Page 58

Through the discussion above, hopefully you understand two different yet equal methods to  consider the clearance of a drug from the bloodstream.  OPTIONAL‐Please participate in the online discussion forum. 

7.3 Clearance II Area under curve (AUC) video Please watch the online video (6 minutes 55 seconds).  A condensed summary of this video can be found in the Video summary page.  OPTIONAL‐Please participate in the online discussion forum. 

Practicing AUC estimation Background: The two ways for calculating area under curve (AUC) of a Cp‐time plot are integration  of the Cp‐time curve and using the trapezoid approximation.  Both methods provide a value for  determining AUC, which can then be used to calculate total clearance.  Instructions: Read the passage below concerning the advantages and disadvantages of both  methods.  Use this information to answer the assessment questions below.  Learning Goal: To understand both the different approaches for calculating AUC and how to use  both methods.  Integration  Integration is an easy method for determining the AUC of a particular drug dose.  Pharmacokinetic  data, whether from animals or humans, are found in the form of Cp‐time data points.  As we have  seen in the assessment questions of Chapter 7.1, we can plot these points, especially in a linear  ln Cp vs. time form, and quickly determine kel and the hypothetical Cpo.  AUC is simply Cpo/kel.   

Although integration is easy, it is not always accurate.  The problem is that a series of ln Cp‐time data  points can be forced to fit to a linear equation without the data actually being linear.  If the data do  not fit, then the simplicity of integration is of little gain because the AUC value will be inaccurate. 

MOOC Medicinal Chemistry  
Advertisement