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                                                    Co-­‐Edition  “La  Città  del  Sole  edizioni”  and  “Prometeo”,  Reggio  di  Calabria,  July  2012          


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Building European Methods                                

This   project,   Building   European   Methods,   has   been   funded   with   support  

 

from   the   European   Commission.   Project.nr:   2010-­‐1-­‐ES1-­‐GRU06-­‐20685.  

 

This  publication  reflects  the  views  only  of  the  authors,  and  the  Commission  

       

cannot   be   held   responsible   for   any   use   which   may   be   made   of   the   information  contained  therein.    

 

 

http://europeanmethods.blogspot.com.es/  

   

           

 

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Building  European  Methods     The   Editors:   IES   ABDERA,   Adra   (Spain),   AGRUPAMENTO   DE   ESCOLAS   DE   PERAFITA,   Porto   (Portugal),   ISTITUTO   LUIGI   STURZO,   Roma   (Italy),   ŞAKİRPAŞA   PUBLIC   EDUCATION   CENTRE,   Adana   (Turkey),   E.   CARLO   SMALDONE,   Rome   /   Reggio   di   Calabria   (Italy),   ŞCOALA   SPECIALĂ   NR.   10,   Bucuresti   (Romania)     The   Authors:   Fatih   Acargil,   Mihaela   Gabriela   Bazarciuc,   Patrizia   Braga,   Mónica   Ramírez   Martínez,   Francisco   Javier   Martín   Álvarez,   María   Rodríguez   Míller,   Celestina  Silva,  Antonia  Silvaggi,  Carlo  Smaldone  Villani.     Reviewers:  Francisco  Javier  Martín  Álvarez,  María  Rodríguez  Míller     ISBN  978-­‐83-­‐0000-­‐000-­‐0     ©  Copyright  by:  IES  ABDERA,  Adra  (Spain),  AGRUPAMENTO  DE  ESCOLAS  DE  PERAFITA,   Porto   (Portugal),   ISTITUTO   LUIGI   STURZO,   Roma   (Italy),   ŞAKİRPAŞA   PUBLIC   EDUCATION   CENTRE,   Adana   (Turkey),   E.   CARLO   SMALDONE,   Rome   /   Reggio   di   Calabria   (Italy),   ŞCOALA   SPECIALĂ   NR.   10,   Bucuresti   (Romania)     this   publication   has   been   prepared   with   the   support   of   the   European   Union   in   the   framework   of   Grundtvig   Programme.   The   content   of   the   publication   does   not   necessarily  reflects  the  the  position  of  the  European  Union  or  any  National  Agency,  nor   does  not  involve  any  responsability  on  their  parts.     Graphic  Design:  Francisco  Javier  Martín  Álvarez,  María  Rodríguez  Míller     Circulation:  70  copies  

 Città  del  Sole  Edizioni,    

   

 

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1. Index…………………………………………………………..… 3 2. Introduction……………………………………………………. 4 2.1. Project explanation…………………………………………... 4 2.2. Introduction and description of partners…………………...

6

2.3. Instructions for the final user………………………………..

12

3. Motivation questionnaire……………………………………. 13 3.1. Introduction……………………………………………………

13

3.2. Questionnaire…………………………………………………

15

3.3. Report of each country………………………………………

19

3.4. General conclusions…………………………………………. 85 4. Teaching practices……………………………………………

94

5. Results after using teaching practices……………………

151

6. Dissemination…………………………………………………. 194 7. Final conclusion………………………………………………. 200 8. Sustainability…………………………………………………..

202

Annex I……………………………………………………………..

206

Credits……………………………………………………………..

214

         

   

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The name of this Project is “BUILDING EUROPEAN METHODS” and its aim is to build the key competences to adult education teachers / trainers and to improve their teaching strategies because they represent an important support for the local community development. The motivation for this project is cooperation. None of us will do better job if we don’t exchange knowledge and experience. That is what building European citizenship is about. Teachers / trainers want to learn together how to better motivate adult learners with different and innovative strategies. The whole collaboration will increase our knowledge about the new technologies that it will be added to our work like a regular means. The learners will profit it because the new technologies are going to be used not like a simple way to access to the information but like an object of knowledge itself and like a way to the professional develop. Besides learners are going to appreciate the value of languages, it is an encourage lifelong language. This project is going to be an opportunity to participate in authentic language learning contexts through direct communication and exchanges. The trainers in adult education have to perfect themselves continuously in order to offer a real support to their adult learner for their optimum integration in the society. The trainers have the role to “predict” the future challenges and help the people to manage them. The awareness of the need to adapt to change, or even to prevent it, represents a priority for those who work in the adult educational system.

   

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CONCRETE OBJECTIVES

Improve the teaching strategies of the adult education trainers/teachers with new methods.

Motivate

innovative

learning

practices

development

using

new

information and communication technology. •

Provide innovative learning practices development and exchange it between partners.

Increase the database of the partners in teaching and learning processes.

Develop competences for a high quality adult education, in accordance with the values promoted by Lisbon Strategy (linguistic and intercultural communication competences, reflective competences).

Increase adult learner capacities to play a full and active role in society.

Make aware about cultural, social and economic variety of Europe.

APPROACH TO ACHIEVE OBJECTIVES

Exchanging experiences and knowledge.

Creating new learning materials to use in adult education.

Testing new activities for adults and to observe learning and motivation consequences.

Compile the use of new technologies in our organization.

Describe teaching practices used in our institution.

Exchange of good practices regarding the efficient adult teaching strategy used by each partner.

Prepare instruments in order to make a research regarding learners’ motivation.

There will be a social interaction between learners and staff in a manner that enhances individual development and socialization, respect and participation.

   

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In this section we want to discuss the most relevant information related to the participating partners. Before that, however, we want to highlight that the major differences among the institutions are not only social or cultural, but also educational. Just after meeting all partners and visiting all countries, those differences were obvious: there are both private and public institutions providing either formal or non-formal courses. The type of courses offered in every center and the students being taught vary from one country to another, as well as the duration of these. Nevertheless, instead of being an inconvenience, the whole project has led to the mutual understanding of partners and to an enriching atmosphere of cultural, social and educational learning.

PARTNER NUMBER 1: IES Abdera from Adra (Spain) The IES Abdera is a public institution which was opened in 1944 and it is located in Adra, in the eastern region from Andalucia. Population’s main activities are fishing and agriculture. Our learners are of a middle socioeconomic level. There are a lot of immigrant learners principally from Maghreb and eastern countries with some linguistic difficulties. Our organization provides adult education, general secondary education, middle school and vocational education in sports, business, computers, aesthetics and hairdressing. It is recognized by the regional education ministry such as the TIC and DIG institution. Besides, it has become consolidated as a bilingual centre and a general secondary education is taught in Spanish and English. Teachers are very active and they participate in a lot of plans and projects like “Plan to improve the school performance”, “Project sport at the school”, “Project of reading and library”, “Plan of equality between men and women”, “School space of peace”, “Experimentation portfolio of languages”, “Supportive

   

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enterprising

young

people”,

“Literary

route”,

“Travelling

room”

and

Environmental education”.

PARTNER

NUMBER

2: AGRUPAMENTO DE ESCOLAS DE

PERAFITA from Porto (Portugal) The Agrupamento de Escolas de Perafita is a public institution opened in 1989 and it is located in Perafita-Matosinhos, nearby the city of Porto. Population’s main activities are industry and services, but we have a very high level of unemployed people. Our learners have a low socioeconomic level. Our school was considered by the Portuguese Educational Board as educational territory of priority intervention. This means we have social problems like unemployment, poor people or in poverty risk, violence and school drop-out. That is why our school is engaged with the local authorities to offer adult education since 2007 in order to contribute to minimize the lack of cultural and academic knowledge of the population, so that the unemployment level becomes lower, even though our core action is to provide basic education for children. Our organization provides adult education in post-labor hours and, during the day, offers to the young people basic education from 5 years old to 15 years old and vocational education for the young of +15 years old in business, commercial, computer and family care. In terms of adult education we have 4 groups going on that involve 50 learners approximately and a pedagogical team of 10 teachers. One of the groups has an individual with special needs (Mental + physical). These four groups represent 3 levels of learning, from the lowest to the highest in terms of the twelve years standard of the Portuguese education system.

   

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PARTNER NUMBER 3: Istituto Luigi Sturzo from Roma (Italy) The cultural Foundation Istituto Luigi Sturzo established in 1951 is a cultural nonprofit organization located in Rome committed to the valorization, conservation and promotion of cultural heritage. It carries out historical and social sciences research activities and high quality professional training address to cultural operators, especially unemployed people through tailor made courses to increase their opportunity to find a job in the cultural sector, widely recognized as a sector full of potentiality however with low and unstable employability. It is also specialized in fundraising activities for the cultural sector. It’s organized in 5 main activity areas: Training and Development Area, Study and Research Area, The Historical Archive, the Library, the Digital Laboratory and a new area Development and Innovation. In these last few years, the Institute grew up achieving excellence in the managing of Italian heritage and educational context. It carries out educational programmers and research activities to increase the employability of adults, graduated students, in the art and humanities, field, fostering creativity, self entrepreneurship, cultural awareness. In collaboration with other organizations and school we have tested educational programmes actively involving students and participants, applying alternative educational methods such as storytelling, blended mentoring and, also, distance learning.

PARTNER NUMBER 4: ŞAKİRPAŞA PUBLIC EDUCATION CENTRE from Adana (Turkey) This is an institution which has got 2900 students at more than one school and makes practical training, placement and exchange projects and implements certification programs in more than 30 branches. On the basis of workshop, it gives theoretical and practical training for students and teachers and professional education specialists. Our mission is that EDUCATION FOR EVERYBODY, EVERY WHERE AND EVERYTIME.    

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Our institution is in a disadvantaged region. Many of the students are migrants from the eastern part of Turkey. And many of them are illiterate. Most of them are only graduate of primary school. Hundreds of courses, SOCIAL-CULTURAL AND VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL, have been organized in our institution. All citizens benefit from these courses. Various kinds of training up courses have been organized like clothing, machine embroidery, computer, handcraft, hand embroidery, furnace, Ebru art, construction mold, real estate brokerage, guitar, wood Painting, Drum, folk dances, family education, theater, folk music. We want to remove the prejudice between cultures and to form confidence as mutually. The aim of our institutions is to save, to help to widespread and to develop the cultural values as open to the world culture and to supply the education possibilities that will be able to adapt to the cultural, social, economic, technological and scientific developments of our age.

PARTNER NUMBER 5: ENTE CARLO SMALDONE from Rome and Reggio Calabria (Italy) Carlo Smaldone Ente has its legal seat in the centre of Rome but usually works in Reggio Calabria. It has a regular operating seat in Rome and can activate three more in three other regions. The structure has a professional basis and the hierarchical roles are defined according to the planning needs: it has a group of planners for the definition of the training needs on the territory or with the institutional interlocutors, then some members are managers of the activities of training, research, counselling and orientation. Finally, the administrative side is centralized, whereas the carrying out of the training and execution actions is mixed: internal for the thematic areas and subjects concerned with the professional competences expressed by the association, external for the other more specialist areas for which the Association turns to co-operations.

   

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The Association has a training seat in Reggio Calabria with teaching equipment, chairs, desks and basic equipment. Moreover it has a teaching seat in agreement with 2 secondary schools in Reggio Calabria and an accreditation has been set up with the Region of Sicily for a seat in Messina too. The Ente will open laboratories of its own in agreement with ‘Scuola Superiore di Formazione’ (Higher training school) in Villa San Giovanni and “Mediterranean” University with classrooms and lecture halls complying with the law 626/94 and able to answer the training requirements of the province area of Reggio Calabria as well. Our professional focuses are environment; tourism, telework and regulations; teachers’ training; administration and book-keeping; Italian for foreign students. Carlo Smaldone Ente usually realizes workshop in vocational education, in 2008 realized a program for waste disposal and another program for “innovative management in agrofood industry” has collaborations and links with several structures in all Italy dealing with handicap.

PARTNER NUMBER 6: Şcoala Specială nr. 10 from Bucarest (Romania) Special School no. 10 is a public institution for children with mental and associated disabilities. The school is focused on continuous professional development of the teachers as a (re)source for assurance the European quality standards in education and encourage the participation in the lifelong learning program as the requirements of Lisbon Strategy. From the 56 specialists of the school there are 30 with the first didactic grad, 6 that graduated the Master in Pedagogy and 2 Phd students at the Doctoral School of Educational Sciences Bucharest University. The teachers of our school had benefited of 5 individual mobilities of general intraining services that wishes to valorize them in the future by developing

   

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projects, experience exchange with specialists in education and by organizing training sessions in adult education. In our institution there is a Commission for continuous professional Development that organizes for 3 years trainings in adult education for developing the digital competence. Another target group in adult education on which our school is focused is formed by the parents of the children in the school. They participate in monthly counseling session of the project “Learning Together, the Younger, and the Older”. In the mean time, the school offers mentorate, coaching and counseling sessions through its 3 formatters and 2 Methodists ISMB to all the teachers from the special education system in Bucharest and to the students from the Primary and Pre-primary Education Department of the Bucharest University.

   

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by Antonia Silvaggi How to use the e-book This e-book it has been designed as a collection of best practice and results of testing from adult education providers from It, ES, TR, PT and RO. This part of the manual bears reference to and makes links with much good practice in the production of teaching practices around Europe. The intention of this manual is to signpost good practice and share a number of practical tools for trainers. Rather than being a single volume to be printed and referenced, this e-book is designed to be an active document, which dynamically offers tools, guidance and examples of other’s work and perspectives from the world of training practice. It contains freely downloadable, printable resources and links to support the production of TP within the context of the BEM project. (ask to others)

For whom the e-book is meant The manual is meant for educators, facilitators, teachers, volunteers working in the educational sector formal, informal and not formal.

How to use the e-book This e-book is a reference for adult teachers, educators in formal learning, non formal learning and informal learning (?). They can go through the e-book read the best practice, read how to apply them and read the results of the testing. Adult educators can choose a best practice and see to which target groups are better suited for. (PROPOSAL: if a trainer tests one of the good practice on another group characteristics it is possible to upload the results on the blog).  

   

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This study follows the design of a descriptive research and has a diagnose value for the motivation’s factors that can stimulate adult learners to participate in lifelong learning programs. The research has an ameliorative aim: to understand how training courses can be organized and what useful tools and approaches has to be developed in order to meet the learning needs of the target group. The method used to collect dates was the need analysis questionnaire that was applied to the adult learners from the participant institutions in the study: •

IES ABDERA: General and Vocational Secondary School located in ADRA – ALMERÍA (SPAIN)

ISTITUTO LUIGI STURZO: Adult education provider located in ROME (ITALY)

ŞAKİRPAŞA PUBLIC EDUCATION CENTRE: Adult education provider located in ADANA (TURKEY)

ŞCOALA SPECIALĂ nr. 10: establishment for learners with special needs located in BUCHAREST (ROMANIA)

AGRUPAMENTO DE ESCOLAS DE PERAFITA: Vocational Secondary School located in PERAFITA (PORTUGAL)

ENTE CARLO SMALDONE: educational organisation located in ROMA (ITALY)

The questionnaire has two parts: one preamble which contains factual/ demographic dates about the target group (age, gender, last level school attained and professional status) and the need analysis with the following indicators: 1. conditions and other important aspects regarding the institution which offers adult educational programs; 2. teaching approaches; 3. teachers/trainers competences and qualities;    

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4. evaluation; 5. usefulness or assessment of the course; 6. further useful information/ suggestions. There were used closed questions with ranked answers and non-ranked given answers but also open questions in order to have a better qualitative perspective on the studied subject.                                                                  

   

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AGE: SEX:

ACADEMIC BACKGROUND: M

OCCUPATION:

F

ORGANIZATION/CENTRE

1. Concerning   the   following   aspects   related   to   an   educational   institution,   ARRANGE  just  those  items  you  consider  more  important  (being  1st  the  most   important  one)  and  GIVE  YOUR  OPINION  on  the  matter:    

Materials  (projector,  board…)  

 

Classroom  arrangement  

What   materials   do   you   consider   necessary   in   a   How  would  you  arrange  it?   classroom?  

 

Facilities  (canteen,  rest  areas…)  

 

Number  of  students  per   classroom  

Give  your  opinion  on  the  matter.  

What   number   do   you   consider   appropriate?  

 

 

Library  /  Study  room.  

Computers  

Give  your  opinion  on  the  matter.  

Give  your  opinion  on  the  matter.  

 

 

Internet  Access  

Timetable  

Give  your  opinion  on  the  matter.  

Give  your  opinion  on  the  matter.  

 

 

Breaks  

How  would  you  organize  them?  

OTHER  ASPECTS  

 

2. According  to  your  preferences,  ARRANGE  the  following  teaching  types  (from   1st  to  3rd,  being  1st  the  most  important  one):        

Traditional  (in  the  classroom)        17  

   


Blended  learning  (both,  in  the  classroom  and  distance  learning)   Distance  learning  

TEACHERS

3. ARRANGE  (from  1st  to  5th,  being  1st  the  most  important  one)  those  aspects   you  consider  more  relevant  in  teachers/trainers:   I  want  my  teacher/trainer  to….    

encourage  us  to  participate  in  the  classroom.  

 

use  attractive  resources.  

 

alternate  theoretical  explanations  and  practical  activities.  

 

connect  content  to  reality  and  professional  practice.  

 

be  available  to  see  me  after  the  teaching  periods  .  

What  other  qualities  would  you  like  your  teacher/trainer  to  have?     4. ANSWER  the  following  questions:   How   would   you   like   to   participate   in   the   classroom?   What   resources   and   materials   would   you   like   your   teacher/trainer   to   use?  

 

 

What   type   of   materials     would  you  like  to  count  on   for  the  course?     What   type   of   activities   do   you  prefer?   Would  you  like  to  take  part     in   out-­‐of-­‐school   activities   (visits,   courses,   conferences…)?   If   so,   which  ones.  

   

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Would   you   like   to   work   in     groups?   How   would   you   do  it?  

5. If  you  know  any  teaching  style  that  you  like,  DESCRIBE  it  in  full  detail:       EVALUATION  

6. How  important  are  these  aspects  related  to  your  evaluation?   ASPECTS  

Not   important  

A  bit   important  

Important  

Very   important  

Enough  information  about  the   objectives  to  attain    

 

 

 

 

Information  about  correction  criteria    

 

 

 

 

Information  about  marking  

 

 

 

 

Range  of  evaluation  instruments  

 

 

 

 

Flexibility  in  evaluation  times  

 

 

 

 

Specify  other  aspects  not  included:     USEFULNESS OR ASSESSMENT OF THE COURSE  

7. MARK  with  crosses  (X)  your  expectations  of  this  course:    

Professional  promotion  

 

Pay  raise  

 

Continue  further  studies  

 

Acquire  new  knowledge  

 

Join  the  labour  market  

 

OTHER  EXPECTATIONS:      

 

   

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FURTHER INFORMATION  

8. ARRANGE  just  THREE  of  the  following  aspects  (from  1st  to  3rd)  about  which   you  would  like  to  receive  further  information:      

Scholarships  (studies,  mobility…)    

 

Possible  further  studies  

 

Job  opportunities  

 

Training  periods  /  Apprenticeships    

 

Complementary  courses  

 

Formative  visits  

 

OTHER  INFORMATION:      

 

9. Finally,  MENTION  those  things  which  could  stimulate  your  participation  in  a   course  in  case  they  have  not  been  mentioned  before:                                        

   

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SPAIN by Monica Ramirez Rodriguez One of the primary objectives of the ‘Building European Methods’ project consists of finding those aspects which can better motivate adult students and make them start or continue their studies. As a consequence, in order to obtain precise information, a questionnaire has been carried out among those students, all questions being focused on getting information about the motivation in an educational context. The questionnaire has been answered by 67 students belonging to different educational levels: secondary education for adults, bachillerato (higher secondary education) and vocational training. The results obtained are thus analyzed in the following sections. As it is indicated in the following pie chart, almost half of the participants were male students (45%) and the other half were female students (55%).

Gender   Male  

Female  

45%   55%  

   

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In order to better analyze the age of the students, we have established different sectors. We highlight that 36.67% of the students are between 22 and 30 years old and 25% are between 17 and 21.

Age  

17-­‐21   22-­‐20   31-­‐40   more  than  40   N.A.  

Approximately half of the students have finished secondary education (45%), followed by 26.67% who have intermediate vocational training.

Background   2%   5%   3%  

18%  

uneducated  

27%  

Primary  School   Secondary  school   Vocaponal  

45%  

High  School   High  vocaponal    

   

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And finally, half of our students are working, whereas the rest of the students are unemployed, housewives and full-time students.

Occupacon   15%  

25%  

8%   Student   Housework   Employed   52%  

Unemployed  

IMPORTANT ASPECTS IN AN EDUCATIONAL CENTRE For most of students the most relevant aspects related to the educational centre are: Aspects Materials

67.16

Classroom arrangement

37.31

Facilities

40.30

Students

   

%

per

classroom

61.19

Library / Study room

59.70

Computers

65.67

Internet Access

56.72

Timetable

58.21

Breaks

35.82

Other aspects

11.94

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As it may be observed both in the table and the next graph: • For 67% of the students the most important aspect is the material used in the classroom, computers included. • Other relevant aspects are the number of students per classroom, the library, the access to the Internet and the timetable.

For each of the above mentioned aspects, the students suggest that: •

The most necessary material resources are computers and projectors.

The student/classroom ratio must be between 15 and 20 students.

The computers must be new, work and have updated software.

The library is necessary to have a space where to study as well as to find information.

The access to the Internet is necessary to look for information.

The timetable must be flexible so that the student can study and work. Besides, there should be a 15-minute break every two hours.

Concerning the relevant aspects in an educational organization, we have also considered important to calculate the punctuation for each of them depending on the times they have been chosen and the order of preference. The punctuation (being 10 the maximum punctuation) is:

   

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Aspects

Punctuation

Materials

7.58

Classroom arrangement

4.52

Facilities

4.96

Students per classroom

6.10

Library / Study room

6.33

Computers

6.43

Internet Access

6.26

Timetable

6.33

Breaks

1.75

Other aspects

3.00

The aspect ‘materials’ stands out as it obtained 7.58 points.

PREFERENCES RELATED TO THE TEACHING STYLES In the first place we have analyzed the teaching styles in terms of the number of students who have opted for each of them as their first choice. Teaching type

   

First choice (%)

Traditional learning

71.64

Blended learning

26.87

Distance learning

1.49

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As can be observed, 71.64% of the students prefer traditional learning.

If we analyze the different teaching styles considering the number of times chosen and the order of preference, we obtain the following information:

The teaching style with a higher punctuation is the traditional one (8.41 points), followed by blended learning (6.34 points).

   

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IMPORTANT ASPECTS IN TEACHERS In order to analyze the most important aspects students want to observe in teachers, we have calculated a punctuation based on the number of times every aspect has been chosen and the order of preference. The punctuation obtained for each of the analyzed aspects is the following:

As can be observed, the most relevant aspects for students are: •

To connect content to reality and professional practice: 5.07 points.

To alternate theoretical explanations and practical activities: 5.04 points.

Other aspects a teacher should have are:

   

To be communicative

To be aware of the students’ obligations

To be impartial

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OPEN QUESTIONS How would you like to participate in the classroom? This question has been answered by 45% of the students. The different ways of participating appear in the following graph:

25   20  

20  

20   16,67  

15   10  

10  

10  

10   6,67  

6,67  

5   0  

Serie  1  

20% of the students prefer to participate by using the blackboard and being encouraged to participate actively, whereas 17% prefer to participate in teacherstudent discussions. What resources and materials would you like your teacher to use? This question has been answered by 79% of the students. The resources and materials to be used by the teacher in the classroom indicated as their favourite ones appear in the following table and graph:

   

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teachers'  resources  and  materials     Computer  and  Internet   access   15%   7%  

Projector  

38%  

6%  

4%  

Pracpcal  resources   Videos  

30%  

Smart  board   Others  

38% of students want the teacher to use the computer and 30%, the projector.

What type of materials would you like to count on for the course? This question has been answered by 58% of the students. The materials the students prefer to use appear in the following table and graph:

teachers'  resources  and  materials     Notes  /  Books   14%   Interacpve   resources  and   games   14%  

Computer   57%  

Internet  access   15%  

51% of the students prefer to use the computer.

   

     29  

   


What type of activities do you prefer? This question has been answered by 57% of the students. The activities they prefer appear in the following graph:

Type  of  accvices   26,32  

15,79   13,16  

13,16   7,89  

7,89   2,63  

One-­‐day   visits  

Conviviality   Field  trips   days  

Sport   Training  and   Housework   acpvipes   pracpcal   acpvipes  

Others  

26.32% of our students prefer one-day visits. Would you like to take part in out-of-school activities? This question has been answered by 97% of the students. The out-of-school activities preferred by our students are:

Out-­‐of-­‐school  accvites  

41,54  

29,23  

15,38   10,77   3,08   Field  trips  

   

Cultural  or  training   visits  

Courses  and   conferences  

     30  

Others  

   

I  do  NOT  want  to   parpcipate  


Among the data indicated in the table, we underline that: •

Cultural trips are suggested by 41.54% of the students.

Coursed and conferences are suggested by 29.23% of the students.

Would you like to work in groups? How would you do it? This question has been answered by 64% of the students. Among them, 79% would like to work in groups. Out of this 79%, 77% would work in four-people groups and deal with a heterogeneous group.

W O R K I N G   I N   G R O U P S 90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 YES

NO

RELEVANT WAYS OF TEACHING This question has been answered by 25% of the students. They contributed with the following information: •

Theoretical explanations with projections. Afterwards, the students make a project using information on the Internet and show it to rest of the classroom using the projector.

•    

Simulations about what a future working situation will be like

     31  

   


Theory followed by many practical activities

Explanation of subject contents (such as those of History) as if they were a tale

The teacher let the students teach each one

The teacher offers examples with current events

The theory is inferred directly from the practice

Theoretical explanation followed by homework and correction. The mark is obtained depending on the mark of the homework.

No evaluation based on exams, but on homework, attitude, classroom participation…

Students must sit from right to left attending to their marks (higher marks on the right, for example) so that the rivalry among students make them better themselves

IMPORTANT ASPECTS IN THE EVALUATION In order to analyze the following aspects related to the evaluation, we have considered the importance given by the students to each aspect and transform it into points.

We can observe that:

   

     32  

   


The most important information students want to know is related to the objectives they have to attain (6.55)

In a second place, they consider relevant the marking information (6.03), which is followed by flexibility in evaluation times (5.91) .

If we analyze every aspect separately, we can assume that:

Concerning the information about the objectives to attain:

   

65% of the students consider it very important.

30% of the students consider it important.

Only 5% do not consider this aspect important.

     33  

   


Concerning the information about the correction criteria: •

65% of the students consider it important.

25% of the students consider it very important.

Only 10% do not consider this aspect important.

Concerning the information about the marking:

   

50% of the students consider it important.

45% of the students consider it very important.

Only 5% do not consider this aspect important.

     34  

   


Concerning the information about the range of evaluation instruments: •

67.74% of the students consider it important.

19.34% of the students consider it very important.

11.29% consider it a bit important.

Only 1.61% do not consider this aspect important.

Concerning the information about flexibility in evaluation times: •

47.54% of the students consider it important.

45.90% of the students consider it very important.

3.28% consider it a bit important.

Only 3.28% do not consider this aspect important.

EXPECTATION OF THE COURSE Once the following graph is observed, we can conclude that most of the students expect to acquire new knowledge and continue further studies.

   

     35  

   


. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Concerning the additional information, what we have first analyzed is the percentage of times the aspects have been chosen in this question. Having a look at the graph, we can underline that students prefer information about scholarships, further studies and job opportunities.

   

Further studies: 69%

Job opportunities: 64%

Scholarships: 57%

     36  

   


In the second place, we have calculated the punctuation in terms of the times they have been chosen and the order of preference. The punctuation (being 10 points the máximum punctuation) is the following:

OTHER ASPECTS RELATED TO MOTIVATION The students have not mentioned any other aspects, as most of the aspects related to motivation have been previously dealt with in the questionnaire. However, the most repeated aspects in this question are:

   

To participate in field trips

To intercalate theory with practice

To participate in one-day visits related to the contents studied

     37  

   


CONCLUSIONS After the previous analysis, we can assume that: 1. Most of students really appreciate the use of computers and the diversity of materials in the classroom. 2. The resources and materials teachers are preferred to use are computers and projectors. 3. Indeed the materials preferred by students are those supported by computers. 4. The traditional teaching type is preferred by 72% of the students. 5. The most important aspects in a teacher are: -­‐

To connect the contents studied in the classroom with the real practice

-­‐

To alternate theory with homework

-­‐

To be communicative, be aware of students’ obligations and be impartial.

6. The favourite ways of participating in the classroom are going to the blackboard, participating actively and taking part in student-teacher discussions. 7. Taking part in cultural and formative visits and attending conferences are among the favourite out-of-school activities. 8. 80% of the students like to work in groups. These groups should be heterogeneous and consist of 4 people. 9. The most important aspects in relation to evaluation are: -­‐

To have enough information about the objectives to attain in a school year or in the subject

-­‐

To be informed about the marking

-­‐

To have flexible evaluation times

10. Major expectations are to continue further studies and acquire new knowledge. 11. Students prefer to be informed about scholarships, further studies and job opportunities. 12. Others aspects related to motivation are:    

     38  

   


-­‐

To participate in field trips

-­‐

To intercalate theory with practice

-­‐

To participate in one-day visits related to the contents studied

PORTUGAL by Celestina Silva

1. INTRODUCTION Concerning the Project “Building European Methods” on adult education, a questionnaire was carried out which aimed to inquiry the adult motivation to learn.

This questionnaire was built in common with the various institutions

/partners involved in the project, having in mind the diversity of each one. Thus, some aspects of reference were selected for all: The training conditions provided by the institution; Teachers / trainers; Evaluation methods; Aims to be attained by the trainee through the course; Other aspects like further information for the LLL. In Portugal the inquiry was applied in two schools: Agrupamento de Escolas de Perafita – Matosinhos and Escola Secundária Alexandre Herculano – Porto. In the first case the inquiry involved: Approximately 50 adult post labour learners from Perafita School. In the second case: Approximately 20 young adult learners from the Technical Professional Secretary Course.

   

     39  

   


From the 70 inquiries applied, only 53 answered. This makes about 76% of answers. 2. RESULTS 2.1 – SCHOOL CENTRE ORGANIZATION Question nr. 1: Concerning the following aspects related to an educational institution, ARRANGE just those items you consider more important (being 1st the most important one) and GIVE YOUR OPINION on the matter. The most important aspect rated with level 1 is Materials with 14 answers (27%) then Computers with 9 answers (18%). The least important rated with level 9 is Breaks with 9 answers (18%). Question nr. 2: According to your preferences, ARRANGE the following teaching types (from 1st to 3rd , being 1st the most important one). The most important Teaching Style with 43 answers of level 1 (83%) it’s the Traditional, then B-Learning (80%) with 41 answers of level 2 and the last was E-learning (93%) with 48 answers of level 3. 2.2 – TEACHERS Question nr. 3: Arrange (from 1st to 6th , being 1st the most important one) those aspects you consider more relevant in teachers. I want my teacher to….

   

     40  

   


The most relevant aspect, with 31 answers of level 1 (61%), was encourage us to participate in the classroom, followed by be available to see me after the teaching periods with 56%. The least relevant aspect was be lenient with absences with 28 answers with level 6 (55%).

For the 1st question the most relevant answer was more debates. For the 2nd question the more relevant answers were

didactic games, computers

and

interactive boards. For the 3rd question the most relevant answer was computers. For the 4th question the most relevant answer more was practice    

     41  

   


sessions. For the 5th question the most relevant answer more was visits and workshops. For the 6th question there were 42 amswer and 93% answered “yes”.

Question nr. 5: If you know any teaching style that you like, DESCRIBE it in full detail: Most of the trainees that answered said that although they prefer the more traditional teaching methods, they also refered the importance of the support of new technologies and Internet access as a complement to learning.

2.3 – EVALUATION

Question nr. 6: How important are these aspects related to your evaluation?

The aspects b and d were the most voted with 77 and 73 answers, however the most important aspect was

a with 39 answers with very important (74%),

followed with b and d with 38. Some others aspects were mentioned by the students: honesty between teacher and student; close relationship between teacher and student; information about evaluation criteria.

2.4 – USEFULNESS OR ASSESSMENT OF THE COURSE

Question nr. 7: MARK with crosses (X) your expectations of this course we can see in the next table the expectations of the students by order:

   

     42  

   


2.5 – FURTHER INFOMATION Question nr.8: ARRANGE just THREE of the following aspects (from 1st to 3rd ) about which you would like to receive further information. We can see that Job opportunities was the most answered followed by Training Periods / Apprenticeships. The least important aspect was Formative visits.

Question nr.9: Finally, MENTION those things which could stimulate your participation in a course in case they have not been mentioned before. In the last question the most frequent answer was the aspiration to have TIC (Technologies of Information and Communication) and a Foreign Language (English) in the course.

3. CONCLUSION

In conclusion we can say that Portuguese adult trainees, regarding the scool organization, would like a wider range of services, namely cafeteria, library and Internet service (faster) because they attend post labour classes and due to this fact schools don’t provide the same quality of facilities. Nevertheless, the trainees referred as the most important the Materials and Computers and gave less importance to the item Breaks. Regarding the Teaching Styles, the trainees elected the more traditional teaching methods as the one they prefer, but with the support of computers, internet and also the library. Concerning

   

     43  

   


Teachers/Trainers,

in

a

general

way,

they

are

satisfied

with

their

teachers/trainers and they consider as more important the encouragement to participate in the classes followed by the teachers /trainer’s availability to provide guidance after teaching periods. Surprisingly the least relevant aspect was the lenience with absences. With reference to the types of participation of the trainees, the most relevant answer was to debate more, which is not very coincident with the traditional teaching method pointed out by them; about resources and materials they would like the teacher/trainer to use, they mentioned didactic games, computers and interactive boards; on the other hand, the trainees would like to count with computers to have during the classes. This answer is due to the fact that the inquiries were placed with the Technical Professional Secretary Course students who don’t have as many computer options as Perafita School adult trainees. This fact is due to a national program and allows them access to a personal lap top at a very low price. Regarding the type of activities that trainees would prefer, they referred practical sessions and also said that they would like to take part in out of school activities like visits and workshops. Finally they said that they like to work in groups preferably with 2 or 3 people. Most of the trainees that answered said that although they prefer the more traditional teaching methods, they also refered the importance of the support of new technologies and Internet access as a complement to learning. As far as evaluation the trainees referred that they like to be aware of the objectives to achieve and the criteria used, as the most important aspects. About the usefulness or assessment of the course, the main answer was in the direction of acquiring new knowledge. Relating further information that trainees would like to receive after the course, job opportunities was the most answered followed by Training Periods / Apprenticeships. The least important aspect was training visits. In the last question the most frequent answer was the aspiration to have TIC (Technologies of Information and Communication) and a Foreign Language (English) in the course. This was pointed out by the adult trainees within the secondary studies level because in their curricula these subjects are not included and they considered them crucial.

   

     44  

   


ROMANIA by Mihaela Gabriela Bazarciuc We will start from the consideration that adult education consists in exactly those major changes in the model of our interior worlds under the pressure of inner and outer evolving events. Organizing adults learning represent a group of methods and procedures which activates at a particular moment in education by interacting with a space and temporal mode of learning realization: guided learning, assisted learning, book learning, self learning, etc. The present questionnaire intended to capture aspects of learning motivation of adults, offering ideas filtered through their perception about their own continuing education. It was filled by 104 adults, teaching personnel with higher education, with ages from 27 to 64 years old, consisting of 94 women and 10 men, all having active positions in the filed of education.

The first envisioned component was the one referring at a organized institution for adults' education, with all the base components, ranked by the respondents as follows:

   

     45  

   


Minimal  Importance  for  adult  educacon   70   60   50   40   30   20   10   0   THE  EXISTENCE   OF  A  LIBRARY  

PAUSES  

CLASSROOM   DESIGN  

TIME-­‐TABLE  

THE    EXISTENCE     OF  AMMENITIES  

IMPORTANT MATERIALS IN A CLASSROOM o modern furniture o video projector o computers o internet o auxiliary: manuals, guides o interactive blackboard Comment: 62% of the students ranked first this material component, with emphasis on multi-media.

THE EXISTENCE OF SOME FACILITIES (cafeteria, other amenities) - 62% of the students ranked this component with 5 and up while 42% do not even consider it necessary. Comment: This approach is rather related to an experience of having minimal if any such amenities although the existence thereof would facilitate the integration with the courseware.

EXISTENCE OF A LIBRARY / STUDY ROOM - 10% of respondents rank this component as very important. Comment: There is a correlation of this propensity and the form of self study present at the level of adulthood though being reduced enough with respect to the required level of self learning through one's own efforts and self motivation.

   

     46  

   


INTERNET ACCESS: 74% consider as very useful to have Internet access, ranking this component on the first or the second place. Comment: using techniques of completing / comparing of information is present at the adults with studies over the average and covers the necessity of general information on a given subject.

PAUSES: are considered as unimportant by 88% of the respondents, but there exists as well the variant of longer pauses or to structure them based on group decision. Comment: The activity effect at adulthood reflects a week preoccupation for the activity hygiene and for monitoring stress, which should be taken into account by the modern curriculum makers and students.

CLASSROOM DESIGN

This aspect was considered as important by just 4% of students. They consider that an arrangement as an open square, semi-circle, is the most favoured augmented by formats adapted for specific types of activity by face-to-face arrangement, differently distributed or student choice splitting groups. Comment: the willingness to communicate openly, directly, without inhibitions, highlights the communication maturity level at adulthood and the relinquishment of the traditional educational patterns.

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN A CLASSROOM: 66% are opting for groups larger then 10 but less than 15, in 2% of the cases it is considered that the group should be smaller or greater than previously mentioned. Comment: the questionnaire is not stipulating the reference type of activity, whether more theoretical of more practical, in order to allow the students to give a more specific answer. It should be known that, for predominantly theoretical activities, disseminating information, the groups can be larger whereas for the practical activities or language learning, smaller groups are more efficient.

   

     47  

   


THE EXISTENCE OF COMPUTERS: it is ranked in top positions and mentioned by 65% in an anticipated manner, even from the first item. Comment: integrating computer assisted learning is a component without which modern learning is hardly possible in adulthood.

TIME SCHEDULE: it is considered by 94% of little or no importance, an option in this respect being expressed by 4% of the students, which favour flexibility and to allow access to both morning and afternoon activities, excluding the usual working day hours. Comment: It is easy to understand that adults which are engaged in other esse\tial activities would orient themselves depending on their own schedule toward additional activities by taking into account how the setup thereof would favour from a time wise perspective the greatest level of participation.

OTHER ASPECTS related to the means of organization: o free discussions are preferred alongside with a few snacks which favours the group's cohesion. o there should be an on-line form of communication with the course organizing setup. o educational partners should be consulted in relation to the proceedings of the curriculum. o the courses should span over 3 - 6 months minimum. o offering certificates of participation. Comment: the opinions, in general, reflect the desire to discard institutionalised education for the application of the concept of learning without school.

2. This item which refers to preferred types of learning, is structured as follows: o preference for traditional learning (face-to-face) - 66% o mixed learning (traditional and distant) - 32% o distant learning - 2%

   

     48  

   


Comment: The evolution of learning preferences biased toward traditional learning, with reduced favouring of distant learning reflects the limited practice in this field and a depreciation that this form of learning has received in the Romanian society stemming from the questionable result obtained by the students of such a form of learning.

1. The component related to teachers, is ranked as follows:

TEACHER'S  QUALITIES   ENCOURAGEMENT   THE  USE  OF  ATTRACTIVE   MEANS   ALTERNATING  THEORY   AND  PRACTICE   REALITY  CHECK   CONTACT  WITH  THE   STUDENTS  

o I would like my teacher to encourage me to participate in the class - 24% o I would like my teacher to use attractive means - 38% o I would like my teacher to alternate theoretical explanations with practical exercises - 67% o I would like my teacher to level the content to the reality and the practical and professional importance - 62% o I would like my teacher to take the time to meet with the students after the completion of the course - 2% o I would like my teacher to be tolerant with absences - 2% o Comment: the third and fourth variants appear on the place number I, in an alternating way, demonstrating the demand for practical learning, immediate applicability.

   

     49  

   


Other qualities that the students would like that their trainers have, are:

QUALITIES  OF  THE  TRAINERS     WELL  DOCUMENTED   EXPLICIT   HUMOR   JUST  IN  EVALUATION   EMPATHIC   EXPRESSIVE   DYNAMIC  

Comment: the teacher's qualities are to be found in a complex, creative and dynamic personality, these being also targets of adult personality in continuing formation. Contemporary, the array of fundamental behaviours of the teacher in the instructive and educational activity was amplified according to the new requirements related to the quality of his conduct. The teacher must be a guide, which directs the receptive efforts of the students, a competent guide, intelligent, imaginative, sensible, with an elevated esthetical taste and kind, such that his entire behaviour would introduce in the class the esthetical dimension, to heighten the awareness thus creating the necessary conditions for the behavioural realization of an education that is implicit, assured as valid from a psycho-pedagogical and didactic perspective. The ideal teacher must approach the study of the subject matter that he teaches, not as a purpose in itself but as a mean to realize the educational objectives.

2. Regarding the mode of organizing the activities, the opinions have been as follows:

   

     50  

   


PARTICIPATION IN THE CLASS

o most active 52% o exercising the role of listener - trainer, evaluator - 34% o brainstorming 23% o attention to task individualization 17% Comment: it can be observed a desire of involvement in chosen activities which reflects the dynamic character of the people that engage in additional training, irrespective of domain. THE MATERIALS AND RESURCES USED BY THE TEACHER - examples: o most modern o multi-role, to explain, to demonstrate, to evaluate o specialized software Comment: Surpassing the traditional system of education the students want modern complex and attractive resources.

CURRICULUM SUPPORT MATERIALS – examples: o modern materials o electronic format materials o files Comment: Taking into account that the modern strategy of education encompasses the teacher's and the student resources within an aggregated

   

     51  

   


strategy, the answers have been already provided at the previous item, such that the answer seems redundant.

THE TYPE OF ACTIVITIES PREFFERED - options: o practical abilities o creative abilities o interactive activities o creative activities Comment: Applying the concept "study today for today", the students prefer the rapid acquisitions, with an applicative-creative character.

PARTICIPATION IN EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES - options: o boot camps o conferences/symposiums o visits o exchange programs o courses Comment: Almost all the students are favouring extra curricular activities pointing them in the category of preferences for additional learning of consolidation.

WORKING IN GROUPS - are favoured: o small groups o random training technique based on ad-hoc criteria Comment: The preferences of the students lean toward small groups and they agree with working in group, which reflects the social maturity level and consolidation of relationships within a group.

5. Other teaching variations are: o interactive teaching o group teaching through uncovering o finite product teaching    

     52  

   


o computer assisted teaching Comment: Just a small part of the students 5% have completed this item, the inertia in adapting to novel forms of teaching owing its origin to the traditional way, teaching by reception, as a core initial formation.

6. The evaluation component conveys the importance of the following aspects:

EVALUATION  COMPONENT   Sufficient  knowledge  of   the  pursued  objecpves  

60  

Knowledge  of  the   evaluapon  criteria  

50   40  

Knowledge  of  the   evaluapon  data  

30  

Knowledge  of  the   evaluapon  instruments  

20   10  

Evaluapon  Flexibility  

0   1  

o sufficient knowledge of target objectives - 36% o knowledge of verification criteria - 56% o knowledge of the necessary data about evaluation - 43% o knowledge of the array of instruments for evaluation - 32% o flexibility in choosing the evaluation period - 4% Comment: Evaluation is a component for which the students are identifying almost all the aspects as being important, correlated with the initial training objectives and with the competences that are overlapping with the evaluation criteria in psycho-pedagogical terms of reference.

Other aspect to include in evaluation: o knowledge of the evaluators' motivations o the significance degree of the evaluators in other reference systems    

     53  

   


Comment: confronted with evaluation psycho-pedagogical uncorrelated forms, in the vast majority the students are not expressing their opinion about evaluation, this stemming from an ambiguity in understanding this component in general.

7. References to the curriculum utility have selected the students' expectations as follows:

o professional promotion - 24% o remuneration gain - 21% o continuing study in the future - 25% o gaining new knowledge - 52% o advancing of the workforce market - 3% o other expectations - not expressed Comment: The references related to the curriculum utility have concentrated on gaining new knowledge correlated with the professional promotion and with the likelihood of continuing study of the curriculum chosen. The intrinsic apparent reasons would be: o out of curiosity o aspiration for competence; o desire to create.

   

     54  

   


The teacher needs to rely on all these forms of motivation, however he is going to look at all times to promote the most valuable intrinsic motivation.

8. Aspects related to supplementary information have been thus arranged:

ADDITIONAL  INFORMATION   EXCHANGE  OF   EXPERIENCE   POSSIBLE  JOBS   350   300  

STAGES  

250   200  

COMPLEMENTARY   COURSE  

150   100  

ADVANCED  LEVEL  

50   0  

BOURSARIES  

1  

o bursaries (studies, motilities) -24% o advanced levels of the same course - 74% o complementary courses - 69% o periods of the training/apprenticeship - 37% o organizing of experience exchange programmes - 69% o other information: are not solicited Comment: The interest of the students mainly consisted in the knowledge of the advanced levels of the same course and organizing some experience exchange programmes, as a way to consolidate already acquired knowledge.

   

     55  

   


9. Aspects that can stimulate participation to the course:

MOTIVATING  PARTICIPATION  IN   Spmulapng  creapvity   TRAINING   Increasing  prespge   Qualificapon  for  bonuses   Interpersonal   Relaponship  Knowledge   Wage  increasing  

1  

Acquiring  professional   credits   The  degree  of  relaxapon  

0  

2  

4  

6  

8  

10  

12  

The  complementaripes   of  interests   The  need  for  conpnuous   improvement  

Comment: Course participation is tied to the satisfaction of the desire of professional compensation, both materially as well as spiritually, but it is anyway seen as a requirement of recognition and of the capacity of continual improvement.

CONCLUSIONS

In a larger context, the effort of education, of learning as adult, correlated with the other efforts, envisions the construction of one own way of life, finding joy in one's practiced activity. From such a perspective, judgements of knowing and appreciation, the feelings and the will of social action play an important role, because it assures both the apprehension of new knowledge about work and life, the new model of human relationship functioning and at the same time, the sinking within one's being of what is of value in the relationships among mannature and society, in work, in everyday life. An important role in adult education is played, as well, by the attachment to institutional means of cultural participation which indicate the belonging to the

   

     56  

   


given community and the perception of the conflict between the group's values and the opposite thereof. Adult education is identified as well with the socializing effort, of developing a cultural world, starting from the specific experiences in given situations. This also represents a way of communicating with the group members of which it belongs. Thus, the formal and informal rules that govern these group relations would lead to different types of development depending of the group cohesion, organizing and orientation. Through the rules of organization thereof, the adult gains the determination of new options. The observations made of the side of the questionnaire are meant to underscore the fact that the scientific, informational dimension alone is not sufficient for a development of cultural representations and the acceptance or the refusal of a certain system of social values. This depends also on factors of the social environment, of biopsychological development, the degree of elevation of the social relationships within the gatherings wherein the adult is engaged or integrated in. From whatever point we would analyze adult education, it is always compared to the capacity of adult learning. From this, stems from a fundamental percept of continuing education: learning to be able to learn; maximum development of these abilities. The global aptitudes play an essential role in learning. The research points out however a certain dependence of these at the previous instruction level, the academic studies assuring a higher level of activation in this respect. The contemporary psychological research invalidates the idea that with age, the capacity of instruction and education would stagnate and become outdated. Contrary, the investigations even show the presence of a legitimacy of development which can be formulated as follows: continuing education leads to continuous development until late in life. This underscores that the essential role in adult education is that of the capacities of learning previously achieved, the type and reason of for learning and not the age in itself. In the context of modernizing adult learning activities, bf{practical demonstrative methods} are taking a distinctive importance, due to the principles of heuristics, discovering new ideas, meanings or skills of major interest. The active participation constitutes the main venue thereof, which explains both their

   

     57  

   


powerful extension that was noticed in the last years as pointed out by the works of speciality, as well as the desire of the organizers to know and utilize predominantly this methods. Adult education is, in its content, development through activity, through action, through experimenting, where exercise occupies an important place. From here the idea - learning by doing - present in the modern works on adult development. In this context, the knowledge, the skills, the novel abilities, are in good measure the result of the subject's education production (the adult) and not simple recordings of events external to the individual. Here it is present the very important substitution operation with respect to the exposition method, for example. Thus, the expression substitutes impression, production - reception, exteriorization - ideation and invention - understanding. The impression, reception, ideation and understanding are present as well, but are surpassed and

thus

assimilated

to

production

and

innovation,

expression

and

exteriorization. Continuing education represents a support of mature personality and a binder with the world personality.

   

     58  

   


TURKEY by Fatih Acargil This questionere has been done in our centre building and also out of our centre building to our course takers such as,computer course,needle work course,ready wear course,accounting course,home textile course,hairdresser course and patient acceptance course .By this study we had a lot of important knowledge about developing the practice in our school.We done this survey to 100 course takers.This survey has been very useful for our project Building European as well as useful for our organization. %86 of the survey takers were women and % 14 were men.Because of the place of our school is ın country side we mentioned that the number of women would be less.However the percentage of women course takers is more than we excepted.

   

     59  

   


The diagram of our course takers age and person numbers

60  

18  

50  

16   52   14  

40   30   20   10  

41  42   12   38   37   10   35  36   33   32   31   8   29  30   28   27   26   25   6   23  24   22   21   19  20   4   17  18   16   15   14   2   0  

0  

-­‐2   14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  35  36  37  38  41  42  52  

As we see from diagram the average betwwen 17-18 ages of the course takers are the most.Our course takers who are between 19-25 ages are the less.We have got less students who are over 50.We are very pleased to have course takers who are over 50.Our target that everytime,everywhere and for everyone ıs succeeded.

Survey  Respondents  EDUCATION  LEVELS   University   Literate   graduate     Two-­‐year  degree   4%  0%   4%  

Primary  School     25%  

High  School   31%  

Secondary  School     36%  

   

     60  

   


As we said in the beginning ,our schools area is in country side and thatswhy it has disadvantages.Because of this % 50 of our students graduations are primary and secondary school. What

materials

do

you

consider

necessary

in

a

classroom?

Who thinks that the most efficient material is Computers are %55 Who are thinking that the second important material is a projector are %24 Who are thinking that the most important think are the boards are &21 Unfortunately for the question “How would you arrange it?” any course taker had an answer.

MATERIALS   BOARD   21%   COMPUTER   55%   PROJECTION   24%  

Facilities (canteen, rest areas…) Give your opinion on the matter. OTHERS   10%   REST  AREAS   19%  

CANTEEN   REST  AREAS  

CANTEEN   71%  

   

     61  

OTHERS  

   


What number do you consider appropriate? NUMBER  OF   STUDENTS  :  10   9%  

Number  of  students  per  classroom  

NUMBER  OF   STUDENTS  :  20   4%   NUMBER  OF   STUDENTS  :   18   6%  

NUMBER  OF  STUDENTS  :  12  

NUMBER  OF   STUDENTS  :  12   27%  

NUMBER  OF  STUDENTS  :  15   NUMBER  OF  STUDENTS  :  18   NUMBER  OF  STUDENTS  :  20  

NUMBER  OF   STUDENTS  :  15   54%  

NUMBER  OF  STUDENTS  :  10  

Give your opinion on the matter. Library / Study room.

STUDY   ROOM   21%  

LIBRARY   79%  

Give your opinion on the matter. Internet Access

   

     62  

   


INSUFFICIENT   51%  

SUFFICIENT   49%  

Breaks, Give your opinion on the matter. 5  MINUTE  

10  MINUTE  

15  MINUTE   20  MINUTE   30  MINUTE   20  MINUTE   2%   2%  

25  MINUTE  

30  MINUTE  

5  MINUTE   13%   15  MINUTE   34%   10  MINUTE   49%  

According to your preferences, ARRANGE the following teaching types (from 1st to 3rd, being 1st the most important one):

Traditional (in the classroom) Blended learning (both, in the classroom and distance learning)

   

     63  

   


Distance learning Tradiponal  

Blended  learning       0%   Distance  learning   12%  

Blended   learning     25%  

Distance  learning  

Tradiponal   63%  

TEACHERS ARRANGE (from 1st to 5th, being 1st the most important one) those aspects you consider more relevant in teachers/trainers:

1- Encourage us to participate in the classroom. 4   5%  

3   3%  

5   10%  

2   12%   1   70%  

   

     64  

   


2-Use attractive resources.

5   7%  

1   8%  

4   23%  

2   46%   3   16%  

3-Alternate

theoretical

explanations

5   21%  

1   4%  

and

2   11%  

4   18%   3   46%  

   

     65  

   

practical

activities.


4-connect content to reality and professional practice.

1   10%  

5   21%  

2   9%  

3   21%   4   39%  

5-Be available to see me after the teaching periods.

DEMAND  FOR  CONTACT   1   9%   5   44%  

2   14%   3   16%  

4   17%  

1. Encourage us to participate in the classroom 2. Use attractive resources. 3. Alternate theoretical explanations and practical activities. 4. Connect content to reality and professional practice. 5. Be available to see me after the teaching periods.

   

     66  

   


Every option evaluated from 1 to 5 and because of this we did a complete evaluation. 2, 5=>1 1=>5, 2=>4, 3=>3, 4=>by giving marks in this evaluation it is thought that the most linked alternative is the first alternative.And the less one is the fifth alternative. 22   23   24   25   0%   17   18   19   20   0%  

5   15%  

4   17%   15   12   13   14   0%  

1   29%  

2    22%  

3   17%  

2   3   4   5   0%  

10   7   8   9   0%  

How would you like to participate in the classroom?

OTHERS   23%  

ORGANIZED   77%  

   

     67  

   


What resources and materials would you like your teacher/trainer to use?

30  

26  

25  

25   19  

17  

20  

13  

15   10   5   0   Projecpon  

Computer  

Slate  

journal  

Others  

What type of materials would you like to count on for the course? Computer,  40   40  

journal,  30  

35   30  

Others,  17  

25  

Slate,  13  

20   15   10   5   0   Computer  

   

Slate  

journal  

     68  

   

Others  


What type of activities do you prefer?

Theater   34%  

Travel   45%  

Conference   21%  

Would you like to take part in out-of-school activities (visits, courses, conferences…)? If so, which ones. 120   100  

YES,  100  

80   60   40   20   NO,  0  

0   YES  

   

NO  

     69  

   


Would you like to work in groups? How would you do it?

YES,  93   100   90   80   70   60   50   40   30   20   10   0  

NO,  7  

YES  

NO  

If you know any teaching style that you like, DESCRIBE it in full detail:

 41   45   33  

40   35  

26  

30   25   20   15   10   5   0   Pracpce  

   

Quespon-­‐Answer  

     70  

Speech  

   


EVALUATION

How important are these aspects related to your evaluation? *Enough information about the objectives to attain 70   60  

60   50   40  

31   30   20   7  

10  

2  

0   NOT  IMPORTANT  

SOME  IMPORTANT  

Information about correction criteria

IMPORTANT  

VERY  IMPORTANT  

Information about marking 80  

64  

70   60  

60  

50  

50  

40   24  

30   20   10   0  

69  

70  

4  

9  

40   30   18  

20   10  

5  

8  

0   NOT  IMPORTANT   SOME  IMPORTANT  IMPORTANT  VERY  IMPORTANT  

   

     71  

   


Range of evaluation instruments

Flexibility in evaluation times

60  

60  

35   35   30   25   20   15   10   5   0  

50   40  

31  

30   20   10  

2  

7  

30   22  

0  

USEFULNESS OR ASSESSMENT OF THE COURSE

MARK with crosses (X) your expectations of this course:

90   80   70   60   50   40   30   20   10   0  

FURTHER INFORMATION ARRANGE just THREE of the following aspects (from 1st to 3rd) about which you would like to receive further information: 1- Scholarships (studies, mobility…) 2- Possible further studies    

     72  

   

13  


3- Job opportunities 4- Training periods / Apprenticeships 5- Complementary courses 6- Formative visits 7- OTHER INFORMATION

17   18   0%  

6   13%   14   15   0%  

5   15%   11   12   0%  

20   21   0%  

7   12%  

2   3   0%  

1   15%  

2   15%  

4   16%  

3   15%  

5   6   0%  

8   9   0%  

As we see ın the diagramm our course takers want to have most information in the field is Acquire new knowledge. 1, 2,3 and 5 these fields are same as each.

EVALUATION According to questionnaire results; 55 % of the learners think that computers are the most efficient material, 24% of learners think that projectors are in the second place and boards come with the rate of 21 % in the third place. Students generally think that the number of the students should be between 10 – 20. We already have about 20 students in each class so our classrooms are generally appropraite for the education. 49 % percent of the learners find internet connection sufficient. We have internet connection in the building and computer classes and language classes. Students want break between 5 min. And 30 min. , in our school breaks are given between 10-20 minutes 63 % of the students prefer traditional education. 70% of the learners think that teachers should encourage them to participate in the lessons. 46% of learners

   

     73  

   


think that teachers should use attractive resources. 44% of students think that they get in touch after teaching periods. 77% of students want to participate in the classroom in an organized way. 26% percent of the learners want their teachers and trainers to use computer in the classroom and 40% of the learners depend on computers more as materials. 100% percent of learners want to participate in out-of-school activities. 93% of learners want to work in group and 41% of them prefer applied education. Most of the learners want to have new information ‘ to acquire new knowledge’.

   

     74  

   


ITALY by Patrizia Braga Description of the Institute The Istituto Luigi Sturzo is a private foundation based in Rome and established 1951 committed to the preservation and enhancement of cultural heritage. It carries out training activities to develop and validate competences required in the cultural, heritage and art field. It develops innovative ideas to ensure the accessibility of cultural heritage to a wide range of target groups, such as students, seniors, professionals and groups at risk. The integration between training and research in historical, sociological, political and economical fields, is the successful factor for delivering and developing high content and high quality training courses. This research is part of the Building European Method project needs analysis, which aim is to depict the motivations that drive adults to enter into training courses and to understand how training courses can be organized and developed to meet the target group’s learning needs. In our case the survey was carried out to a cohort of 72 learners enrolled in 3 courses held in our organization between July 2010 and April 2011. The three training courses in furtherer education were funded by the European social Fund through the local body and thus free for the learners. The three courses were targeted to unemployed people, mainly women, graduated in humanities (art, archaeology, literature, cultural studies, archives). The courses aimed at providing the participants, who had a more academic background, the practical skills and competences needed to enter the cultural labour market, sometimes missing in this kind of target. As the target group is different from the other organization involved in the project which are mainly schools some questions in the questionnaire have been modify because we came to a conclusion that some of the questions were not relevant to the target group addressed. Like in the section evaluation of the questionnaires we didn’t add information about correction criteria and about marking. The most important thing for our learners are if they have acquired those skills which the training was made for. Yet the general structure and the objectives of the questionnaire remain the same.

   

     75  

   


The method of background research was individual written questionnaires handed out in presence and sent by email. 42 respondents replied to the questionnaires. The result obtained are thus analyzed in the following sections:

A) Identification of the target group: sex, academic background, age, occupation B) Organization and logistics of an educational centre These questions aimed at investigating and collect learners’ suggestions on the organization of a training. The questioned ranged from what materials they would consider necessary in a classroom such as projector, computer, internet access, boards, general facilities such as libraries, study rooms to how they would arrange the classroom, their timetable and breaks. The cohort was asked to arrange from the most important aspect to the less important one. Despite the fact that in this analysis of the questionnaires this information is missing, since only few respondents replied to this question, nevertheless is possible to reach a conclusion. C) Teaching types In this section learners were asked an opinion about what teaching types they preferred. They had to arrange from a scale from 1 to 3, being one the most important which one they preferred. The choice was between traditional teaching (in the classroom), blended learning (both, in the classroom and distance learning) and distance learning. D) Important aspects in trainers In this section we wanted to investigate what qualities should possess a trainer. Other questions were about resources and materials would you like your teacher/trainer to use and if they would like to take part into out-of-school activities (visits, courses, conferences, ect....) E) Evaluation questions

   

     76  

   


Evaluation in a training is important, this section aims at collecting learners’ opinion on evaluation tools and how is important the evaluation process for them F) Expectations of the course This section investigates learners’ expectations enrolling in a course and which information among scholarships (studies, mobility…), further studies, job opportunities, training periods or other courses they would like to receive.

A. Identification of the target group In this section we are going to describe the target group of our survey. The respondents were mainly women 92,86% and only 7,14% of the cohort were men (tab. 1). This data is biased to the entry requirement of the training courses. 1. Sex

93%

10 0 % 80% 60% 40% 20%

7%

0%

Male

Female

Tab.1 The age of the respondents ranges between 26 and 35 for the 60% of the cohort. 10% of the respondents are between 36-25 and about the 31% preferred not to disclose (tab. 2).

   

     77  

   


2. Age

10 0 % 80%

60%

60%

31%

40%

10%

20% 0%

26-35

36-45

Prefer not to disclose

Tab. 2 As the graph below shows the cohort is higly qualified: 64% are graduated and over 30% posses or are enrolled in post-graduate studies in the humanities field (graph.3).

Graph. 3 Academic background

With reference to occupation half of the cohort is unemployed 50%, instead 19% employed part time, it means with occasional collaboration contracts. Nearly 20% of the respondents declares to have its own business or to work or have worked in the cultural field. Some of the respondents answered to work as guide tours or as archivist. The 10% of the respondents preferred not to disclose (tab.4).

   

     78  

   


4.OCCUPATION: 10 0 %

50%

80% 60%

19%

40% 20%

10%

10%

0%

Un

pl o em

ss a.. .. i ne d. dP s n e u y B la pl o ura wn t m l O E Cu

d ye

Tab. 4 Occupation

B. Important aspects in an educational centre B.1 Organization and logistics This section examine the important aspects in an educational centre. Learners where asked their opinions about materials, classroom arrangements, facilities, students per classroom, computers, internet access, timetable and breaks and to indicate an order of preference of which all these aspects they feel they are most important. To the question about materials to use in class all respondents had a chance to state which one would they wish to find in class and nearly half of the cohort 45% specified a projector, 16% a Pc, and a 15% handouts (reference materials) and the 11% a board. These where the most mentioned supporting materials as shown in the graph below (graph. 5).

1. Materials in class

10 0 % 80% 60%

45% 26%

40% 20%

12%

17%

board

handouts

0%

projector

   

Pc

     79  

   


Graph. 5 Materials in class From the analysis of the questionnaires all learners clearly declared that the most important aspects to support their training is the use of ICT in class, as a means for research and support, and computers as shown in the graph below (graph.6):

2. ICT

100%

100%

Internet

computer

10 0 % 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Graph. 6 ICT

Regarding classroom arrangement question nearly half of the respondents 45% declared that the ideal number of learners in class would be in a range between 15-20. Over 35% asserted instead that a good number of students in class would be between 20-25 (tab.7).

3. Classroom arrangem ent

10 0 % 80%

45%

60%

36%

40% 20%

7%

5%

5-10

10-15

7%

0%

15-20

20-25

25-30

Tab. 7 Classroom arrangement /number of learners

   

     80  

   


To the question regarding facilities, as swon in the graph below, 43% of the cohort wrote down they would like a place to study, secondly a library (33%) and a place where to exchange ideas with other participants, like a meeting point (tab.8).

4. Facilities

10 0 % 80% 60%

43%

33%

40%

24%

20% 0%

study room

library

meeting point

Tab. 8 Facilities To the question investigating how would they like the timetable to be scheduled the respondents suggested some ideal hours to dedicate to training courses, but most of the comments underlined the importance of a flexible timetable. About 36% of the respondent suggest 5 hours per day or even 6 or 7 hours per day (24%) (tab.9).

5. Tim etable

10 0 % 80% 60% 40%

21%

24%

36%

19%

20% 0%

3-4 days a 6/7 hours month by day

5 hours per day

doesn't specify

Tab. 9 Timetable Regarding breaks the 48% of the cohort suggested a breaks every hour and a half or every hour 10 minutes (tab.10).

   

     81  

   


6. Breaks

10 0 % 80% 60% 40%

48% 19%

19%

14%

every hour

doesn't specify

20% 0%

other

every hour and a half

Tab. 10 Breaks To summarize what has been analysed up till now it is clear that for the cohort is important first of all: •

to have access to computers and to internet

the ideal classroom ranges between 15-20 participants

the use of a project, pc and handouts

Breaks are important and the timetable should be as flexible as possible.

C.Teaching types The cohort was asked to classify in order of preference which teaching type they preferred between traditional, meaning face to face, blended and distance teaching methods. In the first place we have analyzed the teaching types in terms of the number of respondents who have indicate for each of them as their first choice as shown in the table below (Tab. 11):

Teaching style

First choice (%)

Traditional learning

95%

Blended learning

5%

Distance learning

2%

Tab. 11

   

     82  

   


Secondly we can see in the table below that in order of preference the blended learning types has been indicated as a second choice (Tab.12):

Teaching style

Second choice (%)

Traditional learning

2%

Blended learning

93%

Distance learning

2%

Tab.12

95% of the respondents, 32 out of 42, ticked at the first place of their preference the traditional, face to face teaching type. Following, in order of preference, they indicated the blended learning 93% (39 out of 42) and the least preferred teaching style is the distance learning, that was put at number 3 by 40 respondents. Most of the cohort respondent that they prefer the face to face method because there is more interaction with the trainer. Although they are aware of the advantages of distance learning if they can they would choose the traditional method. Otherwise a blended learning method can be a solution.

To the question If you know any teaching style that you like, some of the respondents described what they found useful in the past •

A theory course plus a work placement

Learning by doing

Team work and auto evaluation

The teaching method were the trainer takes the best out of the learner

Overall there is a request for more training practice.

   

     83  

   


D. Important aspects in trainers This section investigates what aspects are important in trainers from the learners’ point of view. The respondents had to choose from a series of statement about trainers which are the most important aspects a trainer should possess and arranged them in order of preference. The statements were: •

Encourage leraners to participate in the classroom.

Use attractive resources

Alternate theoretical explanations to practical activities.

Connect content to reality and professional practice.

Be available to see me after the teaching periods

From the answers given we can observe the following data: 76% of the cohort answered that the most important thing is that the trainer must connect content to reality and professional practice and 24% to alternate theoretical explanations to practical activities. 48% answered that the second most important is encourage active participation in the class room and following at third place of preference to use attractive resources The least important is to be available after teaching period Moreover the learners had the chance in an open question to add other qualities we didn’t mentioned and they suggested the following qualities

   

Able to stimulate interest

Clear and practical

Be very prepared and professional

Seriousness, educated

be able to take out the best from learners

     84  

   


To the following questions what type of materials would you like to count on for the course most of the respondents declared newspapers, books on the subject, audiovisual materials reference material in general. Would you like to take part in out-of-school activities most of the respondents replied yes, one suggested only if it’s relevant to the training activity and another only if it is in the training hours. To the question would you like to work in groups, most of the respondents replied yes, and most of the suggestions were in groups of three or four people. Somebody suggest that is good if each group evaluates the work of the other group.

E. Important aspects in evaluation In these section we suggested some important aspects related to evaluation and the respondents had to tick which of them they thought were “Very important “, “Important”,“A bit important”, “Not Important”. The aspect to investigate were: a) Enough information about the objectives to attain b) Information on final evaluation c) Evaluation on balance of competences d) Flexibility in evaluation times In the table below (tab.13) are depivted the preferences chosen by the respondents:

   

     85  

   


Very

A

bit Not

important Important important Objectives info

27

15

Info on final evaluation

4

16

22

Balance of competences

20

20

2

Flexibility in evaluation times

4

19

19

important

Tab.13 At a glance it is interesting to notice that none of the respodents has ticked “Not important” In the graph (graph. 14) below we can observe the following answers: Very important evaluation aspects

7%

Objectives info

36%

Info on final evaluation Balance of competences

50%

Flexibility in evaluation times

7%

Graph.14 Very important evaluation aspect for learners

The most important is the information on the objectives and on the learning outcomes of the training course, what will they achieve, so this should always be clearly stated.

F. Expectations on the course In the section investigating learners’ expectation about the course we can observe that the most important thing is to join the labout market and acquire

   

     86  

   


new knowledge, equally at 57% and 12% have ticked continue further studies as the most important thing (graph. 15). Expectations of the course_1

57%

Professional promotion Pay raise Continue further studies

57%

Acquire new knowledge Join the labour market

12%

Graph. 15 Learners’ expectations of the course The second most important thing confirms acquire new knowledge 36% following at only 21% professional promotion. The least important thing is pay rise which have been put at number 5 in order of preference being 1 the most important by 74% of the cohort. Even professional promotion is not at the first place of the cohort concern.

In addition we asked learners what kind of information they would like to receive marking not more than 3 options between: Scholarships Further studies Job opportunities Training periods/opportunities Other courses 90% of the cohort marked job opportunities (38 out of 42) and 76% other information on further training opportunities 74% (31 out of 42) (tab.17).

   

     87  

   


Tab. 17 Further information learners would like to receive

To the question asking which other motivations you have to enter a training course, we selected the most representative depicting the overall feeling of the cohort: To enrich my knowledge about topics I know little about To make new connections and enlarge the professional network To acquire practical skills To know new career pathways To acquire more self confidence To develop crosscutting competences that enable people to adapt their profile to a changing labour market

CONCLUSIONS Related to our target group mainly unemployed learners graduated in the cultural, humanities field, which are recognized here in Italy as “weak degrees”, we can reach the following conclusions: •

All respondents suggest that is important to use Pcs and have access to internet

   

     88  

   


Regarding important organization aspects related to an educational centre are: materials to use in class: 45% of the respondents specified a projector, 16% a Pc, 15% handouts (reference materials) and 11% a board. Ideal number of learners in a class are between 15-20, they would like to have at their disposal place to study, a library (33%) and a meeting point. Regarding breaks the 48% of the cohort suggested a breaks every hour and a half or every hour 10 minutes. About 36% of the respondent suggest 5 hours per day or even 6 or 7 hours per day (24%). Breaks are important and the timetable should be as flexible as possible.

The traditional teaching type is the one preferred by the respondents, because there is more an interaction and human relation with the trainer. On the other hand they could appreciate the use of the blended method if given the opportunity.

The most important aspects in teachers are: o Connect content to reality and professional practice o To alternate theoretical explanations to practical activities o Encourage active participation o To use attractive resources

Nearly all respondents (39 out of 42) declared they would like to take part to conferences, seminars, and to work into groups and they would like to use in class newspapers, books on the subject, audiovisual materials reference material in general.

The most important aspects related to evaluation are: o To have enough information about the objectives to attain in a training course o To balance their competences at the beginning and at the end of the training

   

     89  

   


o Flexibility in evaluation times •

The major expectations about the course are equally joining the labout market and acquire new knowledge, 57% each and 12% have ticked continue further studies as the most important thing.

Moreover we should add that related to this specific target group the greater need is to have training as practical as possible enabling the learners to enter more effectively in the labour market. This survey has been very interesting in many ways, it would be interesting to compare different target groups and widen the cohort to have more a comparable data and to put into practice the suggestions collected by the learners

because

at

this

level

we

can

recommendations.    

   

     90  

   

only

suggest

some

partial


by Carlo Smaldone Villani This study follows the design of a descriptive research and has a diagnose value for the motivation’s factors that can stimulate adult learners to participate in lifelong learning programs. The research has an ameliorative aim: to understand how training courses can be organized and what useful tools and approaches has to be developed in order to meet the learning needs of the target group. The method used to collect dates was the need analysis questionnaire that was applied to the adult learners from the participant institutions in the study: •

IES ABDERA: General and Vocational Secondary School located in ADRA – ALMERÍA (SPAIN)

ISTITUTO LUIGI STURZO: Adult education provider located in ROME (ITALY)

ŞAKİRPAŞA PUBLIC EDUCATION CENTRE: Adult education provider located in ADANA (TURKEY)

ŞCOALA SPECIALĂ nr. 10: establishment for learners with special needs located in BUCHAREST (ROMANIA)

AGRUPAMENTO DE ESCOLAS DE PERAFITA: Vocational Secondary School located in PERAFITA (PORTUGAL)

ENTE CARLO SMALDONE: educational organisation located in ROMA (ITALY)

The questionnaire has two parts: one preamble which contains factual/ demographic dates about the target group (age, gender, last level school attained and professional status) and the need analysis with the following indicators: 7. conditions and other important aspects regarding the institution which offers adult educational programs; 8. teaching approaches; 9. teachers/trainers competences and qualities; 10. evaluation;

   

     91  

   


11. usefulness or assessment of the course; 12. further useful information/ suggestions. There were used closed questions with ranked answers and non-ranked given answers but also open questions in order to have a better qualitative perspective on the studied subject. Analyze and general conclusions: The questionnaire has been applied among the students of each partner’s institution and all questions were focused on getting information about the factors that stimulate motivation for learning. There were about 450 adult learners that have participated in this study that were involved during 20102011 in the adult education programs (different courses and workshops) developed by each institution in the project. In order to obtain precise information, the preamble of the questionnaire was about personal details: age, gender, education and present job. The study reveals that most of the learners were females (~90%) and their age was between 14 - 65 years old. The survey has been carried out on people living in urban and rural areas, with a wide range of educational background (from illiterates to master and doctoral degree) and various employment statuses (unemployed, housewives, scavenger, fire guards, teachers, finance guards, estheticians, craft workers, pensioners). The high percentage of women implied in the study can reflect the number of female in the partners’ countries, but we consider that reveals the fact that women are more receptive to lifelong learning. The first section of the questionnaire is focused on the conditions and other important aspects regarding the institution which offers adult educational programs. Learners where asked their opinions about materials, classroom arrangements, facilities, students per classroom, computers, internet access, timetable and breaks and to rank all these aspects considering their importance. For the learners in all the partners countries - no matter their age, gender, education, job status - the most important aspects are connected to new technology, so the higher percentage was scored at the material item (projector, computers) and internet access.    

     92  

   


The new technology has a great impact on everybody’s life and the students are attracted and interested in learning and using the ICT tools. The emphasis on multi-media reflects the need of multi-sensorial learning of the adults offered by computer, projector, Internet and the necessity of assuring the digital competences for working with ICT tools at their jobs and everyday life. Classroom design was considered by the students a non-important item and many of them do not even consider it necessary, so they didn’t mentioned it in their rank. The optimum number of students in the class is between 15 and 20 for an adult education centre as it was mentioned in Spain, Italian, Romanian and Turkey analysis and interpretation of results. We consider that this result shows the maturity of the students that has experienced the group psychology and knows that a medium size group is more appropriate to a learning environment and productive interpersonal relations between teachers and students. At the facilities item many of the Turkish, Italy, Portugal and Spain respondents have mentioned as being very important: cafeteria/canteen, library and study room while those from Romania was scarcely interested in this amenity. This may suggests that the students that pointed the existence of the canteen in the education center are studying after the working hours or they commute. Regarding the existence of library and study room in the adult education centre, there is a correlation between this propensity and the form of self study present at the level of adulthood with respect to the required level of self learning through one's own efforts and self motivation.

The items regarding schedule and breaks reflect very well the reduced spare time/ availability of the adults for study. Their timetable proposals were based on week-ends and after work hours. The respondents that answered that question chose a flexible schedule that allows access to both morning and afternoon activities, excluding the usual working day hours. Their opinions about the breaks were various from different partners: some prefers short    

     93  

   


breaks (5-15 minutes scheduled on group decision) and some didn’t mention. The activity effect at adulthood reflects their preoccupation for the activity hygiene and for monitoring stress, which should be taken into account by the modern curriculum makers and students.

The second section of the questionnaire regards the teaching approaches. The students from all partners’ countries have preferences for traditional teaching in proportion between 63% and 95% (Turkey 63%, Romania 69%, Spain 72%, Portugal 83%, Italy 95%).

The face to face method is preferred because there is more interaction with the trainer and stimulates the exchange of knowledge. On the other hand, the learning styles people are used surely influence their preferences. Some of the students might be are not so familiar with the new technology and manifest an attitude of reticence for challenges. The low percentage for the preferences of e-learning and blended learning is quite against the world trend which tries to promote this type of teaching for reason of economy/ sustainable educational development.

The students were also asked about a preferred method to be used by the trainer. Some of the students opted for methods that include traditional teaching combined with modern technology and materials (Portugal), some described methods mainly based on new technology: simulations, projects presentations (Spain) and other requested for more training practice: learning by doing, teamwork, self-evaluation, practical creative activities (Italy, Turkey, Romania). The traditional method (face-to-face) is still successful but strictly combined with new technology tools and e-content which make easier the process of understanding and learning. The learners prefer to participate in trainings based on the principles of adult education (learning by doing) that develops abilities to put into practice the theoretical content of the training.

   

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The third question is about teachers/trainers competences and qualities and the answers to it’s items are very different. Some ranked as most important that the teacher encourages the students to participate in the class (Turkey 70%, Portugal 61%) and some appreciate mostly that the teacher to alternate theory and practices (Romania 62%, Spain 83%, Turkey 46%) and connect content to reality (Spain 83%, Italy 76%, Romania 62%). The non-important aspects in this question for the Portuguese and Italian learners (Luigi Sturzo Institute) were the availability of the trainer after classes (Portugal 56%) and indulgence with absences (Portugal 55%), while the Italian learners (Carlo Smaldone Institute) marked this lenience with absences as a relevant aspect about the trainer. The conclusion we can take is that the adult students prefer the interactive methods that should attract and motivate them to participate in the learning process because in the adulthood main priority are family, jobs and not study. The preferences of the students demonstrate their demand for practical learning and immediate applicability. The adult learners’ expectances are high considering the contents of learning and they want these to be relevant and helpful in solving their job tasks. The combination of theoretical explanations with practical exercises is needed because it helps the transfer of theory into practice. It is obvious in their responds that they want to develop the required competences for the job market. About the other qualities of the trainers desired by the students we can say they are very demanding. In their opinion the trainers should be: intelligent, communicative, patient, impartial, clear and practical, able to stimulate interest, very prepared and professional, serious, educated, able to get the best out of learners, empathic, dynamic, innovative and not at least but not the last with sense of humor. The teacher’s qualities are to be found in a complex, creative and dynamic personality, these being also targets of adult personality in continuing formation. The array of fundamental competences of the teacher in the instructive and educational activity was amplified according to the new requirements related to the quality of his conduct.    

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The ideal teacher must be a competent guide, which directs the receptive efforts of the students, intelligent, imaginative and sensitive, with an elevated esthetical taste and kind. His entire behaviour should create the necessary conditions for a sustainable education development which is valued from a psycho-pedagogical and didactic perspective. The next items of the questionnaire consist in open questions about participation in class, materials, types of activities and work in groups. The participation in class in students’ opinion has to be dynamic with practical activities, lots of brainstorming and debates, discussions, project presentations and individual explanations. It can be observed a desire of involvement in learning activities which reflects the dynamic character of the people that engage in additional training, irrespective of domain. The materials and resources required to be used by the teacher and students were mostly the same to all partners’ countries. We can notice the emphases on the new technology and modern materials: interactive boards, computers with internet access, videos, projectors, memory sticks, educational soft-wares, interactive didactic games and only few preferences for traditional materials: notebooks, slates, blackboards, journals and books on the subjects. The modern strategy of education encompasses the teacher's and the student resources within a common strategy. Despite students expressed their desire for a traditional approach, they want to be used modern, complex and attractive resources in the classes. We noticed that teachers and students are using progressively the new technology in the class and not only. The types of activity preferred by the students are mostly out of school activity that has to be connected with their subject. These can be: conferences (Italy), travel, theater (Turkey), one-day visits, training and practical activity (Spain,

   

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Portugal, Romania and Italy). Italian students from Carlo Smaldone Institute express their interest for on-line exercises in different subjects and laboratory. We can conclude that the students prefer interactive and socio-cultural activities that favor communication, socialization, cooperation and experience exchange. The last item is about working in group preference. Most of the respondents, irrespective the country, have a preference to work in small groups (3-4 persons). The preferences of the students lean toward small groups and they agree with working in group, which reflects the social maturity level and consolidation of relationships within a group. The third section of the questionnaire is about evaluation and has five items that have to be ranked in a four steps scale from non important to very important. The most important aspect regarding the evaluation is “enough information about the objective to attain” (Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Italy – Luigi Sturzo) and “information about correction criteria” (Romania, Italy – Carlo Smaldone Institute). The item “information about marking” was considered important by Romanian, Turkish and Spanish students while Italian and Portuguese students voted as “not important”. The item” range of evaluation instruments” is important for Turkish and a bit important for Romanian, Spanish and Italian students. However, the most non-important aspect is “flexibility in evaluation times” for all the respondents, except Carlo Smaldone Institute’s students. Other aspects regarding the evaluation mentioned by the students were: teacher’s honesty, close relationship between teacher and students, the transferability of the credits in other educational systems. The rank of the importance regarding the evaluation aspects reflects the maturity of the adult students that are not very interested in marking, but in achieving the necessary competences in everyday life required by the changing society. Evaluation is a component for which the students are identifying almost all the aspects as being important, correlated with the initial training objectives    

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and with the competences that are overlapping with the evaluation criteria in psycho-pedagogical terms of reference. The forth section of the questionnaire regards the usefulness or assessment of the course and contain five options of the students. The items are based on the two extrinsic and intrinsic motivation forms and at one item the students can respond freely in order to obtain from them other possible expectations. For all the respondents, the most important fact was “acquire new knowledge”. The next option as importance was “joining the labour market” for Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Italy, except Romania where the second option was “continuing further studies”. These results can be easily understand because the adults knows better their priorities and participate in lifelong learning programs only on realistic and concrete reasons. Their motivation for study is dictated by the need for improving their competences required by the challenging society changes and the necessity of their adaptability and integration in the labour market. The world economical crises influence the adult students by making them to be eager for knowledge. The fifth section asks students to rank from 1 to 3 (1= most important, 3 = less important) their interest for receiving further information about: scholarships, possible further studies, job opportunities, training periods/ apprenticeships, complementary courses and formative visits. We consider the answers to this question are influenced by the professional status of the students. The ones that don’t have a job or prefer to change it are interested in job opportunity (Portugal, Italy - LSI, Spain, Turkey) or apprenticeships (Portugal, Turkey), the one that are still students would like to know more about scholarships (Italy - CSI) and further studies (Spain), the one that have jobs prefer to improve their knowledge and opt for complementary courses (Italy – CSI) or advanced levels of the same courses and organizing of experience exchange programmes (Romania).

   

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The last item of the questionnaire is an open question related directly by the factors that could stimulate the students to participate in the lifelong learning program. As we expected, the answers are divers and reflects the complex personality of a grownup person. The students mentioned factors that can be classified in three diffenet types of motivations: Social motivation–make new connections and enlarge the professional network, acquire more self confidence, increasing prestige, create a familiar ambience etc. Economic motivation–wage increasing, qualification for bonuses etc. Self-realisation/ knowledge motivation–enrich/update knowledge, know new career pathway, develop general competences as digital and linguistic competences in a foreign language, stimulating creativity etc. We can notice a complimentary of interests, so that we can say the course participation is tied to the satisfaction of the desire of professional compensation, both materially as well as spiritually, but it is anyway seen as a requirement of recognition and of the capacity of continual improvement. In a larger context, the effort of education, of learning as adult, correlated with the other efforts, envisions the construction of one own way of life, finding joy in one's practiced activity.

   

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(In alphabetical order)

1. Cinema as a teaching resource 2. Coaching – blended solution 3. Collaborative learning self-teaching using IT 4. Computer based English teaching 5. Crossword 6. Defining an education mthod replacive himself intead of students 7. Digital storytelling for EU- enlagement stories 8. Fishbowl / conservation 9. Improve research on Google (or any browser) 10. Interactive groups and dialogic reading 11. Learning by doing – Pergamano technique 12. Presentation–practice- production (foreign language) 13. Press analysis 14. Project-presentation using Impress/PowerPoint 15. Role playing 16. Storytelling – Bias, stereotypes and mythds 17. Students become teachers 18. Students collaboration in presenting a new unit 19. Student-content interaction through ICT 20. Study visits 21. Tools for culture 22. Learning by doing – Quilling technique 23. Writing workshop

   

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1. CINEMA AS A TEACHING RESOURCE About the Teaching Method Name to assign Cinema as a teaching resource Aim (purpose of the • To stimulate students’ curiosity and interest TM) towards particular aspects of subject contents. • To complement teachers’ explanations with film images and excerpts. • To make students acquire certain values and a social conscience • To provide students with a critical attitude towards mass media • To know cinema characteristics as a language Learners will know.... • How to take advantage of mass media as tools to transmit ideas, values and knowledge. • How to understand the factors which affect mass media • How to understand and analyse the language of the cinema Learners will be able • Use mass media (in particular, audiovisual to … resources) as tools to transmit information • Understand subject contents by seeing real experiences. • Reflect and debate about teaching, intercultural and/or social aspects. Learners will be.... • Critical towards mass media. How do you use the TM Duration

Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners Software / Programs

   

for

• Teacher and group • Individually Between 4 and 5 hours (depending on the length of the film).

Computer, projector, DVD reader, television or any other resource which allows film viewing. DVD films.

• • •

Questionnaires Pens and notebooks. Cuestionarios.

Web browers.

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Word processors.

How to implement the TM CINEMA AS A TEACHING RESOURCE The main function of cinema (as a document or as a pretext) is still the most frequent. However, there are other proposals in which the cinema proves to stimulate students’ curiosity and interest in particular aspects of the subjects being studied. Our strategy will be different depending on what we want to use a film for: if we assume that a film, which was conceived as a whole, will be divided into different sections, we must adopt different approaches too. In fact, cinema should be integrated within a global teaching strategy which justifies the time and effort invested. We must also bear in mind some elements related to the film suitability, to wit, students’ age, attitude and behavior, and sound quality. Therefore, any activity outline should include a previous analysis on behalf of the teacher consisting of: -­‐ Justification -­‐ Teaching objectives -­‐ Time -­‐ Methodology -­‐ Evaluation Obviously, if we divide the film into different sections to illustrate one particular aspect of our teaching practice, we can obtain many advantages, but we are going to focus on the advantages of full-length films. We will follow this pattern: FIRST LESSON We should reflect on the most interesting features of the film such as: -­‐ Director and actor’s filmography -­‐ Social and space-time context -­‐ Teaching purpose -­‐ Other important aspects We could even prepare a questionnaire to make students think of those aspects we want to highlight while they see the film. SECOND LESSON Although in a one-hour lesson we can probably see no more than 45 minutes of a film, it could be appropriate to reflect on what students have seen so far by putting questions about the context, the characters, the atmosphere… A debate can arise and students can express their opinions. After that, they may continue seeing the film. THIRD LESSON They see the end of the movie.

   

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FOURTH LESSON The teacher can encourage students to talk about some of the things they saw in order that they can reflect on it and we can attain the teaching objective. If necessary, there could even an individual questionnaire consisting of questions related to the film and the subject itself. Significant questions could be a personal synopsys, the thematic analysis (narrative units, contents, secondary topics, characters, viewpoints, credibility…), formal analysis (production, image, music, language…) and a well-reasoned personal review. After that, the evaluation of the activity is of the utmost importance in order to know whether the activity was appropriate for the group (time, topic, subject, objectives…) or not. Results Which results are expected, please describe

Strong points of the TM

To increase the efficiency of the teacher’s traditional explanations (presentation of contents on written paper).

The use of images allows to introduce abstract contents, which may help students in complex processes.

Film viewing produces a sensitive impact on students which is positive for the attitude towards studying.

Film viewing provides students with experiences (e.g. in the past) which cannot be accessed otherwise.

Film viewing develops students’ discovery learning, creativity, participation and critical attitude.

To stimulate students’ curiosity and interest towards particular aspects of subject contents. • To make students acquire certain values and a social conscience How do you help/ This practice tries to be a tool which reinforces the assist who doesn’t learning or comprehension of different teaching aspects archieve the minimum (values teaching), thus the non-attainment of the result particular objectives should be complemented with the use of other resources adapted to the students.

Weak points of the TM

   

This practise requires previous preparation to be successful: availabilty of the room (for proper sound and image), group

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characteristics, film choice....

Evaluation Evaluation tool

Time. Several sessions may be needed to complete the activity.

It is important to design the activity carefully to make students aware that it is a learning task with its own evaluation (mark).

Product created by the students Questionnaires. Attitude and participation in debates, critical comments, etc.... How much time do you The time used for film viewing and one more session to need to evaluate see the questionnaires, if necessary. results How /when do you Several days later. publish the evaluation

   

• • •

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2. COACHING-BLENDED SOLUTION About the Teaching Method Name to assign COACHING-blended solution Aim (purpose of the • enhancement of human resources; TM) • implement training plans that are characterized as "training for the managementof Libraries"; • create training / consulting practice targeted at business needs and operationaltargets; • interconnect professionals belonging to different library facilities; • extend the process of vocational adjustment in other geographical areas with particular reference to the south of Italy; • strengthen networking activities; • support the development of professional communities by encouraging the mutual exchange of knowledge on work processes and collaborative learning skills needed. Target group: Cultural Heritage workers sector (museums, theaters, galleries, directors, officers, local authorities) who are already working but want to broaden their knowledge and upgrade their skills knowledge. In this case, engaged in digitization projects, and in projects to enhance cultural heritage. Learners will know • A Manage all aspect related to the management how to of a project Learners will be able • A 1 To acquire a new perspective on every day to … job Learners will be....

A 3 more confident in their job

How do you use the Peer-to-peer TM Tutor / Learner

Duration

   

In this specific case this method of training was applied to improve the digititazion competences of librarian and their management skills. To each external expert a learner was assigned and he had to follow the learners’ process of acquiring new skills Class 20 hours E learning 130 hours Coaching 50 hours

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Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners

Software / Programs

for

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Projector + handbook Pc + projector + screen Blackboard Flipchart Dia-projector Please add more.... Computer, usually used at work. Paper Block notes Paints Pen / pencil Colors Collective Games Role-playing In-bowl brushers scissors glove Please add more Depends on the project agreed Ppt presentation Excel or Word or Adobe reader software Online tool (need a browser) Special package Social Network Intranet in the organization Depends on the project

How to implement the TM First of all this method is applied in the learners’ working environment. • Steps to follow the method • A a start up phase where learner and coah will agree on a project to pursue and build a trustworthy relationship. • B The learner will meet with is coach at least every two weeks • C Inbetween the use of a e-learning platform will be the continuous element all through the project. Exercises (if you need to describe) Name Coaching Size of the group 1 to 1 Description Learning by doing Duration 50 ore Need co-teaching No

   

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Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM

Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

Increase competences, increase self confidence

Follow even after the programme finished

-Greater flexibility of training modules whose contents are developed according specific project contexts; -Targeted to a Trainers / consultants tailored to specific project contexts -learners’ needs assessment before and after the training (balance of competences) In a relation one to one transversal skills are not developed Low availability of employees to learn from another person, lack of motivation or confidence.

Questionnare: yes Test with closed questions Test with open questions At the begining and at the end of the training How much time do you One week for post evaluation need to evaluate results How /when do you No they are not published, they are going to be used publish the evaluation internally to improve training delivery Do you plan Continuous feedback comments from learne? Please describe

   

• • •

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3. COLLABORATIVE LEARNING. SELF-TEACHING USING IT

About the Teaching Method Name to assign Collaborative learning. Self-teaching using IT Aim (purpose of the Self-learning, collaborative learning, self-creation of TM) materials Learners will know.... • How to work in groups • How to create their own materials How do you use the Via the Internet in 4/5-student groups. TM Duration It depends on the sessions required to complete a teaching unit.

Resources Equipment / Hardware Materials/Tools learners Software / Programs

• PC (Internet access) • Projector for PC (Internet access) • •

Online tools (wiki and blogs). Web browers are required, then. Word processors, PDF readers and spreadsheet and graphics presentation programs (Excel, PowerPoint....).

How to implement the TM • • •

   

The teacher develops a wiki, where s/he includes theoretical contents for each topic (without images or activities), which students should complete. Students are divided into groups of four or five members. Each group of students starts their own blog, known as the students’ blog. The teacher starts a class blog, where s/he indicates the IT activities which must be carried out. These activities require some sort of research either using interactive animations or surfing the Internet (following a webquest model). Students answer questions in their blogs, which may be directly accessed via the class blog. Students are also encouraged to find images to complete the theoretical contents. Sometimes, the activity is the same for all students; sometimes, it changes from one group to another. Once all images are checked, the teacher indicates which of them are going to be uploaded to the wiki to complete the final notes. These notes are increased with other sections included in the students’ blogs. Some question papers are sent to the teacher to check if students are working properly.

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FURTHER INFORMATION: Links to previous practices Wiki / Blog. Results Which results are Learning of subject contents. expected, please describe Strong points of the • The students participate actively in the creation of TM the contents. • It is a dynamic way of working and involves everybody. • It is also an attractive way of working as they use computers and the Internet, tools which have been proved to increase their motivation nowadays. Weak points of the TM • The individual evaluation, as the teacher may not really identify if everybody made the same effort. However, the teacher may evaluate students individually to prevent this from happening... Evaluation Evaluation tool

• • •

   

Evaluation (by the teacher) of the final product: PowerPoint presentation Oral questions to better control the work Individual evaluation, if necessary

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4. COMPUTER-BASED ENGLISH TEACHING About the Teaching Method Name to assign Computer-based English teaching Aim (purpose of the - To improve the students’ English speaking and TM) listening ability - To encourage the students to speak English and to have self-confidence - To raise awareness in learning English using computer - To develop students’ ICT abilites. Learners will know.... • about the usage of computer and tools that are neccessary for this TM. Learners will be able • improve their practise by speaking and listening to … • develop their talents in learning English. • use ICT tools. • detect their abilities in English Learners will be.... • more participant . • more eager to learn English. How do you use the Learners can study at school and at home if they have TM got internet connection. Students are given passwords to access the programme, and their teachers can follow them about how much they have studied or if they have studied or not. This system has a different phylosophy „Slow is fast” which means you have to study at least 45 min. or one hour everyday or every two days. You listen to native speakers at least three times and then you repeat what they have said and also yourecord your own voice check if your pronounciation is OK. or not. You are being graded for your each repitition. The more often you repeat and you studyt the more point you get. Duration Students can study 12 months as long as they have got valid passwords. Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools for learners Software / Programs

   

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Projector Pc + projector + screen Internet access Manual about how to use the system Photocopies Headphones Ppt presentation Excel or Word or Adobe reader software Online tool (need a browser) Special package Social Network Intranet in the organization

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How to implement the TM First of all each student must have one e-mail address and a password ( which is given by their teachers) and they are given a CD and they have to install the CD on their PCs with the help of Internet. All their works will be recorded as long as they keep on studying and as long as they study, they will get higher points. If they stop working , their points will go down. When they don’y have any internet connection, they can work for 15 days off line and whenever they have the internet connection all their works will be recorded. Also students have a dictionary in the system and they can look up the words they need to know their meanings. Students can see their tutor how much they have studied and what part they have studied such as listening, speaking vocabulary etc. Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

How much time do you need to evaluate results How /when do you publish the evaluation

Do you comments learners? describe

   

plan from Please

To encourage students to learn English in entertaining way. Helping them individually and being interested in them closely.

Studying on the computer is very attractive for learners. They are having more and more fun and studying on the computer is motivating for them. Tthe learners have to repeat very often to get higher grade but after a while they get bored studying hard on computer.

Placement test Test with closed questions Test with open question Quizes The results are always evaluated by the computer. Each learner has tutors. Whenever anyone wants to see the results, they can just see the results on computers. Evaluation is always ready on the computer. Parents or learners can see the results on the Net with their passwords. So trainers don’t need to publish at a certeain time. Of course learners can comment on their works and ask for their teachers’ opinion.

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5. CROSSWORDS About the Teaching Method Name to assign Crosswords (CW) Aim (purpose of the To develop skills in using singles word and connect them TM) in one environment To improve capacity to give a single name/ word to a process of events or a continuous row of activities Learners how

will

know

To name processes and activities with plus than 1 item • To learn single words in a foreign language • To learn how to use words in native language • To connect letters to compose a scrabble© Learners will be able • To name complex processes to… • To connect more activities and discover the name of them in a single word Learners will be.... • Selfconfident in the use of native or foreign vocabulary How do you use the Individual (single use) TM Online use Peer-to-peer Teacher / 1 group Teacher/ 2 groups or more Teacher/ Learner Tutor / Group Tutor / Learner Please add more.... Duration Depends from difficulty of CW, usually 1,5 hrs

Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners

   

• for

• • • • • • • • • •

IPad in case of digital use, otherwise a videobeam for collective use in teams or paper and pen for individual use Paper Block notes Paints Pen / pencil Colors Collective Games Role-playing In-bowl brushers scissors

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Software / Programs (in case of use wih iPad)

• • • • • • • •

glove Please add more... Ppt presentation Excel or Word or Adobe reader software Online tool (need a browser) Special package (One App to upload in the web) Social Network Intranet in the organization

How to implement the TM

1) Teacher / methodologis project the crossword using words related to the aim that leraners have to reach 2) Teacher creates the structure of the CW and single defitions 3) Learners have the table and definitions and time to realize the CW 4) Teacher give in individual way or in a competitive team the tables and defibitions and time to game 5) Final evalutation of the method together with learners and creation of a rank of team marking the right/wrong answers 6) Repeat wih different crossword to increase the number of single word or processes to learn Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

   

To increase number of single words in the personal vocabulary To connect names and processed in single words To know the meaning of words which describes processes and rows of activities or Gantt actions To repeat the experience, but complete unarchivement is not expected from Cw, only different level of knowledge can be archieved Single use is very good for personal level of knowledge of words, while in group this is a competitive activity only with the use of mind capacities, skills to answer in time It’s useful especially with single word and not with complicated processes

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6. DEFINING AN EDUCATION METHOD REPLACING HIMSELF INSTEAD OF STUDENTS AND LEARNERS About the Teaching Method Name to assign Defining an education method replacing himself instead of students and learners. Aim (purpose of the Treating and preparing the patients with mental health to TM) the social life with the help of folk dancing, art and Ebru (tradational Turkish handicaft) who are being examined in hospital right now or who had been discharged from hospital. Learners will know.... • A1 how to communicate with healthy people • B1about music, folk dancing and technics about art courses. • C1how to display music, folk dancing and art works. Learners will be able • A2 overcome their physical problems. to … • B2 • C3 Learners will • A3 have less time to listen to themselves. • B3 understand that they will manage to do something like those who aren’t ill. • C3 How do you use the The trainer usually works with one group but can also TM work individually if neccessary. Duration It is advisable that the patients should work everyday to prevent them from forgetting. Resources Equipment / Hardware

According to the types of the courses , it is neccessary to arrange a free room or workshop room and materiaals for art couses. Materials/Tools for • Paper learners • Paints • Pen / pencil • Colors • Collective Games • Role-playing • In-bowl • brushers • scissors • glove • Please add more.... Software / Programs Gerekmemektedir.

   

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How to implement the TM This method should be applied for the patients with mental health and for those who are disadvantaged people in the similar case.To apply this method, the first thing the trainer should do is that s/he should understand the state of mind or psychology of the people with mental health. So the trainers should definitely be trained beforehand. 1- Firstly determining the psychology of the patients by speaking to patients. Those who don’t have the suitable psychology shouldn’t participate in the classes that day.To prepare the lessons for the learners , learners and course environment should be prepared. 2- Before starting the course, it is important to learn the thoughts of learners and to make connection with the lesson. 3- To strengthen this connection , training and behaviours that have to be gained for learners should be repeated at short intervals. 4- The knowledge taught should be repeated at short intervals 5- Helping the trainees to be aware of the work that is done and to receive pleasure from this. Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

Providing the patients’ being able to learn something and being able to understand that they could manage. Helping them individually and being interested in them closely.

Not being a fixed programme and that it could be determined according to the position at that moment. That the patients should forget the training done easily.

Evaluation Evaluation tool

• Drawings • Speeches How much time do you In evaluation, the observations of more than one trainer need to evaluate and responsible evaluator will be received at least in one results week and in one month at most. How /when do you Parents or learners can see the results. publish the evaluation Do you plan Of course learners can comment on their works and ask comments from for their teachers’ opinion learners? Please describe

   

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7. DIGITAL STORYTELLING FOR EU-ENLARGEMENT STORIES (PREVIOUS PROJECT SUPPORTED BY EU COMMISSION) About the Teaching Method Name to assign Digital storytelling for Eu-enlargement stories (previous project supported by Eu commission) Aim (purpose of the The digitalstoyrtelling method is a versatile tool that can TM) be used in learning context to transfert not only digital competences, but also competences on the field of application (in this case Eu-enlargement). Moreover is helpful to develop self esteem and confidence in learning 1st ) day a briefing letting know the learners what the method is about 2nd) storytelling circle. 3) writing of the story board 4) editing of the storyboard 5) voice recording 6) putting images together 7) video editing 8) The story is complete …Screening! Learners will know... • A1 write a story ( story arch) • C1Learn about Eu-enlargement Learners will be able • A2 Edit images and voice to... • B2 bond with other participants • C3 Learners will be... • A3 self confident with digital tools • B3 entusiasitic about the story and teh feeling of sharing How do you use the Tutor / Group TM Duration

whole day for 5 days

Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners Software / Programs

   

for

• • • • • • • • •

Projector + handbook Mouse with a scroll Voice recorder Headphones Digital camera Paper Pen / pencil Personal photos or objects Any editing video, suggested sony veags for pcs and Ilife for macs

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How to implement the TM • Steps to follow the method • A Briefing • C storycircle • D script writing • E voice recording • F edit of the stor Name storycircle Size of the group 4 to 7 Description The trainer in the middle, learners in a circle start with some warming up games: ask learners to make a list of 10 things they hate and 10 things they love, the rule is that arguments that can hit other partcipants’ sensibility are out of the circle. Then you can use some word games An example of word games: Nosense word game: you give a paper to the learner with 20 words, this words are connected to Eu-enlargement topics, italy, Europe, enlargement, boundaries, travel, and you ask him to write a story using all the words. No matter if the story has nosense, but it stimulates creativity thinking and you should ask him to write a story that has a beginning, a peak and an end (arch story) or encourage the learner to bring a picture or an object that has a meaning to him and encourage him to tell a story about it. Another one is to use a lighted match and ask the learner ti tell the stiry they chose to tell while the match is burning away (be careful of health and safety rules with this one) Duration 3 hours Need co-teaching NO Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

   

A story telling a personal lifeexperience convcerning euenlargement You help them till they have finished their story

Active partcipation of learners and commitment Needs time to braek the ice Time and a digitalstiryteller expert

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Evaluation Evaluation tool

• Questionnares • Test with closed questions • Test with open questions How much time do you 2 hours need to evaluate results How /when do you Is not necessary, the story is the evaluation tool publish the evaluation

   

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8. FISHBOWL CONVERSATION (FBC) About the Teaching Method Name to assign Fishbowl Conversation (FBC) Aim (purpose of the 1. To improve capacity of adults to speak in public TM) 2. To improve capacity to concentrate different positions or speeches during a public discussion in categories 3. To have time to say the own position about an argument Learners will know • Manage time during a speech and time how management used during TM • Give a sequence to all different positions Learners will be able • Listen others and express their position to... • Give a public role for their opinions • Manage their time Learners will be... • Selfconfident in the use of their knowledge, language and ideas How do you use the A fishbowl conversation is a form of dialog that can be TM used when discussing topics within large groups. Fishbowl conversations are usually used in participatory events like Open Space Technology and Unconferences. The advantage of Fishbowl is that it allows the entire group to participate in a conversation.

Duration Resources Equipment / Hardware Materials/Tools for learners Software / Programs

Teacher/ 2 groups or more Tutor / Group From 1 to 4 hrs depending from the size of the group

• •

A Pc and videobeam to show to members of FBC all the different positions expressed during time No material, even a block notes or iPad

A WP - word processor to use in addition with a Pc and videobeam to show the summary of single speeches, otherwise a flipchart + pencil

How to implement the TM Four to five chairs are arranged in an inner circle. This is the fishbowl. The remaining chairs are arranged in concentric circles outside the fishbowl. A few participants are selected to fill the fishbowl, while the rest of the group sit on the chairs outside the fishbowl. In an open fishbowl, one chair is left empty. In a closed fishbowl, all chairs are filled. The moderator introduces the topic and the participants start discussing the topic. The audience outside the fishbowl listen in on the discussion.In an open fishbowl, any member of the audience can, at any time, occupy the empty chair and join the fishbowl. When this happens, an    

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existing member of the fishbowl must voluntarily leave the fishbowl and free a chair. The discussion continues with participants frequently entering and leaving the fishbowl. Depending on how large your audience is you can have many audience members spend some time in the fishbowl and take part in the discussion. When time runs out, the fishbowl is closed and the moderator summarizes the discussion. Results Which results are expected, please describe

To give dignity to all different point of views and to learn how it is possible to have an opinion and enrich it with multiple addition given by others.

How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result

Stimulate participation of all member of the outer cicle ti participate in the FBC to express their opinion, so it’s possible to give a colored peace of paper to those who made their opinion publicly.

Strong points of the TM

Weak points of the TM

An advantage of a fishbowl conversation is that it is suitable for large groups. Another advantage is that they lessen distinctions between the speakers and the audience. These two reasons have made fishbowls popular in participatory group meetings and conferences such as Open Space Technology and Unconferences. You need much time to listen all the members of the big group and can happens that argument can change from the argument decided in the beginning.

Evaluation Evaluation Tools How much time do you need to evaluate results How/ when do you publish the evaluation Do you plan comments from learners ? Please describe

No evaluation tool

The evaluation is made together with the members of the fishbowl Immediately

Yes in many small post-it notes to add in a blackboard outside the hall of the meeting reporting the effect of the TM on single participant.

The arrangement of chairs in a fish bowl session. Four concentric rings of chairs surround a smaller group of five chairs. An arrow indicates how any member of the audience may enter the middle section.    

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9. IMPROVE RESEARCH ON GOOGLE (OR ANY BROWSER) About the Teaching Method Name to assign Improve research on Google (or any Browser) Aim (purpose of the • Using a search TM) engine efficiently using various research techniques, including the use of: o Quotes; o The +, – and * signals; o The dot to define file extensions. Learners will know... • A1 the techiques to improve the research in a browser; • B1 reduce the amount of pages resulting in a Internet research Learners will be able • A2 aplly the tecniques for reducing the amount os to... pages resulting in a Internet research Learners will be... • A3 more accurate using Internet techniques; How do you use the Teacher/ Learner TM Duration 1-3 hrs Resources Equipment / Hardware Materials/Tools for learners Software / Programs

• • • •

Pc + projector + screen Block notes Pen / pencil Online tool (need a browser)

How to implement the TM Steps to follow the method A • • • • •

A make a normal research using a browser; B see the results and explain the goal to achieve; C make other research in another page apllying the techniques above described; D compare the results; E explain when to apply .

Results Which results are With this method I hope that students can minimize the expected, please results of an Internet research applying the techniques describe above described. How do you help/ Going to the PC and help the student doing his task. assist who doesn’t

   

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archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

Reduce the time of an Internet research;

Focus on the core of the research.

The student must know how to use a computer;

Need an Internet connection.

Co-evaluation teacher / tutor

How much time do you The result is seen on the monitor. need to evaluate results How /when do you When the students finish their research I will discuss publish the evaluation with them the results achieved.

   

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10. INTERACTIVE GROUPS AND DIALOGIC LEARNING About the Teaching Method Name to assign Interactive groups and dialogic learning Aim (purpose of the • To develop the ability of learning meaningful TM) concepts (so that students can apply them in their real lifes and in their role as citizens) • To improve the motivation towards studying • To improve social abilities Learners will know... • Learn the subject contents Learners will be able • Apply theoretical knowledge to real life to... • Work in groups • Develop social abilities Learners will be... • More hard-working • More respectful towards the ways of working and thinking of others. • More disciplined. How do you use the This practice is carried out in the classroom, in 4-5 TM member groups with the help of volunters and a guiding teacher. Duration One-hour sessions (as many sessions as required by the teacher for every unit in the subject syllabus) Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools for learners Software / Programs

• • • • • • • •

Textbook (and specialized bibliography) PC (Internet access) and projector Camera Photocopies USB store units Web browers Word processors Photo editing software

How to implement the TM Interactive groups are heterogeneous group of students who do an exercise under the supervision of a volunteer tutor (university student, former student, retired teacher, relative....). These groups are totally flexible and students may change every lesson. What is really important is that they must be heterogeneus according to their level, performance, sex.... The teacher is responsible for dividing the class in different work groups and revitalizing those groups and their tutor. The lesson time is divided into four or five periods lasting the same, and the contents are divided into four or five different activities. Therefore, after one period, all groups of students (nomore than 5 or 6) move to another desk, with a different tutor and activity, which enriches their interactions and dynamism. Although all activities are different, they are related to one particular topic. The    

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teacher is also responsible for the coordination and coherence of those activities. Volunteers make sure students interact and learn ones from others. Actually, early finishers help slow students. The former then intensify their own learning thanks to the effort made in trying to explain. These explanations are frequently more easier to understand and there has been a recent experience. The volunteer does not explain the exercise, but shows students what they have to do. His/her mission consists of revitalizing the group, engaging all students, giving ideas if they come to a standstill (for instance, by asking if someone can help other students, encouraging to help and putting questions). Once finished, the teacher colects all exercices done.

Results Which results are expected, please describe

How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM

Weak points of the TM

• To increase the students’ motivation and their academic results. • To improve the atmosphere in the classroom. • To guarantee the contents students learn are really useful and not just memorized. • To reduce the gap between worse and better students. Students help each one so that they can reach the same goals (at least, those basic contents).

• To improve the motivation towards the subject. • To improve academic results. • To develop attitudes of solidarity and modesty among students. • To reinfoce meaningful learning • To improve the atmosphere in the classroom. • Teachers need time and effort to prepare activities. • It may difficult to ge the collaboration of volunteers.

Evaluation Evaluation tool The activities themselves. How much time do you • The evaluation process is continuous. need to evaluate • Tasks are evaluated according to the criteria results established by the syllabus. How /when do you Once the tasks have been corrected, the teacher gives a publish the evaluation mark and communicates the results to the students. Hopefully, after good results, they will continue working Do you plan • Students comment the observations made by the comments from teacher along the continuous evaluation. learners? Please • The students themselves can correct their own describe activities and self-evaluate, which may be considered by the teacher.

   

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11. LEARNING BY DOING – PERGAMANO TECHNIQUE About the Teaching Method Name to assign Learning by doing – Pergamano technique Aim (purpose of the The development of manual ability field and integration TM) of the new techniques in the process of teachinglearning / occupational therapy Learners will know.... • A1 the pergamano paper techniques; • B1 to create thematic cards using embossing technique; • C1 to apply pergamano paper techniques in their activities. Learners will be able • A2 To use new techniques of work from manual to … abilities field; • B2 To create thematic cards using the newly learned technique; • C3 To apply the newly learned techniques in school activities with pupils and/or in other contexts; Learners will be.... • A3 proud of the achievements of the new technique • B3 motivated to create new objects that embellish their lives • C3 interested to apply the embossing technique with pupils and/or in other contexts; How do you use the Teacher / 1 group TM Duration Resources Equipment / Hardware Materials/Tools for learners

Software / Programs

   

1-3 hrs

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Pc + projector + screen Pergamano paper Colored cardboard White paper sheets Colored ribbons Embossing tools 1-8 needles tools Rubber mats Acrylic ink Gel/ ink pens Waxed pencils Patterns Power-Point Presentation

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How to implement the TM Steps to follow the method :

   

A . Technique’s presentation; A power-point presentation with the next themes; ( 10 minutes) HISTORIC; INVENTORS: In a Power-point presentation, I relate the historic of the pergamano, the inventors and the technological process of obtaining it; Then it is described the Embossing technique; GALLERY: There are presented some sample of „what you can do” using pergamano; The learners can see some ready-made cards and pictures with more;

B. Tools and materials presentation: The observation and the handling of the needed tools and materials; The learners can see the needed tools and materials in Power-point presentation and then they can touch and try the tools, see the materials, make an idea about the way of using them;( 5 minutes) MATERIALS: There are presented the special materials needed; TOOLS: There are presented the tools needed for embossing;

C. The succession of the steps: A discussion about the steps, the presentation in PPT and steps to follow analyzing the model; (5 minutes) STEPS: The steps in the creating process are: Tracing the shape with acrylic ink on the front of the card; Coloring the back of the card with waxed pencils; Embossing the back of the card with embossing tools; Perforating the paper with 1-8 needles tools; Cutting the edges using 1-needle tool; The finishing touches: The learners choose the cardboard’s color, the ribbon’s color, the inside paper and assembly the card;

D. The practical exercise: The learners get tools and small pieces of pergamano and try all the steps as I demonstrate, to get use with the new technique; (10 min)

E. The application: The learners get the template and start making the embossed card; They get assistance if needed; (80 minutes)

F. The exhibition: All the learners works are displayed; There are discussions taking place about the exhibits, about the way they’ve worked, about the colors combination; (10 minutes)

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Results Which results are The learners have to follow all the steps in the correct expected, please order. They should create the card in the scheduled describe time. A psychological result of the activity is the increasing of learners’ self-esteem. How do you help/ By individual explanation and practical support assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the The technique contributes to the learners’ personal TM development because it brings something from other European countries, different educational systems and it contributes to our intercultural development as individuals; The embossing technique can become a nice hobby. Increase the interest for learning of new techniques that embellish our lives. It strengthens the role of LLP (Lifelong Learning Program) in European’s active citizenship development based on mutual understanding, respect and tolerance for other cultures; The activity itself has a relaxing feature that reduces daily stress; Increase the capacity of focusing of the persons with ADHD. Weak points of the TM pay attention to the chosen pattern because some may be quite difficult to make Evaluation Evaluation tool

• Questionnaire • Product exhibition How much time do you 1 hours need to evaluate results How /when do you at the end of the workshop and during the product publish the evaluation exhibition. Do you plan in the questionnaire comments from learners? Please describe

   

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12. PRESENTATION-PRACTICE-PRODUCTION (FOREIGN LANGUAGE) About the Teaching Method Name to assign Presentation-Practice-Production (Foreign Language) Aim (purpose of the • To enable the students to produce the target TM) language structure in a meaningful context; • To provide students with an opportunity to personalize the language structure learnt. Learners will know...

Learners will be able to...

Learners will be...

How to use a new language structure in a personal context. Communicate in a more efective way when using the foreign language More autonomous and more confident.

How do you use the Individual (single use) TM Online use Teacher / 1 group Teacher/ 2 groups or more Tutor / Group Tutor / Learner Please add more... Duration 1 hr half day whole day Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners

Software / Programs    

for

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Projector + handbook Flipchart Dia-projector Please add more.... Paper Paints Colors Collective Games Role-playing In-bowl brushers scissors glove Please add more.... Excel or Word or Adobe reader software

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• • •

Special package Social Network Intranet in the organization

How to implement the TM •

“Presentation” is where the language structure (vocabulary /grammar etc) is presented to the students to see if they have previous knowledge of it and then providing the new concept. It involves the building of a situation requiring natural and logical use of the new language structure. The target language formation is usually put on the board either in structure (grammar-type) charts, list of vocabulary, sentences or in dialogs. Presentation can also be done with the help of a ppt or an online tool (video, song etc). This part features more “teacher talk” than the other stages of the lesson.

Next comes “Practice” where the students practice the new language structure in several activities that progress from very simple (with little possibility for error) to more complex activities (as they master the material). These activities should include both “speaking” as well as “writing” skills. Practice activities need to be clear and understandable they should also be directed toward promoting a considerable degree of confidence in the students. In general, a practice activity that looks "attractive" will generate the students' motivation. They need to be challenged, but they should also feel that the activity is "within their reach". “Production” is the stage of the lesson where the students take the new language structure and use it in conversation that they prepare (ideally) and use it to talk about themselves or their daily lives or situations.

Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result

The students are expected to build sentences and to communicate effectively on what they have learnt, but without expecting perfection The teacher should go around the classroom encouraging students and helping them to focus on the language structure/concepts of the lesson and correcting whenever necessary, as well as reassuring them of their progress, and generally boosting their confidence. Strong points of the It can be applied to teach grammar items, functions and TM vocabulary. The students learn the new language structure and have the chance to use their own ideas and talk about themselves. Weak points of the TM The students may feel a certain anxiety when expected to speak in the classroom.

   

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Evaluation Evaluation tool

• Questionnare • Test with closed questions • Test with open questions • Product of the learners (ppt, other....) • Drawings • Speeches • Co-evaluation teacher / tutor • To create a rank How much time do you The evaluation is carried out during the class (direct need to evaluate observation) when the activities (writing and speaking) results are taking place. How /when do you During and at the end of the class. publish the evaluation Do you plan The evaluations are discussed with the each students comments from according to the results achieved. learners? Please describe

   

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13. PRESS ANALYSIS About the Teaching Method Name to assign Press analysis Aim (purpose of the To develop reasoning (the capacity of human beings TM) have to make sense of things, to establish and verify facts, and to change or justify practices). Learners will know.... Subject contents Learners will be able • Analyse to … • Reason • Look for and select information Duration 1 or 2 teaching hours Resources Materials/Tools learners

for

• • •

Press clippings Notebook and pen Theoretical contents of the course

How to implement the TM FIRST STAGE Actually, in this first stage, the teacher explains subject contents. SECOND STAGE - The teacher collects some articles and gives them to the students. - Students must relate those articles to the contents being studied. - The results obtained are debated in group. Results Which results are Identification and comprehension of information related expected, please to subject contents. describe Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

   

• Students participate actively • Students revise contents • Students learn to debate and look for information It may be difficult to find articles related to the subject.

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14. PROJECT PRESENTATION USING IMPRESS/POWERPOINT About the Teaching Method Name to assign Project presentation using Impress/PowerPoint Aim (purpose of the Self-learning, collaborative work, content analysis, selfTM) creation of materials, improvement of linguistic (oral and written) competence, look for information How do you use the In 4-6 student groups TM Duration 1 month Resources Equipment / Hardware Materials/Tools learners

for

Software / Programs

PC (Internet access) + projector + speakers

Textbook

Word processors, PDF readers and spreadsheet and graphics presentation programs (Excel, PowerPoint....) Web browser

• How to implement the TM • • • •

• •

The teacher divides the class in work groups consisting of 4/6 students. Each group is assigned a topic they have to work on by preparing theoretical contents, images, animations, videos, graphs… Students finally create a PowerPoint presentation which will be used in the introduction of the topic to the rest of the class. The teacher guides students in the one-month process in order to make sure they are working on the appropriate contents and understood what they have to do. It is important to encourage students to reach a good level in the quality of their presentation, as it may be motivating for the rest of the students. Apart from the PowerPoint presentation, the group prepares a set of short questions about their own project so that the classmates can put questions along the presentation and the teacher can check all students pay attention.

Results How do you help/ By organizing groups where students help each one. assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the • Students participate actively in writing their own TM notes. • It is a dynamic way of working. • It is also an attractive way of working as they use    

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Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

Further information

• • • •

• • •

   

computers and the Internet, tools which have been proved to increase their motivation nowadays. The individual evaluation, as the teacher may not really identify if everybody made the same effort. However, the teacher may evaluate students individually to prevent this from happening.

Evaluation (by the teacher) of the final product: PowerPoint presentation Oral questions to better control the work Individual evaluation, if necessary Aubert, A.; Garcia, C. 2001. Interactividad en el aula, en Cuadernos de Pedagogía. 1 de abril de 2001. nº301. pp 20-24. Barcelona: Praxis. AAVV. Junio 1998. Comunidades de Aprendizaje: propuesta educativa igualitaria en la sociedad de la información. Aula de Innovación Educativa. Nº72. Barcelona: Graó. Ayuste, A.; Flecha, R.; López, F.; Lleras, J. 1994. Planteamientos de Pedagogía crítica. Comunicar y Transformar. Barcelona: Graó Editorial. Beck, U.; Giddens, A.; Lash, S. 1997. Modernidad reflexiva. Barcelona: Península. (p.o en 1994). Beck, U. 1998. ¿Qué es la globalización? Barcelona: Paidós. (p.o en 1997). Castells, M.; Flecha, R; Freire, P; Giroux, H; Macedo, D; Willis, P. 1994. Nuevas perspectivas críticas en educación. Barcelona: Paidós. Castells, M. 1997-1998. La era de la información (Vol.I: La sociedad red, Vol.II: El poder de la identidad, Vol.III: Fin de milenio). Madrid: Alianza. (p.o en 1996-1997). CREA. 1999. Cambio educativo. Teorías y prácticas que superan las desigualdades. Dossier de las I Jornadas

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15. ROLE-PLAYING About the Teaching Method Name to assign Role-playing Aim (purpose of the Knowledege of how to apply subject contents to real life. TM) Learners will know.... Learners will be able to … Duration

Resources Materials/Tools learners

To apply theory to real-life situations. To perform role-playing using the theoretical contents of a subject. It depends on the subject contents and the number of students.

for It depends on the situation to simulate.

How to implement the TM FIRST STAGE Actually, in this first stage, the teacher explains subject contents. SECOND STAGE - Students recreate through animations or drama the contents previously explained by the teacher. - In order to do it properly and approach reality, students visit authentic places and people involved in those situations which should be represented.

Results Which results are To learn how to apply subject contents to real life. expected, please describe Strong points of the Very practical and visual teaching method. TM Weak points of the TM

   

It might be difficult to find a place where to observe how the subject contents are applied in real situations.

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16. STORYTELLING - BIAS, STEREOTYPES AND MYTHS About the Teaching Method Name to assign Storytelling - BIAS, STEREOTYPES AND MYTHS Aim (purpose of the to achieve a practical outcomes with an individual/ group TM) (community or an organization) Learners will know.... • A1 to express their feeling, experience and knowledge • B1 to practice active listening and speaking skills • C1to compare their knowledge with the new experience Learners will be able • A2 to develop communication by the art of telling to … stories • B2 to distinguish between stereotypes, bias and reality • C3 to understand intercultural differences (values, customs and traditions etc.) Learners will be... • A3 more open minded / flexible with people with different social cultural background • B3 more confident in themselves and tolerant with the other • C3 more aware of the bias they have about people How do you use the Teacher / 1 group TM Duration 1-3 hrs Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners

for

Software / Programs

• • • • • • • • • • •

Pc + projector + screen Blackboard Flipchart Please add more.... Photos Posters Cards Magazines Please add more.... Power-point presentation Intranet in the organization

How to implement the TM • • •    

Steps to follow the method Storytelling A presentation of the theme of the conversation (write down on the blackboard) and its aim/ objective B expose photos, posters, cards, magazines images that reflect

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stereotypes in a power-point presentation • C each participant has to note on a sheet of paper the things that are crossing their minds in the moment they see the images • D share the experience and knowledge regarding the subjects in short stories • E comments, suggestion and self-evaluation Exercises (if you need to describe) Name Bias, stereotypes and myths Size of the group 12 adult learners Description Introduction into the theme „Bias, Stereotypes and Myths” Expose a power-point presentation with different photos and the learners have to write their thoughts about each image they see on a sheet of paper. (ex.: What cross your minds when you see the tower Eiffel? … pizza ? … mafia? … red carnations? …black cat? … 13? …white dress? …an Afro-American person? … a gipsy? etc.). Presentation of their mind association regarding the seen images from which they will begin a conversation about the bias and stereotypes they discovered they have. (Bias = preconceived opinion, usually with a pejorative connotation.) The trainer will stimulate the students to speak about their own experiences using short stories regarding these issues. In this way, they will notice the differences between what they really know or they just heard about. Feed-back and conclusion on their opinions in group Duration 2h Results Which results are expected, please describe

-

How do you help/ assist who doesn’t achieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM

-

-

   

improve the language skills of adult learners recognize symbols, customs, traditions of different cultures; manifest a tolerant attitude and openness to social inclusion; awareness and respect for different cultures; keep the attraction of communication; insist in sharing thoughts, feelings, experiences.

facilitates the understanding of intercultural differences (values, customs, traditions etc.) build confidence between people convince the audience about the verisimilitude of facts and the real nature of people change the behavior / mentality enhance the transversal key competences

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Weak points of the TM

-

Evaluation Evaluation tool

the results need more time to become visible

Fish-bowl technique The students are forming two concentric circles. The one in the middle are allowed to answer in turn the questions: What did you learnt from this activity? How did this activity influence your behavior? After they answer the questions they can be replaced by the students in the other circle until everybody tell his experience/ opinion/ feelings. • Speeches Please add more.... How much time do you 20 min. need to evaluate results How /when do you At the end of the activity publish the evaluation

   

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17. STUDENTS BECOME TEACHERS About the Teaching Method Name to assign Students become teachers Aim (purpose of the Self-learning, content analysis, self-creation of materials TM) Learners will know... Subject-contents Learners will be able • Look for, analyse and select information related to... to the subject contents. • Explain the contents. Duration It depends on the subject contents and the number of students. Resources Equipment / Hardware Software / Programs

• • • •

PC (Internet access) + textbook Blackboard PowerPoint presentations Word processors, PDF readers and spreadsheet and graphics presentation programs (Excel, PowerPoint....).

How to implement the TM • • • • • • • •

The teacher delivers subject contents among students so that students know what should be explained. Each student looks for information related to the assigned contents and prepares a presentation. After a week of research, each student explains the contents to his/her classmates. During the explanation, students can use images, slides, sketches and other necessary resources. Classmates take notes and put questions. If necessary, the teacher intervenes to explain or help the student. Once a unit is completely explained, there is a written test. After all contents have been explained, the teacher provides students with notes of the contents being studied.

Results Which results are Learning of subject contents. expected, describe Strong points of the • The students participate actively during the TM explanation and comprehension of contents. • It is a dynamic way of working and involves everybody. Weak points of the TM • Students may not know how to explain contents.

   

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18. STUDENT COLLABORATION IN PRESENTING A NEW UNIT About the Teaching Method Name to assign Student collaboration in presenting a new unit Aim (purpose of the Self-learning, collaborative work, content analysis, selfTM) creation of materials Learners will know... The subject contents Learners will be able • Work in groups to... • Analyse and select contents Learners will be... Part of a group How do you use the In groups. It is explained below. TM Duration Resources Equipment / Hardware Software / Programs

It depends on the contents to study.

• • • •

PC (Internet access) + textbook Blackboard PowerPoint presentations Word processors, PDF readers and spreadsheet and graphics presentation programs (Excel, PowerPoint....)

How to implement the TM FIRST STAGE (BEFORE TEACHING) • The teacher introduces the outline of contents of a new unit (e. g. the Constitution). • Students are divided into groups, each of them is assigned some of the contents which should be analyzed (e. g. a section of articles). • Each group is responsible for summarizing those contents and adding new remarks, if necessary. After that, students send this information to the teacher, who finally checks if those contents have been correctly understood. SECOND STAGE Now the teacher explains the unit with the students’ assistance: • As a matter of fact, the teacher explains helped by the students. • Students interact with the rest of their classmates and the teacher himself by putting and answering questions. Results Which results are Learning of the contents expected, please describe How do you help/ - They will have extra remedial work assist who doesn’t - Re-explanation of contents by the teacher    

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archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM

Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

How much time do you need to evaluate results How /when do you publish the evaluation Do you plan comments from learners? Please describe

   

The student participates actively in the content explanation and comprehension. • It is a dynamic process and it involves everybody. As the student looks for and analyses the information in a group, it is difficult to perceive if one of the students does not carry out his/her tasks. •

Summary carried out by students The answers to the questions asked by the teacher • The time needed for the teacher’s explanation and the students’ interaction. • Then, tasks are marked according to the criteria established in the course syllabus. Once the classroom explanation is finished and the students’ summaries corrected. - To know if learners consider the practice useful and motivating for the learning of contents. • •

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19. STUDENT-CONTENT INTERACTION THROUGH ICT About the Teaching Method Name to assign Student-Content Interaction through ICT Aim (purpose of the • To improve the comprehension of philosophic TM) concepts, included those in the syllabus of the subject. • To make students familiar with the daily use of philosophic thinking. • To improve the digital competence of students. • To increase students’ motivation towards studying. Learners will know.... • The subject contents and the tools to use. Learners will be able • To apply theoretical contents to the daily routine. to … • To use ICT tools. • To develop students’ creative abilities. Learners will be.... • More thoughtful (less impulsive) • More respectful towards the ways of working and thinking of others. How do you use the The practice is usually carried out individually, using the TM Internet services. The teacher participates actively in the students’ daily tasks. Duration During a whole term, several times a month. Students have to spend 2-3 hours a week in the library or at home using the Internet. Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools for learners Software / Programs

• • • • • • • •

Textbook (and specialized bibliography) PC (Internet access) and projector Camera Photocopies USB store units Word processors Web browers to work on-line (blog and wikis) Photo editing software

How to implement the TM The methodological principle underlying this practice is the so-called collaborative learning. In the first place, subject contents are explained and worked in a traditional way. Then, in the case of Philosophy, a blog is created. This blog is a space where to debate outside the classroom and participation is compulsory. In the case of History of Philosophy, the teacher provides students with the notes and after studying them, students must participate in a blog by answering    

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questions asked by the teacher. The answers are completed and corrected by the students themselves, who also create a glossary of the subject a the same time. Thus, students create contents and learn from each one. Students also make web searches related to the topics already seen in the classroom or to book or film suggestions. They also participate in a picture creativity activity (students take pictures of daily issues which reflect the subject contents). Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

To increase the students’ motivation and their academic results. Working in small groups of these students with adapted contents.

• • • •

To improve the motivation towards the subject. To improve academic results. It is rewarding for the teacher. Teachers need time and effort to prepare activities.

Oral presentations Product created by students (blog and wiki) Pictures How much time do you The evaluation process is continuous. need to evaluate The evaluation of the final product requires a oneresults week work to get a final mark from that continuous process. How /when do you At the end of every term. publish the evaluation Do you plan Students comment the observations made by the comments from teacher along the continuous evaluation. learners? Please describe

   

• • • • •

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20. STUDY VISITS About the Teaching Method Name to assign Study Visits: „At Museums by night” – every thursday at local museum „Quinta de Santiago” and once a year at Oporto Soares dos Reis Museum „Researchers Night” – Once a year event at Science Faculty Museum Aim (purpose of the To put the trainees in contact with reality and to open TM) opportunity windows. Learners will know.... The importance and role of museums • Famous painting authors • The mineral/ animal species • That science exists beyond scientists Learners will be able • Recognize the charactheristics of some to … painters/artists • Recognize the utility of science in a day-to-day basis • Classify minerals • Classify animal spicies Learners will be.... • More conscious of the importance of science and art; • Better informed about University services in general. • Better citizens. How do you use the Individual (single use) TM Online use Peer-to-peer Teacher/ 2 groups or more Teacher/ Learner Tutor / Group Tutor / Learner Please add more.... Duration 1 hr half day whole day Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools    

for

• • • • • •

Projector + handbook Pc + projector + screen Blackboard Dia-projector Please add more Paper      143  

   


learners

Software / Programs

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Paints Colors Collective Games Role-playing In-bowl brushers scissors glove Please add more.... Ppt presentation Excel or Word or Adobe reader software Online tool (need a browser) Special package Social Network Intranet in the organization

How to implement the TM Steps to follow the method : • Prepare the students for the visit; • Explain the objectives; • Explain the transports and timetables; • Elaborate a visit guide with all the aspects to note; • Get information about the museum and about the event: • Distribute all the information to each student/adult Divide the class in groups; each group with a teacher will go through different spaces in the exhibition/museum rooms. Results Which results are We expect that adults, by guided visits with teachers to expected, please spaces where usually they don’t go by themselves, can describe overcome their fear to step inside these cultural spaces, because most of the time they think these spaces are not for them. How do you help/ Insisting in these kind of activity, because, somehow the assist who doesn’t ones who resist on participating will be stimulated by the archieve the minimum others (peers) result Strong points of the The interaction of the group in different environment TM The interaction with other actors of knowledge Weak points of the TM The language used by people who work or guide the visits is, very often, too much „hermetic” to the knowledge level of the students

   

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Evaluation Evaluation tool

• Test with closed questions • Test with open questions • Drawings • To complete the exercise • Drills • Speeches • Please add more... • Co-evaluation teacher / tutor • To create a rank How much time do you 2 or 3 classes after the visit need to evaluate results How /when do you At the end of the ppt presentation of each group publish the evaluation Do you plan The evaluation of each group is comented by the group comments from itself and by the other groups. learners? Please describe

   

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21. TOOLS FOR CULTURE About the Teaching Method Name to assign TOOLS FOR CULTURE Aim (purpose of the The development of cultural institutions is linked to TM) professionals able to fund-raise, to design and manage projects and initiatives to enhance cultural management and promoting cultural heritage. The training course aims to meet the needs of the cultural sector by transferring new skills and professionalism to his players to prepare them and train them upgrade their skills or help to join the cultural labour market. Learners will know.... A1) Analyse the various European funding programs for the cultural sector, with particular attention to the financial perspective established by the European Commission for the period 2007-2013; B1) Investigate and research funding opportunities at national and local levels; C1) Learn techniques of fund raising D1) Analyse the market and the emerging cultural lines; E1) Define a business-plan for the implementation of specific projects from creative idea; F1) Manage the production process in terms of resources (human and technological) times and costs G1) Manage of legal and administrative aspects related to the design and implementation of projects; H1) Implement of financing plans and marketing; I1) Jobless/unemployed people will be able to provide answers to specific business needs of the cultural labour market. Learners will be able A2) Design and submit a project; to … B2)Manage and implement a project in time of human resources and financial costs; C2)Create a network; D2)Draft a communication plan; E2) Draft a finacial plan;

   

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Learners will be....

A3) to introduce themselves with practical tools and hands on practise

How do you use the Teacher / 1 group TM Duration

half day

Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners Software / Programs

for

• • • • • • • • • • •

Projector + handbook Pc + projector + screen Blackboard Flipchart Dia-projector Paper Block notes Pen / pencil Ppt presentation Excel or Word or Adobe reader software Online tool (need a browser)

How to implement the TM Steps to follow the method: • A ) Analyses • B) Hands on tools • C) Examples, cases studies, project work Exercises (if you need to describe) Name Project work Size of the group 3-4 Description The trainer describes the program and the related Community legalised based establishing that programme, following the objectives, priorities, budget, eligibility of candidates, etc. Show resources online where to look for documents. Learners have access to the form and together with the trainers they fill it in, highlighting the relevant key points. Learners will have the opportunity to learn practical skills very important to design projects. The participant can choose to work in groups or individually Duration 3 hours a day per 4 days Need co-teaching Sometimes as in the organisation there are different experts in different filed it can happen that another teacher steps in.

   

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Results Which results are expected, please describe How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result Strong points of the TM Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

Design of a project ready to be submitted

Continuous process of feedback

Project work : practical tools Analysing case studies Step by step analysis of the project Focus on strong and weak points of a project Different backgrounds and different level of expertise of the participants.

Questionnaires Test with closed questions Test with open questions At the begining and at the end of the training How much time do you Post evaluation one week need to evaluate results How /when do you They are used internally to improve training delivery publish the evaluation • • •

Evaluation Methods The evaluation is intended to verify the achievement of learning outcomes for a training session based on data collected from monitoring. The latter measures the performance of specific training session on a basis of a series of indicators such as: It focuses on: • Level of quality training perceived by the end-users • Level of learning by the end-users • Expectation satisfaction by end-users • Level of quality training perceived by the trainers • Level of quality training perceived by costumers • Level of quality of the research products Moreover the institute developed a database of vocational profiles in the cultural sector which aim is to provide the necessary competences to enter specific vocational training courses and a resource for consulting on training programs. The database bank is a meeting point that provides a continuous dialogue for trainers and trainees on the innovative vocational profiles in the cultural sector. The evaluation (self-evaluation forms) process is based on the following steps:

   

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Identification of the vocational profile;

Submission of the relevant form by the learner and relevant to the requested vocational profile and matching between the score before starting the training and the score achieved after the training;

Matching between the ante profile of the participant and post (after the course ended)

User satisfaction survey Section A "Expectations," Ex ante. The section contains items designed to detect the expectations that students have about the course in terms of improvement of professional skills, upgrade, acquisition of knowledge and skills, improve career prospects (for employees), joining in the labor market ( for the unemployed / unemployed), extending the sphere of relationships, satisfaction about the course. Section B, "Content and teaching", in progress. The participants fill in this section during the course, precisely at the end of each learning module. The section contains items designed to detect the correspondence of expectations about learning modules, content quality, the possibility tocompared to their field of activity, clarity of the trainer, the capacity of the trainer to engage the trainees, and if the content of the training is in line with their curricula. Section C "Delivery" Ex post. The class tutor will give this section to students at the end of the course. The aim is to detect user satisfaction at the end of the course. The final part of the questionnaire contais a section also related to the coordination of activities, assistance by thetutor, logistics (classrooms, timetables, etc...), teaching materials distributed, the effectiveness of distance learning (if any) and the usability of the platform FAD (if any). To detect the approval of teachers with respect to the quality of courses, it has also been draft a questionnaire addressed to them. This questionnaire collects their impressions / assessment of the progress of teaching. The aim is to continuous improvement of training through the comments and suggestions of teachers/trainers. The questionnaire will be delivered by tutors to teachers at the end of the learning module. It gives a picture of the quality of service as perceived by teachers by detecting their degree of satisfaction in order to improve the delivering of trainings. Job profiles database: The goal is to provide guidance on the skills necessary to access specific career paths and offer advice for planning and designing training. The database is therefore proposed as a meeting place open to allow a continuous dialogue among stakeholders on innovative professional in the world cultural

   

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Sheets of self-assessment of the level of learning (the database of job profiles available from the home page of the site www.sturzo.it). The evaluation process is based on the following steps: a. Identification of the vocational profile b. Submission of the relevant form by the learner and relevant to the requested vocational profile and matching between the score before starting the training and the score achieved after the training.

   

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22. LEARNING BY DOING - QUILLING TECHNIQUE About the Teaching Method Name to assign Learning by doing - QUILLING TECHNIQUE Aim (purpose of the The achievement of manual techniques for creating TM) decorative objects and integration of the new techniques in the process of teaching-learning / occupational therapy Learners will know... • A1 the quilling techniques; • B1 to create thematic cards using quilling technique; • C1 to apply quilling techniques in their activities. Learners will be able • A2 To use new techniques of work from manual to... abilities field; • B2 To create decorative objects and thematic cards using the newly learned technique; • C3 To apply the newly learned techniques in school activities with pupils and/or in other contexts; Learners will be... • A3 willing to achieve quilling technique • B3 motivated to create new decorative objects that embellish their lives • C3 interested to promote the quilling technique with pupils and/or in other contexts; How do you use the Teacher / 1 group TM Duration 1-3 hrs Resources Equipment / Hardware Materials/Tools for learners

Software / Programs

• • • • • • • • • • •

Pc + projector + screen Colored cardboard Colored paper strips White paper sheets Glue Quilling tools – papuella Ruler Toothpeak Paper shreder Grid Power-Point Presentation

How to implement the TM • •

   

Steps to follow the method A. Technique’s presentation; A power-point presentation with the next themes; ( 10 minutes)

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DESCRIPTION: There are presented some facts about the technique; HISTORIC : There is related the historic of Quilling and the evolution of this art; DENOMINATION: There are differend names for this technique in differend areas; GALLERY: There are presented some sample of „what you can do” using Quilling; The learners can see some ready-made cards and other objects ; TIPES OF COILS: There are presnted the tipes of coils, the shapes ca be made; •

B. Tools and materials presentaion: The observation and the handling of the needed tools and materials; The lerners can see the needed tools and materials in Power-point presentation and then they can touch and try the tools, see the materials, make an ideea about the way of using them;( 5 minutes) MATERIALS: Therea are presented the special materials needed; TOOLS: There are presented the tools needed for Quilling;

C. The succession of the steps: A discussion about the steps to follow analysing the model; (5 minutes) STEPS: The steps in the creating proces are: Roll the strip of paper; Leave the coil to unroll in the grid to get the needed size; Glue the end of the strip; Shape the coil; Glue the coils together to get the design; The finssing touches: The lerners choose the cardboard’s colour, the inside paper and assembly the card;

D. The practical exercise: The learners get tools and materials and try all the steps as I demonstate, to get use with the new technique; (10 min)

E. The application: The learners get the tools anh materials and start making the quilled card; They get asssitance if needed; (80 minutes)

F. The exhibition: All the lerners works are dispalied; There are discussions taking place about the exhibits, about the way they’ve worked, abut the coulours combination; (10 minutes)

Results Which results are The learners have to follow all the steps in the correct expected, please order. They should create the decorative object / card in describe the scheduled time. The activity develops the esthetical sense and the respect for manual work.

   

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How do you help/ By individual explanation and practical support assist who doesn’t achieve the minimum result? Strong points of the The technique contributes to the learners’ personal TM development because it brings something from other European countries, different educational systems and it contributes to our intercultural development as individuals; The quilling technique can become a hobby for learners. Increase the interest for learning of new techniques that embellish our lives. It strengthens the role of LLP (Lifelong Learning Program) in European’s active citizenship development based on mutual understanding, respect and tolerance for other cultures; Listening music during the activity can be very relaxing and make the workshop even more enjoyable. Weak points of the TM Pay attention to the chosen pattern and learners’ abilities because some objects can be quite difficult to make Evaluation Evaluation tool

• Questionnaire • Product exhibition How much time do you 1 hours need to evaluate results How /when do you at the end of the workshop and during the product publish the evaluation exhibition. Do you plan in the questionnaire comments from learners? Please describe

   

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23. WRITING WORKSHOP About the Teaching Method Name to assign Writing workshop Aim (purpose of the • To promote the taste for writing as a means of TM) personal enrichment but also as a working tool; • To initiate daily writing habits; • To develop the taste for writing as a eminently human way of expression; • To develop the written expression as a paramount competence in basic education; • To develop methods and techniques of planning, production and revision of different types of texts; • To promote and facilitate the organization / structure of the speech acquiring methods and writing techniques; • To develop critical thinking and reasoning/arguing ability; • To develop vocabulary, the learning ability, memory, richness of ideas and concept formation; • To develop the creativity as a paramount basis for the written exercises activities; • To improve the educational attainment regarding the Portuguese language. Learners will (know).... • recognize the importance of writing correctly in a personal, social and professional way; • identify different text types; • organize and improve their written productions, depending on the intended goals. Learners will be able • write different text types according to the aim to to … be achieved; • expose their critique and mainly their point of view both in a written and oral record; • build a creative imagination and literary more aesthetic; • Apply techniqyes of planning, production and revision of different types of texts. Learners will be.... • more autonomous; • creative; • mentally organized. How do you use the Individual (single use) TM Online use

   

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Teacher / 1 group Teacher/ 2 groups or more Tutor / Group Tutor / Learner Please add more.... 1 hr half day whole day

Duration

Resources Equipment / Hardware

Materials/Tools learners

for

Software / Programs

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Projector + handbook Pc + projector + screen Flipchart Dia-projector Please add more Paper Paints Colors Collective Games Role-playing In-bowl brushers scissors glove Ppt presentation Excel or Word or Adobe reader software Online tool (need a browser) Special package Social Network Intranet in the organization

How to implement the TM • • • • •

Based on a text read, a theme explored or in a developing content, the writing proposal is made for a particular text type; Clarification of the structure that a text should obey to (presentation of a working script and of an example of a text provided by the teacher): The students start to develop the work individually while the teacher monitors the work of each one making suggestions if necessary; The students are placed in pairs to make the reading/correction of the texts which is based in a checklist provided by the teacher; Display of the written texts.

Results Which results are It is expected that the students have a concern to expected, please improve and vary the vocabulary used.

   

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describe

How do you help/ assist who doesn’t archieve the minimum result

Strong points of the TM

Weak points of the TM

Evaluation Evaluation tool

How much time do you need to evaluate results How /when do you publish the evaluation Do you plan comments from learners? Please describe

   

Once the works are developed in groups, it is sought that the students develop a collaborative and sharing spirit of knowledge and experiences, allowing them a greater awareness of their difficulties and the ownership of rules of writing, not well interiorized. The trainer aims, in this case, to individualize the teaching and to promote the academic self confidence and esteem of the learners. To bet on a more individualized follow-up; At the time of placing students in pairs, the teacher should place the most articulate and predisposed trainees to work alongside those who have more difficulties; It should be sought, as well, to appreciate the effort and to reinforce the confidence of the learner. Students are confronted, at the time, with their weaknesses in terms of writing; Students are advised, in good time, so that they can overcome their weaknessses; Students are actors in the learning process. This type of work requires a lot of effort on the part of the trainer regarding the follow up of all students.

• Questionnare • Test with closed questions • Test with open questions • Product of the learners (ppt, other....) • Drawings • To complete the exercise • Drills • Speeches • To create a rank Given the fact that students have a word limit to write the texts, I try to present the results at the following session. The evaluation is discussed individually with each of the trainees, based on a checklist completed by the trainer. Yes, since the evaluations are discussed and the students can always express their opinions about the work they have done and the evaluation received.

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In this section we introduce the results of the questionnaires answered by the students after using in the classroom.the teaching practices mentioned in the previous chapter, that is, the assessment itself of the practices by the students.

IES ABDERA – SPAIN

1.

Cinema as a teaching resource

The questionnaire whose results are analyzed below has been submitted to and answered by 10 students. The questionnaire has been divided into three different sections: A. Before the teaching practice B. During the teaching practice C. After the teaching practice The first part, which is based on those previous aspects to be born in mind before the implementation of the practice, consisted of these different questions:

A. Before the teaching practice A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

     157  

   


A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?      

YES                                                                                NO  

As can be observed in the graph above, all students answered that they had been previously informed about the new teaching practice. A2. What was your first impression? Did you like it?

   

VARIABLES UNINTERESTING

FREQUENCIES 0

PERCENTAGE 0%

FUN

1

10%

INTERESTING NEW

9 0

90% 0%

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A2. What was your first impression? Did you like it?

 

   

UNINTERESTING              FUN                    INTERESTING                    NEW  

90% of the students surveyed thought it would be interesting when asked about their first impression, whereas just 10% of them thought it was fun. In any case, none of them thought it was uninteresting. During the second part, students are asked about some aspects related to the implementation of the practice. B. During the teaching practice B1. Has it been useful to understand new contents?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

     159  

   


B1.  Has  it  been  useful  to  understand  new  contents?      

YES                                                                NO  

100 % of the students agree on the fact that the practice actually helped them understand new topics. B2. Do you consider this practice has made the understanding of contents easier, less easy or normal? VARIABLES EASIER NORMAL LESS EASY

   

FREQUENCIES 9 1 0

     160  

PERCENTAGE 90% 10% 0%

   


B2. Do you consider this practice has made the understanding of contents easier, less easy or normal?

 

   

   EASIER                                          NORMAL                            LESS  EASY  

As can be observed, 90% students said the teaching practice made it easier to understand contents. Nevertheless, the remaining 10% did not say that contents were less easy, but normal, with the practice. B3. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

     161  

   


B3. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice?

 

   

YES                                                                                NO  

All students said they liked how the teacher used the practice. B4. Has it been too long?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

2

20%

NO

8

80%

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B4. Has it been too long?

   

 

YES                                                                                NO  

80% of the students considered it was not too long. Moreover, they say it was the appropriate time. On the other hand, 20% of the students think it was a bit long. B5. What do you think about the resources used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

APPROPRIATE

9

90%

INAPPROPRIATE

1

10%

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B5. What do you think about the resources used?

 

   

APPROPRIATE                                              INAPPROPRIATE  

90% of the students coincide in that the resources were appropriate. B6. Advantages and disadvantages of the teaching practice ADVANTAGES: ü It helps introduce and understand the contents better. ü You acquire contents related to other aspects beyond the unit. ü You enjoy yourself while you are learning. DISADVANTAGES: ü As the film cannot be seen in one single session, it may be hard to perceive all details at once.

C. After the teaching practice C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

9

90%

NO

1

10%

     164  

   


C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again?

 

   

YES                                                                                NO  

90% of the students wanted the teacher to repeat the teaching practice. Finally, students were asked to add a comment. Here they are: C2. Add any comment if necessary: ü It is quite interesting to implement new teaching methods, as the traditional ones seem to be less effective.

   

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A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?      

2.

Crosswords

The questionnaire whose results are analyzed below has been submitted to and answered by 22 students. The questionnaire has been divided into three different sections: D. Before the teaching practice E. During the teaching practice F. After the teaching practice The first part, which is based on those previous aspects to be born in mind before the implementation of the practice, consisted of these different questions: YES                                                        NO  

A. Before the teaching practice A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

17

94,44%

NO

1

5,56%

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A2. WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION? DID YOU LIKE IT?

 

         GOOD                          FUNNY                            DIFFICULT      

As can be observed in the graph above, nearly 95% students answered that they had been previously informed about the new teaching practice. A2. What was your first impression? Did you like it? VARIABLES GOOD FUNNY DIFFICULT

FREQUENCIES 14

PERCENTAGE 82,35%

1

5,88%

2

11,76%

82.35% of the students surveyed thought it would be interesting when asked about their first impression, whereas just 11.76% of them thought it was difficult. During the second part, students are asked about some aspects related to the implementation of the practice.

   

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B3. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice?

 

   

B. During the teaching practice B1. What did you learn? Students consider they learnt: ü Vocabulary ü Verbs ü Computer skills

B2. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice? VARIABLES FREQUENCIES YES                                                                                NO  

PERCENTAGE

YES

21

100%

NO

0

0%

All students said they liked how the teacher used the practice.

B3. Has it been too long?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

3

15%

NO

17

85%

     168  

   


B3. Has it been too long?

   

 

YES                                                                                NO  

85% of the students considered it was not too long. Moreover, they say it was the appropriate time. On the other hand, 15% of the students think it was a bit long. B4. What do you think about the resources used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

APPROPRIATE

15

100%

INAPPROPRIATE

0

0%

     169  

   


B4. What do you think about the resources used?

 

   

APPROPRIATE                                              INAPPROPRIATE  

All of the students coincide in that the resources were appropriate. B6. Advantages and disadvantages of the teaching practice ADVANTAGES: ü Better understanding of the topic ü You have fun while you are learning ü You can do it on your own at home without time restrictions DISADVANTAGES: ü Lack of time ü Software problems

C. After the teaching practice C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

19

100%

NO

0

0%

     170  

   


C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again?

 

   

YES                                                                                NO  

100% of the students wanted the teacher to repeat the teaching practice. Finally, students were asked to add a comment. Here they are: C2. Add any comment if necessary: ü English turns out to be useful in these lessons. ü Students ask for more crossword homework.

   

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A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?      

3.

Project presentation using PowerPoint/Impress

The questionnaire whose results are analyzed below has been submitted to and answered by 10 students. The questionnaire has been divided into three different sections: G. Before the teaching practice H. During the teaching practice I. After the teaching practice The first part, which is based on those previous aspects to be born in mind before the implementation of the practice, consisted of these different questions: YES                                                                                NO  

A. Before the teaching practice A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

     172  

   


A2. What was your first impression? Did you like it?

 

   

All students answered that they had been previously informed about the new teaching practice.

A2. What was your first impression? Did you like it? VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

UNINTERESTING

1

10%

FUN INTERESTING

5 2

50% 20%

NEW

1

10%

UNINTERESTING              FUN                    INTERESTING                    NEW  

50% of the students surveyed thought it would be fun when asked about their first impression.

   

     173  

   


B1.  Has  it  been  useful  to  understand  new  contents?      

B. During the teaching practice B1. Has it been useful to understand new contents? VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

YES                                                                NO  

100 % of the students agree on the fact that the practice actually helped them understand new topics. B2. Do you consider this practice has made the understanding of contents easier, less easy or normal? VARIABLES EASIER NORMAL LESS EASY

   

FREQUENCIES 10 0 0

     174  

PERCENTAGE 100% 0% 0%

   


B2. Do you consider this practice has made the understanding of contents easier, less easy or normal?

 

   

   EASIER                                          NORMAL                            LESS  EASY  

All students said the teaching practice made it easier to understand contents. B3. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

     175  

   


B3. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice?

     

YES                                                                                NO  

All students said they liked how the teacher used the practice. B4. Has it been too long?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

1

10%

NO

9

90%

     176  

   


B4. Has it been too long?

   

 

YES                                                                                NO  

90% of the students considered it was not too long. B5. What do you think about the resources used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

APPROPRIATE

10

100%

INAPPROPRIATE

0

0%

     177  

   


B5. What do you think about the resources used?

 

   

APPROPRIATE                                              INAPPROPRIATE  

All answers coincide: students agree with the fact the resources were adequate. B6. Advantages and disadvantages of the teaching practice ADVANTAGES: ü It helps understand the contents to study. ü You learn how to use a computer. ü You enjoy yourself while you are learning. DISADVANTAGES: ü No disadvantage was identified by the students.

C. After the teaching practice C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

     178  

   


C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again?

 

   

YES                                                                                NO  

All students wanted the teacher to repeat the teaching practice. C2. Add any comment if necessary: ü No comment was added.

   

     179  

   


A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?      

4.

Self-learning through ICT

The questionnaire whose results are analyzed below has been submitted to and answered by 10 students. The questionnaire has been divided into three different sections: J. Before the teaching practice K. During the teaching practice L. After the teaching practice The first part, which is based on those previous aspects to be born in mind before the implementation of the practice, consisted of these different questions: YES                                                                      NO  

A. Before the teaching practice A1. Did your teacher explain that a new teaching practice was going to be used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

10

100%

NO

0

0%

     180  

   


A2. What was your first impression? Did you like it?

 

   

As can be observed in the graph above, all students answered that they had been previously informed about the new teaching practice.

A2. What was your first impression? Did you like it? VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

UNINTERESTING

1

10%

FUN INTERESTING

0 5

0% 50%

NEW

4

40%

UNINTERESTING              FUN                    INTERESTING                    NEW  

50% of the students surveyed thought it would be interesting when asked about their first impression, whereas 40% of them had not heard of it before. In any case, just 10% of them thought it was uninteresting. During the second part, students are asked about some aspects related to the implementation of the practice.

   

     181  

   


B1.  Has  it  been  useful  to  understand  new  contents?      

B. During the teaching practice B1. Has it been useful to understand new contents? VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

7

70%

NO

3

30%

YES                                                                NO  

70 % of the students agree on the fact that the practice actually helped them understand new topics. B2. Do you consider this practice has made the understanding of contents easier, less easy or normal? VARIABLES EASIER NORMAL LESS EASY

   

FREQUENCIES 5 3 1

     182  

PERCENTAGE 56% 33% 11%

   


B2. Do you consider this practice has made the understanding of contents easier, less easy or normal?

 

   

   EASIER                                          NORMAL                            LESS  EASY  

As can be observed, 56% students said the teaching practice made it easier to understand contents. Nevertheless, the remaining 33% did not say that contents were less easy, but normal, with the practice. B3. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

9

90%

NO

1

10%

     183  

   


B3. Did you like the way your teacher used the teaching practice?

 

   

YES                                                                                NO  

Almost all students said they liked how the teacher used the practice. B4. Has it been too long?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

2

25%

NO

6

75%

     184  

   


B4. Has it been too long?

   

 

YES                                                                                NO  

75% of the students considered it was not long. On the other hand, 25% of the students think it was a bit long. B5. What do you think about the resources used?

   

VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

APPROPRIATE

8

80%

INAPPROPRIATE

2

20%

     185  

   


B5. What do you think about the resources used?

 

   

APPROPRIATE                                              INAPPROPRIATE  

80% of the students coincide in that the resources were appropriate. They even add these resources are useful and innovative. B6. Advantages and disadvantages of the teaching practice ADVANTAGES: ü It helps introduce and understand the contents better. ü You acquire contents on your own (self-learning) ü Easy and fast inside and outside the classroom ü It helps save traditional resources (paper) ü You enjoy yourself while you are learning. DISADVANTAGES: ü It might not be easy to choose among all web resources ü Software problems ü The mark may not satisfy the mark given as it can take many hours ü The lack of time for homework

   

     186  

   


C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again?

 

   

C. After the teaching practice C1. Would you like the teacher to use the teaching practice again? VARIABLES

FREQUENCIES

PERCENTAGE

YES

9

90%

NO

1

10%

YES                                                                                NO  

90% of the students wanted the teacher to repeat the teaching practice. Finally, students were asked to add a comment. Here they are: C2. Add any comment if necessary: ü It is quite interesting to implement new teaching methods, as the traditional ones seem to be less effective.

   

     187  

   


SCOLA SPECIALA NR.10 - ROMANIA 1.

Crossword teaching method report

We have applied this method as an evaluation method at the end of the lesson to dyslexic-dysgraphic young adults. We also used as a method of fixing the knowledge at the end of one workshop with normal adults. There were two kinds of crossword we used: Ø Crossword with words defined as in “Romanian Explicative Dictionary” (for example: “chitara is a musical instrument with strings that sounds by pinching or striking by fingers”.); Ø Crossword with words defined as it was described in the lesson (for example: elephant = “Indian symbol for power.)”; Ø Crossword in which the word were represented in images In the first case, we organize a contest. We offered to the dyslexic-dysgraphic young adults sheet of paper with the crosswords that had to be solved individually. They were encouraged to solve it correct and quickly. The words were represented in images. The second modality was a group evaluation of the young adults. The teacher was defining the word as in the dictionary and they have to recognize the correct word. The person that recognized the word had to write it down on the white board. In the second case, we asked to the trainees to pay attention to the questions and remember the explanation they received during the workshop. We draw the crossword on the whiteboard and the person that recognized the word was asked to write it down. At the beginning of the lesson the students were told about the new teaching practice so they responded (100%) that they were informed about it. At the second question of the first section of the questionnaire “What was your first impression? Did you like it?” the students considered that the new method is interesting – 70%, uninteresting – 20 % and fun (10%). The second part of the questionnaire has four questions regarding the way in which new teaching method was applied at the class and how useful it seems to be for the students.    

     188  

   


100% of the students considered the new teaching practice useful to understand new contents and found it easier to understand the new contents. They also were 100% agree that the teacher used the teaching method in a proper way. The students considered that the new teaching methods was not too long (100%). Regarding the abundance and nature of the materials used in this new teaching method, all the students appreciated they were appropriate and identified no disadvantage for the practice. In terms of benefits, they appreciated the pleasure of playing with words, the positive atmosphere and spirit of competition created, the joy of finding the proper answer. Both target groups have appreciate the teaching method as a funny one and they were 100% agree to use the teaching practice again. Here there are some other useful information about the new teaching method which was not asked in the questionnaire but taken it from the feedback received at the end of the lesson. Trainers considered that it is an interactive teaching method, easy to apply and evaluate the knowledge. The teaching method had a positive impact on both target group. Young adults felt more relaxed and opened towards the evaluation. They discovered the joy of playing with words. The other trainees have memorized easier the new knowledge and structured better the information in their mind. Many young adult preferred the modality of group evaluation because they were stimulated by the contest atmosphere. They also liked to find out the provenience of the words (exp. chitara – from the Italian word “chitarra” or chel – from the Turkish word “kel”).

   

     189  

   


2.

Study visits

Introduction: This method was applied to 12 adult learners, teachers from Special School No. 10 and it was used as a preview for the method “Lucky Trees”. The tools used for this kind of methodology were: the museums with their exhibits, entry tickets, photo camera, semiprecious gems, cooper wire, rocks, glue. Implementation of the method: The methodology has been first explained to students, they were informed that this method was adopted from the portuguese team, and the purpose was to learn more about gems an rocks. The results of the implementation of the teaching method were: more knowledge about gems and rocks evaluated by crosswords, the pictures, the wish to visit the museums more often, ready objects using gems and rocks“Lucky Trees”. After each session the students answered a questionnaire and the results were:

A. Before applying the methodology Was the method well explained by the teacher? 100% answered “yes”.

ye s  

Did you like the novelty of the initiative? 100% answered “yes”.

   

     190  

   


ye s  

B. About de teaching method 1. What did you learn? •

The learners have got new information about the two museums;

They have learned about the connection between natural elements;

They have learned about gems, rocks, their utility and beauty;

2. Did you like the way the teacher applied the teaching method? 100% answered “yes”.

ye s  

3. Was it too long? 91% answered “no” and 9% answered “yes”.

no  

   

     191  

   


4. About de resources, were they appropriated? If not, why not? 100% answered “yes”.

ye s  

5. What were the strongest and weakest points of the method? — Strong Points: — Good time and quality time; — Learning the new things about rocks and gems; — Learning the connection between the elements of the nature; — Leaning to combine useful and pleasant; — Weak Points – None J

C. After applying the teaching method

Should the teacher apply more often this teaching method? If not, why not?

ye s  

   

     192  

   


Conclusion Bringing the novelty in teaching and learning is a well applied trend which assures the success of the attempt. New things incite our curiosity and demand the involvement of more senses for a better perception. Applying “Study Visits” as a strategy/method is a useful and easy way for learners to learn and develop their knowledge. The adult learners, evaluated this method being an attractive, relaxing and active learning tool. They have got a great time, a good experience and have learned new things; From the teacher’s point of view, the use of “Study Visits” gave the opportunity to ensure better explanations, using the real objects (gems in various shapes and sizes) , to lead an interesting and interactive activity and to develop learners artistic sense. One of the objectives of this activity was to increase the need for visiting museums, for full-filing our life with everything what is good and beautiful.

   

     193  

   


AGRUPAMENTO DE ESCOLA DE PERAFITA – PORTUGAL

1.

Crossword teaching method report

Introduction: This method was applied to 14 adult students in three different subjects: ICT, English language and Citizenship & Employability. The tools used for this kind of methodology were: computer, data-show and paper. Implementation of the method: The methodology was explained to students, and teachers used several tools. English used paper; C & E used the combination of paper and data-show and ICT used only data-show. After each session the students answered a questionnaire and the results were:

D. Before applying the methodology Was the method well explained by the teacher?

0   No   Yes   100%  

E. About de teaching method 2. What did you learn? •

IT – Excel and memorize

ENG. – New vocabulary and how to write the new words in a correct way

C.E. – To connect new words with their concepts and memorize

2. Did you like the way the teacher applied the teaching method?

   

     194  

   


0   No   Yes   100%  

3. Was it too long? 4. About de resources, were they appropriated? If not, why not?

0   No   Yes   100%  

5. What were the strongest and weakest points of the method? — Strong Points: — Good to memorize / Structure (ICT + ENG.+EC) — Learning new vocabulary (ENG.) — Learning to connect concepts with the right words (EC) — Weak Points – None J

F. After applying the teaching method

Should the teacher apply more often this teaching method? If not, why not?

   

     195  

   


0   No   Yes   100%  

Conclusion Currently it is paramount to introduce new strategies that make learning more interesting. Applying crossword puzzles as a strategy/method is a useful and easy way for students to learn and develop their knowledge. With the adult students, this method proved to be an active learning tool that is useful for acquiring cognitive knowledge and skills once it requires student participation and interaction, promotes deeper understanding, encourages problem-solving and personal responsibility for learning, along with increased student satisfaction. From the teacher’s point of view, the use of crosswords turned out to be significant once they provide students with an opportunity to think critically, to compete and recall important concepts by using essential vocabulary associated with these concepts. Thus, the use of crossword puzzles in a collaborative/friendly environment is a useful extra to the learning strategies. As demonstrated with the application of the crosswords methodology, this strategy is valuable in education for building critical thinking, communication, memorizing capacities and cooperative learning skills / attitudes.

   

     196  

   


ŞAKİRPAŞA PUBLIC EDUCATION CENTRE - TURKEY

1. Fishbowl Conversation We used this method in the classroom atmosphere. Eighteen students participated in the practice. The learners were asked to talk about the economy in English in Turkey. Their level of English was Pre-Intermediate. We formed a circle of four students with five chairs, one of which was empty. They were encouraged to talk about the economic situation in Turkey. The moderator started the discussion. At the very beginning the learners were very interested in discussion, they competed each other to talk but later they realized that they needed more words to talk. The teacher put some collocations and words on the wall such as inflation, decrease, interest rate, figures, recession etc. just to stimulate the discussion. It was a four- five minute discussion. Each student was willing to talk because they were excited to sit on the chair to express their opinions.

RESULTS It was really a motivating activity to engage the learners with the discussion. The learners were quite comfortable when they were speaking because the moderator hardly ever interfered in discussion and they had self-confidence. Maybe the only problem was the fact that the teacher didn’t choose a better topic. However; -­‐

Learners participated actively and did their best

-­‐

Learners revised some structures such as simple past tense, present perfect tense, simple future tense

   

-­‐

Learners gained some fluency and accuracy in their speaking

-­‐

They obtained a great deal of vocabulary

-­‐

They collaborated and worked in group

     197  

   


LUIGI STURZO - ITALY •

Teaching methods used: §

Crosswords

§

Audiovisual

§

Press

Context and target group: We used these methods in 2 different training courses: 1) Digitalstorytelling to share stories about Eu-enalrgement (30 hours) adressed to 15 adults, some of them were scientific trainers, facilitators, whilst

some

others

were

just

adult

learners

intested

in

the

digitalstorytelling methodology at the Scientific Museum of Rome. We used the methods to introduce the Eu-enlargement process, Eu opportunities, to stimulate a debate on European issues, cultural identity, labour market and mobility. The debate led to create stories on European enlargement 2) Management of cultural events (160 hours in class) adressed to 15 unemployed graduated cultural managers to introduce cultural policy strategies at local, national and European level. To introduce also fundraising methods and tecniques for the cultural sector. We must clarifying that in our Institute we don’t deliver annual courses, as we are not a school but an adult education provider, duration of courses is variable they can last a 1 week or up to 2 months, not considering the internship period. Therefore our trainees, learners are always different, we don’t have a benchmark that we can use to compare results on the same cluster of adults... Comparison is done from the point of view of the trainer and the feedbacks of that particular group. We didn’t explain the method to our groups.

   

     198  

   


Results: From our point of view the most important part was the selection of the material (newspapers, artcles, videos, movies). In this activity we had to train ourselves in selecting the most appropriate training material (lenght, contents, appealing, good sources....). Trainees were satisfied and engaged by the interactive methods used. It permitted to be active in the interpretation and realaboration of the contents provides like articleas or videos. They felt heard because they could share their point of view regarding the contents provided: during the DS courses based on EU enlargement process they could express their opinions creating an interactive debate within the classroom. In reference to the learning objectives stated in the teaching practice called audiovisual, press and crosswords we reach the following results: -trainees enhanced their critical attitude towards mass media - Used mass media (in particular, audiovisual and press resources) as tools to transfer information -Reflected and debated about teaching, intercultural and/or social aspects. •

Students participate actively

Students revise contents

Students learnt to debate and look for information •

Analyse

Reason

Look for and select information -developed reasoning (the capacity of human beings have to make sense

of things, to establish and verify facts, and to change or justify practices) -They acquired the vocabulary related to eu enlargement process and cultural management

   

     199  

   


by Carlo Smaldone Villani Intermediate and end results of the partnership will be disseminated very widely among participating organisations, local communities and the wider lifelong learning community Each participating organisation will disseminate the outcomes of their individual efforts and the collective efforts of the project within their organisations targeting managers, tutors, support staff and learners, using existing channels of communication such as newsletters, presentations, meetings, notice boards and intranet, if appropriate and production and distribution of a project leaflet. Locally, participating organisations will use existing networks of stakeholders to make presentations and give briefings, features in local media, especially newspapers (especially during mobilities), and the local media. And wider distribution of the project leaflet, the participants’ websites and making presentations at local or national events such as conferences and seminars, to ensure that local organisations and other stakeholders are appraised on the outcomes and use the findings to inform their own practices. Opportunities will also be sought o contribute articles to magazines and periodicals to reach a wider membership. The final project outcome will be disseminated to the wider lifelong learning community nationally and internationally. The final project report including training manual will be published and made available on CD and on partners’ websites for downloading. Each participating institution will organise a national dissemination through national events such as conferences, magazines and newsletters. Some examples •

Exchange of experiences showing at the meetings how the project work is developing;

   

Show the education community activities and achievements;

Intermediate and end results of the partnership will be disseminated very

     200  

   


widely among •

Participating organisations, local communities and the wider lifelong learning community.

Each participating organisation will disseminate the outcomes of their individual efforts and the collective efforts of the project within their organisations targeting managers, tutors,

Support staff and learners, using existing channels of communication such as newsletters,

Presentations, meetings, notice boards and intranet, if appropriate and production and

Distribution of a project leaflet.

Locally, participating organisations will use existing networks to make presentations and give briefings, features in local media, especially newspapers (especially during mobilities), and the local media.

Wider distribution of the project leaflet, the participants’ websites and making presentations at local or national events such as conferences and seminars.

• Exchange of experiences showing at the meetings how the project work is developing; • Show the education community activities and achievements; • Review school; • Publication of the experiences in the local press; • Dissemination on the website of the centre and Ministry. Effective cooperation between the partners will be facilitated in several ways. The partnership started as a result of a contact seminar in 2007 and personal contacts through other EU visits. At these events partners spent time working together and developed a very good rapport. All partners have demonstrated a continued commitment to the project since, forming a solid foundation for ensuring cooperation. Cooperation will be facilitated by good communication. Partners have maintained email contact since the contact seminar and this will continue throughout the project. The detailed project action plan will stipulate how partners are required to cooperate and how conflicts will be resolved and

   

     201  

   


actions to be taken in the event that some partners who fail to cooperate. The project meetings will also foster cooperation (and accountability) to other partner since the work programme has been designed in such a way that tasks are divided about equally between the partners and are interdependent, fostering greater ownership of the project. Each institutions/partner must report progress on their actions at projects meetings to enable the lead partner to collate and coordinate responses into project outcomes

The project will use email communication and a pbworks website to facilitate improved communication, information sharing and joint working.

The working language of the project has been in English, but some documents aimed at domestic audiences will be published in native languages. The training in financial education will be in national languages to facilitate wider participation by tutors.

In addition, as part of the preparation for the mobility involving learners, staff and tutors, they have had basic cultural orientation how to say some basic things in the language of the country hosting that mobility.

   

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Dissemination Strategies for Practitioners A Reflective Exercise for Course Participants Definition • “Dissemination” is normally used to refer to the spreading of knowledge in the form of research findings. These rarely have affected teacher practice in the past. • Dissemination of practical knowledge tended to be overlooked in the past. • Formerly considered part of the problem, teachers are now considered an important agent in the educational change.

Underlying Principles • Nowadays, “dissemination” is associated to the exchange of good practice. • Ideas, approaches and values which underlie the programme should be translated into possible classroom practice. • The purpose of dissemination and the goal of short courses are not simply to spread information but to open up possibilities for change. • A two weeks course is not an end in itself but part of a process. Educational change is possible and an appropriate programme can do much to facilitate it. • English Matters recognizes the importance of these principles and has been trying to apply them in practice in the design and implementation of its programmes.

Target Groups Participants in the course, School collegues, school principal, members of the board Educational authorities, Professionals, journalists and website maangers.

Practical Approaches to Effective Dissemination • Co-ordinated efforts. • Electronic communication.    

     203  

   


• Newsletters and reports. • Web sites, blogs, e-learning platform, etc. • Conferences and workshops. • Effective use of change agents.

Practical exercise for course participants: A. Organise the group reflection: • Divide into small groups where every group should decide on a secretary.

B. Discuss about “Dissemination Strategy”. Please make proposals by answering the following questions: • What to disseminate? • Which audiences? • How to communicate?

C. Discuss with your group about a Plan for Dissemination: • Agree with your group on a feasible plan for dissemination. • Share your group proposal with other course groups.

D. Individual task: • Reflect on a simple and easy-to-carry dissemination plan to be implemented in your organisation/institution. • Enrich your plan contrasting your ideas with colleagues, trainers and course tutor. • Write your plan down as soon as possible, before you come back home.

Dissemination means much more than simply telling colleagues about excellent practice. Dissemination will be successful when educational practice is changed.

   

     204  

   


by Carlo Smaldone Villani This final product has been created with the intention to inspire adult teachers and trainers. It’s the product of two years of discussing, exploring, exchanging and sharing thoughts, doubts, culture and creativity among the project partners. All the best practices collected and the hints and tips from the results of the motivation questionnaires submitted to the learners aim at letting adult education become more attractive.

Adult education is the means to foster social inclusion, boost jobs, raise social awareness, enabling adults to improve themselves and the environment around them. It has to be a right for all adults and it’s the trainers and teachers’ task to give them the tools to understand its importance.

All partner took overall responsibility for ensuring that progress towards the outcomes, outputs and milestones, which were monitored by themselves electronically through the wiki and at project meetings. Progress reports were uploaded onto the wiki for comments, feedback and as evidence of completion and achievement. Evaluation took place after each discrete activity such as project meetings, mobilities and training, visits, and the results were used to inform and improve future activities. There was an interim evaluation at the end of the first year and a final evaluation at the end of the project. The evaluation tools included questionnaire surveys, focus groups and individual interviews. The evaluation questionnaires for both meetings and project activities were developed for approval and were used to monitor all project meetings. Each partner used the questionnaire to assess the impact of the project in relation to participants and their organizations. There were evaluations by learners and trainers/tutors. The evaluation focused on the quality of teaching    

     205  

   


and learning, learner satisfaction, the appropriateness of the learning materials, and overall relevance and impact on learners. The final evaluation assessed the extent to which the key project objectives and outcomes were achieved and the impact on learners, staff and the institution. We also created another questionnaire, a motivation questionnaire about education needs and students’ needs. Each country applied this motivation questionnaire. Through this motivation questionnaire we defined materials, teaching methods, conditions and other important aspects regarding the institution which offers adult educational programs, teaching approaches, teachers/trainers competences and qualities, evaluation, usefulness or assessment of the course and further useful information and suggestions.

Each partner, after choosing the best practices more suitable to its working context, applied them in their own institutions. In doing so they have learnt new good practises and have experienced its applicability. This helped them thoroughly improve their education quality and gave the teachers and learners different perspective.

Eventually we had the chance to analyse the impact this project had on our learners, the willingness to be part of something bigger and to learn from one another. We hope that our experience and this final product will inspire you as much it has inspired us in creating it.

   

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by Carlo Smaldone Villani We plan the following impact of the project: 1) the findings of the survey of best practices and the collection of 10-12 best practices, sharing, transferring them to other settings, doing action research, providing feedback will support AE providers and shape their thinking as regards improving attractiveness of and accessibility to AE, adjusting the existing practices to the needs of their institutions; 2) the on-going monitoring and evaluation of the activities and tools according to certain criteria by the target groups (altogether 1.200-1.500 participants from rural areas) will make the project products more user-friendly and applicable in different locations; 3) the training of 140 AE providers and partnerships with 180 stakeholders will increase the critical mass of participants in AE; 4) after cross piloting and action research in each of the consortium countries there will be time allocated for the participants to evaluate the contribution of the target group, the applied methodology, the results of dissemination and communication which will encourage their purposeful cooperation in the future; 5) the produced materials (Collection of best practices, training programme, the Guidebook for AE providers) will be available on the website in native languages in case + English and paper version in English; 6) the involved institutions will improve their management practices in terms of project management, cooperation, communication and quality assurance; 7) participation of the consortium members in different national and transnational conferences, discussions with the aim to disseminate Project findings and results will be facilitated throughout the Project. During the implementation of the project several short – term target groups in 4 consortium countries will be engaged: 1) AE providers (altogether 40 centres and 80 educators), 2) representatives of different stakeholders (municipalities, enterprises, social services, etc., altogether 180); 3) adults from rural areas reluctant to learning, altogether 1.500. The above mentioned target groups will be engaged in different activities and stages of the project implementation. The first two groups will improve their professional skills and management practices    

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while the third group will be reached through realization of the action plans and will give their contribution by evaluating the activities and providing feedback to AE providers to make the product more applicable and user-friendly.

In each of the consortium countries there will be a selection process of AE centres for the participation in the project. Certain common criteria will be developed for the applicants, e.g. centres should be in rural areas with low participation rate in AE, local municipalities and other stakeholders are open to and willing to change the situation, etc. The application process will be voluntary. The centres will apply for the participation themselves motivating their purpose and confirming their willingness to do their best to achieve the project objectives and envisaged outcomes.

Long term target groups after the project is finished will be AE providers and stakeholders in and outside the consortium. The trained AE educators and stakeholders will function as the facilitators for other AE centres, the Guidebook and the project website will be an important resource for AE providers and stakeholders in the future as it will contain methodology, tools, communication and partnership patterns and verified best practices for improving attractiveness of and accessibility to AE, especially in rural areas.

Other target groups will be reached through dissemination process. After cross piloting of the best practices and building new initiatives there will be evaluation seminars/conferences in each of the consortium countries which will be reflected in mass media and on the web page. The transparency of the project implementation and availability of the materials to any interested parties will lead to the expansion of activities and target groups. The Guidebook and other documents will be published in English (so it could be used in other European countries as well) and consortium languages + English language and will be circulated among AE educators and stakeholders.

AE – Adult Education

   

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AFTER THE END OF THE PROJECT After the project has been completed the impact of the project will be sustained by : 1) collected and developed materials (Collection of best practices, userfriendly Guidebook for AE providers; 2) trained AE providers who will function as facilitators and support providers; 3) local evaluation seminars/conferences with enlarged participation of AE providers and stakeholders; 4) all the collected and developed materials will be available on EAEA web page; 5) National Agencies will be informed an provided with project materials.

Impact of project on staff: The main aim of this project is to encourage adult education practitioners to reflect on and develop best practice in the field of adult education. This professional development opportunity, enriched by its intercultural dimension, will promote understanding and skills in using creative and innovative pedagogical approaches. Sharing ideas and approaches that have proved effective in the partners’ institutions will help to increase motivation in the teaching staff. Improved practice resulting from a wider European perspective and the development of new teaching methods.

Impact of project on learners: A common problem that the partners share is that adult learners may have negative experiences of education. This project aims to overcome these barriers, thereby increasing the motivation and selfesteem of the learners. A direct objective of the project is also to develop innovative and creative methods. The sharing of best practice and the development of new pedagogical approaches to the teaching of the objects of the project will have direct benefit on the learners. Greater knowledge and awareness of their own culture and the culture of other European countries. This is of special importance as several of the partner institutions have learners from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds who have little experience of the wider European community.

Impact of project on participating organisations and institutions: A key aim of this project is that the best practice approaches identified and developed as a    

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result of the project will be disseminated throughout each participating organisation. This will result in professional development, improved motivation and the encouragement of reflective practice throughout all the organisations involved. Institutions will have a more European feel, staff and learners will regard themselves as European citizens, being part of a wider European community.

The Grundtvig partners will encourage lifelong learning twining projects of similar nature in their local primary and secondary schools. Will encourage lifelong learning Comenius Regio projects in partner's local governments. Partners will use opportunities to organise Leonardo partnerships.

   

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A short story of the meetings Italy – Roma

At the beginning, we were just a group of unknown people, who gather together in a beautiful palace room in Rome. Beyond the obvious exquisiteness of this room, with the beauty of the frescoes, this building is also part of the history of Italy, because Giuseppe Garibaldi, considered as one of Italy's "fathers of the fatherland", spent one night there. This was the first meeting of the Project and, of course, the atmosphere of this room inspired the partners’ work. Each country presented their institutions and the project was reviewed. The dates for the visits were agreed on; a communication platform to develop the work was created and the work to be carried out until the meeting in Portugal was defined. A challenge was launched to the partners for the creation of the project logo. In the meeting in Rome, we had the chance to visit the scientific high school, “Convitto Nazionale Vittorio Emanuel II”, a    

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secondary school built in the period of Mussolini. Curiously, this school has the M shape, so that when viewed from above, it was possible to perceive the M from Mussolini. This meeting had also the participation of a lecturer of the “Università degli Studi di Romna Tre”, whose input referred to The right of learning, access to knowledge: a pedagogical perspective, which resulted as a significant contribution to the meeting. The partners had the opportunity to visit all the surrounds of the “Ciudad Eterna” (Eternal City) and the Vatican. The environment developed after the visit to the Vatican was very motivating. A great complicity was generated and it seemed that everyone was already missing the future, the meetings to come in other destinations. This feeling of the soul was mirrored in the misty eyes at the time of farewell and it was due, probably, to the fact that we had achieved (in a first meeting) to give body to a project that was bringing us together. Although we did not know each other before, everyone was steadfast in the way they were committed to the project. The feeling of pride, for the success achieved, and the desire to meet all again were the emotions that were arising inside at the moment of saying goodbye. Portugal – Perafita

Perafita is a town set by the sea, so it was a must to show the partners the beauty of the landscape and, therefore, an Atlantic sea sightseeing trip was organized.

   

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In Portugal there were two high points of emotion: this meeting took place in January and, at this time of year, the spectacle of the waves which the Atlantic Ocean offers, does not leave anyone indifferent. So, as a first moment of pause and interaction of all partners, everyone was presented with a lunch in a restaurant by the sea. The lunch was then followed by a walk / bus trip which had the beautiful Atlantic sea as a scenery, in a day when its strength and wildness were impressive and intense. Another emotional moment was a great dinner at the Restaurante Abadia, in Porto. Famous by its cuisine and warm reception, this space allowed experiencing the excellence of the Portuguese traditional cuisine and the Portuguese wines. This was a moment of togetherness, warmness, relaxation, where even the Turkish drink “Raki” which the director from the Turkish school took with him, had its moment of glory (even though this has cost the Portuguese partner a good tip to the waiter!). Before this dinner, the group had already had an experience of ecstasy when visiting the Porto wine cellars. When the city of Porto is mentioned, it is unquestionable to consider and to remember one of the city’s most famous belongings: Porto Wine. Being so, a visit to one of the most traditional Porto wine cellars was thought-out: Ferreirinha Porto Wine cellars. This turned out to be a success! This was undoubtedly a high point of excitement. Of course in this meeting the partners had the agenda to accomplish. So, the working methods which they use with their adult learners were presented. A survey to ascertain the degree of satisfaction of the trainees regarding the training, methods, conditions of training, etc. was created. In the Perafita meeting, the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences of Porto University was involved, through a discussion forum with the masters students and teachers on Adult Studies, which took place in the facilities of this faculty. The design for the Project’s logo was selected at the Secondary school Alexandre Herculano, with the involvement of the students of the professional secretarial course. These students were also responsible for the writing of the minute of this meeting as well as for the research for the hotel and the cultural program of the meeting. While at Perafita, the partners had the chance to visit Perafita’s Civil Parish (Junta de Freguesia de Perafita) and to meet the President of the Parish and also Matosinhos’ City Hall (Camara Municipal de Matosinhos). Last but not least, the partners had the chance to taste the “ex-libris” delicacy of Porto city, the famous “Francesinha” at Café Luso, one of the most ancient and symbolic cafés of Porto.

   

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Romania – Bucharest

The meeting in Bucharest took place in a grey May. Nevertheless, the sun came to “spy” on us very often, bringing colour and brightness to our minds and to the city that hosted us. In this meeting, the opening session had the presence of an association for the disabled, the local media, as well as the educational board representatives. In this meeting, the results of the survey applied to the trainees of the various partnerships were presented, discussed and compared. The partner teams participated in two workshops, one regarding the Embossing Technique and the other on Decorative Candle making. These kinds of handcrafts are used by the school teachers as a method of work with their students because, it must be not forgotten that this is “Special School N. 10”, directed to special needs children. The partners also had the chance to take part in a conference at Bucharest University Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. This conference turned out to become a high time of intellectual and experiences sharing. The partners also had some cultural visits, such as: The Parliament - Ceausescu Palace , the Mogoşoaia Palace and the Children’s Palace. At Ceausescu palace we were absolutely smashed by the grandiosity and luxury of this building. On the other hand, the Mogoşoaia palace was astonishingly simple but with an immense beauty on its peaceful, gracious gardens and adjacent lake. At the    

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Children’s Palace, we were surprised by dancing performances of talented children of different ages. It is remarkable that this palace resulted from the selfless work and donations of people, whose aim was (and remains) to serve the cultural ambitions of the community. The partner school colleagues worked very hard to host us and were so warm to all our project teams. All this thoughtfulness was also reflected in the concern they had to take us to some of the most emblematical restaurants. That was the case of Caru’Cu Bere, a restaurant which is an historic and architectural monument established in 1879, the Tavern Sârbului and restaurant Cercul Militari National. In all these three places we were very well served, but it was at the host school that we had the chance to taste the most delicious typical Romanian food, because they all had extra condiments: affection and love. Touched by such generosity, the partners from Portugal, Turkey and Spain shared their traditional country songs at the farewell dinner, which was also a great moment of sensation and surprise. In this meeting the emotive moments were felt throughout all the meeting, that perhaps just a poet could express. A Portuguese partner read to all Fernando Pessoa (Portuguese poet) translated freely into English. The value of things is not on the time they last but on the intensity with which they occur. That’s why there are unforgettable moments, things that we cannot explain and unique people! Turkey – Adana

   

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The first day of this meeting was something that we will not forget because of the smiles with what all the staff of the school received us. On this meeting in Adana, the project’s blog was presented by the Spanish partner and which was brought up by their students. Each one of the partners shared the various methodologies used by adult educators’ teams. Luigi Sturzo partner showed a Digital Story Telling methodology that uses a video maker tool. It was decided that each country would exchange methodologies presented by the other partner’s teams and would assess (through a survey) the degree of satisfaction of students on its use. The structure of the e-book was outlined, as well as, which contents of the e-book would be developed by each partner. The second day of the meeting was devoted to visit some institutions like Seyhan District Mayor, Seyhan District Education Manager, Recep İNCE Governor of the Seyhan and Mayor of Adana Province. This was a great opportunity to exchange opinions about the Turkish role on the Europe enlargement policy. But the highest moment of the day was the guided visit to the mental hospital/prison Dr. EkremTok which is a partner of the Şakirpaşa Public Education Centre, where we could experience several different sensations: the smell of the pine trees, the gaze in the eyes of the institutionalized people, the calmness of the place… however at the same time we could feel also a certain oppression……… Traditional dance and music were a constant presence throughout the three days visit, and even here, in a close environment, the prisoners had a dance performance prepared for us. When we thought that we had had our share of surprises, we were absolutely wrong, because at the end of the day we were presented with an exhibition of a mixed class of taekwondo. The boys were special but the girls were remarkable because they normally seem mild mannered and in the gymnasium they were awesome!!!! The third day was meant to go to the Syria’s border. In our way, we had a fantastic breakfast on a typical small village, Karlısu. In Hatay, we visited the museum, the bazaar, Hatay Erol Bilecik Technical and Vocational High School and St. Peter’s grave. These were high moments of cultural exchange as well as the feeling upon the arrival at the Syrian border, with the sun in the horizon. The food moments were incomparable due, not only to the quality of the restaurants and the Kebabs, but mostly because they were so joyful and fantastic brotherhood times that cannot be forgotten. In Adana, the expectations regarding the way Turkish people know how to be good hosts were utterly overcome by the proof of affection and attention that everyone received during

   

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the three-day meeting. "We arrive as partners and friends but we leave as brothers", were the words spoken by the director of the partnership ENTE Smaldone, on the last night's visit. We finished this meeting drinking and toasting with a fine Turkish wine and sharing our impressions and views on the host country, its people and culture. It was an intimate moment that summarized the entire set of positive emotions of this visit. Reggio di Calabria – Italy

Reggio di Calabria is well known as a port and University city in southern Italy and faces Sicilia across the Messina strait. Being the third economic center of mainland Southern Italy, it is the largest and oldest city in the region of Calabria and is the second oldest city in Italy overall. This city was always coveted by other empires: Greek (of which the Riace bronzes are testimonials), Roman, Turkish, French, Spanish… but on August 21st of 1860 Giuseppe Garibaldi conquered this city. This famous warrior takes a role, once again, on this history of the Grundtvig meetings, after a few months from the beginning of the project. Upon the arrival, while wandering on the Via Garibaldi, we noticed thousands of coloured confetti spread on the street. We were told this was due to the Carnival corso that had taken

   

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place a few hours before… the feeling of sorrow we had for not having witnessed this event, was compensated by our host who took us to a special trattoria where we ate different, delicious kinds of pizza. On the next day, we went on being surprised by home made, typical food products because next to our working place there was a little market where at the break, everyone could taste and buy, original food products like jam, sausages, olive pates among other things. This meeting had in the agenda to review the whole structure of the e-book; the assessment of each partner’s contribution in its construction and the presentation of the survey results that evaluated the satisfaction degree of the public who experienced the teaching method(s) selected / applied by each country. All tasks were successfully completed with the commitment of the Spanish team who implemented mediation and guidance throughout the work schedule. The host institution and organizer of this meeting, ente Carlo Smaldone, set up a meeting with Mr. Luigi Varratta, the prefect of Reggio, as local responsible of the Ministry of Interior and Mr. Domenico Giannetta, as responsible for the Provincia di Reggio Calabria about local development. They were very receptive and available to meet the institutions involved in this project and to continue relationships with these EU countries. Pithagoras Middle School was one of the institutions the partners had the opportunity to visit. Extremely friendly, they greeted us with a wonderful musical demonstration, a presentation of environmental issue held by their students and with a moment of folk dance. At the end of the day, they toasted us with a buffet, served in a room decorated with the flags of all the involved countries, which allowed the fraternization between the Grundtvig partners, teachers and employees of the institution. The buffet was entirely made up of typical southern Italian flavours, that we could also enjoy in some fine restaurants during our stay, in which the famous bergamotto drink was the queen. Scilla and Sicily were the two cultural visits included in the meeting programme. At the first one we visited The Ruffo Castle, a fortress built by the Dukes of Calabria that overlooks the beach which is one the biggest attractions on this small but enchanting town. As far as Sicily is concerned, the beauty of the Messina cathedral, with its bell tower, turned out to be an interesting place to visit along with Taormina and its picturesque houses, streets, beautiful landscape framed by the sea and by the Etna volcano.

   

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Adra - Spain

Being aware that Adra was the last meeting of the project and the coordinator partner, there was a mixture of feelings towards this encounter. On one hand, the expectations regarding this meeting were very high and on the other hand, there was already a feeling of nostalgia building up because of the moment of goodbye. Words are always short to express deep feelings and that was what happened when writing about the emotions we felt in this meeting. The goal of this meeting was the public presentation of the ebook, which took place on the third day of the meeting, in the presence of the school community and local authorities: the mayor of the town, Mr Enrique Hernando, and the representative of the Educational Regional Board of Almeria for adult education, Mrs María Dolores Sánchez. Our job was to review all the texts of the index and to decide how to do this presentation. So, on our first day of the meeting, after being warmly hosted by the mayor of Adra and his staff, we had a full work day at

   

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the school. However, the Spanish team excelled by the way they pampered all the partners and kept creating unexpected surprises for everyone. For instance, on this day, after a great lunch at the “Club Nautico” of Adra, the highest moment of the surprises was the twenty-minute boat ride along the coastline. This trip was short, however it was rich in moments of adrenalin and anxiety which gave everyone the perfect mood to work in the afternoon. During the second day of our meeting, we were offered a senses cocktail for the visit to Alhambra was an overwhelming experience for the eyes, ears and the aromas. It transported us in time and place and we were able to capture the essence of the Arabic mystique and at the same time the romanticism which was brought about by the beautiful palaces, gardens and love tales. The Alhambra is a landmark of the Andalusian history. As if all this was not enough, this day ended with a Flamenco show, which is also a cultural reference of Andalusia and results of the soul blending of Gipsy and Arabic people which brings up this powerful dance and singing manifestation. The last day of the meeting would end with the presentation of our project publicly at the school. But first we had a meeting at the Regional Education Board of Almería, and we had the possibility to relax touring by the Cabo de Gata – Níjar natural park. It was an amazing experience! For some of us it was the first contact with sea water this year, and for others, surely, with the Mediterranean wild wind and sea. The presentation of our work was very well accepted by the audience which included local authorities, students, teachers and even local entrepreneurs as well as each partner’s entourage. This day ended with a big fiesta in which we shared laughs and tears, doubts but above all, a big hope in human kind because at the end, international projects, either Grundtvig or other are just about people and generous share!

In conclusion we can say that all together we were able to do a great job within this project and that the sharing of professional and cultural experiences made us more aware of European citizenship and will enable us to work better with our adult students in future.

   

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PARTNER #1: IES ABDERA, Adra (Spain) Mónica Ramírez Martínez Francisco Javier Martín Álvarez María Rodríguez Míller Francisco Javier Benjumeda Muñoz Jorge Samos Sánchez Laura Nicoleta Stoica Mª Carmen Fernández Doñas Daniel Rivera Hurtado

PARTNER #2: AGRUPAMENTO DE ESCOLAS DE PERAFITA, Porto (Portugal) Celestina Silva Joaquina Rocha Ana Paula Santos Paulo Cardoso Oscar Pereira Anabela Grilo

PARTNER #3: ISTITUTO LUIGI STURZO, Roma (Italy) Antonia Silvaggi Patrizia Braga The team of the Training and Development department of the Istituto Luigi Sturzo. Head of the Department Mr Fabrizio Melorio

PARTNER #4: ŞAKİRPAŞA PUBLIC EDUCATION CENTRE, Adana (Turkey) Fatih Acargil Kemal Zeki Arslan Cemal Incedal

   

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PARTNER #5: ENTE CARLO SMALDONE, Reggio di Calabria (Italy) Carlo Smaldone Villani Francesca Fedele Tatiyana Kostyuk Evelin Grönebaum   PARTNER #6: ŞCOALA SPECIALĂ NR. 10, Bucuresti (Romania) Mihaela Gabriela Bazarciuc Floare Manolescu Petruţa Lungu Ligia-Matiana Ene Paraschiva-Paula Stoican Cristina-Georgina Eftimie Iolanda Gadjea Paula Grigoroiu Oana-Cătălina Gheorghiu                    

 

   

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Thanks to partners’ institutions that made this book

ESPAÑA ITALIA ITALIA PORTUGAL ROMÂNIA TÜRKIYE

   

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Building European Methods