Page 25

Instructions: Read the passage below and use the information to answer the subsequent  assessment questions.  Learning Goal: To become comfortable working with the different types of units commonly  encountered in medicinal chemistry.  The goal of a drug discovery program is generally to find a molecule that binds a target protein at  very low concentrations.  As has been mentioned before (in Chapter 2), the binding is normally  determined in a biochemical assay, often in the form of a dissociation equilibrium constant (KD).  For  a drug, the values for KD are very small, indicating the drug and target bind very tightly and do not  readily dissociate.  Ideal KD values are in the nanomolar (nM) range, but during development  observed KD values are much higher.  Hits in an early screen might have KD values in the micromolar  (µM) range.  The table below shows the concentrations regularly encountered in a drug discovery  program.  name 

description

unit

relation to molarity 

molar

moles / liter 

M

1

millimolar

millimoles / liter 

mM

10‐3

micromolar

micromoles / liter 

µM

10‐6

nanomolar

nanomoles / liter 

nM

10‐9

picomolar

picomoles / liter 

pM

10‐12

Beyond the reporting of binding data (pharmacodynamics), the units in the table above are also  found throughout pharmacokinetics, especially in reports of the concentration of drugs in blood.  Please complete the online exercise.  OPTIONAL‐Please participate in the online discussion forum. 

Graphing enzyme kinetics data Background: Interpreting enzyme kinetics data requires one to be able to graph the information.   The previous unit contained a video which provided instructions on how to generate graphs from  enzyme kinetics data as a saturation plot (Michaelis‐Menten equation) or in linear form  (Lineweaver‐Burk equation). 

MOOC Medicinal Chemistry