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Edited by LANDALUZ, Certified Quality Business Association Editorial Board LANDALUZ, Certified Quality Business Association D. Manuel Jurado Toro D. Ángel Camacho D. Álvaro Guillén Benjumea D. Francisco Artacho Sánchez D. Jesús Barrio Rubio D. Juan Llanza General Secretariat D. Juan de Porres Guardiola D. Santiago Urquijo Ruiz-Giménez D. Miguel Angel Jiménez Segador D. Pedro Parias Jiménez Dña. Mariella Cingolani Coronel Dña. Lola Jiménez Rodríguez Dña. Mónica García Palma D. Álvaro Martínez Conradi Editorial Coordination and Design GLOBAL PRESS Carlos Javier Aguilar Galea Paloma Rodríguez Rodríguez Rocío Manteca Medina Avda. San Fco. Javier, 24 Edificio Sevilla I planta 9ª Mód. 7, 41018 Sevilla Tel.: +34 954 92 32 33 - +34 954 70 24 50 Fax: +34 954 92 29 65 gp@globalpress.es Photography Miguel Ángel Cano Pérez, Landaluz, Extenda This magazine has the support of EXTENDA, Trade Promotion Agency of Andalucia.

LANDALUZ, Certified Quality Business Association Avda. de Grecia 8 - 41012 Sevilla Tlf: +34 954 23 48 49 -+34 954 65 75 27 Fax: +34 954 62 32 06 info@landaluz.es www.landaluz.es

We would like to thank: La Alhambra, Manuel Rodríguez, Communication Manager of the Doña

María de las Mercedes Foundation.

Depósito Legal: SE-0181-06 4

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50 Flavours The crips: the universal potato

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Dear Friends

Editorial It is a great pleasure to be able to address you all once again. I wish you all the best for 2011 and sincerely hope that, as every year, we can make the best of our abilities to increase our presence in as many markets as possible. As part of our campaign to export the very best of our produce, gastronomy and culture, we begin the year with a rundown of a series of international activities, including a trade exhibition featuring Andalusian products in Switzerland.

This took place in Basle in December and was attended by a large group of buyers from the leading Swiss distribution network, COOP, who were able to learn more about the excellent quality of the region’s produce. Thanks to the exhibition, arrangements have been made to choose a range of products and organise a series of promotional activities in April, the first time an initiative of this kind will have taken place in Switzerland. We would also like to bring to your attention the trade delegation from the Andorran Mercacenter chain who visited the region in January. The aim was to meet companies from all the different sectors of the food industry with the aim of organising a promotional campaign for Andalusian produce in their outlets in May. This will be the second activity of its kind following the excellent results of last year’s campaign, and we are sure it won’t be the last.

ceremony of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy. The organisation is made up of the Gastronomic Academies of Andalusia, Spain, Portugal, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, and Brazil, and it has been set up with the aim of promoting gastronomic activities and exchanges between the various countries. In Peru, we also attended the Mistura gastronomic trade fair, the most important of its kind in Latin America. In this year’s edition Spain was the special guest country. Lastly, in January, we also attended the ceremony for the Alas Prizes, which Extenda awards to Andalusian exporters. The Prince of Asturias attended this edition, showing the importance with which the awards are seen in the business community. We are proud to be able to say that the agro-food sector was well represented amongst the finalists in such a prestigious event. It is extremely pleasing to be able to begin the year by drawing your attention to the wide range of activities which we are carrying out in our constant efforts to open new markets for Andalusia’s magnificent products. This is particularly the case in such a difficult economic climate which can only make us redouble our endeavours to generate better results. During 2011 we shall be making every effort to increase our presence in growing markets, be they Switzerland, Andorra, Hungary, China, Portugal, etc., and as always, we will keep you informed in this publication every three months about all of our products and activities.

As part of our stated aim of supporting the HORECA sector, as a fundamental pillar of our gastronomy and an excellent base for the promotion of our produce, last September we visited South American countries of Peru, Brazil and Argentina, where we attended the presentation

Manuel Jurado Toro 6

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The awards for internationalization promoted by the Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science came at an important time for Andalusian Exports.

Extenda

THE PRINCE OF ASTURIAS PRESENTS THE

AL AS AWARDS FOR INTERNATIONALISATION

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Grupo Medina, The Culinary Collective, Faasa, Vircell S.L. and Xtraice S.L. were presented with Alas Awards for Internationalisation by HRH Prince Felipe de Borbón, at a ceremony in Punta Umbría (Huelva), during the course of which the winners of the five categories were announced. This year’s tenth edition of the awards, which are sponsored by the Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science, coincided with the 25th anniversary of the organisers, the Andalusian Agency for

International Promotion (Extenda), and came at an important time for Andalusian exports. The ceremony was attended by public officials including the President of the Regional Government, José Antonio Griñán; the Secretary of State for Foreign Trade, Alfredo Bonet; the Minister of Economy, Innovation and Science, Antonio Ávila; and the Mayor of Punta Umbría, Gonzalo Rodríguez, as well as representatives from the business sector including the President of the Andalusian Chamber of Commerce, and the Vice President of the CEA, Antonio Ponce. The president of LANDALUZ, Manuel Jurado Toro, who also attended the event, highlighted the significant increase in Andalusian exports and

Left to right: Teresa Saez Carrascosa, Director General of Extenda, Jose Vazquez Malavé, Director General of Ussisa, Miguel Ángel Jiménez Segador, Head of Exports of LANDALUZ, HRH the Prince of Asturias, Felipe de Borbón y Grecia, Manuel Jurado Toro, President of LANDALUZ Business Association for Certified Quality, Juan de Porres Guardiola, Secretary General of Landaluz and Ángel Camacho Perea, Treasurer of LANDALUZ.


Words the importance of promoting consumption of high quality Andalusian produce, both at a national and international level. This is the result of a well-defined strategy developed by EXTENDA which demonstrates the organisation’s strong commitment to supporting the internationalisation of the region’s agrofood sector. The 2010 Alas Awards cover five categories, two of which, “25 Years of International Activity” and ‘‘Importer of Andalusian Produce’ were especially created for this year’s edition. The companies which were unanimously selected by the judges for these prizes were the Grupo Medina from Huelva and The Culinary Collective from the US. The winners of the other three categories ‘Initiating Export Operations’, ‘Export Business’ and ‘‘Establishment abroad’, were Xtraice S.L., Vircell S.L. and Grupo Faasa. Grupo Medina The Grupo Medina was presented with the ‘25 Years of International Activity” award for its pioneering role in introducing and promoting the cultivation of strawberries and other fruit in the coastal areas of Huelva. Their strategy of expanding through innovation has played a decisive role in the development of the agro-food sector in Andalusia over the past few decades. As a result, the province of Huelva has become the biggest producer and exporter of fresh strawberries in the world, with international sales worth €320 million over the last year. Since 1999 Grupo Medina has taken part in a number of promotional activities carried out by Extenda, including participation in trade fairs, commercial missions and promotional campaigns. 25 years supporting internationalisation The Alas awards are part of a programme of activities carried out to promote the internationalisation of the Andalusian Economy by the Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science through Extenda, which has been operating for 25 years and over the last year organised nearly 1,500 international promotional activities with the participation of some 4,000 companies. In addition to its support services, during 2011 the Andalusian Regional Government will assign Extenda additional funds worth €20 million for companies requiring financial backing for internationalisation projects. This measure is aimed at reinforcing internationalisation as an instrument for the reactivation of the Andalusian economy whilst preventing companies from being affected by the stricter requirements imposed by financial institutions to grant loans.

Rocío Medina, President and daughter of the founder of Grupo Medina, to whom HRH Prince Felipe presented the prize, speaking on behalf of all the prize-winners.

Record exports for the region The Andalusian export sector has seen sustained growth for over a year, and between January and November 2010 exports were higher than the whole of 2009. With growth of 27.9%, total exports reached €16,795 million, a figure which was higher than 2008, until then the most successful year for the region, and Andalusia is now in fourth place in terms of overall exports. Exports have grown over 10% more in Andalusia than in any other Spanish region in 2010, leading to a growth of almost 1% in percentage share of total national exports. The region is now responsible for a total of 9.9% of Spanish sales abroad. In terms of the different sectors, somewhat surprisingly in these times of crisis, it has been the industrial rather than the agro-food sector which has seen the largest growth. In terms of the individual provinces it was Huelva which saw the greatest expansion in exports in the first ten months of 2010, with growth rates of 63.5%, 16% more than any other province to reach an overall figure of €3.145 billion. This has meant that Huelva has overtaken Seville and after Cadiz is now the second largest exporter in the region, accounting for almost a fifth of total Andalusian exports (18.7%).

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THE ANDALUSIAN REGIONAL GOVERNMENT ORGANISED A CONFERENCE ON THE NECESSARY REQUIREMENTS FOR EXPORTING FOOD TO THE UNITED STATES

Extenda

Some 40 Andalusian agro-food companies attended a lecture organised by the Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science held at the head offices of Extenda in Seville.

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The Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science, through the Andalusian Agency for International Promotion (Extenda) organised a conference for 40 agrofood companies in order to provide information about the registration requirements of the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) in order to export food to the United States. The information provided was of an essentially practical nature and offered comprehensive details about the documentation required to export food to America, including a practical demonstration by an expert of how to fill in FDA registration forms. The event was one of the support activities developed by Extenda to facilitate the internationalisation

process of the companies operating in the agrofood sector. The essential significance of this conference was based on the fact that in order to export foodstuffs to the USA it is necessary to be registered with the “Food & Drug Administration”, the FDA. This is an organisation run by the United States Human and Health Services Department which covers food safety and standards. The FDA establishes rules and regulations to guarantee that food products produced or imported into the United States are safe for human consumption, according to a series of inspections as established in the Federal Laws for Food, Medication and Cosmetics. The Extenda Business Promotional Office in Miami took an active part in the conference. Andalusian agro-foods in the United States Exports of Andalusian agro-food and drink products between January and November 2010 showed a 28% increase over the same period in 2009, reaching a total value of €323 million. Seville is the leading exporter to the USA with 22% of the total. Cordoba, exported goods to a value of €51.8 million, 70% more than in 2009, and Cadiz also increased the value of its exports by 36%. The most important products are fruit and vegetables,


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A GROUP OF FIFTY GOURMET FOOD RETAILERS FROM FRANCE ATTENDED THE IBERICO HAM CUTTING COMPETITION The Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science helped Andalusian food brands Sierra Morena, 5 Generaciones and Cuyar Jabugo to take part in the event, which was held at the George V Hotel in Paris

The award ceremony was also attended by the Spanish Ambassador to France, Carlos Bastarreche who presented the prize to Yung Li, the professional ham cutter from Byzance, a delicatessen shop specialising in Spanish food products.

this quintessentially Andalusian product.

Between January and October 2010, exports from Andalusia to France stood at €19 million, more than twice the amount for the whole of 2009, with an increase of 114.5%

The event had a dual objective: increasing awareness about Iberico ham in France through the media and opinion makers (restaurateurs, ‘bloggers’, etc.) and encouraging contact between the participating companies and French wholesalers.

Internationalisation and exports

Fifty retailers, importers, traders, and distributors of gourmet foods and other products and the specialised press attended the presentation of the prizes for the Iberico ham cutting competition held at the George V hotel in Paris. This promotional initiative organised by the Department for Economy, Innovation and Science, through the Andalusian Agency for International Promotion (Extenda) as part of a collaboration agreement signed by the latter with ICEX, Fomentos de Extremadura and Excal. The Andalusian government supported the participation of the three brands from the region: Sierra Morena (Córdoba), 5 Generaciones (Córdoba), and Cuyar Jabugo (Huelva).

The members of the jury included Nico Jiménez, Alberto Herraiz – a Paris-based restaurateur who has been awarded a Michelin star, and the Chef of the George V Hotel himself. The event began with a seminar on Iberico Ham and a demonstration by professional ham cutter Nico Jiménez. This was followed by the competition, the presentation of prizes and a workshop with the participation of the ‘bloggers’ who were present at the event. Extenda has been carrying out activities to promote Iberico Ham in France since 2007 with the aim of increasing consumption and spreading awareness about

During 2010 a number of events were organised with the participation of restaurateurs from all the different regions of France.

Exports of Andalusian meat products from January to October 2010 stood at €150.48 million. This represents an increase of 21.7% compared with the same period in 2009 and means that Andalusia is the fourth biggest regional exporter of meat in the world. In terms of markets for Andalusian meat products, the most important is Portugal, followed by France, Italy, Russia and Benin. According to provisional data for 2010, some 74 Andalusian producers have been involved in international sales, 32 of them on a regular basis. The provinces with the largest sales volume are Malaga (€71.5 million), Seville (€45.7 million) and Córdoba (€14 million). Meat exports from Andalusia to France during this period were worth €19 million, more than twice the value for the whole of 2009, which represents an increase of some 114.5%.

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THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ECONOMY, INNOVATION AND SCIENCE AND HUNGARIAN MAGAZINE DECANTER ORGANISED A SHERRY TASTING EVENT IN BUDAPEST

Extenda

Five Sherry producers presented their high quality wines to professionals from the gourmet sector during a lecture held in the Manna Lounge restaurant The Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science, through the Andalusian Agency for International Promotion (Extenda) and the specialised wine magazine Decanter organised a tasting event featuring Sherries produced by five different producers in the Manna Lounge Restaurant in Budapest on the 19th of January. This event was aimed at offering a group of Hungarian professionals and wine connoisseurs the opportunity to sample different types of Sherry whilst providing them with comprehensive information about the specific characteristics of the wines. The initiative was aimed at increasing the presence of Sherry in the range of wines offered in Budapest’s restaurants whilst promoting it amongst consumers.

This promotional event, which was supported by Extenda’s Business Promotion Office in Budapest was led by László Romsics, a sommelier who is widely renowned in Hungary and is also involved in the international education programme developed by the Master of Wine Institute. The tasting was divided into two sessions each with 20 to 25 participants, the first aimed at professionals and the second to connoisseurs. Nine wines produced by five Andalusian bodegas There were 9 wines from five different Sherry bodegas: Manzanilla La Gitana, Pedro Ximénez Triana and Jerez Cortado Wellington from Bodegas Hidalgo; Príncipe Amontillado and Cuco Oloroso from Bodegas Barbadillo; Fino Pale Dry from Bodegas Osborne; Tio Pepe from Bodegas González Byass; Rich Golden from Bodegas Sandeman and Canasta Cream Sherry from Bodegas Williams & Humbert. All the above-mentioned wines are already commercially available on the Hungarian market except for Williams & Humbert’s Canasta Cream Sherry, which Decanter decided to include in the tasting after it was excellently received at a previous tasting event organised by the magazine in October. This activity, promoted by Extenda, was

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an initial step in the participation of Andalusian producers in the forthcoming edition of VinCe, a trade fair for wine producers and other companies working in the sector which will be held in Budapest in March.

different countries. Decanter produces a special edition for Hungary.

The activity was complemented with seminars and workshops analysing the different types of Sherry, as well as a seminar chaired for the first time by British “Master of Wine” Sarah Jane Evans. Created in 1975, Decanter is a prestigious British magazine dedicated to the world of wine which sells approximately 40,000 copies in 92

From January to November 2010 exports of Andalusian wine to Hungary were five times greater than the same period during the previous year. In terms of overall volume of sales, Cadiz was the most important province with 83% of total exports. Six Andalusian companies are currently exporting their wines to Hungary.

The Internationalisation of Andalusian wines

NINE AGRO-FOOD COMPANIES FROM ANDALUSIA PARTICIPATED IN A TRADE INITIATIVE WITH IMPORTERS IN HUNGARY AND BULGARIA

Between the 31st of January and the 4th of February, the Department of the Economy, Innovation and Science, organised a meeting through the Andalusian Agency for International Promotion (Extenda) between nine food and drink companies based in Andalusia and importers and distributors from Hungary and Bulgaria.

from Dos Hermanas (Seville). During the four-day event the companies had the opportunity to present their products to the media, whilst also holding meetings with leading importers, participating in round table debates, and taking part in individual visits to importers facilities, points of sale, etc.

This initiative was aimed at finding agents for the Andalusian companies which have participated in promotional activities held at points of sale in the Cora supermarket chain in previous years. Extenda aims to respond to the demand for new products which is increasing in these markets whilst expanding the availability of the region’s produce in the Hungarian and Bulgarian supermarket sector.

Internationalisation in Hungary

Five provinces represented The nine companies participating in the initiative included Bioalimentación Infantil, Grupo Colvi and Bodegas Williams & Humbert, from Jerez de la Frontera (Cadiz), Visana and Bodegas Cruz Conde, from Montilla (Córdoba), Luxeapers de Nacimiento (Almeria), Bodegas Málaga Virgen, de Fuente de Piedra (Malaga), bioBética from Malaga; and Torres and Ribelles

According to data supplied by Extenda, the Republic of Hungary enjoys a strategic geographical and political position within the European Union. There is an increasing interest in traditional products from the Mediterranean diet, as well as health foods. Furthermore, the government has adopted a number of measures to boost the national economy and stimulate consumption which include reducing corporate tax from 19% to 10%, and Income Tax to 16% from 2011. The agro-food products of interest for this market include cheeses, wine, confectionery and health foods. From January to November 2010 the value of exports of Andalusian agro-food and drink products to Hungary reached €9 million and

the region is the third largest Spanish exporter to the country after Catalonia and Valencia. Almeria is the most important province, accounting for 60.3% of exports, followed by Seville, with 18.5%. Of total Andalusian exports to Hungary, 48.7% come from the agro-food sector, mainly fruit and vegetables, and olive oil. The Bulgarian market Meanwhile, the Republic of Bulgaria, situated in the southeast of the European Union, forming a point of contact between Europe and Asia, has seen a steady increase in average wages and purchasing power in a population which spends approximately 40% of its income on food products. Expanding tastes and a growing concern for healthier eating habits has led to increased interest in the Mediterranean diet. The offices of Extenda in Sofia have observed growth in demand for frozen fish products, olives and olive oil, meat, cured pork products, confectionary and vegetable preserves. ANDALUSIAN FLAVOUR

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LANDALUZ and CONSORCIO DE TURISMO DE SEVILLA PROMOTE SEVILLE IN

MILAN The Consorcio de Turismo de Sevilla, working in collaboration with the Spanish Tourist Office in Milan organised an event in the city entitled “Moda-Siviglia-Opera-Milano” to promote Seville as an attractive destination for conference tourism, fashion, design, opera, flamenco and gastronomy. The event coincided with the hosting of Milan’s BIT (Borsa Internazionale de Turismo), one of the world’s most important tourism trade fairs, which was held on the 18th and 19th of February. Seville was presented to professionals working in the tourist industry (travel agents, tour-operators, associations, institutions) as well as to the public in general, in the gardens of Milan’s Palazzo Isimbardi, where guests had the opportunity to enjoy opera and flamenco, fashion, and the city’s typical gastronomy. The event was attended by Seville’s Deputy Mayor and Head of Events and Tourism, Rosamar Prieto-Castro, as well as the managing directors of the Consorcio de Turismo, Beatriz Arilla, and the Convention Bureau, Manuel Macías, and restaurateurs, designers, opera singers, and flamenco artists.

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Gastronomy played an important role in the event and the Modesto Restaurante represented the Seville Restaurateurs Association . There was also a venenciador and a skilled ham cutter as well as number of other associated activities. Landaluz Landaluz, the Business Association for Certified Quality, which represents more than 140 agro-food companies in Andalusia, played an important role in the event by providing samples of some of the province’s most typical products including olive oil tortas from Tortas Gaviño and olives from Inés Rosales and Jolca, which were included in promotional bags with information about Seville. The Costura Opera fashion show included clothes by prestigious designers such as Carmen del Marco, Manolo Giraldo, Miguel Reyes, Daniel Carrasco, Cañavate, O´Kean y Avila, Blanca Gallego, Missey, Rosa Cuevas and Petro Valverde. Meanwhile the Flamenco Fashion show included work by Rosalía Zahino, Pilar Vera, Pol Núñez, Luchi Cabrera, Pepa Garrido, Angeles Verano, Pitusa Gasul, Aurora Gaviño, Molina Moda and Nuevo Montecarlo. The show closed with a demonstration of traditional shawls by María Angeles Espinar and jewellery by Dublos, Bambla and Rocío de Porres. The worlds of art and culture as essential symbols of Seville and Andalusia were represented by the Mundo Lírico opera company and Triana Flamenca.


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Landaluz and Extenda organise an outbound trade mission with buyers from the Mercacenter Andorra group A number of Head of Purchases from the Andorran distribution group MERCACENTER travelled to Seville to attend meetings with several Andalusian agro-food companies which are mostly members of LANDALUZ, the Business Association for Certified Quality. The mission, which was developed jointly by LANDALUZ and EXTENDA under the framework of a Collaboration Agreement signed by the two organisations, was aimed at organising interviews with companies interested in participating in a point-of-sale promotional campaign which is to be held in the chain’s retail centres during May. This is the second consecutive year in which Mercacenter Andorra holds a campaign to promote Andalusian food products, an initiative which in 2010 had excellent results, both in terms of sales, and the amount of products which were put on sale by the chain. The interviews were held on the 25th and 26th of January and were attended by 30 of the 50 companies which are participating in the campaign, many having decided to be involved again this year in view of the good results obtained in the previous one.

The list of participating companies, which are members of LANDALUZ and operate in a wide range of sectors (meat, oil, wine, confectionery and processed products, fish and vegetable preserves) is as follows: I. C. Zurita, Alvear, Usisa, Celestino Gómez Parra, Aceitex, Envasados Lola, Bodegas Pérez Barquero, Agasur, Los Titos, Ubago, Bodegas Privilegio, Oleoestepa, Famadesa, Alsur, Unioliva, Bodegas Doña Felisa, Gomeoliva, Al-Andalus Delicatessen, Legumbres Pedro, Oleocampo, Altacazuela, Central de Compras Landaluz, Agrolachar, Corsevilla and Camporico. During their stay, the company representatives had the opportunity to visit one of the companies interested in the promotional activity, Veta La Palma, a farmstead located within the Doñana Natural Park where they received first hand information about their production processes and the natural environment in which they are carried out. The MERCACENTER group occupies a leading position in the Andorran market and is the only retail company which is still expanding both in terms of sales and market share.

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LANDALUZ PROMOTES ANDALUSIAN FOOD PRODUCTS IN SWITZERLAND WITH A PRESENTATION AIMED AT MORE THAN 60 PROFESSIONAL DISTRIBUTORS

Last December, LANDALUZ, the Business Association for Certified Quality, organised a promotional event for Andalusian produce in the Swiss market for the first time. The activity was organised in conjunction with the Swiss distribution company LANDALOU Suisse, and came under the Collaboration Agreement which the Association has established with EXTENDA- the Andalusian Agency for International Promotion, a body which is run by the Department of Economy, Innovation and Science. The main objective of the event, which was held in Basle, was to present Andalusian products to companies working in the distribution sector in Switzerland, and particularly to the prestigious COOP chain, the biggest wholesale distributor in the country, with a view to organising point of sale promotional activities in its shops over the next year. It was attended by more than 60 buyers from a range of different sectors,


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including the Marketing Director of the COOP chain, as well as the Commercial Advisor to the Spanish Embassy in Berne, Doctor Fernando Díe Ortega. The sectors which took part in the event included olive oil, olives, wines, meat products, cheeses, fish products, rice, confectionary, vegetable preserves, coffee and snacks, and over 100 different brands were represented. The presentation was attended by 26 company members from the Association which operate in the different sectors targeted by the initiative: Acesur, Alfocán, Bodegas Gallego-Góngora, Catunambú, Ángel Camacho, E. Moreno, Herba, Huerta Camporico, Jolca, Salysol and Tortas Gaviño, from Seville; Aecovi, Altacazuela, Coprodur and Rives from Cadiz. Agasur and Bodegas Doña Felisa from Malaga; Alvear, Covap and Envasados Lola from Cordoba. Embutidos Carchelejo and Unioliva from Jaén; Jamones Lazo, Usisa, and Vinícola del Condado from Huelva; and finally, I.C. Zurita from Granada. The presentation was a resounding success since it attracted a large number of buyers, who generally praised the high quality and variety of the products featured. This is the first time that COOP, Switzerland’s leading supermarket chain, attends a large-scale promotional event exclusively dedicated to one particular region. The chain operates 1,400 shops in Switzerland and has been ranked in first position in a European public poll on the quality of supermarket chains carried out this year by a consulting company. The poll respondents highlighted the quality and variety of the chain’s products and its high level of innovation.

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THE LATIN

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF GASTRONOMY

The Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, based in Seville, is an organisation which is supported by the Confederation of Andalusian Businesses through the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation. The Academy was established in 2009, and the event was marked by an official ceremony in the headquarters of the Real Maestranza de Caballería, in Seville. Its stated aims are to promote the “investigation, protection and awareness of the cuisine and gastronomic activity of the different regions and peoples of Latin America, whilst safeguarding the authenticity of its traditions, support its modernisation, and actively promote initiatives to encourage international cooperation and solidarity”. The organisation currently comprises the Gastronomic Academies of Andalusia, Spain, Portugal, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, and Brazil and includes the two Academies in the United States, the Eastern and the Western, as associate members. During September and October 2010 the Academy was officially presented in Peru, Argentina and Brazil. The following articles are not merely a list of places and activities but more of a diary offering a personal account of all the different things we experienced during this wonderful and memorable journey, wrote by Manuel Rodríguez, Head of Communication of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation. .

PRESENTATION IN

LIMA

The Latin American Academy of Gastronomy was presented in society on the 9th of September during the course of a series of events held in the city of Lima, the capital of Peru, coinciding with the 3rd Mistura International Gastronomic Trade Fair, which was dedicated to Spain.

The presentation took place at an event held in the residence of the Spanish Ambassador in Peru, Javier Sandomingo, who acted as host, and was attended by a number of personalities and dignitaries including Peru’s Minister of Culture, Juan Ossio Acuña; the Deputy Minister of Culture and President of the Peruvian Academy of Gastronomy, Bernardo Roca Rey; the Tourism Advisor to the Spanish Embassy in Argentina, Julio Moreno Ventas; the Managing Director of BBVA Banco Continental, Eduardo Torres Llosa; the President of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, Rafael Ansón; the Director of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela; the President of the Portuguese Academy of Gastronomy, José Ferreira Dos Santos; as well as a number of renowned restaurateurs and gastronomes from Peru, Álvaro Ruiz de Somocurcio amongst them.

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Also within the framework of Mistura, the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy presented in the Morisco Pavillion of the fair site the exhibition entitled “Alimentos de ida y vuelta” sponsored by the Repsol Group which aimed to show the characteristics and history of the most important products exchanged between Europe and South America after the discovery of the New World. The 3-day exhibition, which was officially inaugurated by the President of the Academy, Rafael Ansón; the Director of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela, and the Director of Mistura, the celebrated chef Gastón Acurio, was visited by more than 200,000 people.

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Manuel Rodríguez Head of Communication of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation

Mistura certainly didn’t disappoint us. Quite to the contrary. As we arrive, we see large queues of people waiting to enter the venue and it is obvious that there is a huge interest in seeing, experiencing and, of course, tasting everything.

PERU-Day 1. MISTURA By midmorning, Lima reveals itself as a bustling and dynamic city, as our car negotiates the dense traffic which becomes ever more chaotic as we approach the historic centre. People and noise everywhere. It’s been like this since we left the Hotel Country, situated in the exclusive district of San Isidro. One of Peru’s cultural heritage sites, the hotel has been the operational headquarters for the group of Andalusians and Spaniards who have come to attend Mistura, the gastronomic trade fair which celebrates the best of Peruvian and South American cuisine. We have been invited on this trip to the Andes by the Andalusian Business Confederation (CEA), the Gastronomic Academy of Latin American Academia and the Andalusian Agency for Certified Quality, Landaluz. The idea of the trip was to present the Foundation and the Academy to the people of South America, and at the same time, see for ourselves how gastronomy has become a true passion in this developing country. 20

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The Mistura Gastronomic Trade Fair takes place in a colossal area covering more than 80,000 square metres in the Parque de la Exposición. Amid this potpourri of flavours and aromas, we find a vast array of restaurants, market stalls, shops and exhibition stands. It’s almost a city within a city. The leading light of this movement is Gastón Acurio, the most highly renowned chef in Peru and possibly in the whole of South America. The son of a senator, Gastón Acurio trained in Europe and is much more than the guru of the new indigenous cuisine. He is a figure of great national pride and is treated as such by the people.

As he takes us around the fair, we can see how excited people are to see him, shouting out as he approaches and trying to touch him, have a photograph


taken, or share a few words with him. Gastón Acurio, who has just celebrated his 43rd birthday, has already opened restaurants in Mexico, New York, Sao Paulo and Madrid. Yet the most remarkable aspect about him is his unique vision of the culinary world – an unusual ideology which somehow manages to combine gastronomy and social justice. He says things like: “a restaurant cannot be something distant. We have to provide a respectful form of cuisine. A dish isn’t beautiful if it there is injustice behind it. There should be nothing questionable hidden beneath the tablecloth”.

Once the extensive tour was over, we attended a very special event to celebrate the fact that Spain itself was the special guest country at this year’s edition of Mistura. In recognition of this honour, the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, an organisation created in 2009 under the auspices of the Andalusian Business Confederation and the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, brought a very special present to Lima. This was the magnificent exhibition entitled “Alimentos de Ida y Vuelta” which was housed in the Morisco Pavilion and focused on the different foods and flavours which were traded between Europe and South America following the discovery of the New World. The exhibition, which displayed ten food products from the two different continents in elegant glass cabinets, was presented by Rafael Ansón and Nicolás Muela, and welcomed more than 200,000 visitors during the six days of the event.

On the morning of our arrival we walked around Mistura with Gastón Acurio who was constantly greeted by the crowd. He was accompanied by the President of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, Rafael Ansón, the Director of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela, and the Tourism Advisor of the Spanish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Julio Moreno, as well as Alfonso Marín, Santiago Urquijo and myself. We were assisted at all times by Álvaro Ruiz de Somocurcio, a Peruvian we had just met and to whom we are greatly indebted. We tried exceptional roasts, savoured the national seafood fish known as ceviche; discovered an incredible variety of potatoes, talked to farmers, tasted great delicacies, and realised that South America was closer than ever to our hearts.

The food products on display were as follows: Food products brought by Spain and Portugal to South America: Olive oil, rice, coffee, sugar cane, pork, citrus fruits, pulses, chicken, grapes and wine. Food products brought from the New World to Europe: Avocadoes, peanuts, kidney beans, cocoa, tropical fruits, corn, potatoes, turkey, chilli and tomatoes. The exhibition, which was sponsored by the Repsol Group, was very well received and widely praised by the public, as can be seen from this comment posted on the Generacción.com website: “One of the most important exhibitions shown at Mistura, was one entitled “Los alimentos de ida y vuelta”. In the display, which was made possible by the ANDALUSIAN FLAVOUR

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participation of Spain as the special guest country, as well as the food and wines there were descriptions which listed all the food products which conquered the palates of the colonists during their stay in our land, and which were taken back to Europe to be presented to the Monarchy and the Spanish people, who, no doubt were delighted”. Other representatives of Spanish cuisine who were present at Mistura included Eduard Xatruch, from El Bulli, Jordi Roca Fontané from Celler de Can Roca, Pedro Subijana, from Akelarre, and the Andalusian Dani García, from Calima.

The meal included the following dishes: green and white asparagus with artichoke tartar. Fresh chonta palm hearts, with basil vinaigrette; Carpaccio of locally grown potatoes with japachi goat’s cheese and poached egg; paiche from the Amazon served with goose pure and candied sweet garlic; grilled leg of lamb with quinúa cous cous, and a trio of Peruvian desserts. After the wonderful meal and the desserts, which we all enjoyed in a friendly open air atmosphere, there were speeches by Rafael Ansón and Nicolás Muela, who expressed their pleasure at this exchange of cultures and ideas. The final speech was by Bernardo RocaRey, President of the Peruvian Academy of Gastronomy, and a wise “renaissance figure” who received much of his early training in Seville.

Lunch at the Academy We were invited to our first lunch in Lima by the Peruvian Academy of Gastronomy and we discovered to our good fortune that it was to be held in one of the most iconic historic landmarks in the city: Huaca Pucllana. A ceremonial site for the indigenous population between 200 and 700 AD, Huaca Pucllana is situated in the district of Miraflores, in the middle of modern housing developments, as if bearing witness to both the growth of the city and the past glory of Peru’s ancient civilisation. It was after 2 pm when we arrived at the restaurant which is named after the remains of what was once a 25 metre high monumental pyramid.

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After an introductory pisco sour (a cocktail prepared with pisco, lemon juice and other ingredients) we sat down and proceeded to enjoy a lunch which will be extremely hard to forget.

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Bernardo Roca-Rey, who has been recently appointed Peru’s Deputy Minister of Culture, spoke passionately about the task which had been entrusted to him, and admitted that there was still much to do. Like his predecessors, Mr. Roca-Rey toasted the advances being made in establishing links between Andalusia and Latin America thanks to the efforts of the Andalusian Business Confederation and the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, with which the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy has formed a natural alliance.


The sun had begun to set when we left Huaca Pucllana, but we were reluctant to leave the monument which reflected the full glory and religious power of the Incas. The power of centuries.

Presentation at the Embassy The day ended at the Spanish Embassy in Lima, in the residential district of Barranco, an area where the modern side of the city is clearly visible. Time for formal dress as we were warmly welcomed by the Spanish Ambassador, Javier Sandomingo, and the Minister of Tourism, a gentleman from Malaga called Rafael Fuentes who is as tall as he is charming. In the impressive halls of the residence, the oil paintings and books were a strong reminder of Spain’s undeniable presence and influence. An extremely convivial cocktail (…) and pleasant conversation made for an unforgettable evening in which we travellers from Southern Spain explained in great detail the mission which had brought us there. During the evening, the Director of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela, had the opportunity to explain that the institution, which is promoted by the Andalusian Business Confederation with the support of the Andalusian Regional Government, was set up in 2006 in memory of Doña María de las Mercedes of Orleans, the mother of HRH King Juan Carlos. He also added that Princess Doña Elena de Borbón was its president of honour and that the main objective of the Foundation is to reinforce the relationship between Andalusia and the Latin American Community of Nations through projects which focus on social, cultural, and

economic cooperation. Summary He emphasised that the Foundation was keen to promote initiatives which can help to achieve this aim by organising activities which reinforce the close traditional and historical links between Andalusia and Latin America. Based on the same principle of strengthening interaction between the two worlds, the Seville-based Latin American Academy of Gastronomy was set up in 2009 with the aim of promoting “investigation, promotion and protection of the cuisines and traditional gastronomic customs of the different Latin American peoples and regions”. The Academy, which is currently led by Rafael Ansón, is formed by the gastronomic academies of Andalusia, Spain, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Brazil and Portugal. As he spoke, Rafael Ansón, said that these are excellent times for Spanish gastronomy and highlighted its importance as a key factor in attracting tourists. He explained that one of the most valuable aspects of modern Spanish cuisine is that it offers total freedom when it comes to producing culinary creations. In this respect, Mr. Ansón, quoting Professor Grande Covián, a prestigious doctor and researcher who was the first president of the Spanish Nutrition Society, added: “even if we tell people what they should be eating, the key thing that we have to achieve is that they actually enjoy it”. The President of the Gastronomic Academy of Peru, Bernardo Roca-Rey, also spoke, and the event finally came to an end with a short and moving speech by the Ambassador, Javier Sandomingo, who expressed his satisfaction with the important reception held in the Spanish delegation. By the time we left the embassy it was late but there was still time to chat more informally about the links between Europe and Latin America and the famous tree-lined avenue immortalised by Isabel “Chabuca” Granda in her “Flor de la canela”.

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Summary

Day 2. PLAZA DE ARMAS In the morning, we talked about the previous night while having breakfast in the Hotel Country and once again we set out in the bustling traffic for the drive to Mistura. The day was windy and cloudy but the intense activity in the streets of the city carried on as normal. As we gradually negotiated the hundreds of buses which were everywhere we couldn’t help noticing signs with simple slogans which asked people to vote at the forthcoming municipal elections. Voting will take place in all of the districts (there are 43 in the capital) and each one seems to have different parties, candidates, programmes, promises, photos and slogans. This endless display of candidates and messages kept us entertained on the lengthy drive to the Parque de la Exposición, where Mistura was taking place, which is situated in the central part of Lima or Cercado de Lima (which is also informally known as Centro de Lima or Lima Centro) the first district created as a continuation of the City of Kings where the city of Lima stands today. This time, our visit to the Gastronomic Fair was not as intense as the day before. We noticed that the “Alimentos de ida y vuelta” exhibition seemed to have created considerable interest, the visitors examining the display cases with great curiosity and watching the descriptions in the documentary which was being shown continually on the screens. Later, we visited some of the Spanish stands and saw queues everywhere. People coming and going continually and endless shouts and cries for Gastón Acurio…

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As a result, on leaving the Fair, we were really aware for the first time of the immense importance of the event. We discussed its significance at length as once again we negotiated the chaotic traffic in order to reach the Plaza de Armas de Lima, the central public space in the city, where the Government’s Palace, the Cathedral, the Archbishop’s Palace, the Municipal Palace and the Club de la Unión are situated. In the square which the historian and priest Bernabé Cobo described as “the beststructured and organised square I have everseen anywhere, even in Spain”, we witnessedthe changing of the guard at the Palacio Government’s palace, bought souvenirs from friendly peasants, and then we all visited the Cathedral and its famous crypt, completely covered with mosaics depicting scenes from the Conquest, which houses the remains of Francisco Pizarro, and a small coffer which contains earth from his birthplace of Trujillo. We strolled around peacefully and posed for the ever present camera of Álvaro Ruiz de Somocurcio, who was taking as many photos as he could of this impressive s quare, the site of the foundation of the city of Lima. The founding ceremony took place on the 18th of January in the year of our Lord 1535, when the conquistador Francisco Pizarro, in accordance with the practices of the time, erected a rollo or picota (tall wooden post which was used to execute those who were sentenced to death) in the middle of the site which was to be used as a Plaza Mayor.


The Malabar Restaurant After this brief interlude for tourism, we returned to the San Isidro area for lunch at the “Malabar”, one of Lima’s most prestigious restaurants. A warm, modern, inviting place, this time we were warmly welcomed with a generous pisco. This time, our hosts, academics and gastronomic experts, suggested that instead of the pisco sour (the Peruvian national drink), we tried another cocktail called the pisco chilcano (a traditional drink which is usually made with ginger ale and a touch of lime), which is not as strong as the sour, but are just as enjoyable. Once we sat down to eat, the chef of the Malabar, Pedro Luis Schiaffino (who was to take part later in a conference at Mistura), presented us with his finest dishes, focusing particularly on his fascination for discovering new products from the Amazonian jungle. The menu was as follows: pail of tuna brulée with cocona; snails from the river Amazon with fried charapa; chonta salad chestnut quesillo dressed with palillo and dende oil vinaigrette; green shells, cushuro, maca root and kiuri cucumber; rice with black shells; gamitada rib in cocoa sauce and aguaje puré; grilled kid with chicha de jora; 72% naranjillo chocolate doughnut and petit cakes. The meal was excellent, and the most experienced amongst us, Rafael Ansón, Nicolás Muela and Santiago Urquijo, talked excitedly about the quality of the products, the variety of the flavours, and the imagination in the combination of ingredients They were all in agreement that Pedro Luis Schiaffino is, without doubt, the leading disciple of Gastón Acurio in the vanguard of Peruvian cuisine, not only in terms of his abilities in the kitchen but also for his overall understanding of the restaurant trade. As he told us himself, “many chefs seem to want to juggle as many different ingredients as possible in

Summary their efforts to create something they regard as innovative, but my philosophy has always been more straightforward: the simpler things are, the better”

The conference During the evening, with the flavours of the Malabar still on our palates and in our minds, we attended an extremely important event in the auditorium at Mistura: a discussion hosted by Rafael Ansón, Gastón Acurio and Pedro Miguel Schiaffino, who received congratulatory comments and well-deserved commendations from the Fair organisers. Gastón Acurio, in an insightful speech, pointed out that “there is still hunger in Peru, but we can use gastronomy as an instrument of economic development, to break down barriers. It is opportunity and a society which is fairer and more equal which will finally combat hunger”. The public, which overcrowded the venue, roared with the words of their leader –who has played a key role in making that 10% of national GDP can benefit from his cuisine-emphasised in his speech, which was half about food and half about politics, that “while our traditional fishermen still have no quality of life and can’t educate their children, the ceviche which we enjoy cannot be perfect”.

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It was our last stop and as we sat overlooking the immensity of the ocean we began to make our plans for the following day. We felt the imminent change of rhythm. From this modern part of Lima our next destination was Cuzco, Peru at its most traditional.

PERU-Day 3. CUZCO For his part Rafael Ansón described gastronomy as a major source of hope for the future of the people and, as such, praised the many projects being initiated by the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, which originated in Seville, with the aim of supporting cultural exchange and development. The vibrant and thought-provoking debate went on for over two hours. Afterwards, there was time for calm reflection and a long trip around the city to see the sights almost as if we wanted to make the most of every last minute that we would spend in the Peruvian capital. Although it had suddenly become unexpectedly cold we were taken to Larcomar, an area known as the “modern face of Lima”. With its beautiful position, overlooking the cliffs in the district of Miraflores, Larcomar offers spectacular views over the Pacific Ocean and shows a very different side of the city, a place seems to provide everything the visitor could ask for: culture, tradition, gastronomy, and shopping.

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We arrived at Cuzco on Saturday morning in radiant sunshine. As we walked from the plane to the terminal we saw the city on the mountainsides on each side of the runway. The whole scene, with the airport sheltered in the shadows of the gigantic rocky mass, gave the place a special significance. The interior of the Alejandro Velasco Astete airport, named in honour of the first Peruvian pilot to fly across the Andes, is full of tourist information about trips to Macchu-Picchu,

the sacred valley of the Incas, and the hundreds of other places which pay homage to the legendary civilisation which was discovered by the Spanish conquistadors. The journey into Cuzco was short and we were soon in the heart of colonial. Latin America. In no time at all we reached the Hotel Monasterio, an architectural jewel built over Inca remains with a beautiful chapel decorated with extraordinary gold ornamentation.


We were graciously met by Álvaro Ruiz de Somocurcio, who recommended rest and relaxation to avoid the potential problems of arriving at such a high altitude which would no doubt affect us sooner or later (as we were shortly to discover).

Sheltered behind the solid doors of our hotel rooms, we took it easy for an hour or so but it wasn’t long before curiosity got the better of us. We were soon on our way to the Plaza de Armas, barely two blocks from the hotel. The place was extraordinary, magical, sobering. The enormous square seemed almost limitless. At one end the Cathedral and the Sagrada Familia, at the other the church of the Compañía de Jesús, and everywhere we looked, restaurants, jewellery and craft shops, travel agencies... But a break was much needed and we didn’t regret it. We decided to leave visiting the Cathedral for the next day and instead made our way to the “Chicha” restaurant, the gastronomic kingdom of Gastón Acurio in Cuzco alto. We reached the establishment after climbing some extremely steep steps, and found ourselves in a simply decorated space with white walls and wooden floors. We asked for the menu and set to the task of making sure that we tried everything that was essential. Our meal consisted of ceviche, Urubamba salad, anticuchos, lomo saltado, sancochado chicha… Everything was more or less fine until the second dish arrived, when suddenly some of us were overcome by the effects of altitude. Cuzco is 3,399 metres above sea level and the unexpected arrival of the soroche made us feel completely overwhelmed for a while. So much so that we had to send for some small bottles of oxygen from a nearby pharmacy, and we soon got over it amid jokes and laughter.

Summary The experience of having to take oxygen after the meal was wholly documented in photos. Meanwhile, from the balcony of the restaurant we noticed that night was quickly falling, accompanied by a rapid drop in temperature.But this didn’t worry us. Once we’d had our coffees and made our farewells, we returned once again to the streets to observe the beautiful sight of the sunset over the colonial city. We walked around the narrow passageways, our bodies seemed to be becoming acclimatised to the altitude and we looked around various gift shops where we bought Inca symbols, pre-Columbus vases and reminders of a time that was so long ago and now almost incomprehensible. And, naturally, we touched the smooth texture of the alpaca, a fabric made in Peru with the wool of the domestic animal of the same name. After that we visited the street known as Hatun Rumiyoq so as to see the mysterious twelve-cornered stone, and then the Qoricancha, the important site which was dedicated by the Incas to the Sun God. It was a place which was referred to as the golden courtyard because its walls were covered in gold. Lastly we visited the Barrio of San Blas, home to many craftsmen, and site of the oldest parish church in the city, with its carved wooden pulpit which is considered to be the finest example of colonial design in the city of the time. For dinner we went to the “La Cicciolina” restaurant, which came highly recommended. Situated on the second floor of an old colonial mansion, right in the heart of the city, with its large counter and lively, romantic atmosphere. The food was splendid, and was accompanied by an excellent Chilean wine. We had magnificent shrimps and tuna, exuberant salads, as well as delicious cheeses and desserts. A really good choice to finish a wonderful night. The morning was not so good for some of us excluding Rafael Ansón, who celebrated his birthday in the 3000 year old city.

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Summary GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE ACADEMY IN

SAO PAULO Santiago Urquijo, Head of Marketing and Communications of LANDALUZ, will act as Secretary General for the Academy. The General Assembly of the organisation took place on the 14th of September 2010 in the Instituto Cervantes in Sao Paulo, Brazil. During the event, the Director of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela, was appointed Deputy President of the organisation, whilst the post of Secretary General was given to Santiago Urquijo, Head of Marketing and Communication of Landaluz, the Andalusian Association for Certified Quality the post of Secretary General. Rafael Ansón, President of the Spanish Royal Academy of Gastronomy was elected to be President of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, whilst Fernando Quartin (Brazil) and Maria Podestá (Argentina) were designated Vice Presidents. It was decided that the next General Assembly of the institution, whose Honorary President is Santiago Herrero, will take place in 2011 in Seville, where the Academy is based. During the event at the Instituto Cervantes there was an exhibition entitled “Alimentos de ida y vuelta”, sponsored by the Repsol Group, and organised by the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, which aimed to show the characteristics and history of the most important products which were exchanged between Europe and south America after the discovery of the New World.

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Etc.

BRAZIL.- Days 5 and 6. The Academy For hours, we were captivated by the spectacular views we could see from the windows of the plane as we crossed the Andes. We travelled towards the east, trying in vain to count the endless peaks which appeared before our eyes. We had the sensation that what we saw below us was the heart and soul of South America: a long rocky range of mountains which crosses seven countries and follows the line of the Pacific coast along 7,500 kilometres. Night had fallen by the time we crossed into Brazil, flying over small clusters of lights which shone from the tiny villages in this huge continent. The darkness engulfed us until we finally landed at the international Sao Paulo-Guarulhos airport, from where we were taken to the Hotel Meliá Jardin Europa, on rua João Cachoeira, 107, in the residential area of Itaim. There was no time to rest after checking in and instead we found ourselves in the elegant restaurant where we were warmly welcomed by representatives of the Brazilian Academy of Gastronomy, and its President, Fernando Quartim. During the dinner we were able to plan the next day’s activities and we saw at first hand the strong bonds of camaraderie between the various members of the Academy.

The Assembly This same atmosphere of collaboration was clearly evident during the long meeting held the next morning at the modern buildings of the Instituto Cervantes on the Avenida Paulista. The event was attended by the various representatives of the Latin American Academy, and it clearly underlined the consolidation of the institution and the clear progress it is making in the various projects it is carrying out. The presidential table was occupied by the President of the Portuguese Academy, José Ferreira Dos Santos; the President of the Brazilian Academy, Fernando Quartim; the President of the Spanish and the Latin American academies, Rafael Ansón, and the Director General of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela. It was Mr Muela who gave the first speech, setting out the essential background of the Academy. He reminded us that the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, (…) was formally established on the 21st of September 2009, during the course of an official ceremony which took place at the Real Maestranza de Caballería, in Seville, and was attended by the Minister of the Presidential Office of the Andalusian Regional Government, Don Antonio Ávila; the Deputy Head Brother of the Real Maestranza de Caballería de Sevilla, Alfonso Guajardo-Fajardo, and the President of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Santiago Herrero, who was made President of Honour.

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Summary He also outlined the objectives of the Academy (…), a subject which was revisited by Rafael Ansón, who, in his capacity as President, outlined the organisation’s forthcoming activities and announced the makeup of the new board of directors, in which Nicolás Muela will hold the post of Vice-president, and will include, the presidents of the Brazilian and Argentinean Academies, and María Podestá as Vice-Presidents. The Academy’s future plans include the awarding of prizes to the most influential chefs in each of the member countries and the organisation of the 2011 General Assembly, which, he announced, would be held in Seville. Rafael Ansón, whilst underlining the growth in the awareness of gastronomy and its significance in terms of health, culture, traditions and social relationships, also reminded us that the Academy had been established thanks to the efforts of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, an institution dedicated to the memory of Doña María de las Mercedes of Orleáns, mother of His Majesty the King, Don Juan Carlos, and a symbol of the values of the Spanish monarchy. The essential aim of the Foundation, which is promoted by the Andalusian Business Confederation with the support of the Regional Government, and was officially established on the 27th of December 2006 in Seville, is to reinforce the relationship and cooperation between Andalusia and the Latin American countries in terms of culture, economics, and social activities. The President of the Latin American Academy, Fernando Quartim, reiterated many of these points, after which there was an opportunity to see the documentary produced by the Academy in which Rafael Ansón explained the fascinating history of the culinary 30

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exchange between the Old and New worlds. After the long morning’s work, cocktails were served until early afternoon. The most emblematic rooms of the Instituto Cervantes had been graciously made available by its Director General, Carmen Caffarel, and local Director in Sao Paulo, for an exhibition of the “alimentos de ida y vuelta”, which was visited by the numerous guests who had been invited to this prestigious event, including the Director of the Spanish Tourist Office in Sao Paulo, Belén González del Val.

The city After the meeting, and before the undoubted gastronomic delights which were awaiting us at the dinner, we took the opportunity to see something of Sao Paulo, a modern, rapidly growing city which reveals itself to the traveller as an impressive megalopolis with a population of more than twenty million people. We were able to learn something of its remarkable evolution, its important role in the coffee trade, its vast numbers of European and Asian immigrants, and, above all, its well-deserved reputation as a gastronomic city par excellence. We visited the main districts of Morumbí, Jardin, and Itaim, and saw the historic and emblematic “Patio do colegio”, the Jesuit school built to Christianise the indigenous peoples who lived in the region, and marked the origins of the city in 1554. Driving through the dense traffic of the main streets we were told about the city’s new projects, the most important being the 2014 World Cup, which will undoubtedly focus enormous interest on Brazil and Sao Paulo itself. In fact, we mustn’t forget that the final stop on this intense tour of the city was the stadium of Morumbí,


Summary home to the city’s football team, the most successful in the country, with six national championships to its name as well as 3 Libertadores Cups and 3 Intercontinental Cups.

prepared with fresh products brought especially from the Amazon that day. Like a true craftsman, Alex Atala presented the dishes as they were carefully brought to the table, accompanied by excellent Brazilian wines from legendary vintages. For the sake of posterity I would like to list the dishes: beetroot ice cream with “pripioca” (an aromatic root from the Amazon) with cuttlefish; “pupunha” palm heart millefeuille with coral sauce; breadcrumb oysters with marinated tapioca; shrimp with honey, baby oranges and “jequitaya” (an aromatic plant from the Amazon); black rice with vegetables and chestnut milk from Pará; Ray with clarified butter, peanut froth and black garlic. Palm heart fettuccini carbonara; “Paca” (a fish which is typical of the Amazon) with cassava à Braz; Wild boar with milk pudding and “canjiquinha” (a typical sauce from Minas Gerais). And for dessert there was a “cagaita” sorbet (a fruit from the Amazon), lime and banana ravioli and Pará chestnut torte with salt, rocket, pepper, curry and whisky sorbet.

The dinner Following a brief pause at our hotel we were once again on the move, this time to the temple of gastronomy which awaited us. Voted one of the fifty finest restaurants in the world, the D.O.M. (or “Dominus. Optimus. Maximus”) is situated at Rua Barao de Capanema, 549. Jardins, and is run by highly renowned chef, Alex Atala. It actually occupies position number 18 in the famous St. Pellegrino list of the 50 Best Restaurants in the World. Alex Atala, tall, thin and charming, carefully attended each of the eight diners at his restaurant. He explained each of the exquisite dishes in great detail in what was a truly wonderful, unforgettable dinner,

Without doubt, an extraordinary five star meal. It was not until well after midnight that somewhat reluctantly we left the D.O.M. and we stayed up for a long time immersed in a passionate and intense conversation about our experience and all the pleasant things we have done until the time came to bid our farewell to Sao Paulo and the South American continent. Flying back across the Atlantic the next day we were well aware that all the effort had been well worthwhile. On one hand we have had the opportunity to participate in a successful initiative to promote Latin American gastronomy, and on the other, to embark on a journey which had allowed us to rediscover so much of our past. Fortunately, we knew it wouldn’t be the last time.

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Etc.

ARGENTINA

PLAYS HOST TO THE LATIN AMERICAN ACADEMY OF GASTRONOMY

The Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation and the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, organisations supported by the Confederation of Andalusian Businesses, were presented in Argentina on the 13th of October 2010, during an event which was held at the Spanish embassy in Buenos Aires. The reception was attended by the Spanish Ambassador in Argentina, Rafael Estrella, as well as a number of other notable figures, including Argentina’s Minister of Tourism, Enrique Meyer, and various illustrious representatives of the Spanish community in Buenos Aires. Those attending the event were addressed by the Spanish Ambassador; the Argentinean Minister of Tourism; the Director of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela; the President of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, Rafael Ansón; the President of the Argentinean Academy of Gastronomy, María Podestá, and the Advisor for Tourism of the Spanish Embassy, Julio Moreno. As part of the event, the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation took the opportunity to offer a concert in Buenos Aires the same evening. Entitled “Sonidos de Andalucía” the recital featured the typical music of Andalusia’s traditional fiestas. The concert took place in the Palacio Frers and was interpreted by the National Symphonic Orchestra, thanks to the generosity of the Argentinean Government. The piece was conducted by the Andalusian maestro José Manuel Delgado. At the same time, images of Andalusia’s principal monuments, areas of natural beauty and traditional activities were projected on a screen above the orchestra, and the music was accompanied by the Bulevar Flamenco Company, who interpreted typical regional songs and dances such as saetas, sevillanas, and the traditional religious song known as salve rociera.

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Etc.

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Summary

Day 1. Buenos Aires In the words of a well known tango, a minute in Buenos Aires lasts a lifetime. We were there for forty eight wonderful and exciting hours and the opportunity to regain contact with old friends and familiar places was truly unforgettable. The large group of Andalusian delegates who arrived in Ezeiza had been invited by the Confederation of Andalusian Businesses (CEA), the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy and the Andalusian Agency for Certified Quality, Landaluz. As was the case with the expeditions to Peru and Brazil, our main objective was to present the Foundation and the Academy to the people of South America whilst at the same time, offering our guests a demonstration of the finest music, the roots of which lie deep the history and traditions of our country. Everything was a mixture of flavours and sounds which linked Andalusia and a part of South America which is so much part of our history and our culture That’s how we felt right from the beginning of our expedition to the South American city. Sunday was an opportunity to see it at its best. The early risers took the opportunity to do a little tourism, wandering happily around the San Telmo market, the bright yellow bombonera stadium, the Boca main street with its lively musical ambience, and the modern emporium of Puerto Madero. Later we witnessed the passion for football on the terraces of the River Plate stadium, and, as night began to fall, we were able to take in the impressive Plaza de Mayo and contemplate the breathtaking carving of the Cristo del Gran Amor by the celebrated Sevillian sculptor Luis Álvarez Duarte in the dimly lit-interior of the Cathedral.

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Summary The artists who were to perform at the concert two days later arrived that night and the following morning the whole group met at our headquarters, the Hotel Sofitel, a charming establishment which is exquisitely decorated in a combination of French elegance and traditional Argentinean style. The travelling group comprised: the President of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, Rafael Ansón; the Director General of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, Nicolás Muela; the President of Landaluz, Manuel Jurado; the President of the Committee for Recreational Activities of the Confederation of Andalusian Businesses and President of the Spanish Federation of Polo, Nicolás Álvarez; the President of the CEA’s Committee for Promotion and Associative Relations, Miguel Sánchez y Montes de Oca; the Director General of CEA’s Legal Department, Jaime Artillo; the Director General for Marketing of Landaluz, and secretary general of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, Santiago Urquijo RuizJiménez; the Vice-president of the Andalusian Federation of Advertising Companies, Alfonso Marín Caffarena; an expert from the International Relations Department of CEA, Jose Ignacio Alarcón, and finally myself, Manuel Rodríguez the Head of Communication of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation. The Ambassador for Tourism of the Spanish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Julio Moreno Ventas, acted as master of ceremonies and alma mater of all the events which were about to take place on the banks of the River Plate.

Mr. Moreno himself served initially as guide of the Andalusian delegation as they fulfilled their various commitments. A few of us went to La Rural, the venue where the group of artists who had travelled from Seville were already rehearsing, whilst the rest, the majority, attended the first official event on our programme of activities, which took place at the headquarters of the Argentinean Federation of Hotel and Gastronomic Businesses (FEHGRA). Established in the 1940s, FEHGRA is an organisation which promotes and reinforces interaction between Argentinean hotel and catering businesses with the aim of developing strategies to address the common issues which affect the sector as a whole. The Andalusian delegation was received by FEHGRA’s Board of Directors on the second floor of a large mansion situated in Calle Larrea. There, they discussed a series of institutional matters which are of relevance for both organisations and proposed a number of joint initiatives aimed at using gastronomy as an instrument to raise the profile of both countries as tourist destinations. The following members of FEHGRA’s Board of Directors were present at the meeting: President Oscar Ghezzi and vice presidents Mario Zavaleta, Alberto Ravalli and Marcelo Giovan-noni; the treasurer, Daniel Suffredini; the Secretary responsible for drafting the minutes, Claudio Aguilar; the Coordinator of the Central Region, Carlos Tremsal; the vice-president of sister

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Etc.

organisation Tandil, Luis Cerone; the Chief Executive Officer, Ricardo Amaro; and advisors Jordi Busquets, Jorge López Cortes and Miguel Estruch. The extremely agreeable event also saw the presentation of the Bicentenary Menu, a six course meal especially designed in honour of the Latin American Academy by the chefs from the Federation’s “Restaurante Argentina”. The President of FEHGRA, Oscar Ghezzi, explained that “the Restaurante Argentina, which is part of the Argentinean Haute Cuisine for the World Programme (ACAM), is one of the numerous initiatives developed by the Federation to promote Argentina’s hotel and catering sector”. “This tool”, he added, “is also part of a Strategic Marketing Plan devised to promote the country as a tourist destination through the organisation of events and trade missions in various different countries”. The menu featured the following dishes:

•First course: king prawn cannelloni filled with hake, leeks, and red and black caviar served with cuttlefish noodles, pumpkin pure and lemon subtil. •Second course: Argentinean petit cake filled with provelta cheese and red chorizo, watercress and flowers with olive oil and grapefruit dressing, cold melon soup garnished with cucumber and tomato. •Third course: Angus beef roulade in herbs croute with corn flour humita, basil-scented beans served with country-style bread and caracú marinated in coral lentils. •Fourth course: smoked lamb Sorrentino with locro stew. •Fifth course: semi-bitter chocolate bombon filled with rice cheescake, red fruits, puffed rice with cinnamon, pochoclera baby apple and homenaje al postre vigilante. •Sixth course: sampling of Petit Fours crafted by various chefs. Drinks: Cabernet Ciclos – Malbec Ciclos wines. Norton Tardío wines for dessert. Herbal teas.

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Etc. During the speeches, Rafael Ansón and Nicolás Muela highlighted the importance of the creation of the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy as an instrument which brings together all the various culinary cultures of the different South American countries. Mr. Ansón also spoke of the important role that the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation and the Andalusian Confederation of Businesses have been playing in supporting gastronomy as an element which symbolises the common cultural heritage shared between Andalusia and South America. The meeting culminated in the signing of a collaboration agreement by which the two organisations undertook to develop a programme of joint activities aimed at promoting the gastronomy of the different Latin American regions and peoples. Finally almost everyone was there for lunch, since the rehearsals at La Rural had all gone well. It was the first time the director of the orchestra, José Manuel Delgado, from Seville, had been to the Frers theatre, and he was more than happy with the efforts of the Argentinean Symphony Orchestra, which were taking part in the event thanks to the generosity of the Argentinean Government. Everything seemed to be going perfectly. On one hand contact with the Argentinean gastronomic world was being strengthened, and on the other, preparations were well under way for the “Sonidos de Andalucía”, concert which was to take place in Buenos Aires the next day.

Dinner with the Academy That evening, after briefly passing by our hotel, we went for dinner to the Hotel Alvear. During the meal this year’s prizes for the Argentinean Academy of Gastronomy were to be awarded, at a ceremony which would also serve as a presentation for the Latin American

Academy of Gastronomy. We walked to the hotel in the luxurious La Recoleta district whilst being kept amused by anecdotes by Miguel Sánchez de Oca, and when we arrived we quickly realised that the event was being attended by the country’s most prestigious restaurateurs and gourmets. María Podestá has been President of the Argentinean Academy of Gastronomy since 2006. The Vice Presidents are Nicolás Keglevich and Carlos Pulenta, and the secretary is Alberto Suárez. The Academy sees its role as preserving the traditions of Argentinean cuisine, whilst at the same time spreading awareness about the national cuisine, both in the country itself, and abroad. It is also concerned with studying and raising awareness about cuisine from other parts of the world. So there we were, doing everything we could to understand the excellent meat dishes which we were served, and trying the fine wines, whilst paying tribute to all those professionals from the sector as they received their much-deserved awards. The prizes were marvellous statuettes designed by the well-known artist Ernesto Bertani, and created by the distinguished silversmith Juan Carlos Pallarols. Rafael Ansón and Nicolás Muela sat on the head table, near the stand from where they delivered their speeches, whilst the rest of us were distributed around the room, relishing the opportunity to chat about the subject which united and fascinated us all. We witnessed the enormous pleasure of a young chef from Rosario as he received his prize, and we listened appreciatively to the speeches which underlined the gastronomic links between the continents on each side of the Atlantic Ocean. The night came to an end with a few drinks as the city seemed to be ready to call it a day. Nobody overdid it. Tomorrow was another day.

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Etc.

Day 2. The Embassy and the con certT We arrived early at the embassy, which was a hive of activity, as is customary during important events. The sun shone on the city, bringing out the best in the parks and the grand avenues. We passed along the Avenida del Libertador, which was built in 1950 by Juan Domingo Perón in homage to San Martín, circling the northern side of the capital, until we arrived at the magnificent building which is home to the Spanish Embassy in Buenos Aires. Julio Moreno was waiting for us and we saw that the table was already prepared. Everything in its place, and nothing left to chance. Julio Moreno was already a friend, and the intense few days we spent together, proved that strong bonds are hard to break. We were at the Embassy to take part in the presentation ceremony for the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation and the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, which was to be followed later that evening by the wonderful “Sonidos de Andalucía” concert. We were welcomed by the Ambassador, Rafael Estrella, an Andalusian from Granada with all the typical characteristics of the people from the region. He was certainly a cordial and most hospitable host. After the initial welcome and introductions, the official reception began, beautifully organised by Julio Moreno.

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It took place in a large hall with windows overlooking the well-tended gardens. Apart from the Ambassador there were various well-known Argentinean figures including the Minister Tourism, Enrique Meyer, and prestigious chefs such as Ramiro Gonzaléz Pardo and Francis Mallman, as well as various representatives of the Spanish community in Buenos Aires. María Podestá thanked the Andalusian delegation and the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, whilst underlining, as she had the night before, the growing prestige of Argentinean cuisine. Manuel Jurado spoke about the important role played by Landaluz in the Andalusian agro-food industry, which, he said, accounted for almost 40% of total turnover, and demonstrates the specific significance of the sector in the generation of wealth and employment. At the same time, he underlined the fact that the key function of the Business Association for Certified Quality is to help the companies working in the Andalusian agro-food sector to increase their sales in both national and international markets. Following the speeches we raised our glasses in a succession of toasts to Spain, to Andalusia, to the important organisations which had just been presented in Argentina, and to the ceremony itself, which continued for some time, amid an atmosphere of friendly conversation. By the time we left the magnificent building on the Avenida Figueroa Alcorta the afternoon was almost over. The weather had unfortunately changed for the worse, and later on in the evening it began to rain.

“Sonidos de Andalucía” With hardly a moment to rest, we went directly to the La Rural complex, where

Etc. the “Sonidos de Andalucía” concert was to be performed that night. This recital of Andalusian music was based on the recreation of the typical songs and dances which are so much part of the traditional customs of our community. The performance was to take place in the Palacio Frers, a delightful concert hall, inaugurated in 1910 to commemorate Argentina’s centenary celebrations. The elegant hall has been modernised with a new infrastructure, a versatile stage and the latest technical equipment, to make it one of the finest venues of its kind in Buenos Aires. The classically-styled Palacio is part of the La Rural complex, Predio Ferial de Buenos Aires, a facility which has become one of the main cultural, business and social centres in the heart of the Argentinean capital. By eight o’clock in the evening, as the concert was about to start, it was raining hard in Buenos Aires, but there were long queues at the entrance to the theatre to see this performance of Andalusian music and dance celebrating a whole host of traditional fiestas, some with more religious roots such as Semana Santa (Easter Week celebrations) and the pilgrimage to El Rocio and others simply rejoicing in life itself, such as the ferias which are held all over the region throughout spring and summer. Also featured in the concert were the typical marches which accompany the effigies of Christ and the Virgins as they are paraded through the streets of Andalusia, as well as the flamenco songs and dances which provoke such passion in the people. A veritable feast for the senses in which the guitar, the flute, the cornet and the drums, were the main instruments incorporated into a sea of sounds masterfully blended into a symphonic composition. There was not a spare seat in the house, and right on time, the curtain opened and the Argentinean Symphony ANDALUSIAN FLAVOUR

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Summary

Orchestra was welcomed with a huge ovation. The conductor was José Manuel Delgado, from Seville, who had flown here especially for the occasion. As the orchestra played, images of Andalusia and its most emblematic traditions were displayed on a huge screen at the back of the stage. The guest of honour was the Ambassador, Rafael Estrella, and all the members of the Andalusian mission sat around him. The theatre was full of Andalusians from every generation as well as Argentineans who maintain a special place in their hearts for the land of their forefathers. The introductory work was the “Suite Española” by Isaac Albéniz and then the orchestra began to play the first bars of a piece which took everybody back to Semana Santa, evoking those days of memories and emotions, when the people of Andalusia honour their faith with the pain and celebration of the religious processions. That haunting combination of melancholy and jubilation which is so unique to the region.

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Spellbinding notes and rhythms which have the very aroma of incense, which reminds us of the passionate crowds gathering at the doors of the churches, which evoke the faith of the costaleros, and the disciplined rigour of the nazarenos. It was impossible not to feel the emotion of a land which pays such profound homage to Christ and the Virgins with those awe-inspiring melodies which are passed down from generation to generation. “Esperanza de Triana Coronada”, by José Albero, was the first of the marches to break the silence of the night. It was followed by the sound of voices singing saetas, the traditional laments to Jesus and Mary, which are sung from the balconies as the processions pass.


Summary

It is believed that the saeta was created by the Jews to convince the church authorities of their conversion to Christianity, and was later adopted as a harrowing form of expressing deep religious devotion. Wonderful laments which evoke the pain of the passion, the devotion of the believer, and faith in the resurrection. All the songs in the show were interpreted by the “Flamenco Bulevar” company, a highly experienced ensemble and much sought after group of singers who have performed all over the world with some of the most prestigious contemporary artists. Tamara Aguilera sung a marvellous saeta dedicated to the Virgen de los Dolores, then came the march entitled se “Jesús de las Penas” by Antonio Pantión. “Saeta” by Serrat was performed in a flamenco style, and this section of the show culminated with a piece known as “Coronación de la Macarena” by Pedro Braña. Following this, the section of the performance dedicated to more festive occasions began with the pasodoble “La Giralda” by Eduardo López. The piece was highly evocative of the Andalusian ferias which take place all over the region, from north to south, and from the sierras to the coast, in the ephemeral “cities” of canvas and wood, which spring up for a week and are home to endless music, dancing, and socialising.

During the day in these unique events, there is a constant procession of horses and riders, and people in horse drawn carriages, and then, as night falls, beneath the bright lights of the “casetas”, the ritual of singing and dancing begins. The feria is a temporary home and the casetas are tastefully decorated with curtains and lace, each one adorned with its own pictures and mirrors. And we mustn’t forget the food, their kitchens always prepare delicious treats which can be accompanied by excellent wines. To represent this particularly Andalusian tradition, “Flamenco Bulevar” sang a series of beautiful sevillanas. Following this, the orchestra interpreted the pasodoble “Gallito” by Santiago Lope Sango, and then played four more sevillanas. The final part of the performance was dedicated to El Rocio, the biggest pilgrimage in Andalusia, with a series of fandangos, rumbas and plegarias, and finally, the world premiere of an orchestration of a Salve dedicated to the Blanca Paloma (the patroness of El Rocio) This last piece completely captivated the public and the members of “Flamenco Bulevar” (Tamara Aguilera; Rocío Moya; Inés Ruiz; Iván Moya; Antonio Ruiz; Antonio Gil; Daniel Ruiz; Javier Moya; Ismael Aguilera and Álvaro López), the Conductor, José Manuel Delgado, and the

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Summary

members of the Argentinean Symphony Orchestra were loudly applauded for minutes on end. The excitement of the audience was almost palpable. Everything had worked out perfectly and this was clear to everyone there - Andalusians nostalgic for their homeland, Argentineans who had discovered something of their distant heritage, and of course, we ourselves, who were delighted to see such unbridled passion for our music and some of the most important cultural symbols of our land. Naturally enough the night turned into a magnificent lively fiesta on the third floor of a restaurant which provided the best setting for a memorable experience. The next morning, with just enough time to pack our bags, we were off. The Argentinean presentation of the Doña María de las Mercedes Foundation, the Latin American Academy of Gastronomy, and Landaluz had been a great success, and Buenos Aires, this great city, which as Borges wrote,” seems to lie between the sky and the plains”, had most certainly not disappointed us.

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Etc.

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THE LATIN 46

AMERICAN ACADEMYOF GASTRONOMY

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Flavours

the universal potato C

risps are thin slices of potato which are fried until they have a crunchy texture and are often enjoyed to accompany an aperitif or as a snack between meals. They come in numerous different shapes and forms: curved; with salt; country-style; fried with olive or sunflower oil, or with different flavours such as ham or cheese. They can be in different formats or types of packaging, and even low fat, but whatever the style, crisps are a type of snack which no-one can resist and they are always there in every celebration, with every tapa, and at any time of day. Even today, historians still aren’t in agreement about the origins of the European potato. Although everyone knows they were brought here from the New World by the conquistadors, some feel that they originated in the Andes, whereas others believe that they were first found in Chile. What is clear is that in Spain the first areas to cultivate the potato were those that were close to the ports which received the boats from South America, and as such, it was Andalusia and Galicia where they were initially grown. From Spain they moved to Portugal, Italy and France. Around 1586 they arrived in England and Ireland, and in 1610 they reached Holland. Whatever its exact origins, it is clear that the potato is one of the most adaptable products in the history of world cuisine, thanks to the various ways in which it can be prepared and the fact that it can be eaten on its own or accompanying other types of food.

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I

’m sure that I wouldn’t be wrong if I said that there is one form of preparing them that virtually everyone in the world, on all five continents, must have tried at least once: the potato crisp

The origin of crisps is one of those “happy accidents” of history and everyone agrees that they were first made in the United States. They were invented around 1853 by George Crum, who was a chef at the restaurant at the “Moon’s Lake House Hotel”, situated in Saratoga Springs, New York.

One day, one of the guests, supposedly a certain Cornelius Vanderbilt, a railway magnate and a demanding man, decided that the fried potatoes which Crum had prepared for him were too thick for his liking and he sent them back to the kitchen. The chef cooked him some more, this time making them thinner, but the client complained again, saying they were still too thick and greasy. After the plate had come back to the kitchen various times, George Crum decided to fry some extremely thinly sliced potatoes, almost as thin as cigarette paper. He heated the oil to the maximum and added more salt than usual, thinking that this would be the final straw for the impossible client who would have a plate of chips which were impossible to stick a fork into and were far too salty. However, much to Crum’s surprise, Vanderbilt was extremely satisfied and told everyone else who was eating in the restaurant, so much so, that the rest of the clients asked for the same dish. From then on “Moon´s Lake House” became famous for its “Saratoga Chips” or “Saratoga Crunch Chips”. Some years later, George Crum set up his own restaurant with his special chips as the main attraction. In 1895, after George Crum had retired, William Tappendon began to sell a packaged form of the crisps but it wasn’t until 1920 that they finally found world-wide fame, following the invention of the “potato peeler”, which revolutionised the sector.

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The process In the production of crisps the industrial process follows clearly defined rules and regulations and the potatoes must be fresh, having been picked a maximum of 24 hours earlier. This is to avoid the black marks which are a result of the oxidation of the potato, and therefore, older potatoes are not suitable for the crisp making process. The fresh potatoes go into a peeler, a drum-shaped machine which forces the potatoes towards rough wheels which act as “sanders” and peel the potatoes through a form of friction. They then go into a separator which classifies them according to their size. Following this they pass through a slicer which cuts the potatoes thin slices. The sharp blades of the slicer are adjustable to different sizes and thicknesses, in order to make different types of crisps according to what is required of the final product. The blades are on the walls of the drums which turn rapidly, creating a centrifugal force, pushing the potatoes against them. An average of 36 crisps are created from each potato, each slice having a standard thickness of 1.5 millimetres, although, as we mentioned before, some crisps are purposely made thicker. Once the cutting process is completed, the potato slices are washed in cold water for a period of a minute and are then passed through a drying tunnel to eliminate any excess water. The next part of the process is to fry the slices at a temperature of 195º C for three minutes. By frying the potatoes at temperatures of at least 175º centigrade, they heat up so quickly that they don’t have time to absorb humidity and thus obtain the desired fine-grained crispy texture. Once they are fried it is necessary to drain the potato slices on a mesh like belt, and following this, they are salted. Once again the crisps are subjected to a process of selection so as to eliminate any which have imperfections or stains. The selected crisps pass through a final processing stage which involves adding the aromas and spices which give the different crisps their distinctive flavours of ham, barbecue sauce, pepper etc. before being weighed, packaged, and finally distributed.

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SIMPLY

EL TÍO LAS PAPAS

CRIPS The company is based in the locality of Sierra de Yeguas, between the provinces of Malaga and Seville, right at the geographical heart of Andalusia. El Tío de las Papas is a family business dedicated to the frying of potatoes and other snacks, which was set up in 1995 with an investment of merely 90 €, frying just 20 kilos of potatoes each day on a small market stall. Their energy and enthusiasm enabled them to develop a market in the town and the surrounding area, simply by word of mouth. Demand for the product grew steadily and the family invested in new machinery which they installed in an industrial estate. The company has continued to grow over the years and now has a considerable number of loyal customers. Nowadays they have a range of different products and formats. Their main seller is a 280 gr. packet of crisps which is sold in shops although they also produce a larger 1 kg size for the hotel and catering trade. For children there are 75 and 35 gr. formats which are mostly sold in bars and cafes. All their products are made with the best quality raw materials, regardless of the size of the packet. El Tío de las Papas only use selected Spanish potatoes of the bitter variety and high oleic sunflower oil with minimum 80% oleic acid, which reduces the amount of monounsaturated fats which are damaging for health. Using oils which are high in oleic acid helps to reduce cardiovascular diseases because it increases the amount of good cholesterol in the body.

Other products in their range include Cocktail, Crispy Pork Rinds, Low Fat and Wheel-Shaped Crisps. El Tío de las Papas creates excellent tasty products.

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Flavours

150 gr. potatoes crips. 280 gr. potatoes crips.

100 gr. cocktail 1 k. potatoes crips.

100 gr.crusts.

100 gr. wheels

100 gr. potatoes light.

60 gr. potatoes crips

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MONTI

General de Distribución Montilla, S.L. was set up as PRODUCTOS MONTI in 1980 by the Córdoba Jiménez brothers, and is a continuation of their beginnings in the food industry a decade earlier with the industrial manufacture of confectionary and picos (breadsticks), as well as the distribution of crisps. The development of the company over this period has been remarkable, growing from selling only within the province to operating at a national level and exporting to a number of different countries including Portugal, The Czech Republic, Holland, Guatemala, Angola and Andorra. In 1989 they moved to new premises covering more than 9,000 m2, with an additional 3000 m2 of loading bays and other facilities. Amongst other activities, MONTI operates a fully automated potato frying process which is working continuously on two independent production lines. The company also owns facilities equipped with industrial fryers for the production of a range of snacks and appetisers including wheat crunchies, wheel-shaped crisps, light crisps, etc. Their products are marketed in various different formats: individual portions for the catering industry and the vending sector; medium-sized, for the family market, and finally, in large formats, aimed at large consumer groups. A good example of the quality of their products is the BIOMONTI brand, a range of foodstuffs based entirely on ecological produce. Quality control Their essential objective is to identify the most effective method for the manufacturing of their products, based on research in their sophisticated laboratory and meticulous control of their modes of production. The key to quality control lies in the production process itself, which is based on the demands of the company’s clients, and the analysis by their teams of experts on both the raw materials and the final products. They also work in accordance with all the legislative requirements and are careful to remove any products which don’t reach the required qualities. In order to continually upgrade their standards they adhere strictly to the official certifications of their various systems, in terms of both product quality and environmental issues. (ISO9001:2008; UNE-EN ISO14001:2004).

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to enjoy at any time of the day!

¡perfect


Flavours

80 gr. crusts of wheat

120 gr. potatoes light

100 gr. balls with flavour to cheese

80 gr. crusts of pork

130 gr. selected potatoes from organic farming 100 gr. cocktail

130 gr. undulate crips flavour ham 130 gr. undulate crips

130 gr. potatoes crips 130 gr. potatoes crips campesinas

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Flavours

HISPALANA

“Craft products” 450 gr. potato Crisps

300 gr. potato crisps

150 gr. oven cooked potato crisps

180 gr. special fried egg potato crisps

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Patatas Fritas Hispalana, a company established during the 90s, has seen sustained growth, gradually becoming a respected name in the snack food market thanks to two well-differentiated product lines: potato chips and pico breadsticks.   These products, which are sold under the HISPALANA brand name, are extremely popular among snack consumers, particularly in Seville, which is the main market, although sales are expanding rapidly into the rest of Andalusia and gradually into other Spanish regions thanks to distribution contracts with big chains such as El Corte Inglés, Alcampo, Carrefour, Eroski and Miquel Alimentació.   Our new products are distributed from the Alcampo logistics centre in Valdemoro to the chain’s points of sale in Spain and are also on sale in the national stores of El Corte Inglés during their Craft Food Fair.   The company has distributors in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and its prized picos are served in a number of select restaurants in La Moraleja, Madrid, and Barcelona.   Their agent in Badajoz exports the company’s products to Brussels, and the distributor in El Puerto de Santa María (Cadiz) sells a range of Regañás known as Cáscaras in Japan.   HISPALANA’s reputation has been rewarded with loyalty from both clients and consumers, and this further demonstrates the high quality of the company’s services and products.   Patatas fritas HISPALANA have been awarded the ISO 9001:2008 and the IFS Logistic Standard certifications.

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La Alhambra Welcome, the water’s voice To one whom black sand overwhelmed, Welcome, to the curved hand The smooth column of the marble, Welcome, slender labyrinths of water Between the lemon trees, Welcome the melodious zéjel, Welcome is love, welcome the prayer Offered to a God who is One, Welcome the jasmine.   Vain the scimitar Against the long lances of the host, Vain to be the best. Good to know, foreknow, grieving king, That your courtesies are farewells, That the key will be denied you, The infidels’ cross eclipse the moon, The afternoon you gaze on proves your last.

by Jorge Luis Borges

L a A l h a m b ra 64

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Pause

The

Alhambra, thus named for its red-coloured walls, sits on the al-Sabika hill, on the left bank of the river Darro, to the east of the city of Granada, overlooking the districts of El AlbaicĂ­n and La Alcazaba.

Alhamar, the first king of the Nasrid dynasty, began to build a palace on the site in 1239, over the remains of ancient fortress, which had probably been there since the 9th century. The Alhambra is a monumental complex which was created over more than six hundred years by a diverse range of cultures. During the course of its history it witnessed numerous transformations, and each period has left its own distinctive imprint. Strolling around the site we have the opportunity to discover its magnificent palaces, its fountains, its gardens, its towers, and its gates. The views from the gardens, the gentle whisper of the breeze among the trees and the ever-present sound of water, all remove us from the everyday hustle and bustle and make our visit a unique experience. The Alhambra is not only the most beautiful and best preserved Arabic palace in the world but also the oldest one still standing. Access is through the De las Armas gate to the north or the La Justicia gate to the south. Its strategic position, which dominates the whole city and the Granadan floodplain beyond, suggests that earlier constructions may have existed on the site before the arrival of the Muslims. The earliest accounts date from the 9th century, when in 889 Sawwar ben Hamdun had to take shelter in the Alcazaba – the oldest part of the Alhambra, together with Torres Bermejas.

In the year 1239 Al-Ahmar, founder of the Nasrid dynasty, established his court there and began a reconstruction project which led to the building of the Alhambra we know today. The Alhambra was a palace, a citadel and a fortress. It was the place of residence of the Nasrid Sultans, as well as high ranking officials, officers of the court, and elite soldiers. It saw its period of maximum splendour during the second half of the 14th century, coinciding with the sultanates of Yusuf I (1333-1354) and the second reign of Muhammad V (1362-1391), who were responsible for most of the constructions within the Alhambra which still remain today. Granada, capital of the Nasrid kingdom, gradually absorbed all the Muslim peoples who were fleeing the advance of the Christian conquest. As a result, the city expanded, with the creation of new quarters, and its walls continued to grow almost right up until its eventual fall at the end of the 15th century.

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The palaces of the Alhambra The visit begins in the Mexuar, constructed by order of Ismail I as a place for the administration of justice. We then move on to the Comares Palace, built by Muhammad V, the great masterpiece of the Alhambra, with its refined but lavish decoration. Of special note are the beautiful Patio de los Arrayanes, a large courtyard with a central fountain which is surrounded by marble columns, and the Salón de los Embajadores, the largest hall in the Alhambra, which has seven different chambers around its walls. Its coffered cedar wood ceiling depicts 105 stars which represent the seven Islamic heavens. The numerous sophisticated inscriptions of the Koran engraved on its walls are also particularly beautiful. The Palace of Muhammad V, which served as a royal residence, enhances the magnificence of the whole complex. Its structure includes 4 separate areas set around the famous Patio de los Leones. The visit then continues through the Sala de los Mozárabes, a name which refers to the replacing of the original dome by a baroque ceiling. The Sala de los Abencerrajes, one of the most evocative rooms in the Alhambra, was the setting for tragic stories and legends. It is named after the noble family which was brutally murdered within its walls. The most notable feature in the Sala de los Reyes are the leather paintings which can be seen in its cupolas, whilst the Sala de las dos Hermanas, with its coffered ceiling, featuring the verses of poet Ibn Zamrak covered in gilded and lapis lazuli motifs, is considered the most magnificent of them all. The coloured tiles and the lavishly decorated mozarabic dome are particularly stunning. A large arch leads to the Sala de los Ajimences and the Mirador de Daraxa, which originally overlooked the Albaicín, the Darro valley and the Lindaraja gardens. These vistas were concealed however by the rooms constructed by Carlos V. The Palace of Carlos V contrasts starkly with the nearby Puerta del Vino and the rest of the buildings within the Alhambra. Pedro Machuca, a pupil of Michel Angelo, was commissioned by the emperor to construct the palace in the 16th century. Hence its pure Italian renaissance style, with its quadrangular façade and circular courtyard which now houses the National Museum of Hispano-Muslim Art. The Generalife Gardens The exuberance of these gardens next to the Alhambra is extraordinary. They feature numerous fountains and have been carefully designed with an exquisite variety of flowers and plants. The Generalife has been a source of great inspiration for numerous musicians, poets and writers, and Washington Irving famously used it as the basis for his “Tales of the Alhambra”. The gardens were constructed in 1319 and still retain much of their original design.

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New Features

CONDADO DE HUELVA Condado de Huelva export their wines and vinegars to Berlin

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New Features

hanks to DeMenúHuelva the wines and vinegars of Huelva travelled to Germany to demonstrate combinations with the province’s finest cuisine at Fruitlogística 2011

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The Regulatory Council for the Condado de Huelva and Vinagre del Condado de Huelva Denominations of Origin represented the wine growing sector once again on the province’s stand at the Fruit Logística trade fair, which was held in Berlin from the 9th to the 11th of February. The Consejo Regulador took its catering service, DeMenúHuelva, to the German capital to demonstrate the perfect combination between the wines and vinegars of the Denomination of Origin and the typical food products of the province. Condado de Huelva was featured on the Huelva County Council stand, which gave official support to all the activities taking place on the 10th of February, the Day of Huelva.

DeMenúHuelva offered those attending the trade fair the opportunity to try dishes such as: aliño de melva canutera with ecologically produced peppers from the Sierra de Huelva seasoned with Vinagre Añada Condado de Huelva (a vinegar matured for more than three years using the criaderas and soleras system) and olive oil dressing and combined with Condado Pálido (Fino sherry); sheep’s cheese from the Andévalo area of Huelva and caña de lomo from the Sierra accompanied by Condado Pálido (a Fino sherry); salted tuna from Isla in olive oil combined with Condado Viejo (an Oloroso sherry); oranges from Huelva macerated with Vinagre Añada Condado de Huelva and tuna from the almadraba del Príncipe accompanied by Condado Viejo (oloroso sherry); and for dessert, strawberries from Huelva sprinkled with a few drops of Vinagre Añada, combined with Generoso de Licor (a sweet wine).

The wines and vinegars of the Condado de Huelva bring the Wine Route to Fitur

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he Consejo Regulador of the Condado de Huelva and Vinagre del Condado de Huelva Denominations of Origin took part in the 31st edition of Fitur, the International Tourism Trade Fair, which was held between the 19th and 23rd of January.

The Consejo Regulador travelled to Madrid to promote the wines and vinegars of the Condado de Huelva area with a whole range of activities, including a pairing exhibition with various typical dishes from the province. These took place on the official Huelva Tourism stand and were organised by the DeMenúHuelva catering company.


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Condado de Huelva took the aromas and flavours of its wines and vinegars to the capital city with the aim of increasing public awareness of their gastronomic virtues. The promotional campaign focused essentially on the Condado de Huelva Wine Route, which includes both middle-sized and large cooperatives as well as small family-run bodegas with their air of mystery and romance. The Wine Route combines perfectly with other places of tourist and cultural interest in the province such as the walled town of Niebla with its castle, the Columbus Sites, which are associated with the discovery of America, the natural paradise of the Doñana National Park, and the town of Moguer, birthplace of Nobel Prize winner Juan Ramón Jiménez. Visitors can also enjoy the rich gastronomic traditions of the province, which, apart from the magnificent wines and vinegars of the Denominations of Origin, include world famous products such as Iberico ham, seafood, and strawberries. Apart from attending agro-food and other specialised trade fairs, during 2011, Condado de Huelva, will be taking part in various promotional activities together with other Andalusian regulatory councils in a project entitled “De Menú Denominaciones de Andalucía”. ANDALUSIAN FLAVOUR

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UNIOLIVA VARIEDADES ALIÑO

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nder this name UNIOLIVA has just launched a completely new line of infused Extra Virgin Olive Oil with natural essences.

The Extra Virgin Olive Oil is a blending of three varieties (Picudo, Hojiblanca and Picual) which allows the essences to stand out against the flavour of the oil without loosing its personality.

This infused Extra Virgin Olive Oil is commercialized into dark glass bottles with a total capacity of 250 ml. The dark glass bottles protect the oil from the direct light keeping longer its the freshness.

UNIOLIVA VARIEDADES ALIÑO Lemon (yellow)

UNIOLIVA VARIEDADES ALIÑO Hot Pepper (red)

Each flavour is labeled with a different colour on the label and the cap which allows to each variety to be easily recognizable on the shelves:

UNIOLIVA VARIEDADES ALIÑO Black Truffle (blue)

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UNIOLIVA VARIEDADES ALIÑO Garlic (green)

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ACESUR

THE JUAN RAMÓN GUILLÉN FOUNDATION www.fundacionjrguillen.com  

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he website of the Juan Ramón Guillén foundation is now fully operational. In accordance with the principles of the Foundation, the main objective of the website is to offer in-depth information about the rural sector in general whilst promoting the customs and traditions associated with the olive industry in particular. The web contains news items, which are posted on a daily basis, and feature articles which offer an insight into the different varieties of olive oil, production processes, tasting, cultivation, etc. All the sections offer users the opportunity to make comments or submit questions, which will receive an immediate reply. Additionally, the section called PEOPLE invites users to contribute ideas and suggestions related to the olive oil industry. In parallel with the website, an Amigos del olivar profile has also been created on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/ Amigosdelolivar) so as to increase the visibility of the foundation on the social networks. The overall aim is to reach the largest possible number of people and increase awareness about the culture of olives and olive oil, whilst giving up-to-the-minute information about the Foundation and the sector in general, in order to promote the olive as part of World Heritage, the ultimate objective of the Foundation.

ACESUR

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cesur, a company founded and run by Juan Ramón Guillén, received the Alimentos de España awards presented by the Ministry of the Environment, Rural and Marine Affairs to the Food Industry. Previously, in 2005, Acesur received the Alimentos de España award for the best Agrofood Promotional Campaign. Acesur is the second most important producer of oils for human consumption in Spain and is the largest company to be completely funded by Spanish capital. With 11 different brands, it produces the widest range of oils on the market, including La Española, Coosur, Guillén and Coosol Premium.

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LA VIEJA FABRICA Select Cuisine - FLAVOUR OF THE YEAR 2011

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ÁNGEL CAMACHO ALIMENTACIÓN

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ollowing taste tests carried out in independent laboratories in autumn of 2010 with the participation of 360 consumers representing the Spanish population, the LA VIEJA FABRICA - SELECT CUISINE range was awarded FLAVOUR OF THE YEAR 2011 in the category of jams & preserves.

FLAVOUR OF THE YEAR (SABOR DEL AÑO) is the only exclusively taste-based quality certification process for food products in Spain. The participating food products are tasted and voted by consumers, the best judges of these everyday products to be found on supermarket shelves given that they are the end consumers and always look for the very best for themselves and their families. According to Paul J. Kortenoever, Marketing Director for the brand, “the FLAVOUR OF THE YEAR award is an authentic quality seal granted by consumers in recognition of the longstanding LA VIEJA FABRICA preserves brand, which has a history of over 170 years.” He also added that despite its long history and tradition it is also a highly innovative brand, and to this end LA VIEJA FABRICA has recently presented SELECT CUISINE, a new range with 6 delicious varieties (tomato relish, apple compote, chestnut cream, pumpkin preserves, flower honey and blueberry preserves) to accompany and distinguish your favourite recipes and transform them into a veritable spectacle! The SELECT CUISINE range is available in a handy size (350g) for household use and a larger size (800g) for use by professional cooks. These products offer countless possibilities as ingredients in desserts and as a side dish or garnish for different meat, fish and pasta dishes and desserts.


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USISA

USISA CONFIRMS ITS COMMITMENT TO QUALITY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

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n an increasingly demanding market, USISA aims to set itself apart from its competitors by producing prime quality products, and the company’s R&D and Quality Control Department has recently embarked on the implementation of a new Quality Management System in order to apply the stringent quality control requirements established for the agrofood industry in accordance with international IFS and BRC standards. The system’s main objective is to guarantee the safety of all the production processes and the involvement of the company’s staff in an ongoing improvement process.

Regional Government have recently signed a framework agreement to collaborate in fighting climate change in which the company has voluntarily agreed to reduce its carbon footprint. In accordance with this agreement, USISA has also recently joined the Andalusian System to Offset Greenhouse Gases (SACE) and implemented a number of measures aimed at reducing water and energy consumption, as well as promoting recycling by separating waste generated at source.  

Furthermore, as part of its updated Quality Programme, the company and all its employees have demonstrated their strong commitment to the protection of the environment by adopting sustainable measures which ensure a more efficient internal organisation and the optimisation of results so as to reduce their impact on the environment. In order to formalise this commitment, USISA and the Department for the Environment of the Andalusian

HERMANOS MOY S.A.

MOYSEAFOOD keeps on with its consolidation as the leading Andalusian company in cephalopods exports, expanding its presence abroad and renewing its corporate image through a new website.

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escados Congelados Hermanos Moy, SA has supported its growth strategy on high quality products, excellence in service, the most complete range of the market and a straightforward international focus.

At the moment, the company is operating in over 15 countries, being the reference for cephalopods in the foodservice channel. Due to the excellent results achieved, Hermanos Moy will invest in new facilities that will be inaugurated in early 2012, doubling current production capacity.

With the aim of consolidating its position in the international market, MOYSEAFOOD has recently launched a new corporate image and a new website, available in seven different languages. All about the company in: www.moyseafood.com.

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MUÑOZ VERA

Muñoz Vera is now a leading manufacturer of individual portions for the Foodservice sector

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New Features

uñoz Vera is a market leader in the production of individual portions of oils and vinegars, tomato sauce sachets, and numerous other items. They use attractive well-designed packaging aimed essentially at the Foodservice sector. Their essential philosophy is to offer practical hygienic solutions which retain all the flavours and characteristics of the products they provide.

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The individual portions in their various formats going under the name of Capricho Andaluz are gaining popularity amongst a wide range of important clients. A pioneer in marketing individual portions of oils and vinegars, Muñoz Vera has responded to its clients’ needs by also providing individual sachets of items such as Mayonnaise, Ketchup, Mustard, Garlic-Flavoured Mayonnaise and Barbecue sauce. Muñoz Vera is now marketing a whole range of healthy breakfasts with practical and hygienic portions of quince spread and honey, as well as various forms of sweeteners for drinks. With its various brands and versatile approach, Muñoz Vera has become a market leader in the production of individual portions for the foodservice sector by successfully catering to the wide range of requirements of its clients.


New Features

BODEGAS FUENTE REINA BODEGAS DE FUENTE REINA PRESENTS ITS NEW RED, “PAGOS DE FUENTE REINA 2009”

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uente Reina, a winery based in Constantina (Seville) and managed by Oscar Zapke,  presented its new crianza wine “Pagos de Fuente Reina Merlot 2009”at the Enoteca Andana and the “Pura Tasca” wine bar in Seville The seventh vintage of wines presented by the bodega, which was established in 1998, have, for the first time, been produced exclusively from a Merlot varietal rather than the coupages used in previous years. “This is thanks to the exceptional quality of the 2009 vintage” explains the bodega’s technical director and oenologist Iñigo Manso de Zúñiga, who adds: “because coupages could

not be improved, we have remained faithful to the traditional bordelé production process of selecting the best produce from the vineyards, regardless of their variety”. The wine’s new name, using the term PAGOS (which is equivalent to the French terroir) will only be used for exceptional vintages. The idea is to focus on the production of “vinos de pago” as an essential characteristic of the bodega. Its prestige is based on the character of its vineyards, which are situated at an altitude of 550 metres in the heart of the Sierra Norte and are a key element in the quality of the wines being produced.   

TORTAS GAVIÑO

TORTAS GAVIÑO LAUNCHES NEW PRODUCTS

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he company, which specialises in the production of traditional oil tortas, continues is process of innovation with the launching of two new products: a sweet torta using cinnamon and lemon, and a more savoury variety flavoured with rosemary and extra virgin olive oil. As always, their new range of tortas is made with natural ingredients. They are free of preservatives and artificial colouring, and are very low in calories. Marco Barrena, the group’s Head of Sales, says that the new products “fill a gap” in two different sections of the market. Firstly that of children’s food, because the tortas are produced following traditional methods with natural products and have no additives or colouring, and secondly as sweet or savoury snacks, which can be enjoyed “at any time of the day”. Tortas Gaviño is a family-owned company which has been manufacturing traditional Sevillian confectionary for over a century and their speciality, the tortas, are each made individually by hand. As such, no two are exactly alike. “This elaborate process is another of our distinctive features and is essential to the way we obtain the fine light texture which has made our brand so sought-after”, explains Barrena.

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ALFOCAN, S.A. Sector: CRAYFISH AND SHELLFISH C/ Américo Vespucio, 5-3 41092 SEVILLA +34 954 21 67 00 Fax: +34 954 21 59 37 klaus@alfocan.com www.alfocan.com

ACESUR Sector: OLIVE OIL

AL-ANDALUS DELICATESSEN S.C.A. Sector: HONEY AND MARMALADE

Ctra. Sevilla-Cádiz, km. 550,6 41700 Dos Hermanas (SEVILLA) +34 954 69 09 00 - 68 91 98 - 69 04 50 info@acesur.com / www.acesur.com

C/ Caño de las Eras, 9 18420 Lanjarón (GRANADA) +34 958 77 21 11 Fax: +34 958 77 22 28 info@alandalussca.com / www.alandalussca.com

ACEITEX S.L. Sector: OLIVE OIL

ALIMENTOS “LA PEDRIZA” S.L. Sector: LEGUMES

C/ Federico Mendizábal, 5 - 1º 23003 JAÉN +34 953 24 31 - 19 01 49 aceitex@aceitexp.com / www. aceitexp.com

Alameda de Solano, 16 11130 Chiclana (CÁDIZ) +34 956 53 19 29 - 53 44 34

ACEITUNAS GUADALQUIVIR Sector: OLIVES

ALMENDRERA DEL SUR Sector: NUTS & HONEY

Camino Alcoba s/n. 41530 Morón de la Fra. (SEVILLA) +34 955 85 47 10 / 607 41 38 10 Fax: +34 954 85 25 13 jmateo@agolives.com / www.agolives.com

Camino de la Almendrera s/n 29580 Estación de Cártama (MÁLAGA) +34 952 42 00 20 - 42 08 25 comercial@almensur.com / www.almensur.com

AECOVI-JEREZ Sector: WINE

ALVEAR S.A. Sector: WINE

Urb. Pie de Rey bloq. 3 - bajo izq. 11407 Jerez de la Frontera (CÁDIZ) +34 956 18 08 73 - Fax: +34 956 18 03 01 comercial@aecovi-jerez.com / www.aecovi-jerez.com

Avda. María Auxiliadora, 1 14550 Montilla (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 65 01 00 Fax: +34 957 65 01 35 info@alvear.com / www.alvear.es

AGASUR Sector: CHEESSE

ANDALUZA DE CAFÉS Sector: COFEE

C/ Limitación, 14. Polg. Ind. la Huertecilla 29196 El Tarajal (MÁLAGA) +34 952 17 93 11 fax:+34 952 17 97 09 agasur@agasur.com / www.agasur.com

Pol. Ind. Calonge, parcela 18. 41007 SEVILLA +34 954 35 70 50 - 35 23 04 catunambu@catunambu.com www.catunambu.com

AGROALIMENTARIA VIRGEN DEL ROCÍO Sector: WINE

ANDALUZA DE MIELES S.L. (DORAY) Sector: HONEY

Avda. de Cabezudos, 2. 21730 Almonte (HUELVA) +34 959 40 61 03 - 40 70 52 administracion@raigal.com / www.raigal.com

C/ Aparicio s/n. 41807 Espartinas (SEVILLA) +34 954 11 30 32 - 571 02 68 info@andaluzademieles.com www.andaluzademieles.com

AGROLACHAR Sector: CANNED VEGETABLES

ÁNGEL CAMACHO ALIMENTACIÓN S.L. Sector: OLIVES, OLIVE OIL AND MARMALADE

Avda. de Andalucía s/n. Apdo. Correos 18327 Lachar (GRANADA) +34 958 45 74 32 Fax: +34 958 45 74 24 nchica@agrolachar.com / www.agrolachar.com

Avda. del Pilar, 6 41530 Morón de la Fra. (SEVILLA) +34 955 85 47 00 - 85 01 45 info@acamacho.com / www.acamacho.com

AGROPECUARIA Y AVÍCOLA S.A. Sector: EGGS

MANTEQUERÍAS ARIAS Sector: CHEESE

Carretera de Aznalcázar - Pilas. Km. 2 41849 Aznalcázar (SEVILLA) +34 954 69 07 17 - 69 19 08 jfs@huevosgiralda.com

C/ de Pedro Teixeira, 8 - planta 9 28020 Madrid +34 914 17 47 40 - Fax: +34 915 55 85 08 export@mantequeriasarias.com / www.arias.es

AGROSEVILLA Sector: OLIVES & OLIVE OIL

ARAGÓN Y CÍA S.A. Sector: WINE

Avda. de la Innovación, s/n. Edif. Rentasevilla, pta. 8. 41020 SEVILLA +34 902 25 14 00 Ext. 8607 Fax: +34 954 25 10 71 grupo@agrosevilla.com / www.agrosevilla.com

Camino de la Estación s/n. 4900 Lucena (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 50 00 46 - 50 29 35 gerencia@aragonycia.com / www.aragonycia.com

AHUMADOS UBAGO DENMARK S.L. Sector: SMOKED

ARODEN S.A.T. Sector: OLIVE OIL

C/ Charles Darwin, 3. Parque Tec. de Andalucía. 29590 Campanillas (MÁLAGA) +34 951 01 04 70 Fax: +34 951 01 04 71 ubago@ubagogroup.com / www.ubagogroup.com

Apdo. de Correos 219 14800 Priego de Córdoba (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 72 01 20 Fax: +34 957 72 01 43 administracion@aroden.com / aroden.com


We are ARTICHOKE, S.L. Sector: VEGETABLES C/ Paseo de la Resolana, 20 11405 Jerez (CÁDIZ) +34 956 34 12 18 Fax: +34 956 33 72 72 jrodriguez@altacazuela.com

We are

BODEGAS ANDRADE S.L. Sector: WINE Avda. de la Coronación, 35. 21710 Bollullos del Condado (HUELVA) +34 959 41 01 06 - 41 13 05 bodegas-andrade@hsoft.es BODEGAS BARBADILLO S.L. Sector: WINE

CAMPO DE TEJADA S.C.A. Sector: CHICKPEAS

C/ Luis Eguilaz, 11 11540 Sanlúcar de Barrameda (CÁDIZ) +34 956 38 55 00 - 38 55 29 - 38 55 01 barbadillo@barbadillo.com / www.barbadillo.com

Ctra. de la Estación, s/n. 21870 Escacena del Campo (HUELVA) +34 959 42 32 11 Fax: +34 959 42 31 61 atomasmm@campodetejada.es

BODEGAS TERESA RIVERO Sector: WINE

CAMPO DE ULEILA, S.L. Sector: OLIVE OIL

C/ Puerto, 21 11540 Sanlúcar de Barrameda (CÁDIZ) +34 956 36 14 91 - 47 Fax: +34 956 36 83 79 www.bodegasgarvey.com

Ctra. Rambla del Mar, 15 Polg. La Juaida 04240 Viator (ALMERÍA) +34 950 31 55 09 Fax: 950 31 55 08

mhidalgo@camposdeuleila.com / www.camposdeuleila.es

BODEGAS DELGADO S.L. Sector: WINE

CELESTINO GÓMEZ PARRA S.A. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

C/ Cosano, 2. 4500 Puente Genil (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 60 00 85 - 60 45 71 fino@bodegasdelgado.com www.bodegasdelgado.com

Pol. Ind. “El Caño I”, s/n 14220 Espiel (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 36 41 28 - 36 41 90 direcc@celestinogomezparra.com www.celestinogomezparra.com

BODEGAS DE FUENTE REINA S.L. Sector: WINE

CERVEZAS ALHAMBRA S.L. Sector: BEERS

Apdo. 363. 41450 Constantina (SEVILLA) +34 955 95 40 26 - 610 28 41 13 Fax: +34 955 88 00 17 - 943 31 16 55 info@tintoandaluz.com / www.tintoandaluz.com

Avda. de Murcia, 1. Apdo. 92 18012 GRANADA +34 958 18 50 50 - 80 87 60 marketing@cervezasalhambra.com

BODEGAS DOÑA FELISA S.L Sector: WINE

CESURCA Sector: CANNED VEGETABLES

C/ Cordel del Puerto Al Quejigal, s/n Ronda 29400 - Málaga + 34 951 16 60 33 g.alonso@chinchillawine.com / www.chinchillawine.com

Ctra. de la Estación, s/n 18360 Huétor-Tajar (GRANADA) +34 958 33 20 20 - 33 23 52 - Fax:+34 958 33 25 22 cesurca@telefonica.net / www.faecagranada.com

BODEGAS JOSÉ ESTÉVEZ S.A. Sector: WINE

CÍTRICOS DEL ANDÉVALO, S.A. Sector: JUICE AND CANNED VEGETABLES

Ctra. Nacional IV, km. 640 11408 Jerez de la Fra. (CÁDIZ) +34 956 32 10 04 - 34 08 29 jac@grupoestevez.com / www.grupoestevez.com

Camino de Lepe “Finca la Dehesilla” 21540 Villanueva de los Castillejos (HUELVA) +34 959 38 52 36 jolmos@jgc.es / fvillaverde@jgc.es

PÉREZ BARQUERO S.A. Sector: WINE & BRANDY

CONSORCIO DE JABUGO, S.A. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

Avda. de Andalucía, 27. 14550 Montilla (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 65 05 00 - Fax: + 34 957 65 02 08 info@perezbarquero.com www.perezbarquero.com

Edificio Bluenet. Calle Isaac Newton, nº 3, 3ª planta Módulo A. Isla de la Cartuja. 41092 SEVILLA +34 955 02 46 94 Fax: +34 955 02 46 95 iberiberico@consorciodejabugo.com www.consorciodejabugo.com

BODEGAS F. SALADO Sector: WINE

COPRODUR, S.L. Sector: POTATOES

C/ Mérida, 14 41806 Umbrete (SEVILLA) +34 955 71 56 01 Fax: +34 955 71 56 01 bodegassalado@hotmail.com

Ctra. Nacional IV, km. 630 11407 Jerez de la Frontera (CÁDIZ) +34 956 18 68 40 Fax: +34 956 18 68 36 pedidos@papacking.es / www.papacking.es

BODEGAS RODRÍGUEZ CHIACHÍO Sector: WINE

CORSEVILLA Sector: CHEESE & IBERICO PRODUCTS

Avda. Belén, 2. 14940 Cabra (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 52 06 64 Fax: +34 957 52 19 20 administracion@bodegasrchiachio.com www.bodegasrchiachio.com

Ctra. de Guadalcanal, km. 1. 41370 Cazalla de la Sierra (SEVILLA) Apdo. de Correos 40 +34 954 88 42 86 Fax: +34 954 88 34 06 corsevilla@corsevilla.es / www.corsevilla.es


We are Summary

We are

DESPENSA LA NUESTRA ENVASADOS LOLA S.A. Caminos de las Cuevas, s/n 4710 Villarubia (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 45 88 71 envasadoslola@terra.es / www.envasadoslola.com

C.O.V.A.P. Sector: IBERICO HAM AND CHEESES

DOÑA JIMENA Sector: SWEETS

Avda. del Gran Capitán, 46 - 4º, oficina 6 14008 CÓRDOBA +34 957 47 30 35 - 47 99 24 covap@covap.es / www.covap.es

Ctra. de Alcalá, s/n. 23600 Alcaudete (JAÉN) +34 953 56 02 33 - 56 02 34 jimenezserrano@donajimena.es www.donajimena.es

C.R. CABALLA Y MELVA DE ANDALUCÍA Sector: CANNED FISH

EL GUIJARRAL S.L. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

Glorieta del Agua, 4. Edif. Aljama Center 2º plta. 41940 Tomares (SEVILLA) +34 954 15 18 23 Fax: +34 954 15 18 23 consejoregulador@caballaymelva.com

Urbanización Santa María del Pilar, 31 21005 Huelva +34 959 15 05 14 Fax: +34 959 27 00 23 ana@jabugodeley.es / www.jabugodeley.es

CRISMONA S.A. Sector: OLIVE OIL, VINEGAR, MEAT PRODUCTS AND WINE

EL MESÍAS Sector: SWEETS

C/ Baena, 25. 14860 Doña Mencía (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 69 55 14 Fax: +34 957 67 63 42 direccion@crismona.com www.crismona.com

Avda. de Andalucía, 24 41560 Estepa (SEVILLA) +34 955 91 28 18 csantos@elmesías.es / www.elmesias.es

D.O. CONDADO DE HUELVA Sector: VINEGAR AND WINE

EL TÍO DE LAS PAPAS Sector: POTATOES

Avda. 28 de febrero, s/n 21710 Bollullos Par del Condado (HUELVA) +34 959 41 03 22 Fax: +34 959 41 38 59

cr@condadodehuelva.com / www.condadodehuelva.com

Polig. Indust. Ctra. Martín de la Jara C/ Sabadell 29328 Sierra de Yeguas (MÁLAGA) +34 952 74 65 71 Fax: +34 952 74 65 71 info@eltiodelaspapas.com

COMERCIALIZADORA LOS TITOS S.L. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

EMBUTIDOS CARCHELEJO, S.L. Sector: MEAT PRODUCTS

Pol. Ind. Cárnico, s/n 14440 Villanueva de Córdoba (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 12 14 15 - 12 19 29 info@tioeusebio.com / www.tioeusebio.com

Avda. de España, s/n. 23192 Carchelejo (JAÉN) +34 953 30 20 55 Fax: +34 953 30 22 66 jgonzalez@embutidoscarchelejo.es www.embutidoscarchelejo.es

CONDE DE BENALÚA Sector: OLIVE OIL

EMBUTIDOS JABUGO Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

C/ Puente del Ventorro, s/n 18564 Benalúa de las Villas (GRANADA) +34 958 39 04 02 Fax: +34 958 39 00 78 administracion@condedebenalua.com www.condedebenalua.com

C/ Marqués de Aracena, 78 21360 El Repilado-Jabugo (HUELVA). +34 955 63 02 63 Fax: +34 955 63 04 34

marketing@embutidosjabugo.com / www.embutidosjabugo.com

CONSERVERA CÁRNICA DEL SUR Sector: CANNED MEAT Ctra. Añora-Dos Torres. Km 0,5 14450 Añora (CÓRDOBA) Tfno-Fax +34 957 15 15 14 www.productosdelaabuela.com info@productosdelaabuela.com

EMBUTIDOS MORENO PLAZA Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

COPROHNIJAR S.C.A. Sector: VEGETABLES

E. MORENO S.L. Sector: SWEETS

C/ Olivar, s/n 04117 San Isidro-Níjar (ALMERÍA) +34 950 36 60 15 - 36 60 89 coprohnijar@coprohnijar.net

Avda. de Andalucía, 65. 41560 Estepa (SEVILLA) +34 955 91 26 96 - 91 29 08 emoreno@emoreno.com www.emoreno.com

DANIEL ORTEGA S.L. Sector: NUTS

EXPLOTACIONES INTERNACIONALES ACUÍFERAS S.A. SIERRA DE CAZORLA Sector: MINERAL WATER

Ctra. de Alcalá, s/n. 23660 Alcaudete (JAÉN) +34 953 70 80 90 - 56 03 30 frutossecos@danielortega-sl.es www.danielortega-sl.es

Ctra. del Tranco, km. 18 23330 Villanueva del Arzobispo (JAÉN) +34 953 12 82 44 Fax: +34 953 12 81 17 www.aguasierracazorla.com

DESTILERÍA JOAQUÍN ALONSO Sector: LIQUEUR

FAMADESA S.A. Sector: MEAT PRODUCTS

Bda. de la Estación, s/n 18230, Atarfe (GRANADA) +34 958 43 64 08 www.destileriasjoaquinalonso.com

Camino Santa Inés, 71 29590 Campanillas (MÁLAGA) +34 952 43 30 50 - 43 30 76 fbeltrang@famadesa.es / www.famadesa.es

Pol. Ind. La Rosa, parcela 7-15 29120 Alhaurín el Grande (GRANADA) +34 952 59 57 87 - 59 44 36 afbg1960@hotmail.com


We are FRANJUBA PAN, S.L. Sector: BREAD

We are

Newton, 1, Parque E-Jerez 11407 - Jerez de la Frontera (CÁDIZ) +34 956 18 41 01 Fax: +34 956 31 30 90 info@franjuba.com / www.franjuba.com

HERMANOS CASTAÑO FERNÁNDEZ (TARTESSOS)

GOMEOLIVA S.A. Sector: OLIVE OIL

Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

Avda. de Granada, s/n. 14800 Priego de Córdoba (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 70 05 84 - 54 29 59 gomeoliva@arrakis.es / info@gomeoliva.com www.gomeoliva.com

C/ Tendaleras, 20 21001 HUELVA +34 959 24 55 41 direccion@tartesso.es / www.tartesso.es

GONZÁLEZ BYASS, S.A. Sector: WINE

Sector: FROZEN FISH

Manuel Mª González, 12 114003 - Jerez de la Frontera (CÁDIZ) +34 956 35 70 00 Fax: +34 956 35 70 43 tiopepe@gonzalesbyass.e

C/ Mar Banda, 6 11500 El Puerto de Santa María (CÁDIZ) +34 956 56 08 95 Fax: +34 956 56 08 61 info@moyseafood.com / www.moyseafood.com

GRUPO GARVEY Sector: WINE AND BRANDIES

HUERTA DE ALBALÁ Sector: WINE

Ctra. Circunvalación, s/n. Complejo Bellavista 11407 Jerez de la Frontera (CÁDIZ) +34 956 31 96 50 - + 34 956 31 98 24

www.grupogarvey.com / atencionalcliente@grupogarvey.com

Ctra. CA 6105, Km. 4 Apdo. Correos 320 11360 Arcos de la Frontera (CÁDIZ) bodega@huertadealbala.com www.huertadealbala.com

GRUPO YBARRA Sector: OLIVE OIL AND OLIVES

HNOS. RODRÍGUEZ BARBANCHO S.L. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

Ctra. Isla Menor, km. 1,8. 41703 Dos Hermanas (SEVILLA) +34 955 67 50 60 Fax: +34 954 72 28 66 ybarra@ybarra.es / www.ybarra.es

C/ Marqués de Santillana, 141 14270 Hinojosa del Duque (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 14 02 44 - 14 06 65 info@rodriguezbarbancho.com

GRUPO INÉS ROSALES Sector: SWEETS & OLIVE OIL TORTA CAKES

HUERTA CAMPO RICO S.L. Sector: CANNED VEGETABLES

Parque Empresarial s/n 41830 Huévar (SEVILLA) Tel: +34 954 75 64 27 - Fax: +34 954 75 63 35 grupo@inesrosales.com / www.inesrosales.com

P.E. Cuarto de la Huerta, s/n 41220 Burguillos (SEVILLA) +34 955 73 89 80 www.huertacamporico.es

GRUPO OSBORNE S.A. Sector: WINE

IBEPA 375 S.L. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS & CHEESE

C/ Fernán Caballero, 7 11500 Puerto de Santa María (CÁDIZ) Tel: +34 956 86 90 00 - Fax: +34 956 86 90 36 comunicaciones@osborne.es / www.osborne.es

Avda. de las Lonjas, s/n. Mercacórdoba, mod. 12 polivalente

GUIPÁN S.L. Sector: BREAD & SNACKS

IND. ALIMENTARIAS DE MONTILLA Sector: SNACKS

C/ La Rosa, 23 11002 CÁDIZ +34 956 21 20 78 - 29 22 20 - 28 51 41 joseguillen@guipansur.com / www.guipansur.com

Ctra. Córdoba-Málaga, km. 43,70 14550 Montilla (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 65 06 22 - 65 10 27 monti@pmonti.com / www.pmonti.com

HEINEKEN ESPAÑA Sector: BEERS

IND. CÁRNICAS ZURITA S.A. Sector: MEAT PRODUCTS

Avda. de Andalucía, 1 41007 SEVILLA +34 954 97 99 99 - 97 98 51 ana.garrido@cruzcampo.es / www.cruzcampo.es

Pol. Ind. Juncaril, parcela 236 C/ M 18220 Albolote (GRANADA) +34 958 46 62 20 - 46 50 53 direccion@iczurita.es / www.iczurita.es

HERBA NUTRICIÓN Sector: RICE

INDUSTRIAS ESPADAFOR S.A. Sector: SOFT DRINKS

C/ Real, 43 41920 San Juan de Aznalfarache (SEVILLA) +34 954 58 92 26 - 76 95 79 correo@herba.es / www.herba.es

Avda. de Andalucía s/n 18015 GRANADA +34 958 80 03 04 - 80 04 05 industrias@espadafor.es / www.espadafor.es

HERMABAR NUEVA S.L. Sector: SNACKS

JAMONES Y EMBUTIDOS JABUGO S.A. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

Autovía A92, km. 46,2 41610 Paradas (SEVILLA) +34 954 84 91 49 Fax: +34 955 84 41 84 info@saladitos.com / www.saladitos.com

C/ Marqués de Aracena, 98 21360 El Repilado, Jabugo (HUELVA) +34 959 12 26 78 Tfno. - Fax: +34 959 12 28 00 info@jabugo-sa.com / www.jabugo-sa.com

PESCADOS CONGELADOS HERMANOS MOY, S.A.

C/ Blas Infante, 29. 14280 Benalcázar (CÓRDOBA). +34 957 36 32 22 - 14 16 92 - 670 59 86 90 info@dongutierre.com / www.dongutierre.com


We are Summary GRUPO CABALLERO Sector: LIQUEUR

We are

C/ Virgen del Monte, 54 41370 Cazalla de la Sierra (SEVILLA) +34 954 88 40 13 - 63 11 52 - 88 31 07 cazalla@caballero.es / dirgral@caballero.es / www.caballero.es MANUEL BAREA S.A. SECTOR: DISTRIBUTION Pol. Ind. Ctra. Amarilla. C/ Rafael Beca Mateos, 20 41007 Sevilla +34 954 67 72 26 - 51 87 22 Fax: +34 954 67 02 11 lopez@barea.com / recepcion@barea.com MATADERO DE LA SIERRA MORENA S.A. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS Avda. García Morato 9, Edfi. Gilaresa, of. 9 41011 SEVILLA +34 954 88 98 16 - 22 92 56 Fax: +34 954 88 98 15 info@sierradesevilla.com / www.sierradesevilla.com

JAMONES JAROTE S.L. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

MATADEROS IND. SOLER S.A. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

Avda. del Matadero, 40 14440 Villanueva de Córdoba (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 12 08 34 Fax: +34 957 12 17 41 info@jamonjarote.es / www.jamonjarote.es

Pza. de Prolongo, 1 29580 Cártama-Estación (MÁLAGA) +34 952 42 00 00 - 42 01 15 prolongo@prolongo.es / www.prolongo.es

JAMONES LAZO S.A. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

MAZAPANES DE MONTORO “LA LOGROÑESA” TORREGONZA, S.A. Sector: SWEETS

Avda. de Portugal, 6 21230 Cortegana (HUELVA) +34 959 13 15 60 - 13 18 69 alahore@jamoneslazo.com / www.jamoneslazo.com

C/ Realejo, 7 14600 Montoro (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 16 03 14 Fax: +34 957 16 00 61 www.torregonza.com

J. GALLEGO GÓNGORA S.A. Sector: WINE & BRANDIESS

MONTERO ALIMENTACIÓN S.L. Sector: DESSERTS

C/ Stmo. Cristo de la Vera Cruz, 59 41808 Villanueva del Ariscal (SEVILLA) +34 954 11 37 00 - 11 32 39 gongora@bodegasgongora.com / www.bodegasgongora.com

A. Severo Ochoa, 62. 29590 Campanillas (MÁLAGA) +34 952 20 05 02 Fax: +34 952 29 57 77 export@postresreina.com www.monteroalimentacion.es

JOLCA Sector: OLIVES

MORENO S.A. (MUSA) Sector: SAUCES AND MAYONNAISE.

Autovía Sevilla-Huelva, km. 22,5. Apdo. de Correos 13 41830 Huévar del Aljarafe (SEVLLA) +34 954 15 40 32 Fax: +34 954 15 16 89 jolca@jolca.es / www.jolca.es

Fuente de la Salud, 2 14006 CÓRDOBA +34 957 76 76 05 Fax: +34 957 27 99 07 moreno@morenosa.com / www.morenosa.com

LA ABUELA CARMEN Sector: GARLICS

MUELOLIVA S.L. Sector: OLIVE OIL

C/ La Vega, s/n. Pol. Ind. Horcajo 14548 Montalbán (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 31 04 52 - 31 04 45 info@laabuelacarmen.com / www.laabuelacarmen.com

C/ Ramón y Cajal, 85 14800 Priego de Córdoba (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 02 72 00 - 70 02 60 mueloliva@mueloliva.es / www.mueloliva.es

LA FLOR DE RUTE S.L. Sector: SWEETS

MUÑOZ VERA E HIJOS S.A. Sector: OLIVE OIL

C/ Blas Infante, 20-22 (Ctra. Lucena-Loja) 14960 Rute (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 53 86 61 - 53 86 34 calidad@laflorderute.es / www.laflorderute.es

Ctra. Doña Mencía s/n. Apdo. de Correos 131 14940 Cabra (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 52 92 00 Fax: +34 957 52 21 16 comercial@mvera.com / www.mvera.com

LEGUMBRES PEDRO S.L. Sector: LEGUMES

NAVISA S.A. Sector: WINE

Pol. Ind. La Palmosa. Manzana 3 Calle C, 13-1 7 11180 Alcalá de los Gazules (CÁDIZ) +34 956 42 01 26 - 42 00 07 www.legumbrespedro.com / pedro@legumbrespedro.com

Ctra. de Montalbán, s/n 14550 Montilla (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 65 04 50 - 65 17 47 abaena@navisa.es / www.navisa.es

LICORES DE CASTILLÉJAR, S.L.U. Sector: LIQUEURS

NUÑEZ DE PRADO C.B. Sector: OLIVE OIL

Barrio Los Olivos, derecha 22 B 18818 Castilléjar (GRANADA) Tfno. Fax: +34 958 74 41 13 - 609 160 191

Avda. de Cervantes, 15 14850 Baena (CÓRDOBA) +34 957 67 01 41- 67 00 19 Fax: +34 957 27 99 07 nunezdeprado@hotmail.com

www.licordelimon.com / limonchelo.com / info@licordelimon.com


We are OLEOESTEPA S.C.A. Sector: OLIVE OIL

REY DE OROS S.L. Sector: CANNED FISH

C/ Olivo s/n. Polígono Industrial Sierra Sur 41560 Estepa (SEVILLA) +34 955 91 31 54 - 91 35 37 oleo@oleoestepa.com / www.oleoestepa.com

Polígono Ind. “El Olivar”, manzana 4-6 11160 Barbate de Franco (CÁDIZ). +34 956 43 00 01 / 02 - Fax: +34 956 43 00 05 molina.ventas@elreydeoros.com / www.reydeoros.com

OELOCAMPO S.C.A. 2º GRADO SECTOR: OLIVE OIL

RIVES-PITMAN S.A. Sector: SPIRITS, SCHNAPPS & CORDIALS

Avda. Constitución, 101 bajo 23640 Torredelcampo (JAÉN) +34 953 41 01 11 Fax: +34 953 41 51 64 info@oleocampo.com

Ctra. Madrid-Cádiz, km 550. 41700 Dos Hermanas (SEVILLA) +34 954 69 00 50 - 69 00 66 sadrym@sadrym.com / www.sadrym.com

OLEOQUIVIR S.A. Sector: CHIPS FRIEDS IN OLIVE OIL

RUOLSUR S.L. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

Dir. postal: Apdo. de Correos 7040. 41005 SEVILLA Dir. fiscal: C/ Alfareros, 16. 41710 Utrera (SEVILLA) +34 955 86 78 11 Fax: +34 955 86 77 38 www.oleoquivir.com

P.I. Juan El Cid Calonge, parcela 1, 2, 3. 21270 Cala (HUELVA) +34 959 19 13 61 ruolsur@coralimentacion.com / www.coralimentacion.com

ÓLEO MÁGINA, S.L. Sector: OLIVE OIL

SADRYM S.A. Sector: OLIVES

Ctra. A-401, km. 42. 23568 Bélmez de la Moraleda (JAÉN) +34 953 39 40 50 - 39 40 12 cristina@oromagina.com / jlopez@oromagina.com www.oromagina.com

Ctra. Madrid-Cádiz, km 550 41700 Dos Hermanas (SEVILLA) +34 954 69 00 50 - 69 00 66 sadrym@sadrym.com / www.sadrym.com

PATATAS FRITAS Y APERITIVOS CONCHIFRIT, S.L.

Sector: SNACKS & CHIPS

SALAZONES HERPAC, S.L. Sector: CANNED FISH

C/ La Coruña, naves 13-14-29 Pol. Tecnológico Ogijares 18151 Ogijares (GRANADA) +34 958 50 66 91 Fax: +34 958 50 67 51 info@conchifrit.com / www.conchifrit.es

C/ Hermanos Romero Abreu, 3. 11160 Barbate (CÁDIZ) +34 956 43 13 76 / 19 08 / 07 46 Fax: 956 43 35 20 calidad@herpac.com / www.herpac@herpac.com

PATATAS FRITAS HISPALANA, S.L. Sector: SNACKS & CHIPS

SALYSOL Sector: NUTS & SNACKS

Pol. Ind. La Red Sur, calle 41 - nº 3 +34 955 63 19 42 hispalana@hotmail.com www.patatas-fritas-hispalana.com

Pol. Ind. Fridex, c/ 4 - parcela 79 41500 Alcalá de Guadaira (SEVILLA) +34 955 63 10 13 - 63 01 79 Fax: +34 955 63 05 95 info@salysol.es / www.salysol.es

PIONONO.ES Sector: SWEETS

S.A.T. 1941 SANTA TERESA Sector: OLIVE OIL

Avda. de Andalucía, 9. Urb. Parque Luz Edif. Venus, local 13 - 18014 GRANADA +34 902 17 20 20 Fax: +34 958 20 12 93 info@pionono.es / www.pionono.es

C/ Lantejuela, 1 41640 Osuna (SEVILLA) +34 954 81 09 50 Fax: +34 955 82 06 21 1881@1881.es / www.1881.es

PROASAL SALINERA DE ANDALUCÍA S.L. Sector: SALT

SEVILLANA DE CAFÉ, S.L. Sector: COFFE

Ctra. de Bonanza a Monte Algaida, s/n 11540 Sanlúcar de Barrameda (CÁDIZ) +34 956 36 07 19 - 36 27 89 mgarcia@proasal.es / www.proasal.es

Pol. Hacienda Dolores, Calle 7. 41500 Alcalá de Guadaira (SEVILLA) +34 955 63 15 62 www.cafeab.com

PRODUCTOS MATA S.A. Sector: CANNED VEGETABLES AND SWEETS

SIERRA DE JABUGO, S.L. Sector: IBERICO PRODUCTS

C/ Muralla s/n 23660 Alcaudete (JAÉN) +34 953 56 00 75 - 56 12 02 promata@futurnet.es

Ramón Talero, 14 21360 El Repilado-Jabugo (HUELVA) +34 959 12 28 68 Fax: +34 954 64 93 86 ventas@sierradejabugo.com / www.sierradejabugo.com

PROGUISO Sector: WINE

SOC. COOP. AGR. AND. “SAN FRANCISCO” Sector: OLIVE OIL

C/ Vivero, 35. (Ciudad Sto. Domingo) 28120 Algete (MADRID) +34 91 623 86 07 - 623 81 97 - 954 53 10 85 proguiso@infonegocio.com

Ctra. Córdoba-Valencia, s/n 23330 Villanueva del Arzobispo (JAÉN) +34 902 19 79 55 - 953 45 12 56 Fax: 953 45 19 31 info@sierralasvillas.com / www.sierralasvillas.com

PULEVA FOOD S.A. Sector: DAIRY PRODUCTS Camino de Purchil, 66 18004 GRANADA +34 958 24 01 64 - 24 01 99 puleva@puleva.es / www.puleva.es


We are Summary SOLA DE ANTEQUERA S.A. Sector: CANNED VEGETABLES Ctra. Córdoba, km. 520 29200 Antequera (MÁLAGA) +34 952 84 07 62 - 84 06 24 alsur@alsurvegetales.com / www.alsurvegetales.com TORTAS GAVIÑO (RUIZ TORREÑO, S.L.) Sector: OLIVE OIL TORTA CAKES C/ Dr. Andrés Gaviño, 2 41087 Espartinas (SEVILLA) +34 955 95 02 84 Fax: +34 955 12 60 08 administracion@tortasaceite.es / www.tortasaceite.com UBAGO GROUP MARE Sector: CANNED FISH C/ Charles Darwin, 3. Parque Tec. de Andalucía 29590 Campanillas (MÁLAGA) +34 951 01 04 70 Fax: +34 951 01 04 71 ubago@ubagogroup.com / www.ubagogroup.com U.S.I.S.A. Sector: CANNED FISH Polígono Industrial La Dehesa s/n 21410 Isla Cristina (HUELVA) +34 959 34 35 00 - 33 10 72 clientes@usisa.com / www.usisa.com UNIOLIVA Sector: OLIVE OIL C/ Córdoba, 9. 23400 Úbeda (JAÉN) +34 953 75 68 40 - 75 43 46 almazara@unioliva.es / www.unioliva.es VALLE GALBARRO S.L. Sector: LEGUMES & CEREAL C/ Ctra. de Utrera, 19-A 41760 El Coronil (SEVILLA) +34 955 83 68 23 - Fax: +34 955 83 69 29 legumbres@legumbresvalle.es / www.legumbresvalle.es VENCHIPA, S.L. Sector: OLIVE OIL Avda. de Mijas, 27 29640 - Fuengirola (MÁLAGA) +34 952 47 40 94 Fax: +34 952 58 36 86 pgarcia@omedoil.com / ww.omedoil.com VETA LA PALMA Sector: FISH Pol. Ind. Isla Mayor, 41140 Isla Mayor (SEVILLA) +34 626 95 99 55 eduardo.valdivia@islasur.es eduardo.valdivia@vetalapalma.es / www.vetalapalma.es VINAGRES DE YEMA S.L. Sector: VINEGAR C/ Alvareda, 5 (Apartado 324) 11500 Puerto Santa María (CÁDIZ) +34 956 86 01 34 - 87 48 66 www.vinagresdeyema.es VINÍCOLA DEL CONDADO S.C.A. Sector: WINE C/ San José, 2. 21710 Bollullos del Condado (HUELVA) +34 959 41 02 61 - 41 01 71 info@vinicoladelcondado.com www.vinicoladelcondado.com WILLIAMS & HUMBERT Sector: WINE Ctra. N-IV, km. 641,75 11408 Jerez de la Frontera (CÁDIZ) +34 956 35 34 00 - 35 34 12 williams@williams-humbert.com www.williams-humbert.com

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