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ASSE

ASSE

ASSE PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCED EDUCATIONAL BY AN PRODUCT AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCED EDUCATIONAL BY AN PRODUCT AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ASSE

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONA

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONA

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONA


CONTENTS


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 4

PROJECT DESCRIPTION 5

PEOPLE 10

PROCESS 12

DESIGN 20

PROTOTYPE 26

FABRICATION 32

CONFIGURATIONS 36

BUDGET 56

POST-SCRIPT 58

3


Acknowledgements THIS PROJECT WAS MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FUND FOR INNOVATIVE UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING.

We would like to also thank our colleagues at USC that have assisted us in this effort and special thanks to: Ian McCully, Facilities Coordinator, USC School of Architecture Anders Carlson, Assistant Professor, Structural Engineer Christoph Kapeller, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Architect Janek Dombrowa, Assistant Professor of Practice, Architect

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Design - Build There has been an increased interested in teaching involving “project based” learning thinking through making techniques. The School of Architecture had always had this emphasis in our design studio based curriculum. However design studio pedagogy has been transformed by new technologies that allow for the use of virtual modeling, which in spite of its potentials has significant limitations – not, the least of which is the absence of scale a de-emphasis of materiality, and a lack of tectonic sensibility. Virtual Modeling is dependent on constantly evolving software and suffers from a “craft backlash” both in the design process and ultimately in the buildings produced from such a process. This issue becomes much more significant when it is understood that professional degree programs deploy the design studio as a precursor of what is happening professionally. Our course model employs a project methodology that provides an archetype for design significantly different than that currently used by most of the profession. By investigating the design process through the complete cycle of a design build project – the course will look at craft from the design process through fabrication and deployment. The course will enrich the learning experience including the practicalities of budget, construction and client by focusing on the development of a project through the conceptual and practical implementation, and ultimately the prefabrication and installation of “built work” that serves as an example for both students and community.

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“An Architect must be a craftsman. Of course any tools will do. These days the tools might include the computer, an experimental model and mathematics. However it is still craftsmanship- the work of someone who does not separate the work of the mind from the work of the hand. It involves a circular process that draws you from an idea to a drawing. From a drawing to an experiment, from an experiment to a construction, and from construction back to an idea again.�

6

Renzo Piano 1992


Background Information The course is initiated with a series of material design meetings to identify issues of construction and fabrication to organize collaborative efforts with the constituents. The team will develop systematized components and integrate these elements to define the total installation, merging the technology of design and construction. The completion of projects will allow for an investigative methodology that is currently unavailable in our existing hypothetical studio format. The larger format for studio instruction will provide for flexibility in structuring project efforts and efficiencies in addressing collective issues. The project will be collaboratively designed and executed by the team who will construct and install the design, the result of an integrative design methodology synthesizing the design process with fabrication and producing an architecture that intrinsically relates material, tectonic and form. Understanding the critical importance of construction on the field of architecture and the expansion of this impact from conceptual information management into actual fabrication, a mastery of these techniques becomes essential in the emerging models of contemporary practice. The ability to engage material and tectonic through a complete stream of project development and execution provides the opportunity for learning through hands-on building projects. Hands-on learning is vital for architectural students. Our courses at the School of Architecture cover a wide breadth of topics ranging from cultural history to structural engineering, design theory to environmental conditioning, life drawing to professional practice. While the profession increasingly encourages specialization, all of these areas need to be familiar to all architects. This course proposal studies how design-build can provide a new way of integrating these issues, and to validate the process through construction. 7


We initially proposed to reintroduce building craft into our design studio courses to explore Innovations design, materiality, tectonics and construction using cutting edge technologies. Southern California has unique resources in these types of technologies and we can engage them in the studio environment. By requiring the design process to engage construction, the traditional relationship between design and craft can be re-introduced into architectural education with a different perspective that integrates current methods of digital fabrication into the studio environment. Design / Fabrication exploration will demonstrate emerging building technologies and materials and evaluate their effectiveness. The opportunity for students to physically create, engage in one-on-one conversations and present, discuss and defend their ideas is an intensive learning environment. By introducing a hands-on projects into the curriculum, this proposal can both enrich the educational environment and explore procedures, which potentially help re-define our professional role in society. Introducing a hands-on material project in class directly addresses the need as expressed by students for more in-depth study of materials and fabrication relative to the design process. The exposure to new technological approaches in presentations to the full topic studio enrollment will benefit the whole professional curriculum. By physically creating a built project, students will learn via doing and demonstrate the relevance of these new procedures and techniques. With the project constructed at the School of Architecture, students not enrolled in the class will see their fellow students actively engaged in a building project and learn about both innovative and traditional material options. Having an accessible completed project will provide a public forum for sharing the outcomes with the broader Los Angeles Community. 8


Timeline and Project Description Due to the only partial award of funding, the scale and format of the design-build has been altered to better accommodate new parameters. This course format will be a three week intensive special topics ARC 499 course offered May 15th thru June 4, 2010. This scheduling will allow the students participating to take advantage of the ability to focus on the course without other academic conflicts. The project will be the design and fabrication of mobile presentation furniture for the school of architecture. Focusing on movable walls for drawing pin-up and digital projection [with both indoor and outdoor accommodations] and model podiums for the display of three-dimensional objects, students will identify the needs of the student community, identity the practical and material requirements of the design, and then collectively design and fabricate the final products. The collaborative design method, along with the engagement of design through the full cycle of schematic, design development, construction documentation and construction allow for the full engagement from idea to construction. This short-course will demonstrate design-build to the USC School of Architecture and ignite a precedent for future larger scale and more involved investigations.

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BORDEN PRO-at-EVERYTHING Gail Peter Borden, AIA Assistant Professor of Architecture

FACULTY

LAGRECO FEARLESS LEADER Charles Lagreco, AIA Associate Professor of Architecture MacDonald and Diane Becket Professorship in Community Design

10


CARLOS GUTIERREZ B.ARCH_5TH YR

TEAM

GABE MASON M.LARCH_2ND YR

11

ADRIAN SUZUKI M.LARCH_2ND YR

DAVID HOFFMAN B.ARCH_4TH YR

SEAN HSU B.ARCH_5TH YR


PROCESS

12


13


14


15


16


17


18


19


DESIGN

6'-5" 6'-8"

0'-3"

20


1" 1'-9 2

2'-0"

1" 14

4'-0"

plan 1/16”=1’-0”

21


STEEL FRAME 1 1/4” STEEL ANGLES

1/2” PLYWOOD 1/2” HOMASOTE

22


1/2” PLYWOOD

CASTERS (4) 3” PJ SWIVEL TYPE 23


LOWER CORNER SECTION DETAIL

24


25

UPPER CORNER SECTION DETAIL


PROTOTYPE

EXPERIMENTS: VARIOUS MATERIALS AND DETAILS WERE BUILT AND TESTED AT FULL SCALE BEFORE THE FINAL PROTOTYPE WAS CONSTRUCTED

26


27


PODIUM EARLY PODIUM PROTOTYPES: FOCUSED ON EXPERIMENTS WITH FORM RELATED TO ISSUES OF STORAGE

MATERIAL PROTOTYPES: AFTER ESTABLISHING A VERSATILE FORM, THE EXPERIMENTATION WAS WITH VARIOUS MATERIALS AND DETAILS

28


29


30


FINAL PODIUM PROTOTYPE: DURABLE VERSATILE STORE INSIDE EACH OTHER EASY TO BUILD/MAINTAIN

31


FABRICATION

32


33


34


35


36


PRE.MO

[PRESENTATION MODULE] POSSIBLE ASSEMBLIES

37


UPPER ROSENDIN PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 1

BALCONY WALL CREATES A 3RD WALL ALONG THE BALCONY MORE WALL SPACE CLOSES UPPER ROSENDIN


UPPER ROSENDIN PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 2

SEPARATION WALL DIVIDES UPPER ROSENDIN MORE WALL SPACE POSSIBILITY FOR MULTIPLE REVIEWS 40


41


UPPER ROSENDIN PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 3

CORNER DEFINES A SPACE DIRECTS TRAFFIC AROUND REVIEW SPACE

42


43


LOWER ROSENDIN PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 1

CORNER DEFINES LOWER ROSENDIN AS A SEPARATE SPACE LESS INTERFERENCE TO REVIEWS FROM CIRCULATION DOUBLES USABLE WALL SPACE

44


45


LOWER ROSENDIN PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 2

EXHIBITION BETTER SUITED TO EXHIBITIONS MEANT FOR VIEWING RATHER THAN REVIEWS PROVIDES MORE WALL SPACE

46


47


LOWER ROSENDIN PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 3

NESTED MODULES ARE DESIGNED TO FIT INTO THE HALLWAY GROTTOES

48


49


WATT COURTYARD PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 1

COURTYARD EXHIBITION FOR OUTDOOR EXHIBITIONS CREATES ACTIVE AND PASSIVE SPACES IN WATT COURTYARD ALLOWS REVIEWS TO OCCUR OUTSIDE


51


WATT COURTYARD PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 2

SCATTERED FOR SEPARATE REVIEWS OR EXHIBITIONS COULD SUPPLEMENT LARGER OUTDOOR EXHIBITIONS + EVENTS

52


53


WATT COURTYARD PRE.MO CONFIGURATION 3

CORNER DEFINES A SMALLER SPACE WITHIN WATT COURTYARD FOR MEETINGS OR REVIEWS

54


55


BUDGET

56


Description

Quantity

Cost Per Unit

Total

Metal cutting

84

$2.14

$180.00

Joint Connector Nuts

125

$0.26

$37.46

Joint Connector Bolts

125

$0.15

$23.54

Steel Angles

20 @ 20’-0”

$13.75

$274.92

Plywood

19 @ 1/2” 4’X8’

$34.60

$657.47

Homasote

10 @ 4’X8’

$23.04

$230.39

Casters

21

$10.98

$230.48

Painting

5

$75.00

$375.00

Miscellaneous Tools

$681.20

Fabrication

$2000.00

Publishing

$309.54

$401.85 PER SET

57

$5,000.00


POST-SCRIPT

Conclusions The basic premise of the investigation was that the physical act of making involves a creative thinking through making process quite distinct from the conceptualization of the object because it has to confront the tangible impact of materiality and the discipline of craft which necessitates an appreciation of the construction process. This exposure is commonly only imposed on the architectural profession by the numbing imposition of type where the repetition of building elements and the exposure to the variables and impact of the implementation process has a resultant impact on the design process. The impact of new technology goes beyond its visualization and suggests a new virtual connection between the description of things and their fabrication. By integrating the design and building efforts, there exists the both the potential of merging the two activities and at the same time loosing the feedback that comes with an understanding of the implications of that potential proposition – to paraphrase Rem Koolhas , “now you can build anything.� If one is concerned about the implications, as well as excited about the potential, then it might be reasonable to consider the return to a more tangible connection between the design build dialogue in order to be able to more clearly see the limitations of new technologies as well as their more obvious advantages. The class offered in the summer session had the advantage of highly accessible and underused facilities as well as an intensely focused effort concentrated in a full time three-week schedule. This was somewhat tempered by the lack of student exposure, as only a few were in school on special projects during the first three weeks of summer. A more rigorous testing of the relationship between virtual and actual modeling might have been possible in a full semester studio context but was not attempted in this course. And while there are certainly many unique technological leading edge resources, the lack of lead time did not

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allow us to explore that potential application to the project. The construction experience was somewhat ironically more limited by the students own skills and exposure and by the easily available and affordable resources found in the school and surrounding community. The scale and scope of the project was entirely appropriate and allowed for a reiterative process to test premise and precedent before the final implementation of the designed components. It seems that the decision to fabricate enough units to test their application to the school exhibition spaces, created a ambiguity between prototype and product. If there had been more time, a full prototyping and evaluation would have occurred before all five units were fabricated and instead all were fabricated at once to meet the deadline. This did provide a clear indication of the limitations of the initial premises on cutting and welding the frame as well as the use of connectors and panel materials but did not allow for a demonstration of the lessons learned. Part of that input will involve the use of the system in presentations throughout the school in the rest of the summer and in the fall regular course schedule. That evaluation will provide further insight into the process and its potential application to our curriculum. 06 | 15 | 2010 Gail Peter Borden, AIA Assistant Professor of Architecture Charles Lagreco, AIA Associate Professor of Architecture MacDonald and Diane Becket Professorship in Community Design 59


TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDTO CTUUDAON RA PL YA BNDOEIC TA UC DU OD RE P KSEDOTUATN CA UD YO BRDPEL CA UN DO OIR TA P CUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NATY CB UD DO ER CP UD LO AN RO P ITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

ESSA

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ESSA

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ESSA

TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NATY CB UD DO ER CP UD LO AN RO P ITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

ESSA

TCUDORP LANOITAC

TCUDORP LANOITAC

TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NATY CB UD DO ER CP UD LO AN RO P ITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NATY CB UD DO ER CP UD LO AN RO P ITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUATN CA UD YO BRDPEL CA UN DO OIR TA P CUDE KSEDTO CTUUDAON RA PL YA BNDOEIC TA UC DU OD RE P KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

PRODUCED BY AN AUTO

PRODUCED BY AN AUTO

PRODUCED BY AN AUTO

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