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CARLOS SANDOVAL OLASCOAGA Work 2013

LOCAL CODE / REAL ESTATES: NEW YORK CASE STUDY

Architectural and Urban Proposal for 5,000 Vacant Lots in NYC

SEA LEVEL HIGH-RISE: POPUL ATING THE STAGED RETREAT

Re-development Proposal for the SF Bay Area Urban Areas

URBAN DATASCAPES

A Student Center for UNAM

SNAKE SYSTEM: SMALL / MEDIUM / L ARGE SCALE MODUL ARIT Y

Multi-Scalar System Explorations

NETWORKED ECOLOGIES: RE-THINKING REMEDIATION

Urban and Ecological Proposal for Latrobe

THE GRAND

Re-Development Proposal for Downtown Houston

LISBON PORT TERMINAL

Cruise Terminal Proposal for Downtown Lisbon


LOCAL CODE / REAL ESTATES : NEW YORK CIT Y CASE STUDY

In collaboration with Nicholas de Monchaux DATES

2012– (in progress) PROJECT DETAILS

Local Code / Real Estates uses GIS analysis to identifty thousands of under-utilized or abandoned sites in New York City. These new vacant spaces are imagined as a new urban system. Using parametric design, a unique proposal is generated based on local conditions. The proposals mediate ecological conditions, improving the city as a whole. This new network of sites aims to create a new more robust urban infrastructure. For the New York proposal, working with the Eric Sanderson we are using data from the Welikia project, to map historical ecologies of the vacant sites. We are proposing a set of interventions to renew these historical communities and improve the overall conditions of the sites and the city as a whole. The interventions aim to create a more robust and resilient city. Using behavioral generative algorithms, the interventions are a time based design process and encourage the growth and development of the dynamic site systems. The behavioral processes negotiate with the different local conditions and datasets generating a localized and ever-changing proposal.


FAKE ESTATES / REALIT Y PROPERTIES

Our 2012 survey of underutilized and vacant city-owned parcels discovered over 2000 sites, including the 15 properties identified by Gordon Matta-Clark as part of the unfinished work Fake Estates : Reality Properties between 1971 and 1973. (Matta-Clark himself identified “network architecture” as a guiding theme for these sites’ reinvention. His notes on the sites were exhibited as an artwork in 1991, some 13 years after Matta-Clark’s untimely death.)


SITE SELECTION

0

4

8

16 MILES

2,225 UNDERUTILIZED PARCELS IN NYC.

Identified through a survey of the city’s land-use and property ownership databases, the 2,225 sites shown here represent a combination of vacant city-owned land, undeveloped parcels whose ownership is in default or receivership, and paper streets.


PUBLIC HEALTH ANALYSIS

INCIDENCE OF RESPIRATORY ILLNESS

ASTHMA CASES

US Census, 2010

City of New York, 2010

INCIDENCE OF CANCER

REPORTED CRIME

US Census, 2010

NYPD, 2012


PHYSICAL ANALYSIS

STREET TREES

IMPERVIOUS SURFACES

NYC DPW, 2012

City of New York, 2010

SITE NET WORK

HYDROLOGICAL ANALYSIS

Analysis, 2012

Natural systems in blue, man-made in gray. NYC DPW, 2012


CASE STUDY

Working with Eric Sanderson and his team at the Wildlife Conservation Society, we are using data created for the inprogress Welikia project (an expansion of the earlier Manahatta project) to chart the historic ecologies and habitat of vacant and underutlilized sites in New York, and propose landscape and architectural interventions for the rebirth and renewal of these communities on each site, and throughout a network of sites in the city as a whole. This is not, however a mere exercise; in each case, the site’s history provides a guide to the most robust ecology for site, and city, in the future. Here history guides us to a more ecologically robust and physically resilient New York in the future. 1665 ECO-COMMUNITIES Marine Communities Tidal Wetlands Upland Comminities Appalachian Oak Pine Forest Chestnut Oak Forest Coastal Oak Beach Forest Coastal Oak Hickor y Forest Floodplain Forest Hemplock Nor thern Hardwood Forest Hempstead Plains Grassland High Salt Marsh Lenape Village Site Low Salt Marsh Marine Gravel Sand Beach Communit y Marine Rocky Inter tidal Communit y Maritime Beach Communit y Oak Tulip Forest Pitch Pine Shrub Oak Barrens Salt Shrub Communit y Shallow Emergent Marsh


CASE STUDY SITES

495 11 AVENUE

Eco-community Coastal oak-hickory forest Soil Type Hollis

1

Eco-community Oak-tulip forest Soil Type Deerfield

171.

09

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1.5

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EAST 2 STREET

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Eco-community Oak-tulip forest Soil Type Deerfield

139.

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5

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10.8 0

3

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Eco-community Hempstead Plains grassland Soil Type Pompton

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rate cer can 00,000 /1 ry ato pir 000 res s /1 s e e om al illn inc enti is d re

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2083 MADISON AVENUE

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Eco-community Low salt marsh Soil Type Ipswich

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2735 FRED DOUGLASS BLVD

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Eco-community Oak-tulip forest Soil Type Deerfield

44.8

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$7

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236 BROOME STREET

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221 EAST 3 STREET


SITE PROPOSAL

REGENERATION OF HISTORIC ECO-COMMUNITIES

With the identified problematics and site conditions, a number of site specific strategies are developed to motivate the regeneration and remediation of historical ecologies. Each site becomes part of a networked infrastructure mediating urban aspects like air-quality, drainage, and social problematics.


DESIGN DIAGRAM

ECO-TENSEGRIT Y CANOPY

PROPOSED DR AINAGE AND SOCIAL SURFACE

LEAST COST PATH THROUGH SITE

L ANDSCAPE DIFFERENTIATION

RESTORED ECO-COMMUNITIES

New Social Spaces Precipitation / Run-off absortion Eco-Community Canopy: Solar Radiation and CO2 Absortion Constructed Wetland


PARAMETRIC DESIGN PROCESS

BASE SITE

SOL AR RADIATION ANALYSIS

A site model is generated based on GIS data. The model includes topography information, city parcels, landuses, buildings, solar radiation, and historic eco-communities.

A solar radiation analysis is generated with shadow analysis at different moments throughout the year.

DL A System

TENSEGRIT Y STRUCTURE

A DLA system is developed to simulate the potential regrowth of historical eco-communities according to current site conditions. The system follows daylight and avoids shaded areas. If a site is too dark to support an eco-community, a set of strategies like changing the color of the walls of adjacent buildings, or light reflective membranes are employed.

A structurally optimized tensegrity structure is generated to support the growth of the new biological canopy. New ecological systems are supported by the structure. An approximate structural model of the adjacent buildings is generated: the tensegrity structure attaches to the adjacent buildings at their structural intersections.


ECO-COMMUNITIES

SITE DRAINAGE

The new location of the eco-canopy defines the places where ground level eco-communities can grow. These areas are assigned a different landcover.

A new surface is generated to direct the site’s drainage to the street edge, where a constructed wetland is built. The new surface also creates social and gathering spaces.

PATH FINDING

MULTI-L AYERED INFRASTRUCTURE

Based on topography, the least cost path through the site is calculated. An agent based simulation is then used to differentiate the surfaces adjacent to the paths. The new systems extend and intersect streets and other public spaces.

Based on local micro-climate, soil, social use, and demographic data, a differentiated program, landcover and materials are assigned to the site. Each proposal is part of a site network improving the conditions of the city as a whole.


SEA LEVEL HIGH-RISE: POPUL ATING THE STAGED RETREAT

In collaboration with Gabriel Kaprielian. Nicholas de Monchaux, advisor. DATES

2011-2012 PROJECT DETAILS

SEA-LEVEL HI-RISE re-envisions the urban waterfront around the San Francisco Bay, creating a new set of relationships between urban life and ecology. A managed retreat strategy enables wetlands to migrate with the rising sea-level, while providing resilient infrastructure and new development for the growing population in the Bay Area. The waterfront of the San Francisco Bay Area is facing a growing threat from sealevel rise. Over the next 100 years, a projected sea-level rise of 140cm would affect an estimated 270,000 people in the Bay Area and over 218 sq. kilometers of current urban development. Two opposing solutions are being proposed; one plan envisions an extensive network of fortified levees protecting public and private urban development, while the other plan suggests a relocation of development to allow for the wetland migration to higher elevations with the rising sea level. Our position is that we should settle for neither solution, since both are unsatisfactory responses to a complex and continually evolving challenge. We believe that it is possible to design for both sea-level rise and future wetland ecologies to coexist with urban development. We integrated GIS mapping data on sea-level rise, wetlands, and urban development with parametric modeling software to develop the proposal. Our design strategy involved the creation of an “agent-based� model to simulate sea-level rise and wetland growth patterns around the San Francisco Bay. By combining the agent-based simulation with an interactive map of the current urban development, we generated a parametrically responsive redevelopment plan for the contested area along the waterfront.


PARAMETRIC DESIGN PROCESS

¯

9 70 35 0 70 35 0

70 70

Site 9

San Mateo County o o 37 28’00.27”N, 122 07’23.85” W

SLR (Hectares)

Marshlands (Hectares)

Land Use (Hectares)

Levees (Key)

50cm: 21

Historic: 97

Residential: 177

Planned

AGENT / MA JOR ROAD INTERSECTION Pop: 9793

Pop_SLR150cm: 7363

100cm: 29

150cm: 214

Current: 106

150cm_SLR: 211

Commerical: 17 Industrial: 129

Existing Proposed

Based on GIS information and sea-level rise predictions, a system of artificial intelligence wetland agents was generated. The agents grow and evolve based on water levels, soil sediments and swarm behavior. The agents intersect with the major roads in different staged retreats according to growing water levels.

¯

9 70 35 0 70 35 0

70 70

San Mateo County o o 37 28’00.27”N, 122 07’23.85” W

70 70

San Mateo County o o 37 28’00.27”N, 122 07’23.85” W

Marshlands (Hectares)

Land Use (Hectares)

Levees (Key)

50cm: 21

Historic: 97

Residential: 177

Planned

SLR (Hectares)

Marshlands (Hectares)

Land Use (Hectares)

Levees (Key)

50cm: 21

Historic: 97

Residential: 177

Planned

Current: 106

Commerical: 17

Existing

150cm_SLR: 211

Industrial: 129

Proposed

CENSUS INFORMATION Pop: 9793

Pop_SLR150cm: 7363

100cm: 29

150cm: 214

The site’s census information is used to differentiate the building typology and density. Denser and mixed-used buildings are developed closer to the major roads, while low-rise buildings are closer to wetlands. The development creates new housing for the expected population growth in the Bay Area.

¯

9

SLR (Hectares)

140 210 280 140 210 280 Meters Meters

Site 9

70 35 0 70 35 0

140 210 280 140 210 280 Meters Meters

Site 9

¯

9 70 35 0 70 35 0

140 210 280 140 210 280 Meters Meters

70 70

140 210 280 140 210 280 Meters Meters

Site 9

San Mateo County o o 37 28’00.27”N, 122 07’23.85” W

SLR (Hectares)

Marshlands (Hectares)

Land Use (Hectares)

Levees (Key)

50cm: 21

Historic: 97

Residential: 177

Planned

WEAVING AGENTS / CONSTRUCTED WETL ANDS

MULTI-L AYERED INFRASTRUCTURE

The agents are used to develop new road/building systems for the sites. The wetlands become a new urban infrastructure and are used to treat grey water produced by the urban development. The woven levees create constructed fresh water wetlands and roads within them.

The urban proposal enables the migration of the wetland ecologies, while providing new mixed used developments for the growing population in a staged retreat. A new housing paradigm is proposed with the new set of ecological / urban adjacencies created.

Pop: 9793

100cm: 29

Current: 106

Commerical: 17

Existing

Pop_SLR150cm: 7363

150cm: 214

150cm_SLR: 211

Industrial: 129

Proposed

Pop: 9793

100cm: 29

Current: 106

Commerical: 17

Existing

Pop_SLR150cm: 7363

150cm: 214

150cm_SLR: 211

Industrial: 129

Proposed


EXPLODED A XON: SITE STRATEGY

Mixed-use buildings’ density differentiated by network analysis

Bridge buildings generate intersections between programs.

Woven paths differentiate salt and fresh water wetlands.

Major road intersection (Phase Two). Major road intersection (Phase One). Projected inundation line 100 cms.

Road intersection (Phase Two - 100 cms).

Salvaged Parcels. Road intersection (Phase One - 50 cms).

Paths selected from agent based systems.

Fresh water wetlands

Salt water wetlands


CONSTRUCTED WETL ANDS UNDER BUILDINGS

BRIDGE BUILDINGS INTERCONNECTING BUILDINGS


SITE 11 STUDY

DEVELOPMENT / ECOLOGY REL ATIONSHIPS

The urban and ecological conditions co-exist in the proposed development. The proposal re-thinks the relationship between wetlands and urban development, blurring the barrier between them. The urban development give space for the wetlands to migrate with the sea-rise, and the wetlands become new infrastructure for the developments.


VIEW FROM THE WETL ANDS AND WOVEN LEVEES


DIGITALLY FABRICATED MODELS


DIGITALLY FABRICATED MODELS


DIGITALLY FABRICATED MODELS


2012 VENICE BIENNALE MODELS

MODELS EXHIBITED AT THE ITALIAN PAVILION

A set of models with the agent generated urban proposals were developed to be exhibited at the Venice Biennale. For the “Common Ground� theme of the 2012 Biennale, all the models were built with white card. The set of parameters generating and differentiating the proposals were rastered into the card, while the proposals were lasercut. The angle and elevation of the buildings and levees in the model reflect the site slope.


MODELS EXHIBITED AT THE 2012 VENICE BIENNALE


MODEL DETAILS

SITE 2

With a mostly industrial landuse, Site 2 housing proposal is less dense. Most of Site’s 2 area is completely inundated in the first staged retreat. SITE 7

Site 7 has a high housing density proposal. Sediments and salt are more abundant in the area, speeding up the wetland migration and the agent’s development.


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URBAN DATASCAPES: UNDERGRADUATE THESIS

Advisors: R. Bolanos, M. Nocedal, H. Quiroz DATES

2010 PROJECT DETAILS

With a student population of more than 200,000 students, the “National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) is one of the biggest universities in the world. Its campus ”Ciudad Universitaria” is considered one of the most important Mexican architectural projects from the last century and recently acquired the status of world heritage site. However, being built in the 50’s for a student population of 25,000 students, its campus became quickly overwhelmed. Without building up the necessary infrastructure for the expanding student population in campus, the sorrounding areas transformed into informal commercial zones. The once habitational areas next to campus quickly became an off- campus extension of the school. Urban Datascapes tries to provide much needed infrastructure for the school’s campus, in order to enable students to get a proper educational experience. It tries to revitalize the decadent urban areas next to campus, enabling the creation of a “college town”. The project is the result of several use and occupational studies carried out among the student population. The findings helped the understanding of students mobility around campus, how they get to campus, and how they use the spaces on campus. Urban Datascapes aims to provide a heterogenous space to properly serve the diverse student population. It tries to create a student interaction that doesn’t currently exist. Generative methods were developed in order to relate the project’s spatial conception to a complex network of social, environmental and material forces. The project questions the campus’ urban and architectural modernist principles, and re-thinks the Matbuilding concept. Thesis awarded distinction.


INTERIOR VIEW OF STUDENT LOUNGE


SITE MAP: CURRENT CONDITIONS

MIXED-USE

SUBWAY LINE

COMMERCIAL

STUDENT’S SHORTEST PATHS

INFORMAL VENDORS

CAMPUS BOUNDARIES

BACKGROUND

Since the creation of the subway stations next to Campus, the adjacent urban areas were completely transformed. Studies carried during the project estimated that 95% of the 200,000 students use public transportation to get to campus. Most of these students transit through the “Copilco” neighborhood. During the past 15 years, 40% of the neighborhood illegally transformed into mix use or commercial establishments. The transformations in the neighborhood also attracted informal vendors that took over the area’s public space. The area between the Campus’ limits and the subway station turned into an informal extension of campus, providing all the services and infrastructure the campus lacks of. The site for the proposed student center was chosen after rigurous pedestrian flows studies. It is situated in the areas with more intense pedestrian flow. The center is an educational and urban proposal, both providing institutional study spaces and re-organizing the sorrounding public and private transportation systems. It will be a link between the campus’ internal transportation systems and urban transportation systems, thus creating a new relationship between the city and the campus.


ENTRANCE VIEW, STUDY ROOM UNDER

PROPOSAL

The student center is proposed as mat building that will both create a new public space on the street level and more located services in the underground levels. The design reflects the diversity of the user’s needs, providing faster pedestrian routes between campus and public transportation systems, and creating leisure spaces at the same time. After carefully mapping the influence every commercial establishment has on pedestrian flows, a series of shortest path simulations were carried out. A system that combined the force of influence of every establishment, the number of students passing by each area, and the minimum distances between campus and transportation infrastructure was created. The simulations generated a system of shortest paths that pointed out the areas where social spaces were formed. The models obtained directly influenced the student center’s morphology, differentiating the street level’s suface to create gathering and leisure areas in located zones. The morphological transformations are related to the environmental characteristics and social events occuring in the field. The center’s morphology provides a heterogenous space that will endure the constant use transformations of the area, and will allow a wide range activities for the student population.


LOCATED

PROLONGED

TRANSITION

CREATETRIANGULAR TRIANGULAR GRID 1. 1. CREATE GRID base grid formed by 4’ triangles base grid formed by 4’ triangles

5. OFFSET GRID (GRID 2)

offset distance determined by underground lighting necessities and spatial influence (more/less sunlight)

EDUCATIONAL

CULTURAL

RECREATIONAL

COMMERCIAL

ADMINISTRATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE

NS LI CO GHT ND ITI O

E SO IN CIA FL L UE NC

SP IN ATIA FL L UE NC E

STUDY ROOM READING ROOM COMPUTER LAB TUTORING MEDIA LAB ART STUDIO DANCE STUDIO MUSIC STUDIO AUDITORIUM OUTDOOR THEATER EXHIBITION SPACE MEETING ROOMS STUDENT UNION LOUNGE GARDEN GAME ROOM CAFETERIA CAFE BAR VENDOR KIOSKS OFFICES BATHROOMS PARKING BICYCLE RENTAL BUS STATION

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MEDIA LAB ART STUDIO DANCE STUDIO

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MUSIC STUDIO AUDITORIUM OUTDOOR THEATER EXHIBITION SPACE

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STUDY ROOM READING ROOM COMPUTER LAB TUTORING

MEETING ROOMS STUDENT UNION LOUNGE GARDEN GAME ROOM

CAFETERIA CAFE BAR VENDOR KIOSKS

OFFICES BATHROOMS

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PARKING BICYCLE RENTAL BUS STATION

2. DIFFERENTIATE SURFACE

OFFSET GRID GRID (GRID 3.3.OFFSET (GRID1)1)

transformation of the individual modules based on pedestrian flow

offset distancedetermined determined by light offset distance byunderground underground light necessities (direct/indirect light) necessities (direct/indirect light)

6.6.DIFFERENTIATE SURFACE USE DIFFERENTIATE SURFACE USE

TRANSFORM MODULES 7.7.TRANSFORM MODULESLOCALLY LOCALLY

determinethe theuse use (create spaces, sitting determine (creategathering gathering spaces, sitting spaces,transition transition zones, collection) by by spaces, zones,rainwater rainwater collection) differentiating GRID height differentiating GRID22modules’ modules’ height

allowing individual modules modules to direct allowing individual toblock/allow block/allow direct

sunlight, andre-shape/differentiate re-shape/differentiate sitting spaces sunlight, and sitting spaces


VA CY PR I

SP DY ACE NA MI SM

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spatial influence social grouping commercial spaces spatial influence shortest paths followed by students

4. TRANSLATEIN IN Z GRID GRID 4. TRANSLATE Z TO TOSTRUCTURE STRUCTURE build structure for the original grid by moving GRID 1 in build structure for the original grid by moving GRID 1 in Z, structure responds to structural needs (surface Z, structure respondscurvature) to structural needs (surface curvature)

8. TRANSLATEIN IN Z Z TO GRID 1GRID 1 8. TRANSLATE TOSTRUCTURE STRUCTURE selected modules create vertical structure and diffentiate selected modules create vertical structure and diffentiate the orthogonal underground space the orthogonal underground space

9. FINAL ROOF SURFACE


MAIN ENTRANCE / CAFE / READING ROOM / GARDEN

blend spaces blendspaces

CIRCUL ATIONS Gathering Spaces Located Localized Transition

SOCIAL FORMATIONS

1

TRANSITION

2

1 INDIVIDUAL SPACES (STATIC)

Differentiated underground surface. Not so differentiated environments. Static conditions. 2 INDIVIDUAL SPACES (DYNAMIC)

Differentiated underground surface. Homogenous environments. Dynamic conditions.

SOCIAL FORMATIONS

SOCIAL FORMATIONS


SECTION PERSPECTIVE: COMPUTER L ABS + STUDENT UNION

SOCIAL FORMATIONS

1

TRANSITION

2

1 HIGH SOCIAL INTERACTION (STATIC)

Differentiated underground surface. Differentiated environments. Static conditions. 2 INDIVIDUAL SPACES (DYNAMIC)

SOCIAL FORMATIONS

CIRCULATION

Surface not differentiated Homogenous environments Dynamic conditions.


EXPLODED MODEL

Outdoor theater Music studios Bar Game room

1

1. INDIVIDUAL MODULES

CIRCUL ATION

SE ATING + BLOCK SUN

R AIN WATER COLLECTION

SE ATING + ALLOW SUN

SE ATING

CIRCUL ATION + INDIRECT SUNLIGHT

DOUBLE SE ATING

CIRCUL ATION + BLOCK SUNLIGHT


ENTRANCE PL AZA, CAFE UNDER

FILOSOFIA STREET, STUDENT UNION UNDER


HRS / ACTIVIT Y 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 12 13 14 15 16 MAIN ENTRANCE: DAY TIME

1

17 18 19 20 21

2 22 23 24 1 2 3 4 MAIN ENTRANCE: NIGHTIME

2

5


CAFE AND COMPUTER SPACE: 12 HRS

The building operates within the logic of the transforming conditions of social, economical, and environmental activities sorrounding it. Social program is not pre-defined and has the ability to change throughout the day and year, according to the different intensities of social activity. DAY / NIGHT ACTIVITIES

The roof apertures that during the day provide differentiated indoor conditions, during the night provide outdoor light. This transforms the urban condition, providing safety for the students. The negative outdoor space that during the day is used as circulation, during the night provides an urban outdoor nightlife opportunity.


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SNAKE SYSTEM: SMALL / MEDIUM / L ARGE SCALE MODUL ARIT Y

Arch 101, Prof. R. Choksombatchai DATES

2008 PROJECT DETAILS

Snake’s vertebral systems consist of numerous vertebrae that bear long, movable ribs. The system’s dynamic capabilities allow the snake to perform its daily functions; the system’s transformations are fundamental to activities such as feeding and movement. Movable ribs form part of a system that transforms according to existing stress; forces are then transmitted along the entire system. The “Snake System” is a set of interconnected modular units that continuously transform according to the forces applied to it. Like the snake’s skeletal system, the “Snake System” becomes a diagram of its forces in multiple layers of performance. The system was developed in a series of scales, switching between materials and modifying the system logic according to the specific material properties. The system was tested out through physical experimentation with different force variables. After recognizing the system’s behavior towards different forces, a number of optimization states were recognized. These states acquired structural capabilities through force transmission among the system. Further experimentation was carried out with different system configurations, adding them up and obtaining more complex configurations. The explorations carried out tried to obtain a system capable of creating complex material effects and defining spatial characteristics.


SNAKE SYSTEM

SMALL SCALE MODUL ARIT Y

Force is transmitted along the system’s core, modifying the entire system. Structural stability is found by applying opposing forces. Apart from structural explorations, the system’s capacity to define different spatial qualities was mapped. Spatial effects, like light transmission, were further explored at larger scales. 1-4 1

System Transformations 5

Optimized State of System

2

3

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MATTER - FORCE REL ATIONSHIPS

1

Optimized State of System 2

Force Relationships: Plan 3

Material Effects of the System

1

2

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SNAKE CHAIR

MEDIUM SCALE MODUL ARIT Y

The “snake chair” is a further exploration of the system’s structural capacity and its material organization. It explores the system’s dynamic capacities and its ability to transform according to the forces affecting the system. Departing from an optimized structural configuration previously found through physical experimentation, the system adapts to different body weights and body shapes, while maintaining its stuctural capacity.


BUILT PROTOT YPE

DETAIL: SYSTEM

DETAIL: STRUCTURE / SYSTEM


L ARGE SCALE MODUL ARIT Y

EXTERIOR VIEW


THE “SNAKE HOUSE”

The “Snake House” is the final step in the series of modular explorations. It tests out the structural capacity and material effects of the system at a large scale. The site’s steepness was used as a starting point for spatial organization. Site conditions were treated as a force field that informed the system’s development. Site views and programmatic/environmental requirements were major forces acting on the system. Structurally, the system becomes a diagram of the forces acting upon it; each module is dimensioned according to the structural stresses applied. A work / live space was proposed. The variability encountered in the spaces allows multiple activities to occur in the same space, thus enabling the existance of both programs. An circulation loop weaves both programs together, creating social spaces in the pathway intersections. These blend spaces provide a gradient of environmental conditions that allow infinite occupation modes.


L ARGE SCALE MODUL ARIT Y

Living Room/ Library

Waiting Room

Waiting Room Living Room/ Library

Social Room/ Game Room

Social Room/ Game Room

Social Room/ Game Room Living Room/ Library

Meeting Room Living Room/ Library

Master Room Guest Room Dining Room/ Kitchen

Guest Room

Dining Room/ Kitchenette

Dining Room/ Kitchen

Meeting Room

Master Room

UNFOLDED SECTION


EXPLODED A XON: CIRCUL ATIONS

INTERNAL / EXTERNAL CIRCUL ATIONS

Weave both systems together, create social spaces, terraces and gardens in their intersection points. NEW PROGRAMMATIC REL ATIONSHIPS

Shifting programmatic relationships and creates blend spaces at circulation’s intersection points.


a-a’

SECTION: OFFICE

SECTION: GUEST R


ROOM / MAIN ROOM

SECTION A-A’

The system transforms in different ways, responding to a field of environmental (views, sunlight) and programmatic forces. WORK SPACES

The system folds to block southern sun, and allows northern light. The wall system opens up to the southern views, while blocking southern sun. LIVE SPACES

The double layered wall system created provides different privacy gradients along the room’s space. It allows a wide range of activities in the rooms. The system folds to allow privacy.

SECTION: MEETING ROOM


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SIDE VIEW

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System’s transformations create places to sit, lie down, and vertical circulations; they provide differentiated environmental conditions, enhance views, and provide privacy.


SITE VIEW


CONSTRUCTION LOGIC

1 Floor system. 2 Support system: shaped truss. 3 Insulating Membrane. 4 Snake System.

INTERIOR VIEW: LIVING ROOM

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VIEW FROM TERRACE


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NETWORKED ECOLOGIES: RE-THINKING REMEDIATION

In collaboration with Mona Gandhi and Hassan Sazmand DATE

2011 PROJECT DETAILS

The inevitable shifts in global climate and economical conditions have made us question and rethink the ability of the cities to resist and adapt to these changes. A city like Latrobe, Australia whose landscape, economy and social conditions are based primarily on coal based energy prodution is particularly vulnerable to the global and local changes. With the coal reserves adn production in decline, the social and ecological conditions in Latrobe have already started to reduce. With these conditions in mind, Latrobe must re-think its cultural and ecological landscape, transitioning from a single economy andecology to a more diverse one. By mapping the area, several sites that are currently underutilized or to become vacant with the mining decline were found. “Networked Ecologies� rethinks these sites as urban and ecological connectors and spaces that will provide robustness to the landscape. In order to provide robustness and resilience to the landscape, we are proposing a diversifiaction of the set of relationships between these sites. Honorable mention in the Transiting Cities Competition organized by RMIT in Australia.


CURRENT REGION CONDITIONS

SITE STRATEGY COAL MINE

AGROFORESTRY

INDUSTRIAL ZONE

TOWN CENTER FREE WAY TR AIN STATION COAL MINE

RESIDENTIAL ZONE

POWER STATION WATER BODY

ECOLOGICAL ZONE PA STURES

The proposal discovers the in-between spaces, between the existing functions and aims to create a new social and ecological network. A series of targeted architectural interventions are developed in these spaces; the interventions are open-ended and are expected to grow an expand, eventually joining the series of existing isolated functions with each other and create a series of unexpected interconnected spaces. The proposed interventions will create a new infrastructure for the area, providing energy production alternatives, to the decaying mining industry. At the same time, the project proposes an ecological remediation of the mining sites, utilizing constructed wetlands to clean the accumulated waste and regenerate the species population of the area. Depending on the distance to a number of vacant buildings, the proposal re-utlizes and combines with them, reprogramming the buildings with community oriented activities. This aims to decentralize the community and generate a strong economical network. With the expansion of the “Networked Ecologies�, the exising functions of the city are intensified and complemented. This new network is everchanging and continually growing and adapting to the current conditions.

NATIONAL PARK

CURRENT ECONOMIC / ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS


MINE & ELECTRICAL PL ANT REMEDIATION

SITE STRATEGY

While coal provides 80% of the electricity in Victoria, Australia, it is expected to last only 20 more years. Re-thinking energy and resource production in the area is an essential point of the design proposal. The proposal replaces the coal energy production for a diverse number of strategies, diversifying Latrobes economy, making it more robust and resilient at the same time.

CURRENT ECONOMIC / ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS

PROPOSED ECONOMIC / ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS

SOL AR ENERGY WIND ENERGY GEOTHERMAL ENERGY BIO-ENERGY TIDAL POWER WAVE ENERGY HIDRO ELECTRICIT Y

L ATROBE

L ATROBE


PATTERNING STUDIES

NET WORK EXPANSION: +5 YEARS

NET WORK EXPANSION: +10 YEARS

NET WORK EXPANSION: +15 YEARS

NET WORK EXPANSION: +20 YEARS

ZONE 1 ZONE 2

ZONE 3 ZONE 4

ZONE 5 ZONE 6

ZONE 8 ZONE 7


PROPOSED NEW INFRASTRUCTURE IN MORWELL TOWN CENTER

DIFFERENTIATED L ANDSCAPE / ZONE 6


ZONE 6: PL AN AND SPATIAL DIFFERENTIATION

NEW ENERGY GENERATION

L ANDSCAPE AS ENERGY PRODUCER

COAL MINE REMEDIATION

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE AND ECOLOGY

URBAN FARMING DE VELOPMENT

WATER AND WETL AND REMEDIATION

RECREATION AREAS / INFRASTRUCTURE /


ECOLOGY AND RECREATION

CURRENT CONDITION / URBAN AGRICULTRUE / INFRASTRUCTURE

INFRASTRUCTURE / ENERGY STORAGE

NEW NET WORK / ACCESS

L ANDSCAPE REMEDIATION

ANIMAL SANCTUARY

RECREATION AREAS


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THE GRAND: ULI COMPETITION ENTRY

In collaboration with Brian Chambers, Jim Farris, Ali Momin, and Deepak Sohane. DATES

January - April 2012 PROJECT DETAILS

One of the four finalist entries for the 2012 ULI Competition in Houston, Texas, “The Grand” is a new district named from the Grand Central Station that once belonged to this site. In the next 25 years, Houston’s population will increase in 3.5 million and 1.5 million jobs will be created, and its suburban development is projected to continue increasing. The Grand aims to offer a competitve alternative to the suburban neighborhoods by offering Houstonians access to everything in and out of downtown. In the near future a commuter rail station will be built in the Grand district; at last connecting visitors and neighbors to the center of Houston.


SITE STRATEGY

EXISTING CONDITIONS

RE-NEW GRAND TRANSIT STATION

The site’s location is ideal: superior views to downtown’s skyline, walking distance to the theater district, historic distric and the buffalo bayou corridor. Access to major freeways, Memorial Dr., Washington Street and a commuter rail connection.

The transformation of the Amtrak station and integration of a future commuter rail into downtown will have dramatic improvements to bringing suburban neighborhoods downtown and becoming an amenity for residents to return to the city.

RE-CL AIM WASHINGTON STREET

RE-STORE BAYOU WATERFRONT

The neighborhoods off Washington Street have seen great investment in recent years. Reclaiming this historic street access is the fastest way to connect people downtown while increasing the value of this land to service communities.

Franklin Street creates a physical and ecological barrier between the property and the buffalo bayou. Restoring this edge with a park frontage creates a great amenity to the city and increases the capacity of this land to hold a growing population.


AERIAL VIEW OF SITE

VIEW FROM WASHINGTON ST


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SITE PL AN TRANSPORTATION NET WORK

Amtrak to New Orleans

I-45 Off Ramp

Commuter Rail to Galveston

A

C

I-1

P

OV 0H

Park & Ride Bus Service

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5F

I-4

P

M

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La

L

L

Amtrak to San Antonio

W

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Av

P

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tensio

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Preston Stre

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Commuter Rail to Hempstead

Ta e enu

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PERFORMATIVE L ANDSCAPE

1

2

6 3

7 8 4

9 5 10

PROPOSED INTERVENTIONS

1. Community Garden 2. Community Center 3. Repurposed Portion Of Franklin St Bridge 4. Storm Water Filtration Gully 5. Restored Riparian Landscape 6. Elevated Event Space 7. Storm Water Filtration Gully 8. Restaurant 9. Kayak & Bike Rental 10. Smith St Bridge With Light Rail


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LISBON CRUISE TERMINAL

Professional work for FREE - Fernando Romero DATES

2010 PROJECT DETAILS

International competition entry. Creation of new transportation infrastructure in dowtown Lisbon, Portugal. The projects seeks to revitalize downtown Lisbon, providing new public spaces, and redefining the street relationships. The project seeks to create a visual connection between the river and the city. RESPONSABILITIES

In charge of formal explorations for the proposal. Development of conceptual diagrams.

TOP VIEW OF THE TERMINAL

VIEW FROM THE RIVER


ARCHITECTURAL / URBAN REL ATIONSHIPS

-

Localizacao das áreas de concurso Downtown Lisbon

Alfama Enlarged Intervention Site

Alfândega de Lisboa Museu do Fado G.N.R Proposed Site Museu Militar Infante D. Henrique Av. Estação Sta. Apolonia

SITE OVERVIEW

NEW PUBLIC SPACES

Downtown Lisbon

Modify Circulation of Infante D. Henry Av.

Boarding

Restaurants

Services

Public Plaza

Arrivals

Recreational Area

Public Transportation

PROPOSED PROGRAM

VISUAL REL ATIONSHIP

Public Space / Terminal / Commercial

Redifine River / City Relationship


VIEW FROM DOW TOWN LISBON

ARRIVALS LOBBY


PL AN / SECTION

Acesso cobertura - miradouro sobre Rio Tejo

Largada e recolha de passageiros - carros particulares Largada e recolha de passageiros - Táxis

Accesso vertical estacionamento

Entrada

Saída

Controle

Entrada SEF Correios

Cambios

Agentes econ.

Sala de espera

Info tur.

Hall Espera

Controle MB Cabines I.S. Publ. M

Cacifos Policia marit.

Sanidade marit.

Entrev.

I.S. Publ. H Coord. Turno Arquivo

Embarque malas

Entrev. Sala Oper.

Sala multi-uso I.S. públicas

Sala Desc. Laboratorio

Sala multi-uso

Reunioes

Apoio Admin.

Apoio Admin.

Arquivo Raio X

Área de cargas e descargas de malas coberta

APL

SEF

Alfandega

Gab. assist.

Convivio Gab. coord.

Saída malas

Inst. Temp.

Copa Comum

Gab. Verif.

Gab. coord.


A

A’

SECTION A-A’

Estacionamento coberto para 30 Bus

Accesso vertical estacionamento

Área volumes para despacho aduaneiro

Perdidos e achados Desembarque malas

Área coberta de cargas e descargas de malas

Área de arrumos do cais

Accesso ao cais

GROUND FLOOR PL AN


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