (Fig. 2). Repeat down the length of the bracelet. Pass through the 12A of the clasp loop and back through the nearest 1B.

Artist’s Tip To prevent the thread from tangling around previous fringe work, hold the bracelet over the index finger of your nondominant hand and cup the majority of the project in your palm. This leaves only a few fringe beads exposed over the top of your finger and is an immense help in reducing tangles.

Fig. 1: Building the bracelet base

Fig. 2: Forming the first fringe of Row 1

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Artist’s Tip Keep in mind that the fringe creates a much smaller inside diameter on the bracelet than the length of beads you first strung. To lengthen the bracelet by 1", add 11⁄4" of size 6° beads to the base and make sure you start with an odd number of beads in the base row.

Fig. 3: Attaching the small starfish bead

Row 2: Repeat Row 1. For the last fringe,

string 3A, the small starfish bead, 2A, 1C, and 2A; pass back through the starfish bead and the first 3A added. Pass through the next B (Fig. 3), the 12A of the clasp loop, and back through the nearest 1B. Row 3: String 19A, the large starfish bead, 1C, and 2A; pass back through the first 17A just added (Fig. 4). Note: Most of the 17A will be hidden inside the starfish. Work fringe as in Row 1 down the length of the base. Secure the threads and trim. ✦

Fig. 4: Adding the large starfish bead

JENIKA PERRY is a bead hoarder and owner of Beadles Originals Beads in Logan, Utah. Her mother taught her to make her first bracelet in 2000, and she hasn’t put her beading tools down since. Jenika’s goal is to someday visit the Czech Republic and Japan and watch beads being made firsthand. RESOURCES Check your local bead shop or contact: Magatama teardrops, seed beads, clasp, and FireLine braided beading thread: Beadles Originals Beads, (435) 755-3171, www.beadlesoriginals.com. Starfish beads: Fire Mountain Gems and Beads, (800) 355-2137, www.firemountaingems.com.

Q+E 38

It’s It It’ t’s easy easy to o ad a adapt apt this thi his d design esign esi gn by substituting substi sub stitut tuting ing g ot o other h her beads bea eads d in n pla place ce of the e starfi a sh and teardrops. te tea rdrops.

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WHATEVER YOU CAN DREAM UP –

TURN IT INTO CRYSTAL! With the amazing crystals from the SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS assortment, you can bring sparkle to your favorite items – and create your own designs. SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS let you fully express your creativity. Not only are they easy to use. They are also available in the latest fashion colors, effects and cuts. Used in a variety of applications (beading, sewing, wire work, etc.), they blend perfectly with other crystal elements. Most importantly, they offer a one-of-a-kind brilliance! There are no limits to your imagination. Whatever you can dream up – turn it into crystal and choose from the extensive SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS product collection. Updated and enhanced twice a year with new colors and products, it keeps you one step ahead of worldwide trends in fashion, style and design. Find out more about our latest collection, download free step-by-step instructions and experience the sparkling world of CREATE YOUR STYLE at WWW.CREATE-YOUR-STYLE.COM

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this & that M E L I N DA B A R TA

Artist’s Tips • If adjusting the length of the bracelet, make sure the number of beads used in the peyote rows is divisible by four, plus one. • A little twisting is okay, but hold the beadwork as flat as possible while working the peyote-stitch rows to prevent the work from twisting too much.

TECHNIQUES peyote stitch netting See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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CONNECT TWO QUICK-TO-STITCH STRIPS of peyote into a

bracelet using simple netting and very few materials—just a little bit of this (size 8° seeds beads) and a little bit of that (size 11° seed beads). MATERIALS 1 g matte metallic light green size 11° Japanese seed beads (A) 2 g gold size 11° Japanese seed beads (B) 2 g silver size 11° Japanese seed beads (C) 3 g matte metallic leaf green size 8° Japanese seed beads (D) 1 sterling silver 14x28mm 2-loop hook-andloop clasp Smoke 6 lb braided beading thread

TOOLS Scissors Size 12 beading needle

FINISHED SIZE: 71⁄4"

1) FIRST STRAND. Use even-count,

flat peyote stitch and netting to work a base strand: Rows 1 and 2: Use 3' of thread to string 77D and 7A, leaving a 4" tail. Pass through the top loop on one half of the clasp and back through the last D added (Fig. 1—blue thread). Row 3: String 1D, skip 1D, and pass through the next; repeat for a total of 38D. String 7A and pass through the top loop on the other half of the clasp. Tie a knot with the tail and working threads and exit the nearest D of Row 2 (Fig. 1— red thread). Row 4: String 1D and pass through the next D of Row 2; repeat for a total of 38D (Fig. 2). Pass through the 7A of the clasp loop and exit the nearest D of Row 1 (Fig. 3—blue thread). Row 5 (netting): String 3B and pass through the next D of Row 1, D of Row 2, and D of Row 1; repeat to add a total of 19 nets (Fig. 3—red thread). Exit the end D of Row 2.

2

3

1

Fig. 1: Working Rows 1–3

2

3 4 1

Fig. 2: Adding Row 4

3 2 4 1

Fig. 3: Working Row 5 off Row 1

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Row 6 (netting): Pass through the 7A of

the clasp loop and exit the nearest D of Row 4 (Fig. 4—blue thread). String 3C and pass through the next D of Row 4, D of Row 2, and D of Row 4; repeat to add a total of 19 nets (Fig. 4—red thread). Secure the threads and trim. 2) SECOND STRAND. Make a second strand that attaches to the other loop of the clasp: Rows 1–4: Repeat as for the first strand, nd, connecting to the clasp’s bottom loop. oop. Row 5: String 1B, pass through the nearest earest center B of the first strand’s Row 5,, string 1B, and pass through the next xt D of Row 4, D of Row 2, and D of Row ow 4;

repeat to connect all nets. Pass through the 7A of the clasp loop and exit the first D of Row 1 (Fig. 5). Row 6: Repeat Row 5, passing through beads of Rows 1 and 2, using C in place of D, and connecting to the center C of the first strand’s Row 6. Use tight tension to pull the 2 strands together. Note: Row 3 of both strands will form the sides of the bracelet. Secure the threads and trim. ✦

Option For a narrower bracelet, use size 11° seed beads for the peyote rows and size 15°s for the netted embellishment.

C p p in t

4 3 2 1

Fig. 4: Adding Row 6 to Row 4

Fig. 5: Connecting the 2 strands

MELINDA BARTA is senior editor of Beadwork, author of the best-selling books Custom Cool Jewelry and Hip to Stitch, and coauthor of Mixed Metals (Interweave, 2005–2009). Look for her two newest beadweaving books in 2012 and 2013. Visit www .melindabarta.com. RESOURCES Check your local bead shop or contact: Clasp: Objects and Elements, (206) 965-0373, www.objectsandelements.com. Seed beads and FireLine braided beading thread: Beyond Beadery, (800) 840-5548, www.beyondbeadery.com.

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Indulge

yourself

in beading projects... (you’re worth it!) grab your copy today to: r Get an inside look at expert tips from jewelry-making’s top designers. Kathie Khaladkar

r Skip the guesswork with step by-step instructions and full-color illustrations.

Beadwork Presents: Favorite Bead Stitches 2011

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is packed with 148 pages of fun projects and easy-to-follow how-tos in the favorite stitches of artists like you. Peyote Herrin gbone

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exciting twists on techniques and expert tips.

Right-An gle

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princess pearls C. J. BAUSCHK A

TECHNIQUES right-angle weave variation two-needle right-angle weave picot See pp. Q+E 48 and 94 for helpful technique information.

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PEARLS AND CRYSTALS FORM A regal pairing in

this surprisingly simple but elegant bracelet. MATERIALS 3 g gold-lined crystal size 11° seed beads (A) 59 Colorado topaz 4mm crystal bicones (B) 48 peach 6mm potato pearls (C) 13 gold-finish 4x4mm spacers (D) Crystal 6 lb and 8 lb braided beading threads

TOOLS Size 12 beading needles Scissors

FINISHED SIZE: 7¼"

1) BRACELET BAND. Stitch the band and clasp loop: Unit 1: Use 8' of 6 lb thread to string 1A, 1C, 1A, 1C, 1D, 1C, 1A, and 1C, leaving an 8" tail. Pass through all the beads again, exiting the first 1A strung (Fig. 1—green thread). Clasp loop: String 1D, 11A, 1B, and 3A; pass back through the 1B just strung. String 11A; pass back through the 1D and the beads in Unit 1, exiting through the 1A below the loop (Fig. 1—blue thread). Pass through the 1D and 6A. String 3A; pass through the last 1A exited to form a picot. Continue through 5A, 1B, and 3A; pass back through 1B and continue through 6A. String 3A; pass through the last 1A exited to form a second picot and continue through 5A. Weave through beads to exit the 1D between the 2C (Fig. 1—red thread). Unit 2: String 1C, 1A, 1C, 1D, 1C, 1A, and 1C; pass through the last 1D exited and the first 1C just added (Fig. 2).

Fig. 1: Stitching Unit 1 and the clasp loop

BEADWORK QUICK+EASY

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Fig. 2: Adding Unit 2

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Unit 2: String 2B on the right needle and

1B on the left. Use the left needle to cross through the second B added to the right needle. Unit 3: Repeat Unit 2 (Fig. 4—blue thread). Unit 4: String 1B on each needle and cross the needles through the bottom B of Unit 1 (Fig. 4—red thread). Repeat the thread path several times to reinforce; secure the thread and trim. Set the cube aside.

3) ASSEMBLY. Use the bracelet’s working thread to string 1D, 1B, the crystal cube, 1B, and 1A; pass back through 1B, the cube, 1B, 1D, and 1A (Fig. 5). Secure the thread and trim. ✦ C. J. BAUSCHKA has taught off-loom beadweaving for more than five years. The mother of eight children, she lives in Adrian, Michigan, with her husband, Kevin. You can see more of her work at www.4hisglorycreationsbycj.com and www .cjbauschka.blogspot.com. RESOURCES: Check your local bead store or contact: Swarovski bicones: FusionBeads.com, (888) 781-3559. Pearls, Lima Beads, (888) 211-7919, www.limabeads.com. FireLine and all other materials: Meant to Bead: (419) 842-8183, www.meanttobead.com.

Fig. 3: Embellishing the edges

Embellishment: String 1A, 1B, 3A, 1B,

and 1A; pass through the lower left 1C of Unit 1, forming a loop between the third and second C on one edge. Continue diagonally through the center 1D and exit through the upper right 1C of Unit 2 (Fig. 3—blue thread). String 1A, 1B, 3A, 1B, and 1A; pass through the lower right 1C of Unit 1. Continue diagonally through the center 1D and the upper left 1C of Unit 2. Continue through the nearest 1A and the lower left 1C of Unit 2, exiting through the 1D (Fig. 3—red thread). Units 3–11: Repeat Unit 2 and the embellishment for a total of 11 units with 10 edge loops per side. Unit 12: String 1C, 1A, 1C, 1A, 1C, 1A, and 1C; pass through the last 1D exited and the first 1C just added. Embellishment: Repeat the embellishment as before to add a final loop on each edge and exit through the 1A at the tip of the bracelet. Don’t trim the thread. Set the band aside.

Fig. 4: Stitching the crystal cube

Artist’s Tip If you’re comfortable working with the recommended 8' length of thread, you can make this bracelet (with the exception of the crystal cube) without stopping to add thread along the way. You’ll avoid filling the pearl holes with extra thread passes, and you won’t have to hide any knots.

Fig. 5: Attaching the cube

2) CRYSTAL CUBE. Use two-needle right-

angle weave to form a crystal cube for the other half of the clasp: Unit 1: Place a needle on each end of 3' of 8 lb thread. On the right needle, string 4B and center the bicones on the thread. Use the left needle to cross through the fourth B strung to form the first unit. Q+E 46

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ďŹ nish it your way

Take your jewelry to the next level with over 30 custom clasps, jump rings, ear wires, bails, and more.

Handcrafted Wire Findings Techniques and Designs for Custom Jewelry Components Denise Peck and Jane Dickerson *4#/rQBHFTr

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more techniques CRIMPING HALF-HITCH KNOT

Half-hitch knots may be worked with two or more String a crimp tube and pass through the finding. Pass back through the tube, leaving a short tail. Use the back notch of a pair of crimping pliers to pinch the tube into a U, leaving a wire on each side of the bend. Rotate the tube 90° and use the front notch to form the pinched tube into a clean cylinder.

strands—one strand is knotted over one or more other strands. Form a loop around the cord(s), pull the end through the loop just formed, and pull tight. Repeat for the length of cord you want to cover.

WIREWORK To form a simple loop, use flat-nose pliers to make a 90° bend at least ½" from the end of the wire. Use round-nose pliers to grasp the wire at the tip; roll the pliers toward the bend, but not past it, to preserve the 90° bend. Adjust the pliers as needed to continue the wrap around the nose of the pliers. Trim the wire next to the bend. Open a simple loop just as you would a jump ring (see below).

OVERHAND KNOT

DAISY CHAIN

Begin by stringing a small number of beads and forming a circle by passing back through the first bead strung. String 1 bead and pass through the bead opposite the first bead of the circle, forming the “daisy.”

The overhand knot is the basic knot for tying off thread. Make a loop with the stringing material. Pass the cord that lies behind the loop over the front cord and through the loop. Pull tight.

SQUARE KNOT

F I N I S H I N G A N D S TA R T I N G NEW THREADS Tie off your old thread when it’s about 4" long by making a simple knot between beads. Pass through a few beads and pull tight to hide the knot. Weave through a few more beads and trim the thread close to the work. Start the new thread by tying a knot between beads and weaving through a few beads. Pull tight to hide the knot. Weave through several beads until you reach the place to resume beading.

The square knot is the classic sturdy knot for securing most stringing materials. First, make an overhand knot, passing the right end over the left end. Next, make another overhand knot, this time passing the left end over the right end. Pull tight.

SURGEON’S KNOT

GLUING

Place a sparing amount of glue on knots to secure them (we recommend G-S Hypo Cement) or use enough glue to completely secure beads to a surface (E6000, Terrifically Tacky Tape). Allow any glue to dry thoroughly before continuing.

To form a wrapped loop, begin with a 90° bend at least 2" from the end of the wire. Use round-nose pliers to form a simple loop with a tail overlapping the bend. Wrap the tail tightly down the neck of the wire two or three times. Trim the excess wire to finish. Make a thicker, heavierlooking wrapped loop by wrapping the wire back up over the coils, toward the loop, and trimming at the loop.

The surgeon’s knot is very secure and good for finishing off most stringing materials. Tie an overhand knot, right over left, but instead of one twist over the left cord, make at least two. Tie another overhand knot, left over right, and pull tight.

To open a jump ring, grasp each side of its opening with a pair of pliers. Don’t pull apart. Instead, twist in opposite directions so that you can open and close without distorting the shape.

Wrapped-loop bails turn sidedrilled beads, usually teardrops, into pendants. Center the bead on a 3" or longer piece of wire. Bend both ends of the wire up the sides and across the top of the bead. Bend one end straight up at the center of the bead, then wrap the other wire around it two or three times. Form a wrapped loop with the straightup wire, wrapping it back down over the already formed coils. Trim the excess wire.

These basic instructions are for techniques used in this issue’s projects and are from The Beader’s Companion (Interweave, 2005). Don’t have this popular book? Call (800) 272-2193 or visit interweavestore.com.

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