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CARLOS A. SAINZ CACCIA URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN


ABOUT MYSELF I am an architect from Guadalajara, Mexico and MIT-Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP) Master in City Planning with a Certificate in Urban Design.

CARLOS A. SAINZ CACCIA 9 Ward St. Apt 1 casainz@mit.edu Somerville, Ma Twitter: @sainzcaccia 02143 USA LinkedIn: /sainzcaccia

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I strongly believe that no matter what your profession is, you should always contribute to the transformation and improvement of your surroundings. As urban planner and architect, this is vital in guiding my goals and projects. I am passionate about analyzing what people do in the urban space but most importantly what people could be doing if the environment around them was different. Successful city development should always put people at the center while balancing a diverse (and often competing) array of interests from different sectors of a community. The public realm is precisely the place where these interests are expressed and where a sense of community is built.


CONTENTS ACADEMIC WORK Matching Transit and Open Public Spaces. MCP Thesis

p. 4

Minsheng Docks Shanghai

p. 6

Impact of the Big Dig on Boston’s Downtown

p. 8

Alameda Diagonal Promenade

p. 10

Lafayette Park

p. 12

Valencia Recreational Farms

p. 14

Morelos Park Urban Renovation

p. 15

2017 2016 2015 2012 2011

2010 2010

PROFESSIONAL WORK Mascota Downtown Renovation

p. 16

City of Colima Urban Design Manual

p. 17

Chapultepec Avenue

p. 18

Zapopan Tram

p. 20

2014-2015 2013

2008 & 2013 2011

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MATCHING TRANSIT AND OPEN PUBLIC SPACES MCP THESIS

MIT. Cambridge, MA. Spring 2017

project location Guadalajara, Mexico

Abstract

The way we perceive the urban environment affects the choices we make and therefore our behavior. This has an important effect when we navigate a city: how urban spaces are laid out influence our travel choices. With an increasing number of cities considering transit oriented development (TOD) as a primary planning focus of their policies, the connection between the urban image and the transit system is crucial. If planners want to bring people closer to transit, we will need to improve people’s perception of the system and its context. Open spaces have a particular relevance for both urban spaces and the process of navigation. Their openness allow people to perceive a larger portion of their surroundings, easing the process of wayfinding and enhancing the sense of place, which is highly valuable for the construction of true communities. This thesis explored the role of open spaces, not only as attractive urban amenities and recreational spaces, but as organizing elements of the urban territory and as anchors for transit arrival points. Four different theoretical topics were consulted to build a conceptual model of how an open space oriented transit system would look like: perception and behavior theories; environmental images, urban form and wayfinding theories; Place-making concepts; and transit-oriented development theories. The theoretical background later offered the foundation to explore the city of Guadalajara, its open space network and its transit infrastructure. The thesis used Guadalajara as a mean to show the previously analyzed theory and how open public spaces can be utilized as primary elements to structure transit systems and to enhance the enhancement of a sense of place around transit stations. Thesis Advisor: Prof. Brent D. Ryan

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Guadalajara central district’s LRT Stations and matching open public spaces


theoretical conclusions

The theoretical background showed a clear connection between positive travel behavior towards transit, the consequence of the user’s perception and experience, and the importance recognizable places. Urban open spaces as city features potentiate the existence of a recognizable place, in particular for TOD districts.

Central square as structural element

Transit lines and matching open spaces.

• Pairing a transit stop with an open space improve the legibility of the transit system • Open spaces, thanks to their sight opening, ease the wayfinding process and the creation of each user’s mental image of the transit node. Juarez Station open space oriented analysis

Paseo Alcalde

• The existence of open spaces can change the observer’s perception of the area, modifying their behavioral choice.

Refugio Station

Decompression of the urban space

• Open spaces are remarkable urban features to achieve identity and brand identifiable TOD nodes.

Mercado Corona

City Hall Cathedral

School

SCheme

Catedral Station

Open space oriented transit scheme

UDG

The proposed urban structure of the open space oriented transit scheme for a TOD zone is one where a controlled and spatially defined urban open space is paired with the transit stop at the center of the district. The central open space serve as the station’s urban vestibule, as the gateway to the neighborhood, and as the beating heart of the community that will attract denser development and mixed-uses.

Av.Vallarta

Parque Revolución

Av. Juárez

Juarez Station

El Carmen

Universidad Station

Expiatorio

Calz. Federalismo

San Francisco / Aranzazú

Hospital

9 Esquinas Av. La Pa z

Mexicaltzingo Station

500M /800M Buffer

0

0.25

0.5 KM

Open Public Spaces

Parks, Squares, Promenades

TREN LIGERO (LRT) Line 1

MACROBUS (BRT) Line 1

Line 2 Line 3

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MINSHENG DOCKS SHANGHAI CONCEPT

MIT - THU - SJTU. Beijing, China. Summer 2016

project location Shanghai, China

This project was part of the 2016 MIT - Tshingua University Joint Urban Design Studio.

site

The project’s site consisted in an abandoned industrial facility along Shanghai’s river waterfront, which contained remarkable industrial architecture consisting in two large silo buildings and warehouses. The studio’s goal was to not only redevelop the site but also reintroduce productive activities.

The proposal aknowlegdes “information” as the seed of the 21st century production. In this urban ecosystem, the production of knowledge is tested, shared, and then archived and curated. The program consisted in three categories: arts, health and media, which represent a balanced strategy for innovation and development: arts nourish the mind, health nourishes the body and media supplies society the medium to express and connect. The concept followed 5 principles: - Access - Density - Transparency - Linking

- Cross-Pollination

In addition to the five principles, three ideas were considered which assisted in modulating design decisions: - The neighboring community - The industrial heritage of the site - The traditional idea of Chinese open spaces/gardens Team Work. 6 members Role: Lead the land use proposal and program distribution. Responsible for al the skteching, many of the 2D drawings and some 3D visualizations. Responsible of presenting the final result to the board of reviewers and guests. Supervisors: Prof. Dennis Frenchman and Dr. Jota Samper (MIT); Prof. Zhang Jie and Prof. Shao Lei (THU); Prof. Wang Lin and Dr. Wu Jian (SJTU)

Program overview

A- mRi nTdSceramics lab

H E- bAo dLTy - H fashion studio

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Rapid Prototyping lab

exhibition hall

design studio

PHOTOGRAPHY LAB

App development

research lab Biomedical imaging

dance studio

Consulting Room

Chinese medicine

painting studio

Fashion runway

M- s oEc Di e It yA-

gym

seminar room

seminar room

Arts therapy room

Operating room

ward

LECTURE HALL

FILMING STUDIO

media studio


Program distribution

program organization and layout

Different uses cluster surrounding outdoor spaces as a mosaic of activities. The result is a patchwork of uses, creating clusters with their own distinct personality. The different enclaves are linked using a runway network (the loop) that beyond its accessibility purpose, offers a way to experience the site from above and to look inside the different production areas inserted into preserved and new buildings. The project utilized the principles of the Chinese Garden creating many small openings that offer a peek of what lies beyond, enticing the passer-by to explore.

Loop plan and connections

Transversal section

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IMPACT OF THE BIG DIG ON BOSTON’S DOWNTOWN MIT. Cambridge, MA. Fall 2015

Adjusted property value in 1985

Adjusted property value in 2015

2015

1985

project location Boston, MA

project definition

Central Artery/Tunnel Project was a multi-billion project that changed Boston’s downtown area by removing the elevated highway, building new parks, and improving the pedestrian conditions. Although there is no doubt that the area “looks better” now, and that the urban space improved significantly, but does this reflects on measurable data? We gathered and organized data from Boston’s Assessment Office to evaluate if property value and land use changes have occurred along the Greenway in the last 30 years, different than those happening in the rest of Boston’s Downtown.

Team Work. 3 members Role: Responsible joining the data with the geographic information and producing the spatial and statistic analysis and maps. Supervisor: Prof. Sarah Williams

VALUE HEAT MAP 2015 val_2015 / SHAPE_area VALUE HEAT MAP 2015

0.000 - 204.9 205.0 - 517.1 0

517.2 - 857.1 VALUE HEAT MAP 2015

0.125

0.25

0.5 Miles

val_2015 / SHAPE_area

¯

0.000 - 204.9

$900.00    

1350 2500 1357 -–2436 Property Value per Square Foot

200 205.0– -500 517.1

2500 5500 DOWNTOWN 2437 -–5593

500 517.2– -850 857.1

+5500 5594 - 10990

$800.00    

850 857.2– -1350 1356

$700.00    

1357 - 2436

$600.00    

$500.00    

517.2 - 857.1 VALUE HEAT MAP 2015

0 – 200 0.000 - 204.9

BIG DIG  

0.125

0.125

0.25

0.25

0.5 Miles

0.5 Miles

¯

¯

0 – 200 0.000 - 204.9

1350 2500 1357 -–2436

200 205.0– -500 517.1

2500 5500 2437 -–5593

500 517.2– -850 857.1

+5500 5594 - 10990

850 857.2– -1350 1356 1357 - 2436 2437 - 5593

The property 5594 - 10990value (adjusted to inflation) changes showed an initial increase in the Big Dig area but there is no an identifiable constant trend that differenciates the Big Dig value changes with those in the rest of Boston’s Downtown.

2437 - 5593

$400.00    

$300.00    

$200.00    

$100.00    

1990

0

Property Value by area ($/SF) 857.2 - 1356 val_2015 / SHAPE_area

5594 - 10990

$-­‐         1985  

0

205.0 - 517.1

Property Value by area ($/SF) 857.2 - 1356 val_2015 / SHAPE_area

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2015

1985

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015


% CHANGE IN VALUE

BIG DIG % 2010-2015

Percentage change in adjusted property value every 5 years

1985-1990

1990-1995

PER_1510 1995-2000

-100% - 0% 120.00%

% Change  in  property  Value  

0% - 25%

DOWNTOWN

BIG DIG  

104.60%

100.00%

80.00%

25% - 50% 50% - 100% 63.07%

60.00%

100% - 200%

42.33%

20.00%

0.00%

36.39%

35.20%

35.08%

40.00%

200% - 500%

33.24%

11.08%

9.12%

+500%

0.48%

-­‐20.00%

-­‐40.00%

-34.51% -44.70%

-­‐60.00%

1985-­‐1990

1990-­‐1995

1995-­‐2000

Land 1985 uses in 1985 and 2015

2000-2005

2005-2010

2000-­‐2005

2005-­‐2010

2010-­‐2015

2015

2010-2015

BIG DIG % 2010-2015 PER_1510 -100% - 0% 0% - 25% 25% - 50% 50% - 100% 100% - 200% 200% - 500% +500%

% Change  Land  Use  area  between  1985  and  2015   DOWNTOWN  

GREENWAY

200%

UE

BIG DIG % 2010-2015 PER_1510 1995-2000

-100% - 0% 0% - 25% 25% - 50% 50% - 100% 100% - 200% 200% - 500% +500%

160% 150%  

Further, when analyzing the percentage change in value every 5 years, it was possible to confirm the initial increase for Big Dig properties (probably caused by real estate especulation), but later matching the rest of the downtown’s trend. In terms of Land Use changes, it was interesting to note the dramatic increase of residential uses in the Big Dig area in comparison with the rest of Boston’s Downtown.

100%

60% 50%   27%   9%   0%  

17%

16% 7%  

0% Residen9al  

Commercial

Residen9al/Commercial

Industrial

Tax Exempt  

N/A

-­‐50% -­‐53%  

-­‐100%

2010-2015

-­‐60%

-­‐66%

-­‐59%

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ALAMEDA DIAGONAL PROMENADE ITESO. Guadalajara, Mexico. Fall 2012

Site master plan

project location Guadalajara, Mexico

SITE

The project was part of a Project of Professional Application in ITESO. It was a collaboration with the municipal government related to the Digital Creative City (CCD in Spanish) project located in Guadalajara’s Historic Downtown. The CCD Master plan considers the redensification of this area and new public spaces are needed to fulfill the potential new residents demands.

CONCEPT

Specifically this conceptual project considers an intervention along a street known as Alameda Diagonal, which in the past was part of the river that crossed Guadalajara. The Alameda Diagonal Promenade aims to recover the lost river and considers possible new buildings for the CCD project. New parks and plazas are created using the triangular blocks formed by the diagonal. A complete analysis of the city’s layout, the land use, the roads and the buildings in the area was done in order to identify risks and opportunities in the area and protect the few relevant buildings. Team Work. 6 members Role: Team Leader. Responsible for the conceptualization, context, traffic and zoning analysis, urban design, presentations, 2D Graphics and rendering post production. Supervisors: Arq. Jenaro de Silva Sagaón and Arq. Margarita de Silva Peña Building typology analysis

Traffic Analysis

Conceptualization

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Detailed illustrative site plan

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LAFAYETTE PARK

General site plan

Park design components

ITESO. Guadalajara, Mexico. Fall 2011

project location Guadalajara, Mexico

SITE

The Lafayette Park Project is located in a central area of Guadalajara known as the “Colonia Americana”. This is a vibrant area where all the activities happen around the Chapultepec Ave. (formerly known as Lafayette Ave.) Although this area is attracting several real state and cultural projects, there is a lack of green open areas. The goal for this project was to provide this part of the city with a large open public green space. The location was chosen after a comprehensive analysis of the area, specially identifying historic or artistic relevant buildings.

CONCEPT

The followed a bold approach proposing the construction of a new park by demolishing most of the buildings on the 4 selected city blocks, carefully preserving heritage building and the residential character of the area. Tunneling vehicular along Hidalgo ave allowed the inclusion of nearly 2 hectares of park and the construction of vertical housing around it. The project was called an “Urban Reef”, since as in marine reefs, here there would be an explosion of life and activities establishing guidelines for new residential buildings. Team Work. 4 members Role: Team Leader. Responsible for the park’s design, parking solution and the 2D Graphics Supervisor: Arq. Juan Palomar Verea

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Existing buildings

Illustrative site plan

Proposed buildings

Park


Masterplan guidelines

General section

Parking solution

A special container was design to allow large trees to grow over the underground parking.

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VALENCIA RECREATIONAL FARMS

Green border between city and farms

UPV. Valencia, Spain. Spring 2010

project Location Valencia, Spain

SITE

Valencia in Spain is known for its beautiful rural areas around de city. The city’s farms and gardens are threatened by the growth of the urban land. The area for this project is located between the urban limit and a large highway south the city.

CONCEPT

The project introduces the concept of recreational farm, which is a place where city residents can rent small farming spaces where they can grow their own vegetables. The project organizes the land by establishing a green border defined by the existing ditches followed by the recreational farms and placing the best preserved historical farms at the center The recreational farm subdivisions were defined according to the rustic land organization and respecting existing properties, ditches and roads.

Illustrative masterplan

Individual Work Supervisor: Arq. Fernando Gaja i Diaz

PROJECT

CONTEXT

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Roads

Constructions

City Border

Transition Gardens

Market Gardens

Recreative Farms Phase 2

Ditches

Industrial Buildings

Recreative farms facilities

Protected Farms

Recreative Farms Phase 1

Recreative Farms Phase 3


MORELOS PARK URBAN RENOVATION

Area masterplan

UPV. Valencia, Spain. Spring 2010

project Location Guadalajara, Mexico

SITE

The project was located in Guadalajara, Mexico; in an area around the Morelos Park in the city’s historical center. Most of the land surrounding the park is own by the municipal government but the area was completely depressed and most of the buildings unused.

CONCEPT

The concept was to adapt the concept of a mall along a new street that linked the historic monument area with the park. Two anchor stores were set in the end points of the street, and new residential buildings with stores in the ground level along the path. The urban layout was changed in order to improve its functioning and a new building typology, with large common spaces, was introduced

Aerial view and residential building typology

Team Work. 5 members Role: Responsible for the zoning, land use and urban form analysis and 3D graphics. Supervisor: Arq. Juan Cano Forrat

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MASCOTA DOWNTOWN RENOVATION

Existing conditions

PLANEN. Guadalajara, Mexico. 2014-2015

project LOCATION

Town of Mascota, Mexico

Site

Mascota is a town of around 8,000 located in the State of Jalisco’s mountainous region. The project consisted in the urban design renovation of its Historic Downtown.

concept

The street intersections were modified. New ramps were built to allow universal accessibility without altering the historical characteristics of the town’s urban fabric. The construction of the ramps also allowed to organize the street parking spaces. A materials’ palette was defined according to the traditional elements, preferring stones and mosaic sidewalks. As part of the project, we held meetings with town residents and authorities to make sure that project respected the resident’s concearns and most importantly to create a shared vision of the new urban design. Team Work. Role: Project Manager. Participated in the conceptual, architectural and urban design. I was responsible for the architectural drawings, the project presentations, and of the government and community meetings. Collaborators: Arq. Claudio Sainz, Arq. Argelia Ramos Master plan First interventions

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Proposal sketch


CITY OF COLIMA URBAN DESIGN MANUAL PLANEN. Guadalajara, Mexico. 2013

project LOCATION Colima, Mexico

project definition

Team Work. This was a collective work between PLANEN and NAME Architects Role: Member of the lead working team. Participated in the general conceptualization, workshops, analysis, elaboration of data sheets. I was responsible for drafting the universal and specific criteria Collaborators: Arq. Rocio Name, Arq. Leonardo Martínez Arq. Juan Carlos Name, Arq. Claudio Sainz

VIALIDAD

ESTACIONAMIENTO

ÁREA DE AMORTIGUAMIENTO

CICLOVÍA FRANJA DE MOBILIARIO

BANQUETA LÍMITE DE PROPIEDAD

LÍMITE DE PROPIEDAD

We conceived a manual that allows update its contents over time and include more data sheets as needed.

BANQUETA FRANJA DE MOBILIARIO MACHUELO CICLOVÍA ÁREA DE AMORTIGUAMIENTO

Data sheet example

The work consisted of four different parts: - Analysis of current laws - Analysis of the context - Definition of general and specific criteria - Design of the elements that make up the urban space (included in the manual as data sheets)

Analysis example

The Manual was commissioned by the municipal government of the city of Colima. The purpose of the Manual was to give the government clear guidelines for the design of new areas of the city and the renovation of established areas.

SERV. VARIABLE VARIABLE

2.08 3.00

0.80

1.20

3.30

1.20

3.30

0

1

7.50

NOTAS: - De acuerdo al R.Z.M.C. la acera se considera como la suma de: la banqueta, la franja de mobiliario y el machuelo. - Para la disposición de elementos en la franja de mobiliario se deberá consultar la página 111 (Interacción con el Mobiliario Ubrano) del M.I.U.C.

5 2.08

0.80

1.20

0.80

2.50

A.030

BANQUETA EN VIALIDAD COLECTORA

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CHAPULTEPEC AVENUE

Conceptual scheme

PLANEN. Guadalajara, Mexico. 2008 & 2013

project LOCATION Guadalajara, Mexico

SITE

Chapultepec Ave. is one of the most important recreational areas of the western side of the city. The project was conceived in phases and consisted in a comprehensive urban design renovation of the avenue.

CONCEPT

The avenue was thought as a large square, raising the vehicle lanes to the median strip and sidewalks levels. Historical values like the traditional Guadalajara mosaic (red and grey) in the sidewalks were preserved, and the fountains restored acording to the original desing. The number of trees was increased and electrical wiring was concealed.

Road section

SOCIAL INTEGRATION

After the renewal of the Promenade in 2009, the area has reemerged as a meeting point, attracting new real state investments. The social success has exceeded expectations and it became a center of cultural, artistic, social and political activities; a meeting point for communication of ideas and recreation of Guadalajara. Team Work. This was a collective work between PLANEN and NAME Architects Role: Collaborated with the architectural drawing, 2D representation, photographs and presentations. Project Director: Arq. Claudio Sainz

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Illustrative floor plan


Avenue master plan 19


ZAPOPAN TRAM

Redestribution of the road section

PLANEN - TAU. Guadalajara, Mexico. 2011

project lOCATION Zapopan, Mexico

project definition

The tram was commissioned by Zapopan’s municipal government and was produced in collaboration with 7 of the most important design firms of the city. The firms’ were responsible for the urban planning and design and the station’s architectural design. The tram line was divided into 6 sections, with the general criteria and architectural solution developed by the workshop and each office made the specific analysis and detailed urban design of their section.

STATION and urban design CONCEPTs

The stations were designed to be a referent in their context. It consisted in three parts: 1. Plaza - Link between the station and crosswalk 2.Tower - The turnstiles’ lobby, intended as a neighborhood’s reference. Local artists were invited to intervene each of the 12 m towers. 3. Platform. Two types of stations, single and double, were design depending on the demand shown in the transportation studies. A car lane was removed from each side, allowing to maintain the median strip and include a bike lane by the sidewalk. The trees from the median strip were maintained and new ones were included in the areas between stations. Team Work. This was a collective work between 7 firms in Guadalajara: Agraz Architects, Ibañez Architects, JCName, Juan Palomar Architects, MetroArquitectura, PLANEN, and consultant Juan Ponce. Work credited as part of TAU Architectural and Urbanism Workshop. Role: Participated as my office representative in most of the workshops between the other firms and in the meetings with authorities. I participated with the analysis and architectural and urban design of one of the sections of the project. Responsible for some of the architectural drawings and 2D graphics. 20

Single and double platform station


Federalismo Station site plan

Urban solution scheme visualization

Federalismo Station section

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CARLOS A. SAINZ CACCIA URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN

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Portfolio  

© Carlos A. Sainz Caccia Urban Planning and Design Portfolio

Portfolio  

© Carlos A. Sainz Caccia Urban Planning and Design Portfolio

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